Sunday, March 13, 2016

The executive lane: Wealthy businesspeople commute by helicopter from Fraser Valley mansions




A Bell Jet Ranger helicopter circles a 20-acre estate in Langley, allowing a high-angle view of a private lake and 10,000-square-foot French chateau-style mansion, complete with saltwater pool and tennis courts. The chopper lands on a manicured lawn yards away from a bronze, Roman-style water fountain of the sort displayed on the grounds of Versailles.

Danny Evans, a realtor with 36 years’ experience, pops out of the helicopter and greets a crowd of realtors sipping glasses of champagne. The crowd mingles at the chateau’s massive door, hewn from Lebanese cedar and imported from a 16th-century castle.

Evans is excited specifically about the buyers interested in this 2006-built, $5.8-million home, and generally about new revenue streams coming into the Fraser Valley market.

One stream seems to be Vancouver-area executives cashing out and looking for country homes after an unprecedented injection of offshore capital has boosted the city’s home prices.

The bigger stream is offshore investors, mostly from China, who already own properties in Vancouver and are now looking for acreages outside the city.

According to Evans, both types of buyers are increasingly using helicopters to commute to and from Vancouver.

“We’re seeing a lot of Chinese flocking out to this area now and they want to get back and forth to Vancouver, so they’re very intrigued by the helicopter concept,” Evans said.

Evans said that, in 36 years, he’s never seen a hotter, more “unbelievable” market. He’s reminded of 1980-81, the last time Metro Vancouver home-price graphs curved straight up. In 1981, when interest rates soared, the market crashed. Evans says the current market will plateau, but won’t fall.

“With this new wave of buyers, you say $6 million and they don’t sneeze,” Evans said. “They are fairly guarded. We ask, ‘Can you afford a property that is $5.8 million? They say, ‘Oh, yeah, yeah, we have other property.’ ”

Evans said most of the investors he’s met are wealthy businesspeople from Mainland China, but there are also immigrants from China who now farm in B.C.

“One group pulled up in six stretch Escalades, and they had their own Chinese interpreter,” Evans said. “We’ve also seen a group from Russia and one from Iran. Some of them, you don’t really ask what their background is.”

The Langley estate is owned by developer Kent Sillars, president of Vesta Properties. Sillars is a client of Sky Helicopters, a firm that started a membership program for executives in January.

Company manager George Lacny said businesspeople choosing to sell Vancouver homes and commute from larger estates in the Fraser Valley or Vancouver Island “are the perfect candidates for our heli-service membership.”

“This is definitely a growing area of business for us,” Lacny said.

Flying from Vancouver to Langley with Danny Evans, Sky Helicopters pilot Bryce Westlund explains that wealthy offshore investors and their realtors are a growing client base.

Sky Helicopters has now flown about 70 realtors or clients of Concord Pacific — the Vancouver-area developer founded in the 1980s by Hong Kong multibillionaire Li Ka-Shing — on tours of the Fraser Valley.

“Usually we take six (Concord Pacific realtors) at a time, flying two of our smaller helicopters in formation,” Westlund said. “In one trip we covered about seven of their developments. They like getting the lay of the land.”

Green Party MLA Andrew Weaver agrees with Danny Evans that B.C.’s market has never been hotter and that offshore cash is the driver.

In contrast to Evans and many B.C. realtors, though, Weaver sees the offshore investment boom as a negative force in a “literally crazy” speculative market.

“It’s like you’re chasing Bre-X stock, and there can only be one equilibrium result,” Weaver, a mathematics PhD, said.

“It’s going to be a crash.”

Story and video: http://www.theprovince.com

Transformer stolen from Gautam Buddha Airport in Bhairahawa

Kathmandu, March 13

A high-voltage electricity transformer was stolen from the restricted area at Gautam Buddha Airport in Bhairahawa, affecting regular power supply to the major aviation navigation equipment for a week.

According to a source at GBA, flight operation department officials noticed the dysfunctional status of the VHF omni-directional range and distance measuring equipment (VOR-DME) on March 7 after 11 kilovolt power transformer was stolen from the airport premises.

VOR is a type of radio navigation system for aircraft which broadcast a VHF radio composite signal, including the station’s morse code identifier and data, allowing the airborne receiving equipment to derive a magnetic bearing from the station to the aircraft while DME is a transponder-based radio navigation technology that measures distance by timing the propagation delay of VHF or UHF radio signals.

Air traffic controllers feared that the sensitive equipment used for ground-based navigational aids could be non-functional anytime causing a serious navigation problem in the airport.

According to them, GBA is now operating an old generator in the daytime rather than installing a new transformer that costs less than Rs 7 lakhs.

“How can a power back-up generator operate VOR–DME for more than a week as the equipment must be made operational round the clock?” asked an ATC officer. The GBA uses 114.7 MHz frequency to handle navigation works.

Bhairahawa incident also reveals the sheer negligence on part of the Civil Aviation Authority of Nepal, which operates airports across the country, for not timely replacing the transformer, according to an operation manager of a private airline.

Without sharing details, Arjun Bahadur Gurung, Maintenance Officer at GBA, has confirmed that 11 kilovolt power transformer was stolen on March 7. Airport manager Shishil Chitrakar refused to comment, saying police investigation was on.

According to district police office in Bhairahawa, the investigation is under way. “The culprits have not been identified yet,” an officer told this daily, saying the incident occurred in the restricted area.

A version of this article appears in print on March 14, 2016 of The Himalayan Times.

Original article can be found here: https://thehimalayantimes.com

Let's keep Yuma's skies pilot-friendly

Laser pointers might seem like innocent toys. They are cheap, easy to find, and can entertain cats for hours. But for pilots, they can pose serious problems.

Officials at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma recently asked the public to take care with laser pointers, and to not point the devices at aircraft.

Yuma is known for being an aviation-friendly community. Each year, we welcome the pilots who come to Marine Corps Air Station Yuma for training, because our weather conditions are perfect for such activities.

Their concerns are valid. Officials note that over the last few months, the number of incidents involving aircraft and laser pointers have increased, including an incident with a Search and Rescue helicopter.

Beams from laser pointers, when shined toward the sky, can reach the cockpit of aircraft, and can compromise the pilot’s vision.

