Tuesday, May 31, 2022

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N604ND: Incident occurred May 27, 2022 at Henderson Executive Airport (KHND), Clark County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aircraft landed and veered off runway into a ditch.

AIA Charlie LLC


Date: 27-MAY-22
Time: 17:45:00Z
Regis#: N604ND
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LAS VEGAS
State: NEVADA

Aeronca 7AC Champion, N84583: Accident occurred May 27, 2022 in Monongahela, Pennsylvania

National Transportation Safety Board accident report number: ERA22LA244 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allegheny, Pennsylvania

Aircraft crashed in a wooded area for unknown reasons. 


Date: 27-MAY-22
Time: 23:02:00Z
Regis#: N84583
Aircraft Make: AERONCA
Aircraft Model: 7AC
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: MONONGAHELA
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Carlos Cabral, left, and Harry Bochter




Harry Bochter and Jacqueline Cabral

Harry Bochter

Harry Bochter

Anna Marie and Harry Bochter


Carlos Cabral helps push the Aeronca into its hangar.




November 2021 -   With a successful swing of a wooden propeller, Harry Bochter was ready to celebrate.

For his 75th birthday, he decided to pilot an airplane that is older than he is, but just barely.

“It was taken off the assembly line in May 1946. And I was taken off the assembly line in October 1946,” he joked after landing the two-seat Aeronca Champion on the grass near his home-away-from-home hangar at Finleyville Airport.

A look inside the hangar reveals why flying represents the best birthday option for Bochter. The front is full of tools and equipment for tasks such as fabricating parts – he has built his own plane – and his office in the back essentially serves as an aviation reference library, one that got its start when he was a youngster.

“My aunt had a candy store in Burgettstown, and she had magazines. There was an Air Progress,” he said. “I stared at that thing, and I just fell in love with airplanes. At the end of my stay with her, she said, ‘Do you want to take that magazine with you?’ I said, ‘yeah,’ and I still have it today.”

Bochter, who lives in Pleasant Hills, went on to join the Experimental Aircraft Association as a junior member when he was about 14. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he decided to take his interest to the next level by making a significant purchase.

“My first airplane was a 1941 Aeronca Defender. It was a World War II surplus airplane that I bought in '68, and I had that for a few years. Back then, it was just another old airplane. Now it’s a ‘warbird,’” he said, referring to vintage military aircraft that fetch premium prices.

Aeronca – that’s shorthand for Aeronautical Corp. of America – holds a prominent place in aviation history as the first successful light airplane, designed by pioneering aviator Jean A. Roche (1894-1981), who made his initial flight just eight years after the Wright Brothers.

The yellow-and-orange ’46 Aeronca that Bochter piloted actually belongs to Peters Township residents Carlos and Jacqueline Cabral, who operate Vortex Helicopter Services in hangars near his.

“The reason I’m here is because of Harry,” Carlos said. “My son and I came to visit the airport, and Harry was in his hangar working on his airplane. He was just very kind and started telling us about the airplane that he built, which is now in the helicopter’s hangar. He gave my son a wooden propeller, which is still in his bedroom, up on the wall.”

He also introduced Cabral to Gary Gries, the late aviation enthusiast who sold him the Aeronca. Bochter often works on keeping it in good condition, his penchant for producing spare parts helping to cut down on costs.

“It has a few blemishes, but it flies well,” Cabral said. “The more scratches and dings it has on it, the more it’s been used.”

Bochter used it on his birthday to circle not all that far above Finleyville Airport as his spouse of 44 years, Anna Marie, joined Cabral in chronicling the adventure on their smartphones. Harry acknowledged her role in his ability to pursue his avocation.

“It helps to have an understanding wife in all this,” he said.

Piper PA-28RT-201T Arrow IV, N2148J: Accident occurred May 29, 2022 near W4 Ranch Airport (84TE), Morgan, Bosque County, Texas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Location: Morgan, Texas 
Accident Number: CEN22LA227
Date and Time: May 29, 2022, 15:27 Local 
Registration: N2148J
Aircraft: Piper PA-28RT-201T
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On May 29, 2022, about 1527 mountain daylight time, a Piper PA-28RT, N2148J, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near W4 Ranch Airport (84TE), Morgan, Texas. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

While in cruise flight at 9,500 ft mean sea level (msl), the pilot observed the throttle lever creep back and a burning smell. The pilot descended to about 5,000 ft msl and observed heat in the flight deck with low #3 cylinder heat temperature and manifold pressure, followed by a loud rattling engine noise. The pilot shut off the engine and flew a forced landing to runway 17 at 84TE. The airplane touched down short of the runway and impacted a hill, which resulted in damage to the right wing. The airplane was retained for examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N2148J
Model/Series: PA-28RT-201T 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KINJ,685 ft msl 
Observation Time: 15:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 23 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C /20°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 18 knots / 24 knots, 160°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.67 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Pampa, TX (PPA)
Destination: Houston, TX (AXH)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 31.99,-97.55 (est)

Aircraft experienced engine issues and landed one (1) mile short of the runway.  

