Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Fiery Helicopter Crashes Persist With Industry Slow to Upgrade Fuel Tanks: Safer fuel-tank technology has been available for decades, but isn’t used on some popular models

A survivor, lower right, walks away from the scene of a deadly tour helicopter crash along the jagged rocks of the Grand Canyon, in Arizona February 10, 2018. Airbus Helicopters EC130 B4, N155GC. The air-tour flight was operated by Papillon Airways Inc.


The Wall Street Journal
By Andy Pasztor
August  7, 2018 8:00 a.m. ET

After a rash of helicopter accidents several years ago ending in fatal fires, industry executives and regulators reached a high-profile compromise: Businesses could avoid rules mandating safety upgrades and retrofits but would be expected to make the changes on their own.

“You got our attention and we’re going to participate,” said Matthew Zuccaro, president of Helicopter Association International, the leading trade association, at the time.

But three years later, critics and even some industry leaders say some helicopter companies haven’t followed through to quickly and voluntarily install more durable, less fire-prone fuel tanks on an array of civilian helicopters. These vehicles are used for everything from sightseeing flights to utility repairs to emergency medical transportation.

Over roughly the past two decades, according to accident investigators and industry critics, there have been more than 170 fiery helicopter crashes in the U.S. alone, at least 80 avoidable fatalities and ballooning legal liabilities for both manufacturers and operators.

As retrofit efforts lag—only 20% of some widely used Airbus SE commercial models are fixed nationwide, for example—lawmakers, plaintiffs’ attorneys, other industry critics and members of a Federal Aviation Administration-created advisory committee are stepping up calls for strict federal mandates.

Attorney Gary Robb, who has represented scores of fire victims or their families over the years, says the FAA has encouraged a “regulatory loophole without any safety justification.”

In a June interview, acting FAA administrator Daniel Elwell said the agency is methodically “examining everything” surrounding the issue, but hasn’t decided whether mandates are necessary.

In a statement last month, an agency spokesman called the topic “a high priority for the FAA,” adding that officials are assessing the advisory group’s existing and anticipated recommendations for safety enhancements.

“The industry continues to make voluntary strides,” according to the statement, which pointed to crash-resistant systems available from seven different manufacturers. In March, the advisory panel told the FAA it would cost the industry roughly $184 million over 10 years to build and then operate all those choppers with fully compliant fuel systems.

Reducing such threats “may be hard and businesses will have to figure out how to make it work,” according to Rep. Ed Perlmutter, a Colorado Democrat who has been a prominent voice demanding change. “But it’s the right thing to do.”

Sometimes, a spectacular crash changes everything. That is what happened when five British tourists, including two newlyweds, died of burns and other injuries after a Papillon Airways sightseeing helicopter crashed and erupted in flames near a landing zone at the western part of the Grand Canyon in February.

In under three weeks, the operator announced plans to retrofit its entire air-tour fleet with crash-resistant fuel tanks. A company spokeswoman declined to comment.

Under voluntary efforts, the industry promised to make safety upgrades and retrofits intended to prevent fuel tanks from rupturing and killing pilots and passengers in otherwise survivable crashes. Industry leaders pledged to aggressively switch to more crash-resistant fuel systems on their own—either on assembly lines or by relying on retrofits—featuring stronger tanks, fuel lines and valves better able withstand impact. Mr. Zuccaro of the industry association called the change then “a major cultural shift.”

The basic technology dates back to the Vietnam War, and is standard on military choppers world-wide. If installed after aircraft are delivered, costs for some of the fixes run between $75,000 and $110,000 per helicopter. The price tag during initial assembly is a fraction of that amount.

Federal rules continue to permit production of various models, designed before the mid-1990s, lacking the most effective fuel-system upgrades.

The contrast between safety protections on new models—including totally automated recovery systems to help disoriented or confused pilots—and decades-old fire problems stemming from older designs, was highlighted last month at the Farnborough International Air Show. Mitch Snyder, president and chief executive of Textron Inc.’s Bell helicopter unit, practically invited the FAA to mandate tougher requirements.

Emphasizing that Bell embraced crash-resistant fuel systems on the production line ahead of FAA moves in the 1990s, Mr. Snyder told reporters “in some cases, safety costs more” and “it needs all of us to perform.” Bell would like chopper operators to upgrade tanks “in every single aircraft we have ever produced,” he said, adding “I do believe that regulation plays a role.”