In fact, the FBI compares the impact to setting off a camera flash in a dark room.

It can be a distraction hazard as far up as 12,000 feet, traveling more than a mile in the air, disorienting and temporarily blinding pilots, the FBI reports.

Pilots across the United States have been forced to change direction because of laser pointers, and several have required medical attention.

Too often, people want to see how far the beam can reach. But that action isn’t without consequences. The beam can disorient a pilot, injuring or permanently damaging their eyes.

In Yuma, that problem can be compounded at night, when military pilots are wearing night vision goggles, or flying low for training.

A federal law passed in 2012 made lasing aircraft punishable by up to five years in prison, according to the FBI’s website.

It’s a dumb, dangerous thing to do, and the punishment is a steep one.

As the next MCAS Weapons and Tactics Instructor Course draws near, it’s critical that people respect the pilots, and refrain from aiming laser pointers into the skies.

Original article can be found here: http://www.yumasun.com/opinion

Inveterate aviator George Vose dies

George Vose



FORT STOCKTON – George Vose, who had been flying in light aircraft and teaching new pilots since 1941, died peacefully early Monday in a Fort Stockton nursing home.

He was 93.

“He was my flight instructor and taught me all I know,” said Cade Woodward, a flight instructor and member of the Alpine Airport Advisory Board. “His unique style was an inspiration in my career.

“He came through the Depression and World War II, a very special group of people, and was a very important addition to our lives and to our log books,” he said.

Vose did many things beyond flying, including his work on bone density and working with the U.S. astronaut program, X-Rays and wildlife tracking, Woodward said.

He was hospitalized with pneumonia last week but was released. Vose wanted to return to his home at Taurus Mesa in south Brewster County but his doctor said he needed continued health care so he was moved to the nursing home.

He died peacefully early Monday, his nephew John Robertson of Skaneateles, New York, said.

The Avalanche featured Vose in 2014 as a pilot with a certified flight instructor rating at age 92.

Federal rules require commercial airline pilots to retire at age 65 but private pilots can fly as long as they can maintain their health certificates.

“The hardest part now is getting in and out of the airplane,” he said in June 2014.

Vose had two knee replacements and got around with the aid of a cane. His lone airplane in Alpine was a high-wing Cessna 172, though he also had a part interest in a Piper J3 Cub based in Denton.

Low-wing airplanes that require climbing onto the wing to gain entry are “out of the question,” he said.

Vose got his first lesson in an Aeronca Chief in 1941 and two years later was giving indoctrination training to potential military cadets as a civilian flight instructor in Piper L4s, the military designation for the popular Cub.

Since those days, he trained more than 2,500 pilots, many going on to careers including as airline pilots. “I’m so old, many of my students are retiring,” Vose said.

Over his long career, he flew radio-telemetry wildlife tracking for various government agencies. The first “run” was on a peregrine falcon, tracking the bird from Texas Padre Island to Lake Superior where it entered Canada.

He flew author Alan Tennant on some of his falcon-tracking ventures described in his best-selling book, “On the Wing.”

And he flew a BBC photographer over the Grand Canyon in Arizona.

During the war, Vose was assigned to Sheppard Air Force Base near Wichita Falls.

“I hated Texas,” he said. “I hated Wichita Falls. I never wanted to see Texas again.”

Vose moved to Bakersfield, California, saying he would never go back to Texas.

But he drove through the Big Bend area in 1952 and liked it. Later, while working for Texas State College for Women in Denton, now Texas Woman’s University, he met Assistant Comptroller Jim Whitehead, who had graduated from Sul Ross State University.

“I asked him how I might buy some land in Brewster ‘South County.’ He advised me to subscribe to the Alpine Avalanche,” he said.

Responding to an ad in the paper, Vose said he found 1,600 acres about 50 air miles south of Alpine “when land was very cheap.”

He bought it in 1977 and began building an adobe home and laying out four gravel-surface runways 3,500 to 5,000 feet long.

Vose built his Taurus Mesa adobe home almost completely by himself.

He laid out three runways, plus one leading to his home. He sold land along the main runways for residents to build homes so they could have quick access to the airfield.

He hosted fly-ins and barbecues at Taurus Mesa in the fall and friends came from around the world.

He lived there ever since.

Woodward said Vose did not want a funeral. Instead, friends and family are planning a future fly-in, which could include a flyover to spread his ashes over Taurus Mesa.

Original article can be found here: http://www.alpineavalanche.com

Cessna 182A Skylane, N2230G: Fatal accident occurred March 13, 2016 Alpine, Wyoming

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N2230G

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Casper FSFO-04

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA084
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 13, 2016 in Alpine, WY
Aircraft: CESSNA 182A, registration: N2230G
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 13, 2016, about 0230 mountain standard time, a Cessna 182A, N2230G, collided with terrain shortly after departing from Alpine Airport, Alpine, Wyoming. The airplane was registered and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot and three passenger sustained fatal injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The personal cross-country flight was departing from Alpine with an assumed destination of Rigby Airport, Rigby, Idaho. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

A resident at the Alpine Airport stated that he heard the airplane land on March 12 about 1930. The pilot and passengers then went to a local restaurant for the night. The resident heard them depart about 0230 on March 13. The departure sounded normal but he could not discern the slow fading of noise of a takeoff that he could normally hear during a departure due to the orientation of the mountains.

The airplane wreckage was located about 1.5 mile north-northwest of the runway and was consumed by fire. The wreckage was recovered for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

A fund has been established for the family of David and Jessica Anderson/GoFundMe


Thomas “Brook” Summers, a dentist, and his wife Heidi, were two of the four victims of Sunday’s plane crash in rural Bonneville County. A donation account has been set up at Zions Bank to benefit the couple’s children. Donations will be accepted at any Zions Bank location in Idaho Falls.





IDAHO FALLS — A fund has been established for the children of a couple killed in a plane crash Sunday morning.

David and Jessica Anderson, along with Thomas “Brook” and Heidi Summers, all died in the crash north of Alpine, Wyoming, near Palisades Reservoir.

The Anderson’s leave behind three children – ages 15, 13 and 10.

CLICK HERE TO VISIT GOFUNDME PAGE.

A GoFundMe page, created by a close family friend Tuesday morning, says all proceeds will be set aside for the Anderson kids with the guardian determining where to use the funds.

