Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Australian Drone Engine Maker To Open Factory In Hood River, Oregon




The unmanned aircraft industry cluster in the Columbia River Gorge is growing yet again. An Australian company that specializes in drone engines plans to open a factory in Hood River, Oregon, early next year.

Orbital Corporation announced it has leased a newly built industrial and office building in Hood River where it will assemble and test small aircraft engines. The number of new jobs created appears modest at first. 

"Generally we would be employing somewhere in the range of 12 to 15 staff, expanding to up to 30 within a 12 to 18 month time frame based on our expansion plans," an Orbital executive emailed.

Conveniently, and not coincidentally, Orbital's space is practically next door to its biggest U.S. customer, a Boeing subsidiary named Insitu. Insitu uses Orbital's engine to power its fixed-wing military and commercial reconnaissance drone, the ScanEagle.

Insitu is now the largest private company in the Gorge. Since it started there, other companies in the sector have set up shop leading to area getting the occasional nickname Dronetown USA.

The industry cluster also includes drone maker Aerovel, transponder maker Sagetech, Hood Technology and Overwatch Imaging, among others. 

"We have been looking for the right property for Orbital’s needs for some time," Orbital CEO Todd Alder said in a statement. "Securing an exclusive long term lease over a new purpose built facility in such a highly sought after location in Hood River is a fabulous outcome." 

Story and audio ➤ http://kuow.org

Cleveland's SkyLift loss could be Canton's gain



CANTON, OH (WOIO) -

For years LeanDog, a software company in Cleveland, has been trying to get a SkyLift project off the ground but it just won't fly. 

The idea was to have high-tech and interactive gondolas travel the Lake Erie waterfront and into downtown with several stops along the way. 

This project has been met with several hurdles. 

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has strict regulations surrounding Burke Lakefront Airport. 

The Port of Cleveland would have issues with the cable cars crossing the Cuyahoga River and shipping lanes. 

There are several bridges in the city of Cleveland that have moving parts that could also be an issue. 

On the city of Cleveland's side working on this project was Donn Angus in the Planning Department. 

Angus no longer works in Cleveland because he's taken the same position in Canton. 

New home?

With Angus in Canton the Skylift may have found a new home. 

Angus has applied for a $25,000 grant from the Stark County Regional Planning Commission to be awarded or denied in January. 

That money would be used for a feasibility study to see if there's a way to connect downtown Canton to the Pro-Football Hall of Fame and its massive Village expansion project. 

 "The stops would be either inside the Pro Football Hall of Fame village or immediately outside of it along Fulton Road and Downtown Market Square," Angus said. 

High flying high tech

Not only would the gondolas be transporting you to your destination they could also be taking you to a virtual world. 

The idea is to have the ride be interactive. 

"Yes the vision is to create an immersive experience once inside of the cars utilizing a digital experience of either virtual reality, augmented reality or perhaps mixed reality," Angus said. "So once you are within the cars you will not only be transported between two points (the Hall of Fame and downtown), but to another reality."

Take two starts from the beginning

Although a lot of work had been done in Cleveland, including renderings, site maps and even a promotional video none of that work has been done for Canton's project. 

This idea is in the extremely early stages. 

"The planning grant will be utilized to further explore the feasibility of the proposal, to look at the route to make certain that it is the most appropriate, as well as developing artistic renderings that will be utilized in the capital campaign," Angus said. 

Speaking of a capital campaign, Angus said the idea is to raise the money and not have the taxpayers in Canton or the county footing the bill. 

"The plan is not to have the city of Canton carry the financial burden. We are looking at a private investor developing the 'TransporTainment' concept, naming rights, etc; or even a public/private partnership," Angus said. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.cleveland19.com

Naked Man Apprehended on Dulles International Airport (KIAD) Property


A man was arrested in Virginia after getting into a car crash, taking off his clothes and jumping on a vehicle near Dulles International Airport, causing major delays during the Tuesday afternoon rush hour, police said.

Officers arrived about 3:30 p.m. at Route 28 and Frying Pan Road after a naked man was reported running in the area, Fairfax County police said.

An investigation showed that Jose Gonzalez Flores, 32, of Sterling was involved in a crash with two vehicles while traveling south on Route 28, also known as Sully Road, in his pickup truck, police said in a statement Wednesday.

UPDATE: Officers were called to a three-vehicle crash reported near Rt. 28 and Frying Pan Road around 3:30 p.m. Callers reported a naked man running from the scene. He has been found by officers and is being assessed by medical personnel.

Gonzalez Flores then allegedly assaulted one of the drivers involved in the crash before returning to his truck and throwing items onto the road. Police said he then stripped off his clothing and ran into traffic.

While on the road, Gonzalez Flores jumped onto a passing truck and broke a window before leaving the scene, according to the statement. He was arrested in a drainage ditch on Dulles Airport property with the assistance of officers from the Virginia State Police, the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority and the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office, police said.

Gonzalez Flores was taken to a hospital with injuries that were not considered to be life-threatening. No one else was injured during the disturbance, police said.

After his release from the hospital, police said, Gonzalez Flores will be served with warrants charging him with two counts of felony hit and run, throwing an object at a moving vehicle, destruction of property, assault and battery, indecent exposure, disorderly conduct and possession of marijuana.

Route 28 was blocked during the incident, and delays stretched for up to three miles, according to authorities.

Story and video ➤ https://www.washingtonpost.com



A naked man walking on Route 28 in Fairfax County, Virginia, caused cars to crash Tuesday afternoon, police said.

Drivers swerved to avoid the man in the area of Frying Pan Road, and some of those drivers crashed. Video taken by a truck driver showed the man riding a flatbed truck at one point and apparently repeatedly striking it.

The man ran into the woods but was caught on Dulles International Airport property.

Police said the man was originally involved in a car crash along Sully Road and assaulted a driver who was involved in the crash. They said the man then took off his clothes even as the temperature was dropping and jumped on a passing vehicle, the flatbed truck, before eventually getting off and running from the scene.

Officials said the man was taken to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. He has not been identified.

Story and video ➤ https://www.nbcwashington.com




DULLES, Va. - Wild video shows the scene after a naked man crashed a truck near Washington Dulles International Airport, began running in the roadway and jumping on multiple vehicles Tuesday afternoon.