On Tuesday, a Bell spokeswoman said she didn’t know what portion of the company’s fleet has been retrofitted.

Critics fault some manufacturers for moving too slowly to secure necessary federal certification for retrofit kits they could offer customers. Further delaying fixes, certain operators have balked at spending the money, adding the extra weight or taking aircraft out of service to do the work.

The U.S. helicopter unit of Airbus, for example, estimates that only about one of every five of a popular, single-engine line it sells is retrofitted with sturdier fuel tanks. The company didn’t have kits for any of those models available until early this year, but Airbus officials say they are now offering them at manufacturer’s cost through the end of 2018. A spokesman said the company anticipates demand for retrofits “equaling about another 20% of the fleet.”

The delays partly stem from the fact that there are so many different types of choppers requiring individual U.S. and European approvals for retrofit parts, plus “there’s a real fear” about unintended consequences affecting other onboard systems, according to Jeffrey Trang, the unit’s vice president for technology and flight operations.

Despite a drumbeat of deadly crashes and hefty damage awards, some industry spokesmen appear sanguine about progress. “Everybody would like to have it happen quickly,” the industry’s Mr. Zuccaro said in an interview earlier this year. “We’re trying to do it in a timely, logical and efficient manner,” he said, adding: “this is not something that you can snap your fingers, and in a day you have it.”

—Jim Carlton contributed to this article.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.wsj.com

de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Mk I, registered to Rust Properties LLC and operated by Rust's Flying Service Inc doing business as K2 Aviation, N323KT: Fatal accident occurred August 04, 2018 in Denali National Park and Preserve, Talkeetna, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wasilla, Alaska
K2 Aviation; Talkeetna, Alaska
Federal Aviation Administration; Washington, District of Columbia

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


K2 pilot Craig Layson

Location: Talkeetna, AK
Accident Number: ANC18FA063
Date & Time: 08/04/2018, 1753 AKD
Registration: N323KT
Aircraft: De Havilland DHC-2
Injuries: 5 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Sightseeing 

On August 4, 2018, about 1753 Alaska daylight time, a single-engine, de Havilland DHC-2 (Beaver) airplane, N323KT, sustained substantial damage during an impact with steep, high altitude, snow-covered terrain about 50 miles northwest of Talkeetna, Alaska, in Denali National Park and Preserve. The airplane was registered to Rust Properties, LLC and operated by Rust's Flying Service Inc, doing business as K2 Aviation as a visual flight rules on-demand commercial air tour flight, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 when the accident occurred. The commercial pilot and four passengers sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight originated at the Talkeetna Airport (TKA) about 1705.

According to K2 Aviation, the purpose of the flight was to provide the four passengers a one-hour tour flight. This tour was to consist of an aerial tour of multiple glaciers, which included a flyover of the Denali Base Camp located on the Kahiltna Glacier, at 7,200 feet mean sea level (msl), and then return to Talkeetna.

According to archived global positioning system (GPS) track data from K2 Aviation's in-flight tracking system, at 1746, as the flight passed over the Denali Base Camp, the airplane initially turns south, and travels down the Kahiltna Glacier. As the flight progressed southbound, it then turns to the left, and towards Talkeetna on a southeasterly heading. As the airplane continues on the southeasterly heading, the track terminates near a knife-edge ridge above the Kahiltna Glacier on Thunder Mountain.

At 1753, the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) received the first alert from the accident airplane's 406MHz emergency locator transmitter (ELT). At 1756, K2 Aviation was alerted that the accident airplane's satellite tracking had stopped moving, and lost aircraft procedures were immediately initiated.

About 1800, a satellite phone call from the accident pilot was received by personnel at K2 Aviation. The pilot stated that they had impacted a mountain and needed rescue. The call only lasted a couple minutes before the connection was lost. After several attempts, contact was once again made with the accident pilot, and he stated that he was trapped in the wreckage and there were possibly two fatalities. No further information was received before the connection was once again lost.

At 2008, the National Park Service (NPS) high altitude rescue helicopter based in Talkeetna, was dispatched to the coordinates transmitted from the accident airplane's 406MHz ELT. However, due to continuous poor weather conditions in the area, the helicopter crew was not able to reach the accident site. Search and rescue assets from the National Park Service (NPS), the RCC, the Alaska Air National Guard, the Alaska Army National Guard and the U.S. Army joined in the search and rescue mission.