Date: 29-MAY-22
Time: 20:27:00Z
Regis#: N2148J
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28RT
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: MORGAN
State: TEXAS

Piper PA-22-160 Tri Pacer, N8926D: Accident occurred May 27, 2022 at Northwest Regional Airport (52F), Roanoke, Denton County, Texas Texas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

https://registry.faa.gov/N8926D

Location: Roanoke, Texas
Accident Number: CEN22LA225
Date and Time: May 27, 2022, 11:00 Local
Registration: N8926D
Aircraft: Piper PA-22-160 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N8926D
Model/Series: PA-22-160 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 33.004,-97.2258 (est)
 
Piper PA-22-160 Tri Pacer, N8926D, being flipped back over on it's gear May 27 2022, at Northwest Regional Airport (52F).
~


Aircraft landed and flipped over in the grass at the end of the runway.  

Date: 27-MAY-22
Time: 16:00:00Z
Regis#: N8926D
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ROANOKE
State: TEXAS

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N20487: Accident occurred May 30, 2022 at Waldron Airstrip (90WA), East Sound, San Juan County, Washington

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Point To Point Air LLC


Location: East Sound, Washington 
Accident Number: WPR22LA194
Date and Time: May 30, 2022, 11:35 Local
Registration: N20487
Aircraft: Cessna 172M 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Non-scheduled

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N20487
Model/Series: 172M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter air carrier (135)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KORS,31 ft msl
Observation Time: 11:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C /10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 190°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 4600 ft AGL
Visibility: 5 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 48.71177,-123.01824 

Aircraft landed and veered off runway into the brush. 

Date: 30-MAY-22
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N20487
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: EAST SOUND
State: WASHINGTON

Lancair IV-P, N994P: Incident occurred April 07, 2022 at Lafayette Regional Airport (KLFT), Lafayette Parish, Louisiana








Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aircraft nose gear collapsed on landing. 

Mooney Travel LLC


Date: 07-APR-22
Time: 15:35:00Z
Regis#: N994P
Aircraft Make: LANCAIR
Aircraft Model: IV
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LAFAYETTE
State: LOUISIANA

Fatal accident occurred May 30, 2022 in Milpitas, Santa Clara County, California




MILPITAS, California (KGO) -- The Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office says a man was killed and a woman was injured in a hang-gliding accident Monday, at Ed R. Levin County Park in Milpitas.

Authorities said the two were harnessed together in a tandem flight, when they crashed around 12 p.m.

The park is described by Milpitas fire officials as the fourth most popular spot in the Bay Area for hang-gliding and para-gliding.

Officials said the pair took off from the 1750 launch site, which is the highest launch point at the park.

"People who give tandem rides here are typically instructors, or pretty advanced flyers," a long-time paraglider who asked to remain anonymous told ABC7 News.

He described the hang-gliding and paragliding community in the Bay Area as pretty tight knit.

He said he and others are drawn to the park because it offers several launch points atop Monument Peak to match levels of experience.

However, he noted Monday afternoon's wind would make for a dangerous flight.

"You could feel the gusts," he said. "That's not very good."

The crash happened around noon. Officials said the woman was airlifted from the scene to Regional Medical Center, and her condition is currently unknown.

Because of the remote location of where the crash happened, responding agencies admitted they ran into some issues early on.

"It's very remote. The terrain is very rugged," Battalion Chief Galahad Zamora with the Milpitas Fire Department said. "It's a single lane road in order to get up to that location. It provided some challenges for our equipment and personnel to get up there and make patient contact."




The news came as a shock to residents who frequent the county park and often catch gliders touching down at a known landing zone.

San Jose resident John Golthy told ABC7 News, "They catch the wind, lift off, fly back down and land in here."

Information on the man who died, or the woman who was injured has yet to be released.

ABC7 News asked the long-time paraglider, "Are you afraid that you might know these people who were involved?" He took a moment and then replied, "Yeah. Yeah."

Batt. Chief Zamora said incidents in the area are common with hang gliders down or paragliders down.

The paraglider added, "There's accidents, but minor accidents. I'm kind of surprised to hear there's a fatal accident."




Monday, May 30, 2022

Hartford Union High School Aviation Club building a Van's RV-12





HARTFORD, Wisconsin — Some high school students in Hartford are taking advantage of a unique opportunity to build an RV-12 airplane.