“These kids will need these funds. Their whole life just changed and got really hard for all of them. There was no will and we are not sure about life insurance for the kids. If you can please donate, even a small amount will help these very special kids,” according to the GoFundMe account.

An account has also been set up for the Summers children at Zions Bank. Donations to the fund can be made at any bank location. Donors should ask for the “Brook and Heidi Summers” account.


Original article can be found here: http://www.eastidahonews.com

Dr. T. Brook Summers, D.D.S.: http://www.familydentalhealth.com 


The four people who died in a plane crash near the Palisades Reservoir over the weekend have been identified.

Thomas “Brook” Summers, 39, a local dentist, his wife Heidi, 36; Jerry “Dave” Anderson, 40, a sales representative at Andersen Hitches, and his wife Jessica, 38, all perished after a small airplane crashed one mile north of the Alpine, Wyo., Airport, a Bonneville County Sheriff’s Office news release said.

The plane, piloted by Dave Anderson, crashed shortly after taking off from the Alpine airport early Sunday. The National Transportation and Safety Board is investigating the crash.

Ryan Andersen, owner of Andersen Hitches, said all the victims were great people who cared deeply about their families. Andersen said Dave Anderson was a “family guy,” and leaves behind three children ages 10 to 15.

“He was a really fun guy to everyone around him … he was real, you know he was real,” Andersen said.

He said Dave Anderson had a lot of family in the area and his children will be well taken care of.

The Summers were the Andersons’ neighbors and they have four children. Andersen said his children are best friends with the Summers’ children.

“They’re just great people,” Andersen said. “What a great two couples.”

Employees at Family Dental Health Center, where Brook Summers worked, declined to comment.

A donation account has been set up at Zions Bank to benefit the Summers children. Donations will be accepted at any Zions Bank location in Idaho Falls.

Bonneville County Sheriff’s Sgt. Karl Noah said a cause for the crash remains under investigation. The accident occurred many hours prior to the call for assistance, a Sheriff’s Office news release said. The airplane, a 1958 Cessna four-passenger plane, was completely burned.

Investigators continue to gather forensic identification of the bodies and remove crash debris from the site, the release said.

This marks the fourth small airplane crash and third fatal plane crash near the Palisades Reservoir in the past year.

• On Aug. 27 two Idaho Falls men survived a crash north of Irwin when their two-seater airplane hit a wire strung over the South Fork of the Snake River.

• On Oct. 15 an Oklahoma man died and a teen girl survived after a two-seater airplane crashed in the Little Elk Creek drainage east of the reservoir.

• On Jan. 4 a Pennsylvania man and a North Carolina teen died after a two-seater plane nosedived into the ground near the reservoir.

Original article can be found here: http://www.postregister.com



Thomas “Brook” and Heidi Summers



Jessica and David Anderson


The four people who died in a plane crash near the Palisades Reservoir over the weekend have been identified.


Thomas “Brook” Summers, 39, a local dentist, his wife Heidi, 36,; Jerry “Dave” Anderson, 40,, a sales representative at Andersen Hitches, and his wife Jessica, 38, all perished after a small airplane crashed one mile north of the Alpine Wyoming Airport, a Bonneville County Sheriff’s Office news release said.


The plane, piloted by Dave Anderson, crashed shortly after taking off from the Alpine, Wyo., airport early Sunday. The National Transportation and Safety Board is investigating the crash.


Ryan Andersen, owner of Andersen Hitches, said all the victims were great people who cared deeply about their families. Andersen said Dave Anderson was a “family guy,” and leaves behind three children ages 10 to 15.


“He was a really fun guy to everyone around him … he was real, you know he was real,” Andersen said.


He said Dave Anderson had a lot of family in the area and his children will be well taken care of.


The Summers were Dave Anderson’s neighbors and they have four children. Andersen said his children are best friends with the Summers children.


“They’re just great people,” Andersen said. “What a great two couples.”


Employees at Family Dental Health Center, where Brook Summers worked, did not want to comment.


Bonneville County Sheriff’s Sgt. Karl Noah said a cause for the crash remains under investigation. The accident occurred many hours prior to the call of assistance, a Sheriff’s Office news release said. The airplane, a 1958 Cessna four-passenger plane, was completely burned.


Investigators continue to gather forensic identification of the bodies and remove crash debris from the site, Noah said.


Original article can be found here: http://www.postregister.com


David and Jessica Anderson


Dave Anderson and his wife, Jessica.


IDAHO FALLS — Bonneville County sheriff investigators have released the names of four people killed in a plane crash north of Alpine, Wyoming, near Palisades Reservoir.

Thomas “Brook” Summers, 39, and Heidi Summers, 36, along with Jerry “David” Anderson, 40, and Jessica Anderson, 38, all died in the crash that occurred hours before they were found Sunday afternoon. All of the victims were from Idaho Falls.


Brook Summers was a dentist at Family Dental Health Center in Idaho Falls. According to a biography on the company website, he and Heidi had four children.


David and Jessica Anderson were the parents of three children, according to Ryan Andersen (no relation), the president of Andersen Hitches. David Anderson had worked with the company for the past 11 years.


“He was such a great guy and took care of business very well,” Andersen told EastIdahoNews.com. “Most importantly he was a family guy. Everything was about his family.”


Andersen says David got his pilot’s license last fall and was piloting the plane when it went down.


Investigators are on the scene working to determine what caused the accident.


The airplane was a four-passenger, 1958 Cessna, 182A, single engine, fixed-wing, according to investigators. The plane left the Alpine airport early Sunday morning and crashed shortly after takeoff.


The National Transportation Safety Board is now in charge of the investigation.


The Summers and Anderson families were well-known in east Idaho, and Andersen said losing them is devastating.


“Dave cared about everyone and was a super friendly guy,” he said. “We’re really going to miss him.”



Original article can be found here:   http://www.eastidahonews.com

Jessica and David Anderson


Brook Summers


BONNEVILLE COUNTY, Idaho -  The Bonneville County sheriff's office has released the names of the two couples killed in a plane crash Sunday. 

Jerry "David" Anderson, 40, the pilot of the plane, and his wife Jessica Ann Anderson, 38, were killed.   Thomas "Brook" Summers, 39, and his wife Heidi Summers, 36, were also killed in the crash.