On August 6, about 0717, the crew of the NPS's high altitude rescue helicopter located the airplane wreckage in an ice crevasse, at an altitude of about 10,920 ft msl, on a hanging glacier on Thunder Mountain, which is located about 14 miles southwest of the Denali Summit. The airplane was highly fragmented, and the right wing had separated and fallen several hundred feet below the main wreckage. Subsequently, an NPS mountain rescue ranger was able to access the accident site utilizing a technique known as a short-haul, which allows transport of rescue personnel to otherwise inaccessible sites while suspended beneath a helicopter using a long-line. Once on scene, and while still connected to the helicopter, the ranger was able to locate the deceased pilot and three of the passengers in the forward portion of the fuselage, but the fifth occupant was missing. The fuselage was fractured aft of the trailing edge of the wings, and the fuselage was splayed open with blown, packed snow inside.

Rapidly deteriorating weather conditions limited the initial on-scene time to about five minutes.

On August 10, NPS launched another short-haul site assessment mission. During this mission, the fifth occupant was located in the aft section of the fuselage and was confirmed deceased.

According to NPS management personnel, given the unique challenges posed by the steepness of terrain, ice crevasses, avalanche danger, and the instability of the aircraft wreckage, it was determined that recovery of the occupants remains, and retrieval of the aircraft wreckage, exceed an acceptable level of risk and therefore a recovery will not be attempted.

The airplane is equipped with a Pratt and Whitney R-985 series engine.

The closest official weather observation station to the accident site was located at the Talkeetna Airport, about 50 miles to the southeast. On August 4, 2018, at 1753, the station was reporting, in part: wind 170° at 6 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; ceiling and clouds, 8,000 ft. scattered, 10,000 ft. broken; temperature 72° F; dew point 54° F; altimeter 29.87 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: De Havilland
Registration: N323KT
Model/Series: DHC-2
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: K2 Aviation
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TKA, 365 ft msl
Observation Time: 1753 ADT
Distance from Accident Site: 50 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 8000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 170°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 10000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.87 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Departure Point: Talkeetna, AK (TKA)
Destination:  Talkeetna, AK (TKA)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 4 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 5 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




This photo from the National Park Service shows the site of a plane crash into the side of a mountain near the top of Thunder Mountain in the Alaska Range, near Denali.


ANCHORAGE (KTUU) - Recovery of the plane that crashed into a mountain in Denali National Park Saturday may not be possible for another couple of days, at least, say some of the agencies involved. The National Park Service and National Transportation Safety Board are still working up their plan of action, which is also dependent on weather, for the recovery of the plane, and those killed in the crash.

The plane, piloted by Craig Layson flying for K2 Aviation, also had four Polish passengers on board when it crashed within Denali National Park. Officials say that all on board are presumed to have died in the crash. Four were confirmed dead by a National Park Mountaineering Ranger who was hauled to the scene by helicopter. The ranger was unable to see the fifth person in the plane due to his short time at the plane and limited access, but presumes that person was in the plane as well.

Katherine Belcher, spokesperson for the National Parks Service, said the agency is still in the planning process Tuesday, meeting throughout the day to determine the next course of action for recovering the bodies of those who died.

Belcher said there's no plan to approach the plane Tuesday, due to poor weather conditions, and that action taken by NPS would likely need to wait until Thursday or Friday, as weather permits.

Clint Johnson, Chief of the National Transportation Safety Board's Alaska district, told KTUU that this investigation is unusual.

"Our office is very used to dealing in very remote, challenging areas, however, this accident, and where the wreckage came to rest, is even over our heads," Johnson told Channel 2 Tuesday afternoon.

"This one is a unique situation because the wreckage is at altitude, and a very precarious location, so we're working right now very closely with the National Park Service, to see if we can gain access to the accident site," Johnson said. "I think that's unlikely, given the pictures that we saw yesterday of the airplane, that we probably won't be launching investigators to the actual site."

Johnson said that two separate recovery missions would likely be planned: one for the bodies trapped on the plane, and one for the plane itself.

While the Park Service will spearhead the main recovery effort of getting the bodies out of the downed plane, NTSB is focused on retrieval of the plane, which will take place after the bodies are recovered.