Three times a week, Maggie Colwell comes to the Hartford Municipal Airport to work on the project with her classmates.

On this day, she found a gas leak while inspecting the aircraft.

“We had this happen but before it was leaking from the fuel pump and we fixed that, but now apparently, it’s leaking from somewhere else,” said Colwell.

Colwell is a senior and a member of Hartford Union High School’s Aviation Club.

She said the club has been working on this project since 2020.

“Looking back, I don’t know why they let a bunch of high schoolers start a plane so we started with these little starter kits and it was awful. They were so bad, super hard to do and all of us didn’t give up. Why? I don’t know but they were garbage, so looking back, they should not have let us touch an actual airplane but here we are,” said Colwell.

It was through these frustrations that Colwell discovered her passion.

After graduation, she plans to attend Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to study Human Factors Psychology.

“Basically what that is, is looking at the interactions between humans and machines and how to design those interfaces better for the person who is using them so that’s the next step for me and I ultimately want to end up in the aviation world because I love this group of people and any airport I step foot on, it’s just a great experience,” said Colwell.

Richard Glendon, a junior, has also worked on this plane for the past two years.

He says he always had an interest in aviation and building this aircraft only solidified it.

“I have learned a lot about the mechanicals in terms of what goes on in aircraft and everything, a lot of tech ed skills," Glendon said. "I have learned to grow as a person and become more responsible and get my stuff together."

Before this plane is able to take flight, Colwell and company have a checklist of items dozens of pages long to go through.

Then the Federal Aviation Administration will inspect the aircraft before giving the final clearance to fly.

“We will be able to go up for our first flight and then go from there so we will be able to spend time with one of our mentors because they are all certified to fly up in the plane, going around,” said Colwell.

Colwell said she is excited to fly this plane this summer, but the most satisfying part for her was the journey along the way.

Working together with her classmates to build an actual airplane is an experience many of her peers will never have.

Kettle Moraine Youth Aviation funded the airplane project through private donations.

They hope to build more airplanes with more students in the future.

Story and video:  https://spectrumnews1.com



Cessna 177 Cardinal, N2837X: Accident occurred April 16, 2022 in Phoenix, Arizona

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona 

AirSpeed Marketing LLC


Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Accident Number: WPR22LA175
Date and Time: April 16, 2022, 12:45 Local
Registration: N2837X
Aircraft: Cessna 177 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N2837X
Model/Series: 177
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDVT, 1488 ft msl 
Observation Time: 12:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C /-8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 210°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Unknown
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 33.688306,-112.08255 (est)

Same-day Walmart drone delivery service coming to Richmond by end of 2022




RICHMOND, Virginia (WRIC) — The future of grocery shopping is coming to Richmond in 2022.

Walmart has partnered with DroneUp, a company based out of Virginia Beach, to deliver packages up to ten pounds right to your home in 30 minutes.

“In terms of the operation, once the order is placed, the customer is given a notification that we are selecting and packing their order. You get a notification that your order is on the way,” Chief Technology Officer for DroneUp John Vernon said.

DroneUp pilots will operate the drones from an air traffic control tower set up at select participating Walmart stores. The pilots can currently fly up to 30 feet and between 80 to 100 feet from the nearest Walmart.

“We are starting small with the idea that we can deliver to a certain set of customers,” says Vernon. “Then, as we continue to improve a certain set of operations, we will be expanding to three, five, and ten miles, as both capabilities and regulations allow.”

While ground transportation is still an option to deliver packages and groceries, DroneUp wants to utilize the free airspace to help customers economically and logically. Adding drones to delivery services takes cars off the road, fewer packages in delivery trucks and reduces the cost for customers. Delivery services starting at $3.99.

“We ensure that we fly over roofs, crossroads perpendicularly, and pause if we have to. There are many people in place to manage the safety aspect of the operation,” Vernon said, when asked about the security and safety of the drones.

Richmond is currently one of six cities to be the future home of the delivery service. Still, DroneUp has successfully delivered items for over a year with Walmart. When asked if there was one product that continuously gets delivered, Vernon quickly answered, “Ironically, the number one item has been Hamburger Helper.”