The Anderson's have three children.   David worked for Anderson Hitches in Idaho Falls. 

The Summers' have four children.   Brook was a dentist at Family Dental Health Center in Idaho Falls. 

Bonneville County Sheriff office said the airplane was a 4 passenger, 1958 Cessna, 182A, single engine, fixed wing.

The plane left the Alpine, Wyoming airport in the early morning hours Sunday and crashed shortly after take off.   It crashed about a mile from the airport, they reported. 

The crash was not reported to the sheriff office until late afternoon.  

This is the fourth plane accident to happen in the Alpine area since August 2015. 

Original article can be found here:   http://www.localnews8.com



David and Jessica Anderson


BONNEVILLE COUNTY, Idaho - Four people are dead after a small plane crashed near the Palisades Reservoir in Eastern Idaho Sunday afternoon.

The Bonneville County Sheriff's Office confirms that two men and two women were killed in the crash along the Idaho-Wyoming border.

According to Lt. Kevin Casper, the four-seat Cessna took off from the airport in Alpine, Wyoming and went down just minutes later north of the reservoir. The crash was reported at about 1 p.m.

The names and ages of the deceased are being held until family members have been notified.

Casper said the plane was completely burned. 

Original article can be found here:   http://www.ktvb.com

On March 13, 2016 at 1:39 p.m. the Bonneville County Sheriff's Office responded to a small airplane accident 1 mile North of the Alpine Wyoming Airport. 

The accident location was near China Beach on the Palisades Reservoir in Bonneville County.

This accident had occurred many hours prior to the call for assistance.

The aircraft was completely burned.

At this time we can only confirm that two adult males and two adult females died in the accident. We are not able to confirm the names due to pending family notifications.

Bonneville County Back Country Deputies, Forest Service Law Enforcement, Alpine and Swan Valley EMS, along with Bonneville County Search and Rescue responded to the scene.

Hangar plans develop at Camarillo Airport (KCMA), Ventura County, California

A developer has been lined up for a $9 million project at Camarillo Airport that will include the building of 100,000-square-feet of much-needed hangar and office space.

On Wednesday, the Camarillo City Council received the update about the hangar space along with information about a major runway reconstruction project from Tom McNamee, director of airports for Ventura County. He said the airport has over 150 pilots on a five- to seven-year wait list for hangar space, so the county is constructing about 45 hangars in the northeast corner of the airport.

The 650-acre airport is operated by the county in partnership with the city and is home to more than 600 general aviation aircraft, and there are about 150,000 and 200,000 takeoff and landings per year.

McNamee said the $14 million reconstruction of the runway, which has not had a major rehabilitation in about 21 years, is expected in the next couple of years.

"This is our next major project after we get started with our hangars. This one is interesting because it's a bit difficult with the safety areas we have to maintain. We essentially have to shut down the airport," said McNamee.

He said the plan for runway reconstruction calls for the shut down of the airport for three months during one year, and the Oxnard airport will be shut down for the same period of time the following year as it also undergoes reconstruction.

"We're staggering the projects. The tenants in Camarillo can move up to Oxnard the best way we can accommodate them and then the following year, those tenants can move to Camarillo," McNamee said. "It's a big project for us, but we're doing everything we can to minimize that impact to our tenants."

Also in his update, McNamee said 35 acres of cars being stored at the Camarillo Airport will start being moved in the next couple months to make way for airport construction.

Hyundai and Kia were storing the cars at the airport because they ran out of space on land leased near the Port of Hueneme.

The cars moved from the airport will be consolidated to locations closer to the port until they can be shipped to dealers.

"Originally, the cars were going to stay a few months. It's now been over a year. We generate about $170,000 a month in revenue for storing these cars. It's allowed us to actually save money and pay for that hangar project we want to do without having to get a loan. It's been great for us that way, but they're starting to be phased out," said McNamee.

He told the council that Camarillo Airport generates about two-thirds of the $300 million in airport revenue. Also, 2,500 jobs are created from both the Camarillo and Oxnard airports run by the county.

He said about $100 million has been invested in the airport in the last 15 years, with more than $40 million in grant money used for maintaining runways and installing LED lighting.

In other action at Wednesday's meeting, the council gave initial approval to change its sign ordinance to allow eight temporary freestanding noncommercial signs permitted on each residential, commercial or industrial property beginning 90 days before an election.

Previously, the city allowed one temporary freestanding campaign sign for each political candidate or issue on each property.

The city based the change on a Supreme Court decision made last year stating that cities "may not give preferential treatment in providing opportunities for posting noncommercial messages on signs based on the sign's content."

"The Supreme Court said we can't call them campaign signs anymore, so we can't say one per candidate or issue anymore. That's now illegal, thanks to our Supreme Court. They thought they were expanding speech, but it makes it more difficult to regulate when you have that. We didn't want unlimited amounts of any kind of sign, so we felt it necessary to place some limits on it," said Don Davis, assistant city attorney.

Original article can be found here: http://www.vcstar.com

Third graders from Edith Bowen visit the Logan-Cache Airport (KLGU), Utah



Fifty third graders buzzed with excitement as their bus pulled up to the Logan-Cache Airport. They jumped off the bus and walked into the warehouse where an airplane was stored. Most of them “wow-ed” as their eyes adjusted enough to the darkness to see one of Utah State University’s own planes from the aviation technology program. There was a sense of magic in the air that only comes from field trips.

The kids visited the airport on March 1 to learn how airplanes interact with gravity. They made their very own gliders out of Styrofoam plates and watched a presentation about how planes work. It was also a good opportunity for them to take selfies while they sat in the cockpit of a plane. The USU flight team hosted the field trip.

The third grade class photographer Gwyneth Zollinger held her newly made Styrofoam airplane in her hands while she inspected it up close.

“It is fun to be here today because we get to see airplanes and we get to make them,” she said as she threw the glider and watched it drift away. She chased after it, picked it up and repeated the process.

The students just finished a unit in their classes about gravity, so they wanted to see how planes actually overcome it, said Nancy Stewart, a third grade teacher from the Edith Bowen Laboratory School. Stewart said it is great to give the students the hands-on experience they need to remember important concepts like gravity.