If recovering the bodies proves too difficult or impossible, Johnson said the NTSB would likely then try to recover both the plane and those on board in one trip. Johnson said two NTSB investigators were planning on flying to Talkeetna Wednesday to begin a preliminary investigation. The ultimate recovery of the aircraft would be in cooperation with K2 Aviation's insurance provider, Johnson said.

While Layson has been named by officials, the four Polish nationals have not. Belcher said that the NPS is working with the Polish consulate in Los Angeles to notify family members of the deaths first.

Story and video ➤ http://www.ktuu.com

ANCHORAGE (KTUU) - Talkeetna is mourning the loss of a pilot and four passengers who are all presumed to have perished in a plane crash in Denali National Park.

Air travel is one of Talkeetna's biggest attractions, as it draws in thousands of tourists flying in and out of the town. Many who take to the air will return safely but that wasn't the case for K2 pilot Craig Layson and four Polish flight-seers, when their plane crashed into a mountain on the Alaska Range.

"There is always an inherent risk when you're flying around a mountain that makes its own weather and that weather can change really fast," said David Lee of Sheldon Air Service.

While Layson may have worked for a competing air service, together as pilots, Lee says they were colleagues and when a deadly incident happens to one, it impacts all.

"You know you don’t wish this on anybody even though sometimes it’s competitive around here it does affect the whole industry, really the whole state of Alaska," said Lee.

Inside the Talkeetna Roadhouse, one of a handful of iconic businesses that tourists fill during these popular summer months, Trish Costello greets and serves guests with a smile on her face. While she's smiling externally, internally she's still mourning the loss of a fellow colleague in the tourist town she calls home.

As someone in a service industry, Costello says it’s difficult to deal with a loss like this because she still has to cater to the needs of every visitor while trying to process the impact this crash has had on her beloved community.

"They don’t really know what’s going on and they don’t realize that our staff is trying to operate completely shocked, processing their emotions, and dealing with the loss," said Costello.

Costello said she worked with pilot Craig Layson's wife, Maggie, so this tragedy hits very close to home for her and her staff. But says she’s trying to keep her emotions in perspective knowing the grief and shock the staff at K2, and the victims' families, are feeling.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.ktuu.com

Piper PA-28-181 Archer III, N925PA: Incidents occurred August 06, 2018 and October 03, 2016 at Deer Valley Airport (KDVT), Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

August 06, 2018: While taxiing, struck the wingtip of aircraft N433PA.

http://registry.faa.gov/N925PA

Date: 06-AUG-18
Time: 15:15:00Z
Regis#: N925PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28 181
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: DEER VALLEY
State: ARIZONA

August 06, 2018:  While standing, aircraft's wing was struck by N925PA which was taxiing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N433PA

Date: 06-AUG-18
Time: 15:15:00Z
Regis#: N433PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 44 180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 91
City: DEER VALLEY
State: ARIZONA



October 03, 2016: Aircraft on landing, went off the runway, nose wheel collapsed and the propeller struck the runway.

Date: 03-OCT-16
Time: 23:30:00Z
Regis#: N925PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PHOENIX
State: Arizona

MD Helicopter MD 500D: Incident occurred August 06, 2018 at Honolulu International Airport (PHNL), Hawaii

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Reported bird strike, right window broken, returned to Honolulu International Airport

Date: 06-AUG-18
Time: 18:50:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: MD HELICOPTERS
Aircraft Model: MD500D
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Operator: MK5
City: HONOLULU
State: HAWAII

Endeavor Air, Bombardier CRJ900: Incident occurred August 06, 2018 at Portland International Jetport (KPWM), Maine

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Flight Number 3296: Reported bird strike with damage to left wing.

Date: 06-AUG-18
Time: 21:33:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CRJ9
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: ENDEAVOR AIR
Flight Number: 3296
City: PORTLAND
State: MAINE

McDonnell Douglas 500-E, N424WC: Accident occurred August 06, 2018 in Big Falls, Koochiching County, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Rotorcraft slipped off skid into swamp.