Authorities said they responded to a crash report on Route 28 near Frying Pan Road at about 3:30 p.m.

Video sent to FOX 5 by a viewer shows a man appearing to have crashed a pickup truck into the back of a dump truck. The man is then seen jumping in the bed of the pick-up truck before he starts running around on the roadway.

The video shows the man attempting to climb up into the dump truck as vehicles attempt to pull away from the scene. At one point, it appears the man jumps on to the back of a passing truck which attempts to drive away but the suspect clings to the vehicle.

Police said the man was eventually taken into custody and was being medically evaluated.

Story and video ➤ http://www.fox5dc.com

Law enforcement drones stolen from official's vehicle



CLEBURNE, Texas -- Police in Cleburne are investigating the theft of multiple drones and other expensive camera equipment used by law enforcement.

The gear was stolen late last week from Johnson County Emergency Management Director Jamie Moore's vehicle, which was parked at his Cleburne home in his driveway overnight.

"They targeted my vehicle for sure," said Moore. "I don't think they knew what they would find."

He said he discovered the theft Friday morning when his kids walked out the door and saw the doors of his red SUV left open. He said the thieves took most of the technology that was stored inside.

"We're right at the $30,000-mark in technology stolen out of this vehicle," Moore said.

Some of the gear was his own personal camera equipment, but much of it was owned by Johnson County, including multiple state-of-the-art drones.  

As Emergency Management Director, Moore has been a leader in law enforcement drones. WFAA has profiled his work in the past, deploying drones across North Texas and beyond in rescue operations, missing persons cases and other situations.

This fall, his drones were deployed in response to Hurricane Harvey and in the search for Sherin Mathews. This theft, Moore said, is a setback.

"It's more than just stuff. This is somebody's life," he said.  "And they just took away our ability to deal with that, and that's extremely frustrating."

Moore is working with Cleburne police to investigate the theft. He is hopeful that whoever is responsible will be apprehended, and some of the gear returned, but he says it should be a wakeup call to everyone about how vehicles can become targets.

"Especially around Christmas time, when you see an increase in vehicle thefts," he said.

Moving forward, Moore said he will not keep his personal camera equipment in his vehicle again, but he does not have that luxury for some of the drone equipment, which needs to be ready to go.

Instead, he's having a new custom security system installed on his truck.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wfaa.com

Narcotics bust results in seizure of Beech V35A Bonanza, N22PK and marijuana at Pryor Field Regional Airport (KDCU), Decatur, Alabama

http://registry.faa.gov/N22PK 



LIMESTONE COUNTY, Ala. - A tip about a suspicious aircraft in Decatur led police to the discovery of 38 pounds of marijuana. Officers arrested the man flying the plane, and took the drugs and airplane into custody.

The Vice Narcotics Unit of the Decatur Police Department received information about a suspicious aircraft flying into Pryor Regional Airfield on December 9.

Investigators observed a 1967 Beechcraft V35A as it landed at the airfield around 3:45 p.m. Authorities approached the pilot, Yevgeny Faktorovich of Sausalito, California, for a pilot certification inspection after the plane came to a stop.

Officers say that Faktorovich immediately became extremely nervous and kept glancing back towards the passenger's compartment of his aircraft.  K-9 Officer Greg Rutherford and K-9 Baron arrived on scene and performed an air sniff around the aircraft. Baron indicated the presence of narcotics inside the plane.

Authorities detained Faktorovich and obtained a search warrant for the aircraft. Investigators discovered a large garbage bag, a suitcase, and a black plastic storage bin full of marijuana. Each container had 12 to 15 plastic baggies containing anywhere from half a pound to two pounds of marijuana. The combined weight of the marijuana totaled over 38 pounds.

Authorities estimated that the drugs have a street value of $120,000 - $160,000.  "It's quite unusual for a local municipal law enforcement agency to encounter such a take," said Decatur Police Chief Nate Allen

Authorities seized the marijuana and the aircraft was seized by Homeland Security pending condemnation proceedings in Federal Court.

Faktorovich was charged with one count of trafficking in cannabis and transported to Limestone County Jail on a $100,000 bond that has since been paid.

Federal Authorities were notified and further charges could be pending.

Story, video and photo gallery ➤ http://whnt.com

Yevgeny Faktorovich of Sausalito, California, is originally from the Ukraine.


A California man is facing drug trafficking charges after Decatur police seized 38 pounds of marijuana on an airplane at Pryor Field Regional Airport, according to a release.

Police received a tip Saturday about a suspicious aircraft flying into Pryor Field. The plane, a 1967 Beechcraft, landed at 3:45 p.m. Investigators with the Decatur Police Department watched the plane land.

After the aircraft taxied to the terminal and was parked by the pilot, investigators approached to perform a pilot certification. The pilot has been identified as 56-year-old Yevgeny Faktorovich of Sausalito, California.

“Faktorovich immediately became extremely nervous and continued to glance back towards the passenger's compartment of his aircraft,” the release said. “At that point, K-9 Officer Greg Rutherford and K-9 Baron arrived on scene and performed an air sniff around Faktorovich's aircraft. K-9 Baron indicated the presence of narcotics in Faktorovich's aircraft.”

Faktorovich was detained and a search warrant was obtained for the plane. Upon a search of the aircraft, investigators found a large plastic garbage bag, suitcase and black plastic storage bin full of marijuana. Each container had 12 to 15 plastic baggies containing anywhere from a half-pound to 2 pounds of marijuana. The combined weight was more than 38 pounds and has a street value of about $150,000.

Investigators seized the drugs, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security seized the plane, pending condemnation proceedings in federal court.

Faktorovich was charged with one count of trafficking in cannabis and transported to Limestone County Jail. He is being held on a $100,000 bond.

The release said further charges could be pending.

Story and photos ➤ http://www.enewscourier.com 





A tip about a suspicious aircraft turned into a narcotics bust at Decatur's Pryor Regional Airfield.

On December 9th, investigators with the Decatur police received information about a "suspicious aircraft" flying into Pryor Regional Airfield.

After the plane landed, investigators identified themselves and approached the pilot to perform a pilot certification inspection.

According to the Decatur Police, the pilot, identified as Yevgeny Faktorovich of Sausalito, California, immediately became extremely nervous and continued to glance back towards the passenger's compartment of his aircraft.