“The Edith Bowen Laboratory School really tries to do project-based learning and place-spaced learning, so when the kids can come out to places like the airport they can really see where pilots actually overcome gravity,” she said.

An assistant professor of the aviation technology program, Andreas Wesemann, said the field trip was a great opportunity for the students to not only learn about the science of flying, but also the magic of it. He said he was about the same age as the third graders when he fell in love with aviation. He grew up in Salt Lake right under the airport approach, so he saw airplanes flying overhead all the time. He hoped he could one day grow up to be a pilot.

“It wasn’t until years later that I figured out how to get there and to fulfill my dream,” he said. “Now we can help these third graders achieve their dreams. I love that.”

Wesemann said it is important for everyone, especially the third graders, to have dreams and aspirations.

“My dream of flying airplanes came true,” he said. “If I can pass that on to the next generation of pilots, few things in life are as rewarding.”

Wesemann said not only is the field trip beneficial for the third-graders, but it was also a great opportunity for the USU Flight Team, who hosted the field trip, to teach kids about aviation.

“They came out here to do a service project and they got to explore and we get to explain these concepts to kids,” he said. “It is an opportunity for the flight team to do service and be able to showcase their program to the younger kids.”

The field trip was a chance for the flight team to do community service, said Tyson Daun, a senior studying aviation technology and a member of the club.

“As a team, we participate in competitions, but we also help out in the community with things like this field trip,” he said.

Original article can be found here:  http://usustatesman.com

Cessna 180J, N9925N: Accident occurred March 13, 2016 at Burlington International Airport (KBTV), Chittenden County, Vermont

http://registry.faa.gov/N9925N

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Portland FSDO-65

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA128
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 13, 2016 in South Burlington, VT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/03/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 180, registration: N9925N
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during takeoff roll the airplane encountered a gust of wind from the left side. He said that he "dipped" the left wing in an attempt to counter the wind gust but lost control of the airplane, flipped over nose first and impacted the runway. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the vertical stabilizer.

The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control during takeoff roll, which resulted in a nose over.


A Cessna 180 plane flipped over on a Burlington International Airport runway Sunday after experiencing some difficulties taking off, Director of Aviation Gene Richards said.

Two people were in the small aircraft at the time of the incident. 

Richards said the plane's pilot was transported with non-life threatening injuries to the University of Vermont Medical Center, and the passenger was waiting for a family member to pick him or her up for possible transportation to the hospital.

"They think possibly neck injuries on the pilot, but there's nothing confirmed," Richards said.

Richards said the incident occurred around 3:20 p.m.

It is unclear as of 4:30 p.m. how high the plane was in the air before it came back down and landed, Richards said. 

It appears the plane may have had some issues as it was getting ready to take off, he said.

"Those are the details I'm waiting for," Richards said. 

He added that he had been in touch with the Federal Aviation Administration and was in the process of gathering more information.

Richards said he believes the plane is privately owned.

The South Burlington Fire Department and the Vermont Air National Guard Fire Department responded to the airport, Richards said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com




SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt.-- Director of Aviation Gene Richards says a small, single-engine plane flipped over during take off at Burlington International Airport Sunday afternoon.

Richards says the pilot and one passenger were taken to UVM Medical Center for injury evaluation.

The pilot was taken by ambulance, and the passenger was picked up by family for a trip to the hospital around 4 pm.

According to Richards, the plane was a 1975 Cessna 180.

Original article can be found here: http://www.mychamplainvalley.com





Accident occurred March 12, 2016 in South Holston Lake, Bristol, Sullivan County, Tennessee

If anyone has information about the pilot or those who rendered aide, contact the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency at 1-800-831-1174 or the Sullivan County Sheriff’s Office.


Randy Wells, right, describes how an ultralight plane flew over he and Randy Deel's heads while they were on South Holston Lake fishing on Saturday. The plane crashed into the water shortly after and the two raced their bass boat to help in getting the pilot out of the water and onto another boat that came from a local marina. The plane sank in 105' of water according to the depth finder on the boat.



BRISTOL, Tenn.—A pair of fishermen were on South Holston Lake late Saturday afternoon when a small ultralight plane crashed into the water.

“I said, ‘Why is he flying so low? He is going to crash that thing.’ And he did crash it,” said Randy Deel, who pulled the pilot to safety.

Matthew Cameron of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency said witnesses observed the ultralight aircraft go down into the lake in front of Painter Creek Marina in Sullivan County about 5 p.m.

Deel, and his friend and co-worker, Randy Wells, were near the marina at the time.

“He came down the cove and I mean dead straight over top of us,” Wells said. “Then he waved. We waved back. That’s when he started doing all of these tricks.”

Deel said he had attempted to take a picture of the pilot as he was flying over the bass boat.

After a couple maneuvers, the plane went out of sight and into the water.

“When it hit, it flopped straight over,” Deel said.

The two men rushed to the middle of the reservoir to where the plane crashed. They observed the pilot bobbing up and down in the water

“We heard him holler ‘help’ twice,” Wells said.

Once they reached the man, who they said had a difficult time unhooking himself from the plane, Deel managed to pull the pilot to the side of the boat.

“He acted like he was in shock,” Deel said. “He was really cold and bleeding on his hand. He said, ‘I’m OK. I’m OK.”

A pontoon boat, which had also been at the marina, also went to the man. Deel said he was unable to pull the man into the bass boat, so the individuals on the pontoon boat helped him into their vessel.

“They had a ladder,” Deel said. “I couldn’t lift him out of that water.”

“As of now, no one knows the identity of the pilot,” Cameron said. “The aircraft sank and has not been recovered.”

The TWRA does not investigate aircraft accidents, but was called to the scene to explore the possibility of boating involvement, Cameron said.

If anyone has information about the pilot or those who rendered aide, contact the TWRA at 1-800-831-1174 or the Sullivan County Sheriff’s Office.

The man was not seriously injured and left in a private vehicle, witnesses said.

“He was lucky we seen him,” Wells said. “There is no way he could have swam that far. That water is too cold.”

He added that the water at that point was about 105 feet deep.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.heraldcourier.com



A ultralight plane went down in South Holston Lake in Bristol, Tennessee around 5 p.m Saturday.

The plane went down in the lake near Painter Creek.

TWRA tells us a pontoon boat was able to pick up the pilot after the crash.