Wilson Construction Company

http://registry.faa.gov/N424WC

Date: 06-AUG-18
Time: 16:40:00Z
Regis#: N424WC
Aircraft Make: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS HELI
Aircraft Model: 500 E
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: CORPORATE
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
Operation: 91
City: BIG FALLS
State: MINNESOTA

Cessna A188B, registered to an individual and operated by Lloyd Darter Aviation, N4996R: Accident occurred August 06, 2018 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4996R

Location: Sedalia, MO
Accident Number: CEN18LA321
Date & Time: 08/06/2018, 1515 CDT
Registration: N4996R
Aircraft: Cessna A188
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On August 6, 2018, at 1515 central daylight time, a Cessna A188B, N4996R, experienced a total loss of engine power and impacted powerlines and terrain during an aerial application about 10 miles north of Sedalia, Missouri. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and post-crash fire. The pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to an individual and operated by Lloyd Darter Aviation under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from an unknown location at time unknown. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N4996R
Model/Series: A188 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Lloyd Darter Aviation
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Agricultural Aircraft (137) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: DMO, 910 ft msl
Observation Time: 1453 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 220°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:


Deputies and firefighters from Pettis County were dispatched to a plane crash on Monday in the area of Green Lawn Road in Hughesville.

According to the Pettis County Sheriff's Office, the pilot reported mechanical problems as the cause of the crash. 

The pilot was taken by private vehicle to an area hospital for treatment. 

An investigation is underway by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://ksisradio.com

Cessna 120, N76524: Accident occurred August 06, 2018 near West Plains Regional Airport (KUNO), Pomona, Howell County, Missouri

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Louis - St. Anne, Missouri

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N76524

Location: Pomona, MO

Accident Number: CEN18LA317
Date & Time: 08/06/2018, 1251 CDT
Registration: N76524
Aircraft: Cessna 120
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 6, 2018, about 1251 central daylight time, a Cessna 120, N76524, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing near Pomona, Missouri. The pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The airplane departed about 1145 from the West Plains Regional Airport (UNO), West Plains, Missouri, on a local flight.

The pilot reported that he was departing UNO and was about 500 ft above ground level when the engine stopped producing power. He executed a forced landing to a field and during the landing rollout, the airplane collided with a fence and haybale which resulted in substantial damage to the airplane.

At 1253, the surface weather observation at the UNO, located about 2 nm northwest of the accident site was: wind 210° at 10 knots; visibility 10 miles; few clouds at 5,000 ft; temperature 33° C; dew point 21° C; and altimeter 30.15 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N76524
Model/Series: 120
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Carrell Jack F
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: UNO, 1228 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 210°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: West Plains, MO (UNO)
Destination:  West Plains, MO (UNO) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:




POMONA, Mo. — No injuries were reported Monday after a small plane crashed in a field near Pomona.

Highway Patrol Troop G Information Officer Sgt. Jeff Kinder says the Highway Patrol was notified of the crash around 1 pm, however area residents reported hearing the crash around 10:30 am.

Kinder says the pilot told law enforcement that the plane lost power, causing him to make an emergency crash landing near N Highway about a mile east of Pomona. The 84-year-old pilot left the scene of the crash and walked to the West Plains Regional Airport in Pomona to report the incident.

Sgt. Kinder says there was damage to the plane, as well as a fence and a mobile home on the property where the landing took place. The plane will be left at the scene for the day before being moved from the property sometime Tuesday.

Kinder says that due to it being a crash landing and due to the damage to the airplane, the Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the incident.

Because there were no injuries, Kinder says the Highway Patrol will not be releasing the name of the pilot, in accordance with the Highway Patrol’s policy concerning the release of names of people involved in non-injury accidents.

Original article  ➤ https://www.ozarkradionews.com

Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, N263AT: Incident occurred August 06, 2018 at Trenton-Mercer Airport (KTTN) and Incident occurred September 11, 2015 at Morristown Municipal Airport (KMMU), New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

August 06, 2018:  Gear collapsed on landing.

Airline Transport Professionals Corp of USA

http://registry.faa.gov/N263AT

Date: 06-AUG-18
Time: 18:15:00Z
Regis#: N263AT
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 44 180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TRENTON
State: NEW JERSEY



September 11, 2015: Aircraft on landing nose gear collapsed.

Date: 11-SEP-15
Time:  16:07:00Z
Regis#:  N263AT
Aircraft Make:  PIPER
Aircraft Model:  PA44
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None
Damage:  Unknown
Activity:  Instruction
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City:  MORRISTOWN
State:  New Jersey

Tango XR, N454WS: Accident occurred August 06, 2018 at Galion Municipal Airport (KGQQ), Crawford County, Ohio

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

http://registry.faa.gov/N454WS


NTSB Identification: GAA18CA470
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 06, 2018 in Mansfield, OH
Aircraft: WALTER C SMYTHE TANGO XR, registration: N454WS

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Lost control on landing, ran off the runway and flipped over.