At that point, K-9 Officer Greg Rutherford and K-9 Baron arrived on scene and performed an air sniff around Faktorovich's aircraft. K-9 Baron indicated the presence of narcotics in Faktorovich's aircraft.

Faktorovich was detained, and a search warrant for the aircraft was obtained. Upon searching the aircraft, investigators found a large garbage bag, a suitcase, and a black plastic storage bin. Each of the containers contained plastic baggies of marijuana totaling 38 pounds.

The Aircraft was also seized by Homeland Security "pending condemnation proceedings in Federal Court."

Faktorovich was charged with one count of trafficking in cannabis and transported to Limestone County Jail in lieu of a $100,000.00 Bond. Federal Authorities were notified and further charges could be pending.


Story and video ➤ http://www.rocketcitynow.com

Pilot Maurice Sugden receives Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award

Maurice Sugden, Hallock, Minn., holds the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award and his certificate for over 50 years of flying accident free given to him Nov. 21. Sugden is standing next to his Piper PA12 Super Cruiser.

 Celebrating with their father were all seven of Maurice and Dianne Sugden’s children (l-r) Bob, Peggy, Rick, Debbie, Kathy and Scott.



George Maurice Sugden, Hallock, Minn., was honored with the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award at a presentation Nov. 21, 2017.

The award is given to pilots who hold a U.S. Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) or Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) pilot certificate, have 50 or more years of civil and military flying experience, is a U.S. Citizen and has not had any airman certificate revoked.

Sugden, who has been flying for 67 years, was given the award at a ceremony which had all his children present along with many friends and fellow pilots.

Presenting the award to Sugden was Jay M. Flowers, Federal Aviation Administration Safety Team (FAAST) Program Manager from Fargo, N.D.

Sugden’s interest in flying started when he was a teenager watching the daily airplane activity at the Hallock airport. The sound of Dr. R.A. Knutson’s six-cylinder engine in his Stinson 108-2 airplane enticed Sugden further and he began flying lessons.

He took a couple of flights with Robert Younggren who managed the local airport before getting lessons from LaMar Anderson, Hallock.

After only 6.4 hours of instruction, Sugden soloed on Nov. 24, 1950 in a 1946 Piper J3C-65 Cub, N88593.

“Maurice flew as often as he could but sometimes lessons became father apart than desired because he had to earn the $12 for every hour of instruction,” related nephew Bill Sugden, who served as emcee for the event.

On July 17, 1951, Sugden earned his Private Pilot Certificate after taking his test in Grand Forks, N.D. with examiner James Montgomery.

Shortly after gaining his license, Sugden took his mother for her one and only flight with him. She was not impressed and did not fly with him again.

Many others can recall their first airplane ride with Sugden at the controls. I remember taking my first flight with him and he loved to do tricks that were scary and/or thrilling depending on how you looked at it. He made sure every flight was a memorable flight and he enjoyed giving rides to anyone who asked.

Sugden continued flying as much as possible and purchased his own plan a 1940 Taylorcraft Bl-65, N24712 in 1953.

After many years of flying, Sugden ventured to New Ulm and Fairmont, Minn., in the spring of 1965 taking lessons from Lloyd Alsworth. He earned his Commercial Pilot Certificate May 27, 1965 in Fairmont. He returned home and began flying a Piper Pawnee doing aerial application for Luther Younggren. He flew with Younggren for five years before partnering with Clare Nelson, forming Nelson-Sugden Flying Service. Sugden continued in the aerial application business for 40 years.

During his career, he flew the employees of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources so they could complete their annual moose survey in North-western Minnesota.

 The survey was done when there was enough snow cover to spot the moose and never done when temperatures were at 25 degrees below zero. He enjoyed doing this for eight years.

“It wasn’t uncommon to see coyote, timber wolf, and whitetail deer as well,” stated Bill Sugden in his report on his uncle's flying career. “He also helped with locating and counting the various elk herds in the region.”

Sugden also flew many trips to Lake of the Woods for ice fishing with family and friends.

Always looking to add to his piloting experience, Sugden flew to Inter-national Falls, Minn. in the fall of 1980 to get his Single Engine Sea (SES) airplane rating. On Oct. 28 1980, Sugden earned this rating from James Einerson flying a Cessna 180.

Over his 67 years of flying, he has logged over 16,000 safe flying hours with over 10,000 in an ag plane. One of his more memorable flights was this summer when he gave his three great grandsons rides in his 1947 Piper PA12-150 Super Cruiser.

To commemorate his flying career, Sugden took a flight Nov. 24, 2017 – 67 years to the day after his first solo flight.

Story and photos ➤ https://www.kittsonarea.com

Robinson R44 II, N74805, Hawaii Pacific Aviation Inc: Accident occurred August 26, 2016 at Kona International Airport at Keahole (HKO), Kailua/Kona, Hawaii

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii
Robinson Helicopters; Torrance, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N74805

Location: Kailua/Kona, HI
Accident Number: WPR16LA168
Date & Time: 08/26/2016, 0745 HST
Registration: N74805
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 26, 2016, about 0745 Hawaii standard time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N74805, was substantially damaged following a loss of control after landing at the Kona International Airport at Keahole (HKO), Kailua/Kona, Hawaii. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and pilot under instruction (PUI), who is also a CFI, were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed during the instructional flight, which was being conducted in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed HKO about 0715.

In a written report submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the CFI/pilot in command, reported that as they entered the North Practice Area (NPA) he instructed the PUI to make the first approach to a spot in the middle of the gravel road, which would provide plenty of clearance. The CFI stated that the spot chosen was one of the gravel roads in the NPA, which has a wide area, and is flat and smooth with no large rocks. The CFI further stated that the PUI began his approach on a left downwind, then turned on to base and final "…and everything was looking great. I told him to complete the approach to a full stop on the ground." The CFI reported that the approach was smooth, and that the initial set down was very soft and smooth as well. The CFI opined that once the skids were on the ground, the PUI continued to lower the collective towards the full down position, at which time the helicopter began to rock in a fore and aft motion. The CFI stated that as the intensity quickly increased he came on the controls, and from that point on all that he could recall was that "…we were in the air again in uncontrollable flight." The CFI reported that the helicopter was oscillating intensely, then came to a stop about 20 to 30 ft and a little more than a 45° angle to the forward and left of the initial touchdown point. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage as a result of impact with terrain.