Although, authorities have not been able to identify the pilot. TWRA is asking anyone who witnessed the crash to contact them.

No injuries have been reported.

Public information officer Matt Cameron says the plane sunk, and there are no plans to retrieve the plane. He says that will be the responsibility of TVA or the owner.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wcyb.com

Temco GC-1B Swift, N1CY: Fatal accident occurred July 28, 2014 in Yulee, Florida

YEAGLE CHARLES F:  http://registry.faa.gov/N1CY

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA363
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 28, 2014 in Yulee, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/02/2016
Aircraft: TEMCO GC 1B, registration: N1CY
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The airline transport pilot was taking off in the airplane for a personal flight. A witness reported seeing the airplane depart and then noting that the engine rpm was “low but steady.” About 200 ft above ground level, the airplane banked left, “stalled,” and then descended out of the witness’s view. The airplane impacted terrain in a marshy area about 0.2 nautical mile from the departure end of the runway. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures.

Although atmospheric conditions at the time of the accident were favorable for the accumulation of carburetor icing at glide and cruise engine power settings, it could not be determined if carburetor ice had formed while the airplane was on the ground before the accident.


Although the pilot was susceptible to an increased risk of impairment/incapacitation from an enlarged heart and septal scarring, the investigation was unable to determine if pilot impairment due to heart disease or other identified medical conditions contributed to the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain airplane control, which resulted in subsequent impact with terrain.



Charlie Yeagle



HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 28, 2014, about 1000 eastern daylight time, a Temco GC-1B, N1CY, impacted a swamp shortly after departure from Flying-A-Ranch Airport (FL84), Yulee, Florida. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall and fuselage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to an eyewitness, he observed the airplane depart on runway 5 and noted that the "engine rpm's were low but steady." About 200 feet above ground level, the airplane banked left, "stalled," and descended out of his view.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, multiengine land, and single-engine sea. In addition, he held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine, and instrument airplane. He held a Federal Aviation Administration first-class medical certificate that was issued on May 8, 2014, with a limitation of "must wear lenses for distant – possess glasses for near vision." At that time, the pilot reported 30,000 total hours of flight time, of which, 75 hours were in the previous six months of the medical exam. No pilot logs could be located.

AIRPLANE INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the airplane, manufactured in 1948, was registered to the pilot/owner in 1980. It was equipped with a Continental Motors O-300-A, 145-hp engine. According to airplane maintenance logbooks, the most recent annual inspection was completed on June 8, 2014, and at that time, the airplane had accumulated 2,934.8 hours in-service.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The airport was privately-owned and did not have an air traffic control tower. The airport was equipped with one runway designated as runway 5/23. The runway condition was not reported. The turf runway was 2,000 feet-long by 100-feet-wide, and a 25-foot tall tree was located 650 feet from the departure end of runway 5. The airport elevation was approximately 25 feet above mean sea level.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 0955 recorded weather observation at Fernandina Beach Municipal Airport (FHB) , Fernandina Beach, Florida, located approximately 6 miles to the northeast of the accident location, included wind from 260 at 7 knots gusting to 14 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 30 degrees C, dew point 24 degrees C; barometric altimeter 29.97 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted terrain in a marshy area approximately 0.2 nautical miles from the departure end of runway 5. The airplane came to rest in the marsh and was partially submerged. A postaccident examination of the wreckage confirmed flight control to all flight control surfaces. The main fuel tank was approximately three-quarters full of fuel and the auxiliary tank was nearly empty. Samples of fuel drained from the airframe were absent of debris or water. The fuel selector was position to the main fuel tank. The throttle and mixture controls were in the full forward position. The carburetor heat control was in the "OFF" position.

A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that continuity of the crankshaft and valvetrain was confirmed to all cylinders and to the rear of the engine. The top spark plugs were removed and exhibited normal wear when compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug chart, and were light gray in color. Thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders when the propeller was rotated by hand. All valves were in place and no anomalies were noted. The magnetos sparked on all terminals when the crankshaft was rotated, and the impulse couplings operated without anomaly. The fuel pump contained fluid similar to 100LL aviation fuel and the fuel screen was free of debris.

The engine controls remained attached to the carburetor and moved without anomaly. The carburetor was removed and disassembled. The carburetor bowl contained about 4oz of brown water, and the bottom of the bowl was corroded and rusted. The water was similar in color and smell to the water in the swamp surrounding the wreckage. No other anomalies were noted with the carburetor.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot's remains on July 29, 2014, by the Office of the Medical Examiner, Jacksonville, Florida. The autopsy findings included "multiple blunt force injuries," which was also listed as the cause of death.

In addition, the heart was enlarged, and demonstrated hypertensive heart disease. It weighed 475 grams and was described as having a floppy and soft consistency. The left ventricle and the interventricular septum measured 15 and 17 mm, respectively. For comparison, the average weight of a heart of a man his weight is 395 grams with a range from 299-521 grams and the average left ventricle and the interventricular septum are 12.3 mm (SD 1.6 mm) and 13.6 mm (SD 2 mm) respectively. In addition, mild coronary artery disease with about 30% stenosis was seen in multiple arteries. There was no evidence of acute myocardial infarct or coronary thrombosis. Microscopic examination of the left ventricular septum identified patchy mild myocardial fibrosis with no sign of myocarditis. Finally, cirrhosis of the liver was also identified.

Forensic toxicology was performed on specimens from the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The toxicology report stated no ethanol was detected in the vitreous fluid and no drugs were detected in the blood.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The carburetor icing probability chart from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB): CE-09-35 Carburetor Icing Prevention, June 30, 2009, showed a potential for icing at cruise/glide engine power settings at the temperature and dew point reported around the time of the accident.


 NTSB Identification: ERA14LA363
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 28, 2014 in Yulee, FL
Aircraft: TEMCO GC 1B, registration: N1CY
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 28, 2014, about 1000 eastern daylight time, a Temco GC-1B, N1CY, impacted a swamp shortly after departure near Yulee, Florida. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall and fuselage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and the airplane had departed from Flying-A-Ranch Airport (FL84), Yulee, Florida.

According to an eyewitness, he observed the airplane depart to the east and noted that the "engine rpm's were low but steady." He watched the airplane and about 200 feet above ground level, the airplane banked left, "stalled," and descended out of his view.