Date: 06-AUG-18
Time: 15:10:00Z
Regis#: N454WS
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: TANGO XR
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: GALION
State: OHIO

Cessna T206H Turbo Stationair, N27VA: Incident occurred August 06, 2018 at Lynchburg Regional Airport (KLYH), Campbell County, Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Blew tire and veered off the runway.

Commonwealth of Virginia
Department of State Police

http://registry.faa.gov/N27VA

Date: 06-AUG-18
Time: 18:32:00Z
Regis#: N27VA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 206
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LYNCHBURG
State: VIRGINIA

Challenger II, N1666R: Accident occurred July 23, 2018 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N1666R

Location: Oshkosh, WI
Accident Number: CEN18CA291
Date & Time: 07/23/2018, 0950 CDT
Registration: N1666R
Aircraft: Quad City CHALLENGER
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that she made a wide turn from base leg to final approach because she did not know exactly where the runway was placed. She stated she banked the airplane to line up with the runway and was still in a bank when the airplane approached the runway threshold. She added power to keep from getting too low, but the airplane contacted the ground and spun around, coming to a stop up against a chain-link fence.

The left wing, rudder, and elevator sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The experimental amateur built airplane was landing on ultralight runway 33 during Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) AirVenture when the accident occurred. The EAA AirVenture Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) contained a diagram showing the approach route for airplanes landing on runway 33. The procedure is to follow the northbound road at the east end of Ripple Road then make an approximate 30° left turn near the runway threshold to align with the runway. The west side of the northbound road is bordered by trees. The accident airplane contacted the ground near the beginning of the displaced threshold for the runway.

The accident was captured on a ground-based video which showed the airplane in a left descending turn as it approached the runway. The airplane continued in the left turn until the left wing contacted the ground. The left main gear and nose gear then contacted the ground followed shortly thereafter by the right main gear. The airplane then slid rearward and spun to the left coming to rest after the tail contacted the fence. The airplane came to rest on a heading of 45°. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Private
Age: 50, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Sport Pilot
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/27/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/11/2016
Flight Time:  874 hours (Total, all aircraft), 299 hours (Total, this make and model), 798 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Quad City
Registration: N1666R
Model/Series: CHALLENGER II
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2008
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: CH2-0899-1897
Landing Gear Type:
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  07/15/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:
Airframe Total Time:  348 Hours
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner: Holtz Rodney R
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOSH, 782 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0953 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 9°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 350°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Wautoma, WI (Y50)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Oshkosh, WI (OSH)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0915 CDT
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Wittman Rgnl (OSH)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 808 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 33
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1200 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  43.966944, -88.560833

Cessna 180K, N2801K: Incident occurred August 03, 2018 in Fairbanks, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska

While taxiing aircraft struck wing of parked aircraft. 

http://registry.faa.gov/N2801K

Date: 03-AUG-18
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N2801K
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 180K
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: FAIRBANKS
State: ALASKA

Rans S-7S Courier, N8443B: Accident occurred August 04, 2018 in Tyonek, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

http://registry.faa.gov/N8443B

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA469
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 04, 2018 in Tyonek, AK
Aircraft: Rans S7, registration: N8443B

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Crashed under unknown circumstances.

Date: 04-AUG-18
Time: 23:30:00Z
Regis#: N8443B
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: S 7S
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: TYONEK
State: ALASKA

Rescuers have saved the lives of two people who were injured in a plane crash near Tyonek on Saturday, according to Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson officials. 

A good Samaritan pilot who was in the area saw the plane crash and called the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center, according to a release from Dept. of Military and Veterans Affairs. Airmen with the Alaska Air National Guard's 210th and 212th Rescue Squadron responded to the crash site after being alerted by RCC's Anchorage center. 

"An HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter from the 210th Rescue Squadron launched from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson," officials wrote. "Also aboard the helicopter was a Guardian Angel team from the 212th Rescue Squadron."

While crews were en route, the downed plane's emergency locator transmitter was detected. 

The helicopter flew to the location of the downed aircraft, rescued the two people inside and flew them to Central Peninsula Hospital in Soldotna. 

The 210th and 212th Rescue Squadrons were awarded two saves.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.ktva.com