In a statement submitted to the NTSB IIC, the PUI reported that he and his instructor departed from Kona Airport around 7:50 am local time, for the North practice area. Everything was good, and he performed a controlled and smooth normal approach to a flat well open area. The skids touched the ground and then a strong rocking aft and forward movement accompanied by heavy vibrations started. He tried to lower the collective but made it worse, so he tried to pick up to correct, then it felt like the helicopter shot out forward/leftwards approximately 10 feet away from landing spot. He recalled that the cyclic did not respond to inputs well enough, and ended up crashing nose first with a main rotor blade strike in the ground, no dynamic rollover happened. As soon as the helicopter stopped moving, the mixture was pulled out to shut down the engine.

On October 4, 2016, Federal Aviation Administration aviation safety inspectors assigned to the Honolulu Flight Standards District Office, Honolulu, Hawaii, examined the helicopter.

The tailcone cowling attach points were inspected with the tailcone installed. No damage or defects were noted. The torgue on the tailcone attaching hardware using a calibrated torque wrench was checked. The torque was 655-inch pounds per the manual. The torque broke (nut moved) at 355-inch pounds on all bolts. Additionally, the tailcone was removed and no elongation or damage to the bolts, washers, skin or structure were noted.

Flight Control Servos and Push-Pull Tubes

With the mast fairing removed, the main rotor torque tube, control tubes and servos were examined. No damage or defects were noted. The flight controls were moved through a full range of motion with and without hydraulic power. Control continuity and operation appeared to be normal.

Main Rotor Gearbox Mounts

The main rotor gearbox mounts were inspected with the tailcone and both fuel tanks removed. The inspection of the mounts' rubber portion, as well as the associated ears of the mounts, revealed no damage or defects. Using a calibrated torque wrench, the torque registered on the main transmission bolts was 90-foot pounds, which was consistent with the value denoted in the maintenance manual. 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 45, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Helicopter
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/09/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/02/2016
Flight Time:  650 hours (Total, all aircraft), 74 hours (Total, this make and model), 565 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 126 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 43 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 28, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/17/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/24/2016
Flight Time:  198 hours (Total, all aircraft), 16 hours (Total, this make and model), 128 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ROBINSON
Registration: N74805
Model/Series: R44 II
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2005
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 10934
Landing Gear Type:Skid
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/14/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 80 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5747 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: IO-540
Registered Owner: Hawaii Pacific Aviation Inc.
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As: 
Operator Designator Code: RP8S

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HKO, 47 ft msl
Observation Time: 0753 HST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 71°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 7000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 23°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots, 150°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Kailua/Kona, HI (KOA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Kailua/Kona, HI (KOA)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0740 HST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Kona International Airport (KOA)
Runway Surface Type: Gravel
Airport Elevation: 47 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 19.743056, -156.032778 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA168
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 26, 2016 in Kailua/Kona, HI
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration: N74805
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 26, 2016, about 0745 Hawaii standard time, a Robinson R44 II helicopter, N74805, was substantially damaged following a loss of control after landing at the Kona International Airport at Keahole (HKO), Kailua/Kona, Hawaii. The two certified flight instructors were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed during the personal flight, which was being conducted in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed HKO about 0715.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the flight instructor who was acting as pilot-in-command reported that after landing and in the process of bottoming out the collective, the helicopter began to gently oscillate fore and aft about its longitudinal axis. This was followed shortly by the oscillating condition becoming more severe, to the point where one main rotor blade, the tail boom, and the lower vertical fin impacted terrain. The tail boom and lower vertical fin were substantially damaged as the result of the impact with terrain.

The helicopter was secured by the operator pending further investigation.

Some money of Island Air's missing 401K plan to be restored



HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -  There's some hopeful news for former employees of Island Air affected by the company's sudden shutdown.

After the loss of benefits and inability to access 401K accounts, the Star Advertiser reports some of the money will be restored. 

Some $35,000 will be put back into the proper accounts after the airline deposited some of the money into wrong ones. 

A bankruptcy judge ruled Monday that the funds must be restored.

It is still unknown when the former employees will actually be able to access their 401K accounts because there's no one authorized to help with the retirement plan. 

The 401K plan was "self-administered" by the company. Since all employees were terminated, former employees have no proper assistance accessing their funds.

It's the latest development in the trying times the employees have faced since the airline's closure in November.

Former competitor, Hawaiian Airlines, held a job fair to help terminated employees seek work.

"It is frustrating, especially for the people that have families and are dependent on this paycheck," former Island Air worker Macyn Lautalo told Hawaii News Now last month. "I feel sorry for them. It's the holidays and people need their money."

Story and photo ➤ http://www.hawaiinewsnow

Northern Air Cargo, Boeing 737-232, N320DL: Incident occurred December 10, 2017 in Anchorage, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Load shifted while in-flight causing cargo to impact fuselage.

Northern Air Cargo Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N320DL

Date: 10-DEC-17
Time: 01:10:00Z
Regis#: N320DL
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: ANCHORAGE
State: ALASKA

Cessna 172A, N9897T: Incident occurred December 11, 2017 near Sacramento Mather Airport (KMHR), Sacramento County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Highway patrol advised there was a aircraft in a field near KMHR.

http://registry.faa.gov/N9897T

Date: 11-DEC-17
Time: 20:55:00Z
Regis#: N9897T
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: MATHER
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 207A, N9349M, Double R Air LLC: Incident occurred December 11, 2017 at Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Miami-Dade County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Prop struck a dolly while taxiing on the ramp.

Double R Air LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N9349M

Date: 11-DEC-17
Time: 22:50:00Z
Regis#: N9349M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 207
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA
Country: UNITED STATES

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N9417Z, American Aviation Inc: Incident occurred December 11, 2017 at Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport (KBKV), Hernando County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aircraft had a prop strike during landing.

American Aviation Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N9417Z

Date: 11-DEC-17
Time: 16:00:00Z
Regis#: N9417Z
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BROOKSVILLE
State: FLORIDA

Mooney M20M, N1091A: Incident occurred December 11, 2017 at Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (KSAV), Chatham County, Savannah, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Atlanta, Georgia

Aircraft landed gear up.