The airplane impacted terrain in a marshy area approximately 0.2 nautical miles from the departure end of runway 5. A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that control continuity was confirmed to all flight control surfaces. The main fuel tank was approximately three-quarters full and the auxiliary tank was nearly empty. The fuel selector was in the "ON" position. The throttle and mixture controls were in the full forward position. The carburetor heat control was in the "OFF" position.

The airplane was retained for further examination.


Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15  







Charles F. "Chuck" Yeagle 

 April 4, 1949 - July 28, 2014

Mr. Charles Forrest “Chuck” Yeagle, age 65, of Yulee, passed away on Monday, July 28, 2014. Born in Trenton, NJ, he was the eldest of two sons born to Vivian Eunice Ashenfelter Yeagle and the late Forrest Ellwood Yeagle. He grew up in Trenton, NJ and Armonk, NY and followed in the footsteps of his father, mother and brother and became a licensed Pilot at the age of 16. After graduating from high school, he enlisted in the United States Army and served as an Aviation Warrant Officer in Vietnam. Upon being discharged, Chuck came to Yulee and began a long and distinguished career as a Pilot and Flight Instructor. 


At the age of 25, he joined St. Regis Paper Company where he ran their Aviation Department. In the late 1970s he earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Management from Pacific Western University. Chuck later flew as a Commercial Pilot for New York Air and Evergreen Airlines before joining Continental Airlines in 1986. In 1987 he met Arlene Solomon whom would become his wife in July of 1988. He remained with Continental, flying out of the Newark, NJ hub, until retiring in November of 2009. 

At the time of his retirement, Captain Yeagle joined Watermakers Air of Fort Lauderdale, FL, as Director of Operations. His position with Watermakers allowed him to continue to fly private charters and freight transports to and from the Bahamas. Chuck had made the Flying A Ranch in Yulee his home since 1979. In addition to flying, he was an avid boater and enjoyed his many trips crossing the Gulf Stream to the Bahamas and South to the Florida Keys. 

Chuck leaves behind, his wife of 26 years, Arlene S. Yeagle, Yulee, FL, his mother, Vivian A. Yeagle of Palm City, FL, his brother, Curtis Ellwood Yeagle, Coral Springs, FL, two nephews, Brian and Jeffrey Yeagle and many friends. Funeral services will be at 11:00 am on Friday, August 22, 2014 at Jacksonville National Cemetery where military honors will be accorded by the United States Army Honors Detail. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to K-9s for Warriors.
=========

YULEE, Fla. —  Photos of the crash site show a yellow and white single-engine plane intact, resting in the marsh near Lofton Creek in Yulee.

Investigators say the plane went down around 10 a.m. Monday moments after taking off from the Flying A Ranch.

The pilot, 65-year-old Charlie Yeagle, was killed.

"He was a great guy. Lived down here for 30 years. He's flown in and out of the property for the last 30 years," said Jonathan Arnett.

The Flying A Ranch has been in his family for decades.  He said Yeagle was an experienced pilot.  He was a former commercial airline pilot and a flight instructor.

"He's really helped me out in my flying career," said Arnett. "I've flown with him several times."

"According to a witness, upon takeoff, it appeared that the aircraft lost power and it crashed in the marsh," said Undersheriff George Lueders with the Nassau County Sheriff's Office.

The crash site could only be accessed by boat.  By the time first responders arrived, they say Yeagle was dead.  Arnett calls the crash unfortunate -- a tragic loss of a close family friend.

"Family and everybody is just upset about what happened," he said.

Investigators say the plane went down before Yeagle could make any radio distress calls.  They have not yet said where he was headed.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating.

The NTSB tells Action News they will have more information on the crash Tuesday. The sheriff's office said they left the scene Monday evening and that one NTSB investigator was on the scene Monday night. Action News did see DEP and FAA vehicles leave the scene before 7 p.m. Monday.  We have also learned the plane was a 1948 Global Swift.  


http://www.actionnewsjax.com


  









Nassau County Sheriff’s deputies boat on Lofton Creek near the site of a plane crash Monday morning.

Investigators are still trying to find out why an experienced commercial pilot from Yulee crashed into the Lofton Creek marsh Monday morning within minutes oftaking off from the airstrip at the Flying A Ranch where had lived for the last 30 years.

The pilot, who a friend says was flying a vintage plane from the late 1940s, did not survive.

Authorities said Charles Yeagle, 65, died at the scene off Miner Road south of Yulee High School and that he was the only person in the aircraft.

Yeagle, who was retired from a long career for a commercial carrier, worked as director of operations for Nealco Air Charter Services based in Fort Lauderdale. The owner of the company said in an interview Tuesday that Yeagle was a dedicated employee as well as a friend.

“He was the consummate professional,” said David Hocher.

“It’s a loss for the company because we’re a small operation with a few employees, but it’s also a loss on a personal level. We were all friends.”

According to the Federal Aviation Administration’s website, Yeagle was certified to fly commercial jets and had FAA certification to sign off on the proficiency of other pilots.

The National Transportation Safety Board is sending investigators to the crash site, said Nassau County Undersheriff George Lueders. He said the NTSB will decide when to move the aircraft from the marsh.

Lueders said a witness saw the plane go down.

“According to the witness, the plane had just taken off when it appeared that it lost power and lost altitude,” said Lueders.

The undersheriff said the pilot was apparently trying to gain altitude in an effort to return to the airstrip at the Flying A Ranch before the crash.

He said the plane went down “probably 10 to 15 feet from Lofton Creek itself, in the marsh.”

He said someone from the ranch called 9-1-1 just after 10 a.m.

Fred Arnett, who owns the Flying A Ranch as well as the airstrip on the 85000 block of Miner Road, said he and his wife, Jean, heard Yeagle’s plane take off around 9:30 a.m. but did not hear any sounds of trouble.

“It sounded fine from the house,” said Arnett.

Arnett said a local fisherman spotted the plane in trouble and then called him at home. Arnett said the fisherman could not say why the pilot and his plane dropped from the sky.

“The emergency workers said they think that maybe he had a heart attack or some kind of medical emergency,” said Arnett. “All I know for sure is that this is a terrible, terrible accident.”