Schofield Aircraft Leasing LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N1091A

Date: 11-DEC-17
Time: 02:00:00Z
Regis#: N1091A
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: 20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SAVANNAH
State: GEORGIA

Diamond DA20-C1 Katana, N85WP, registered to and operated by Falcon Aviation Academy LLC (and) Beechcraft F33A Bonanza, N6027K: Fatal accident occurred September 07, 2016 at West Georgia Regional Airport (KCTJ), Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia

Taylor Nicole Stone
~


Lt Col William L. "Bill" Lindsey
~






The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 

N6027K Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N85WP Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N6027K  Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

N85WP  Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

N6027K  Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

N85WP  Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

William L. Lindsey: http://registry.faa.gov/N6027K

Falcon Aviation Academy LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N85WP




Location: Carrollton, GA
Accident Number: ERA16FA312A
Date & Time: 09/07/2016, 1048 EDT
Registration: N6027K
Aircraft: BEECH F33
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Midair collision
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Location: Carrollton, GA
Accident Number: ERA16FA312B
Date & Time: 09/07/2016, 1048 EDT
Registration: N85WP
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA20
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Midair collision
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The Diamond flight instructor and student pilot were in the traffic pattern at the non-towered airport practicing landings. The Beech pilot entered the traffic pattern on an extended left downwind leg with the intention of landing. Pilots of other airplanes in the pattern reported that the Diamond instructor was making standard traffic pattern callouts on the common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF); however, the Beech pilot was not transmitting on the CTAF. Witness observations, radar data, GPS data, and examination of the wreckage of the two airplanes revealed that, while both airplanes were on final approach for landing, the Beech overtook the Diamond from above and behind. The landing gear of the Beech struck the horizontal stabilizer and elevator of the Diamond, and then both airplanes abruptly descended into the terrain short of the runway. The Beech came to rest inverted and on top of the Diamond. An examination of wreckage of both airplanes did not reveal evidence of any preaccident anomalies or malfunctions.

Testing of the Beech's VHF communications radio revealed that it was set to an old CTAF frequency for the airport that had been changed about 5 years before the accident. A local airport frequency card dated 7 years before the accident that was found in the Beech's cockpit listed the old CTAF frequency that was set in the Beech's radio. Another pilot at a different airport heard the Beech pilot making pattern calls on the incorrect frequency about the time of the accident.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 

The failure of the Beech pilot to see and avoid the Diamond that was in front of and below his airplane on final approach and his use of an incorrect radio communication frequency for the airport. 



Findings

Aircraft
VHF communication system - Incorrect use/operation (Cause)

Personnel issues
Use of equip/system - Pilot (Cause)
Use of policy/procedure - Pilot (Cause)
Monitoring other aircraft - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-VFR pattern final
Midair collision (Defining event)

Uncontrolled descent
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

On September 7, 2016, at 1048 eastern daylight time, a Beech F33A, N6027K, and a Diamond Aircraft Industries DA20-C1, N85WP, collided in midair on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern to runway 35 at West Georgia Regional Airport (CTJ), Carrollton, Georgia. The Beech was substantially damaged, and the private pilot was fatally injured. The Diamond was destroyed, and the flight instructor and the student pilot were fatally injured. The Beech was registered to and operated by the private pilot. The Diamond was registered to and operated by Falcon Aviation Academy LLC. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91; the Beech pilot was conducting a personal flight, and the Diamond pilots were conducting an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans were filed for either flight. The Beech departed from Fulton County Airport (FTY), Atlanta, Georgia, about 0915, and the Diamond departed from Newnan Coweta County Airport (CCO), Newnan, Georgia, about 1000.

According to personnel from Falcon Aviation Academy, the pilots of the Diamond were practicing traffic pattern operations and landings at CTJ. The Diamond entered the traffic pattern, followed a few minutes later by N263CF and then by N169PS, both Falcon Aviation Academy DA20s. The flight instructor and student pilot on board N263CF saw the Beech on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern. Moments later, the flight instructor and student pilot on board N169PS entered the traffic pattern from the east. They looked down and to the left, in the direction of the final approach path for runway 35, and saw two airplanes collide. The instructors and the students on board both trailing DA20s reported that they did not hear the Beech pilot broadcasting his intentions on the CTJ common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) but they heard the accident Diamond making position calls in the traffic pattern before the collision, with the last call being made on the final approach.

Another flight instructor employed by Falcon Aviation Academy reported that he was familiar with the Beech pilot and his airplane. He had just completed a flight at CCO and heard the Beech pilot broadcasting traffic pattern calls for CTJ about the time of the accident; however, the Beech pilot was broadcasting over the CCO CTAF of 122.7 MHz. The flight instructor reported that the Beech pilot was not in the traffic pattern at CCO at the time of the transmissions.

Radar data provided by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control personnel indicated that the Beech pilot entered an extended left downwind for CTJ from the north, above and behind the accident Diamond, which was on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern. The ground speed of the Beech was about 50 knots greater than the ground speed of the Diamond. The last radar returns were on the downwind leg, about 2,000 ft above mean sea level, or about 850 ft above the ground. The locations of the last radar returns showed the airplanes approaching the base leg for runway 35.

The Diamond was not equipped with GPS data recording capability. A portable GPS receiver recovered from the Beech recorded the accident flight. The recording indicated that the Beech was established on the downwind leg for runway 35, about 2,500 ft GPS altitude and 150 knots groundspeed. The CTJ airport elevation was 1,164 ft. The Beech descended toward the base leg, turning base about 2,200 ft and 122 knots. The Beech turned onto final about 1,450 ft and 79 knots. The last recorded data point was at 1048:00, with the Beech at 1,201 ft and 76 knots, about 607 ft south of the runway 35 threshold.




Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 24, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/17/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/05/2016
Flight Time: 850 hours (Total, all aircraft), 621 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 20, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/05/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:  20 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 79, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/05/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/30/2015
Flight Time: 2500 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

The Beech Pilot

The pilot of the Beech, age 79, held an FAA private pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane ratings. He held an FAA third-class medical certificate with a restriction to have glasses available for near vision. He reported 2,500 total hours of flying experience on his FAA third-class medical certificate application that was dated October 5, 2015. His personal pilot logbook was not located.

According to the owner's representative (insurance adjuster), the Beech pilot reported that he completed a Beechcraft Pilot Proficiency Program on October 30, 2015, at Blairsville, Georgia. This was confirmed verbally and accepted as a current flight review by the insurance company.

The Diamond Flight Instructor

The flight instructor in the Diamond, age 24, held an FAA commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multi-engine land, airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. She held an FAA flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine, and she held an FAA first-class medical certificate with a restriction to wear glasses. She was seated in the right cockpit seat. She reported 600 total hours of flying experience on her FAA first-class medical certificate application that was dated March 16, 2016. A review of her pilot logbook revealed about 850 hours total time, including 721 hours in single-engine airplanes and 366 hours as a flight instructor.

The Diamond Student Pilot

The student pilot in the Diamond, age 20, held an FAA student pilot certificate. He held an FAA second-class medical certificate with no restrictions. He was seated in the left cockpit seat. He enrolled in the ab initio training program at Falcon Aviation Academy on August 4, 2016, and had logged about 22 hours of flight time.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N6027K
Model/Series: F33 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: CE-833
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/13/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4549 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-BB
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Beech

The off-white- and blue/gold-colored Beech F33A was a single-engine, low-wing airplane with a conventional tail. A review of the airplane's maintenance and airworthiness records revealed that an enhanced Whelen light-emitting diode (LED) wingtip position and anti-collision light system, model OR6502GE/OR6502RE, and a Whelen LED tail position and anti-collision light system, model OR5002V, were installed on the airplane per FAA Supplemental Type Certificate, dated November 10, 2014. The airplane was equipped with landing and taxi lights. The airplane was not equipped with a traffic advisory system (TAS), traffic alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS), or automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) equipment or displays. The Beech's avionics suite included a King KX 155 VHF communication/navigation transceiver and a Garmin GNS 530 GPS/communication/navigation all-in-one unit.

According to information provided by the owner's representative, the Beech's most recent annual inspection was completed on or about July 13, 2016. At the time of the inspection, the airframe had accumulated about 4,549 total hours of operation.

Diamond

The white- and blue-colored Diamond DA20 was a single-engine, low-wing airplane with a T-tail configuration. It was equipped with wingtip-mounted anti-collision strobe lights and navigation position lights, and a landing and taxi light. The airplane was not equipped with a TAS, TCAS, ADS-B equipment or displays. The Diamond's avionics suite included an iCOM AC-A200 VHF air band transceiver and a Garmin GNS 430 GPS/communication/navigation all-in-one unit.

The Diamond's most recent annual inspection was completed on August 9, 2016. At the time of the inspection, the airframe had accumulated about 1,990 total hours of operation. 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CTJ, 1165 ft msl
Observation Time: 1055 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 8500 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 19°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.3 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: ATLANTA, GA (FTY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Carrollton, GA (CTJ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0915 EDT
Type of Airspace:  Class G 

The CTJ 1055 weather observation included wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles, scattered clouds at 8,500 ft, temperature 30°C, dew point 19°C, and an altimeter setting 30.30 inches of mercury. 



Airport Information

Airport: West Georgia Regional (CTJ)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1164 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 35
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5503 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

CTJ was a public, non-towered, uncontrolled airport with a single runway, designated 17/35. The runway was 5,503 ft long and 100 ft wide. The published traffic pattern direction for runway 35 was to the left. Falcon Aviation Academy personnel reported that their pilots frequently used CTJ for training purposes.

The CTAF/UNICOM frequency for CTJ at the time of the accident was 122.975 MHz. CTAF communications were not recorded. The airport manager reported that the CTJ CTAF frequency was changed from 122.7 MHz to 122.975 MHz in 2011.

N85WP Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 33.623333, -85.149167

N6027K Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 33.623333, -85.149167

General

The main wreckage of both airplanes came to rest in a grass field, about 408 ft south of the approach end of runway 35, on the extended centerline of the runway. The Diamond came to rest in an upright position. The Beech came to rest inverted and on top of the Diamond wreckage. The wreckage debris field was about 350 ft long and about 80 ft wide, oriented on a heading of 350º. All major structural components of both airplanes were accounted for within the wreckage debris field.

Beech

The wreckage of the Beech was generally intact; the wings and empennage remained attached to the fuselage. Flight control cable continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the flight control surfaces. The ailerons, elevator, and rudder remained attached in their respective positions on the wings, horizontal stabilizer, and rudder. Blue-colored paint transfer marks were found on the lower surface of the right wing, near wing station 108. Impact damage with paint transfer was found on the top of the fuselage around station 131.

The nose gear separated from the airplane during the impact sequence. White paint transfer markings were observed on the nose gear tire. The left and right main landing gear were found in the extended positions. White paint transfer markings were observed on the left, main gear tire. The wing flaps were extended 20º.

The master and avionics switches were found in the "on" positions. The strobe light switch was found in the "on" position. The taxi light switch was found in the "on" position, and the landing light was found in the "off" position; however, both switches had impact damage. The position of the navigation light switch could not be determined because of impact damage.

The engine remained attached to the firewall. External examination of the engine did not reveal physical evidence of a mechanical malfunction or anomaly. The propeller assembly separated from the engine at the crankshaft/propeller flange junction. The fracture surfaces exhibited features consistent with overload. The propeller blades remained attached to the hub and displayed chordwise scratches, blade twisting, leading edge gouging, and surface polishing.

A laminated card titled "LOCAL AREA FREQ" and dated April 27, 2009, was found in the Beech's cockpit. The card, which listed the frequencies for multiple airports in the area, listed the frequency for the CTAF at CTJ as 122.7 MHz.

Diamond

The Diamond came to rest upright, under the wreckage of the Beech. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the elevator and rudder to the cockpit controls. Aileron control continuity was confirmed from the right aileron to the cockpit controls. The left wing separated from the fuselage during the impact sequence. The left aileron control tubes had multiple fractures that exhibited overload signatures. The empennage separated from the fuselage about 14 inches forward of the vertical stabilizer root leading edge.

Blue paint transfer marks were observed on the leading edge of the Diamond's right wing. The marks were about 8 inches long and 12 inches from the wing root. The Diamond's landing, taxi, strobe, and position light switches were impact-damaged, and their preimpact positions could not be determined.