Arnett said he has owned the airstrip for 40 years and that he has known Yeagle for the past 30 years.

“He was an outstanding person, a family man, well liked, and he was absolutely in love with aviation,” said Arnett. “He was the kind of person who would rather fly somewhere than drive a car.”

Arnett said Yeagle lived on the ranch with his wife, Arlene, and that the couple did not have any children.

“They are great people,” said Arnett.

He said Yeagle split his time between homes in Yulee and Fort Lauderdale.

“He wasn’t going to work this morning, he told me he was off this week,” said Arnett. “I don’t know where he was going today. He was always flying somewhere.”

Arnett said the plane was found in the marsh about a mile and a half from the north end of his 3,000-foot runway. He said a local boater gave emergency responders the first ride to the scene.

“It took some effort to get them out there, but the plane wasn’t in the water. It was on a dry part of the marsh,” said Arnett.

Sheriff’s deputies launched their own boats Monday morning from the Lofton Creek boat ramp along A1A in Yulee.

Yeagle was reportedly flying a Globe/Temco Swift, which is a light, two-seat single-engine plane. The FAA registry said the plane was manufactured in 1948 and that Yeagle registered the aircraft in 1980.

Authorities similarly identified the plane, calling it a yellow and white 125 Swift.

“It’s an older, classic (plane) and he won all kinds of

awards for it. He fixed it up and worked on it for hours. Groomed it. It was like his child,” said Arnett.

Arnett said Yeagle parked his plane in the on-site hangar and had purchased a home on the property 30 years ago. He said Yeagle was one of several owner/investors in the airstrip. Arnett said his hangar houses six aircraft.

The ranch occupies several acres at the end of Miner Road where it meets Haddock Road. It is a scenic property surrounded by old growth shade trees and a simple brown wood fence. An orange windsock is clearly seen through the trees.

For most of Monday morning sheriff’s deputies blocked the metal gate leading to the Flying A Ranch. One of the deputies said Yeagle’s wife was on her way to the property from her job in Jacksonville and that he was assigned to keep the driveway clear.

Throughout the morning, cars and trucks arrived intermittently, and after speaking with a deputy through the driver’s window, they were allowed to proceed down the long dirt driveway or were turned away.

Adults, several of them holding small children, were seen gathered with emergency workers behind a brown-colored home on the ranch near the edge of the marsh. An ambulance was parked nearby.

Fire Rescue Chief Matt Graves said Stations 30 and 70 responded to the crash. Around 12:30 p.m., a sheriff’s motorboat pulled away from a nearby dock and headed east along Lofton Creek.

Arnett said his airstrip is licensed with the state and that no one from the property has ever been involved in an accident. Late Monday afternoon, he struggled to understand and explain what happened.

“There’s not any magical reason to explain why this happened. I just don’t know,” said Arnett.

Read more: Fernandina Beach FL News Leader. The local news source for Amelia Island and Fernandina Beach FL - Consummate pro dies doing what he loved flying.


http://www.fbnewsleader.com

YULEE, Fla. - The 65-year-old pilot of a small plane was killed Monday morning in a plane crash in the Yulee area, according to the Nassau County Sheriff's Office.

Charlie Yeagle had just taken off from Flying-A-Ranch Airport, a private airport in the 85000 block of Miner Road, when there was some kind of a problem, according to the Sheriff's Office.

A witness told deputies that after taking off, it appeared the plane lost power before crashing.

The plane, a 125 Swift, crashed into marsh about 500 yards from the end of the runway. The site is only accessible by boat.

Undersheriff George Lueders said deputies initially had trouble getting to the plane.

"Luckily, a man here that had a boat that he took the first responding officer out there and they were able to get through the marsh to the plane to check on the condition of the pilot," Lueders said.

The FAA says it is investigating and that the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the crash's probable cause.

Yeagle, a veteran pilot, lived with his wife on the private property where the airport is located. The private airport has been there for nearly 40 years and is owned by a family Yeagle was friends with.

"He was a lifelong pilot," Lueders said of Yeagle. "He started very young and retired from one of the airlines. He was a flight instructor."

Fred Arnett, who owns the landing strip, said investigators are looking into whether the pilot suffered from health problems after takeoff.

People who heard what happened showed up throughout the day. Joey Stephens said his brother just talked to Yeagle about the plane last week.

"My brother was just telling me he'd redone it and was just a really good guy," Stephens said.


- Source:  http://www.news4jax.com
   
YULEE | An experienced pilot died Monday morning after crashing his single-engine plane into a marsh shortly after taking off from a long, grassy runway on a private airstrip in the southern part of this Nassau County town. 

Undersheriff George Lueders identified the pilot as Charlie Yeagle, about 65, who has homes in Nassau and Fort Lauderdale.

No one was with Yeagle when the accident occurred just after 10 a.m. in the 85000 block of Miner Road at the Flying-A-Ranch.

Lueders said a witness told authorities Yeagle’s plane, a yellow Globe/Temco GC-1B Swift, failed to gain much altitude when it plunged into the marsh near Loftin Creek about 500 yards off the runway.

Officials with the National Transportation Safety Board are en route to the scene to determine a cause for the crash.

A friend of Yeagle’s said he had just finished refurbishing the plane a few days ago.

“It’s just tragic. Local guy. It’s terrible,” said Joey Stephens, 52, who stopped by the crash site.

Lueders said Yeagle lived on the property along with his wife. Several other homes are also on the site.

Lueders said Yeagle had been flying for decades and was known as a safe pilot.

“The airport has been here 40 years, and this is the first accident he’s had,” he said of the ranch.


- Source:  http://members.jacksonville.com


Nassau County Undersheriff George Leuders informs the media about a Globe/Temco GC-1B Swift plane that crashed into the marsh near Loftin Creek about 500 yards off a small grass runway at the Flying-A-Ranch off Miner Road Monday, July 28, 2014 in Yulee. Pilot Charlie Yeagle was killed in the crash that happened just after 10 a.m. 


View of a grass runway where a small plane, a Globe/Temco GC-1B Swift, took off and then crashed into the marsh near Loftin Creek about 500 yards off a small grass runway at the Flying-A-Ranch off Miner Road Monday, July 28, 2014 in Yulee. Pilot Charlie Yeagle was killed in the crash that happened just after 10 a.m.