Lightweight pieces of the Diamond were found on a northerly path, beginning 340 ft south of the main wreckage. One of the most southerly pieces of wreckage debris was the right half of the Diamond's elevator. Closer examination revealed black transfer markings on the upper surface of the elevator that were consistent in color and tread pattern with the right main landing gear tire of the Beech. Examination of the Diamond's horizontal stabilizer revealed similar transfer markings on its upper surface. The other small pieces of debris located south of the main wreckage were identified as sections of the Diamond's canopy and wing root/fuselage skin. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Beech Pilot

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation Division of Forensic Sciences performed an autopsy of the Beech pilot and the cause of death was blunt trauma of the head and chest, and the manner of death was accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Research Sciences Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing and identified doxazosin and losartan in the pilot's blood, and doxazosin, dextromethorphan, and its metabolite dextrorphan in urine. Doxazosin and losartan are blood pressure medications also named Cardura and Cozaar, respectively. The pilot reported the use of doxazosin and losartan to the FAA during his most recent FAA third-class physical. Dextromethorphan is an over-the-counter cough suppressant available in a number of products.

The Diamond Flight Instructor

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation Division of Forensic Sciences performed an autopsy of the Diamond flight instructor and the cause of death was blunt head trauma, and the manner of death was accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Research Sciences Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing of the flight instructor. The specimens tested negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and a wide range of drugs, including major drugs of abuse.

The Diamond Student Pilot

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation Division of Forensic Sciences performed an autopsy of the Diamond student pilot and the cause of death was blunt trauma of the head and torso, and the manner of death was accident.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Research Sciences Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing of the student pilot. The specimens tested negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and a wide range of drugs, including major drugs of abuse.

Tests And Research

The King KX 155 VHF transceiver and the Garmin GNS 530 all-in-one unit from the Beech were sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory to determine the frequencies in use at the time of the accident. The examination revealed that the KX 155 communication frequencies were set to 118.17 MHz (active) and 126.22 MHz (standby). The GNS 530 communication frequencies were set to 122.7 MHz (active) and 124.050 MHz (standby). The waypoint communications information page for CTJ was accessed during the examination even though the installed GNS 530 aviation database expired as of November 12, 2015. The CTAF/UNICOM on the displayed page showed the correct frequency of 122.975 MHz.



Additional Information

FAA Rules, Regulations, and Guidance to Pilots

Title 14 CFR 91.113 addresses aircraft right-of-way rules and states, in part, the following:

(b) General. When weather conditions permit, regardless of whether an operation is conducted under instrument flight rules or visual flight rules, vigilance shall be maintained by each person operating an aircraft so as to see and avoid other aircraft. When a rule of this section gives another aircraft the right-of-way, the pilot shall give way to that aircraft and may not pass over, under, or ahead of it unless well clear.

(f) Overtaking. Each aircraft that is being overtaken has the right-of-way and each pilot of an overtaking aircraft shall alter course to the right to pass well clear.

(g) Landing. Aircraft, while on final approach to land or while landing, have the right-of-way over other aircraft in flight or operating on the surface, except that they shall not take advantage of this rule to force an aircraft off the runway surface which has already landed and is attempting to make way for an aircraft on final approach. When two or more aircraft are approaching an airport to landing, the aircraft at the lower altitude has the right-of-way, but it shall not take advantage of this rule to cut in front of another which is on final approach to land or to overtake that aircraft.

The FAA's Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), dated December 10, 2015, paragraph 5-5-8, includes pilot procedures for see-and-avoid while in flight and states, "When meteorological conditions permit, regardless of type of flight plan or whether or not under control of a radar facility, the pilot is responsible to see and avoid other traffic, terrain, or obstacles."

The AIM, paragraph 4-1-9, also describes operations to/from airports without an operating control tower and the use of a CTAF and states, in part, the following:

a. Airport Operations Without Operating Control Tower

1. There is no substitute for alertness while in the vicinity of an airport. It is essential that pilots be alert and look for other traffic and exchange traffic information when approaching or departing an airport without an operating control tower…To achieve the greatest degree of safety, it is essential that all radio-equipped aircraft transmit/receive on a common frequency identified for the purpose of airport advisories.

b. Communicating on a Common Frequency

The key to communicating at an airport without an operating control tower is selection of the correct common frequency…A CTAF is a frequency designated for the purpose of carrying out airport advisory practices while operating to or from an airport without an operating control tower.

The AIM describes the recommended communication procedures regarding departure aircraft on the CTAF and states, "Pilots of inbound traffic should monitor and communicate as appropriate on the designated CTAF from 10 miles to landing. Pilots of departing aircraft should monitor/communicate on the appropriate frequency from start-up, during taxi, and until 10 miles from the airport unless the CFRs or local procedures require otherwise."

The Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-24A), section 13, addresses scanning procedures for visually acquiring traffic:

The pilot can contribute to collision avoidance by being alert and scanning for other aircraft. This is particularly important in the vicinity of an airport.



The See-and-Avoid Concept

The FAA issued AC 90-48D, "Pilots' Role in Collision Avoidance," in April, 2016 to alert all pilots "…to the potential hazards of midair collisions and near midair collisions (NMAC), and to emphasize those basic problem areas related to the human causal factors where improvements in pilot education, operating practices, procedures, and improved scanning techniques are needed to reduce midair conflicts."

AC 90-48D stated that each person operating an aircraft, regardless of whether the operation was conducted under IFR or VFR, shall maintain a vigilant lookout for other aircraft at all times. Regarding visual scanning, the AC specifically stated that "Pilots should remain constantly alert to all traffic movement within their field of vision, as well as periodically scanning the entire visual field outside of their aircraft to ensure detection of conflicting traffic.". AC 90-48D also described several specific methods that pilots could use to visually acquire other traffic. 



Preventing Similar Accidents 

Prevent Midair Collisions: Don't Depend on Vision Alone

The "see-and-avoid" concept has long been the foundation of midair collision prevention. However, the inherent limitations of this concept, including human limitations, environmental conditions, aircraft blind spots, and operational distractions, leave even the most diligent pilot vulnerable to the threat of a midair collision with an unseen aircraft.

Technologies in the cockpit that display or alert of traffic conflicts, such as traffic advisory systems and automatic dependent surveillance–broadcast (ADS-B), can help pilots become aware of and maintain separation from nearby aircraft. Such systems can augment reality and help compensate for the limitations of visually searching for traffic.



What Can You Do?

Educate yourself about the benefits of flying an aircraft equipped with technologies that aid in collision avoidance. Whether you are flying in congested airspace or a remote location, a cockpit display or alert of traffic information will increase your awareness of surrounding traffic.

Become familiar with the symbology, display controls, alerting criteria, and limitations of such technologies in your aircraft, whether the systems are portable or installed in the cockpit. High-density traffic around airports can make interpreting a traffic display challenging due to display clutter, false traffic alerts, and system limitations.

Use information provided by such technologies to separate your aircraft from traffic before aggressive, evasive maneuvering is required. Often, slight changes in rate of climb or descent, altitude, or direction can significantly reduce the risk of a midair collision long before the conflicting aircraft has been seen.

Remember that while such technologies can significantly enhance your awareness of traffic around you, unless your system is also capable of providing resolution advisories, visual acquisition of and separation from traffic is your primary means of collision avoidance (when weather conditions allow).



Interested in More Information?

The following Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) resources can be accessed from www.faa.gov:

Advisory Circular (AC) 90-48D, “Pilots’ Role in Collision Avoidance,” alerts pilots of the potential hazards of midair collisions and emphasizes pilot education, operating practices, procedures, and improved scanning techniques. The AC also discusses technologies in the cockpit that display or alert of traffic conflicts.

The FAA’s NextGen program on ADS-B offers up-to-date requirements, coverage maps, and program information.

The website www.seeandavoid.org, which is funded by the FAA and the Air National Guard, aims to eliminate midair collisions by providing pilots with educational resources and other information about airspace, aircraft visual identification, aircraft performance, and flight hazards.

The NTSB’s Aviation Information Resources web page, www.ntsb.gov/air, provides convenient access to NTSB aviation safety products. This safety alert and others, such as SA-045, “See and Be Seen: Your Life Depends on It,” can be accessed from the Aviation Safety Alerts link.

The NTSB presents this information to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Note that this should not be considered guidance from the regulator, nor does this supersede existing FAA Regulations (FARs).

















NTSB Identification: ERA16FA312A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 07, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: BEECH F33, registration: N6027K
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA312B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 07, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA20, registration: N85WP
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 7, 2016, at 1047 eastern daylight time, a Beech F33A, N6027K, and a Diamond Aircraft Industries DA20-C1, N85WP, collided in midair on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern to runway 35 at West Georgia Regional Airport (CTJ), Carrollton, Georgia. The Beech was substantially damaged and the private pilot was fatally injured. The Diamond was destroyed and the flight instructor and one student pilot were fatally injured. The Beech was registered to and operated by the private pilot. The Diamond was registered to and operated by Falcon Aviation Academy LLC. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91; the Beech pilot was conducting a personal flight to CTJ and the Diamond pilots were conducting a local, instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans were filed for the Beech or the Diamond. The Beech departed from Fulton County Airport (FTY), Atlanta, Georgia about 1020, and the Diamond departed from Newnan Coweta County Airport (CCO), Newnan, Georgia about 1000.

According to personnel from Falcon Aviation Academy, the pilots of the Diamond were practicing traffic pattern operations and landings at CTJ. The Diamond was the first airplane to enter the traffic pattern, followed a few minutes later by N263CF and then by N169PS, both Falcon Academy DA20s. The flight instructor and student pilot on board N263CF observed a Beech Bonanza on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern; however, the Beech pilot did not appear to be broadcasting his intentions on the CTJ common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF). Moments later, the flight instructor and student pilot on board N169PS entered the traffic pattern from the east. They looked down and to the left, in the direction of the final approach path for runway 35, and observed two airplanes merge, then collide. They also did not hear the pilot of the Beech broadcasting his intentions on the CTAF. All pilots on board both trailing DA20s heard the flight instructor on board the accident Diamond making her position calls in the traffic pattern prior to the collision, the last call being made on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern.

Initial radar data provided by air traffic control indicated that the pilot of Beech entered an extended downwind from the north, above and directly behind the Diamond, which was also on downwind leg of the traffic pattern. The ground speed of the Beech was about 50 knots greater than the Diamond. The last radar returns, were about 2,000 feet above mean sea level, or about 850 feet above the ground. The locations of the last radar returns were in an area on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, approaching the base leg of the traffic pattern for runway 35.

Initial examination of the wreckage revealed that both airplanes remained physically attached after the collision until ground impact. The main wreckage of both airplanes came to rest about 408 feet south of the approach end of runway 35, and on the extended centerline of the runway. The wreckage of the Beech was inverted and on top of the Diamond wreckage. Lightweight pieces of the Diamond were found on a northerly path, beginning 340 feet south of the main wreckage. All major structural components of both airplanes were accounted for within the wreckage path boundary. One of the most southerly pieces of wreckage debris was the right half of the Diamond's elevator. Closer examination revealed black transfer markings on the upper surface that were consistent in color and tread pattern with the right main landing gear tire of the Beech. Examination of the Diamond's horizontal stabilizer revealed similar transfer markings on its upper surface. The other small pieces of debris located south of the main wreckage were identified as sections of the Diamond's canopy and wing root/fuselage skin.

The pilot of the Beech, age 79, held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument airplane ratings. He held a FAA third class medical certificate with a restriction to have glasses available for near vision. He reported 2,500 total hours of flying experience on his medical certificate application that was dated October 5, 2015.

The flight instructor in the Diamond, age 24, held a FAA commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land, airplane single engine land, and instrument airplane. She was seated in the right cockpit seat. She held a FAA flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single engine. She reported 600 total hours of flying experience on her FAA first class medical certificate application that was dated March 16, 2016.

The student pilot in the Diamond, age 20, held a FAA student pilot certificate. He held a FAA second-class medical certificate with no restrictions. He was seated in the left cockpit seat. He enrolled in the ab initio training program at Falcon Aircraft Academy on August 4, 2016, and had logged about 20 hours of flight time.

CTJ was a public, non-towered airport with a single runway, designated 17/35. The runway was 5,503 feet long and 100 feet wide. The published traffic pattern direction for runway 35 was to the left. Falcon Aviation Academy personnel reported that their pilots frequently used CTJ for training purposes. CTAF communications were not recorded.

The wreckage of both airplanes was retained by the NTSB for further examination.