Dick Rochfort, ATP, CFII - Master Instructor: Flying the RNAV 23 at Frederick, Maryland


Ride along with Master Instructor Dick Rochfort on an in-flight demonstration of the techniques and procedures for avoiding rain while flying the RNAV 23 at Frederick, Maryland, in a G1000 equipped Piper PA46 Meridian.  Dick uses proper call-outs and well documented, disciplined procedures to ensure the safety of this challenging flight. Dick Rochfort is a full-time pilot trainer specializing in the Piper PA46 Matrix, Malibu, Mirage and Meridian aircraft. He provides pre-purchase valuation, training, corporate service and expert witness services worldwide. You may view hundreds of additional videos and articles about flying the PA46 aircraft at http://www.rwrpilottraining.com/ or contact Dick directly at mail@rwrpilottraining.com 

Fly Safely - Train Often

Beech King Air 350C, N98FM: Accident occurred May 21, 2022 at Fort Stockton-Pecos County Airport (KFST), Texas

National Transportation Safety Board accident number: CEN22LA209

Federal Aviation Administration Scheduled To Release Environmental Assessment Of Space-X Boca Chica Operations




Tuesday is the day the Federal Aviation Administration is to release its environmental assessment of the expanding SpaceX rocket testing and launch facility on Boca Chica Beach. The much-delayed report will be key in determining whether SpaceX is granted a license to conduct its first orbital launch of its giant Starship prototype from coastal Cameron County.

For the past six months, the Federal Aviation Administration has been assessing how expanding SpaceX operations on Boca Chica, and the rocket launch itself, will impact the environment and the structural integrity of homes and businesses in the area.

SpaceX is hoping for a finding of “no significant impact” but the Federal Aviation Administration could also order a more in-depth study. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has said that could prompt a move of launch operations from Boca Chica to Cape Canaveral.

Aeronca 7AC, N1294E: Incident occurred May 29, 2022 in Walland, Blount County, Tennessee

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee 

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances in a wooded, mountainous area. 

Southwind Aviation Inc


Date: 30-MAY-22
Time: 01:00:00Z
Regis#: N1294E
Aircraft Make: AERONCA
Aircraft Model: 7AC
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: KNOXVILLE
State: TENNESSEE



BLOUNT COUNTY, Tennessee (WVLT) - One person was injured after a plane crashed in the Chilhowee Mountains on Sunday, according to officials with the Blount County Sheriff’s Office.

A fixed-wing two-seater with two people onboard, the pilot and his wife, crashed near Walland during the afternoon hours of May 29, officials said.

The couple reportedly escaped but the pilot suffered minor injuries. His wife told officials she was not injured in the crash, according to a spokesperson.

Once the plane went down, a sheriff’s office official said the man and woman walked out of the woods, which took “a while.” Afterward, they both went to the Blount Memorial Hospital to get checked out.

As of Sunday evening, a spokesperson told WVLT News that crews had not found the airplane.

WVLT News has reached out to the Federal Aviation Administration to learn more but has not heard back at this time.


BLOUNT COUNTY, Tennessee — The Blount County Sheriff's Office said one person had minor injuries and another was uninjured after a small plane crashed in the Chilhowee Mountains in Walland, east of Maryville.

They said the plane went down Saturday afternoon, and they had not found the plane by Sunday evening. It was a fixed-wing two-seater aircraft that had two people onboard, the pilot and his wife.

Both walked out of the woods, and deputies said it took them a while to eventually arrive at Blount Memorial Hospital to get checked for injuries.

Additional information about the plane crash was not immediately available. This story will be updated when more information is available.

Maule MX-7-180C, N1043B: Fatal accident occurred May 30, 2022 in Willits, Mendocino County, California

National Transportation Safety Board accident number: WPR22LA192

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California 

Aircraft experienced engine issues and crashed while landing on a private strip and caught on fire.

https://registry.faa.gov/N1043B

Date: 30-MAY-22
Time: 15:40:00Z
Regis#: N1043B
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: M7
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 1
Flight Crew: 1 fatal
Pax: 1 serious
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WILLITS
State: CALIFORNIA

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290. 


The pilot of the aircraft that crashed yesterday east of Willits is on life support after suffering traumatic head injuries, a close friend of the family told us this morning.

Despite initial reporting, yesterday’s plane crash resulted in two parties injured, the pilot and his girlfriend [Male Adult age 33-year-old from Willits and a 26-year-old female]. The pilot reportedly “sacrificed his body for his girlfriend and threw himself on her when he knew the plane was crashing” taking the hardest impact.

Information in the Federal Aviation Administration’s Accident and Incident Notification System stated the “aircraft experienced engine issues and crashed while landing on a private strip and caught fire.”

After the plane had crashed, the pilot’s girlfriend reportedly “grabbed him and pulled him out of the burning plane since he was unconscious.” She suffered internal bleeding requiring surgery. Meanwhile, the pilot is fighting for his life, a close friend told us.

Multiple sources have stated the crash did not occur at the Eden Valley Ranch airfield as originally reported, but at a recently installed airstrip located on private land.

The family friend confirmed that this is accurate. The airstrip they were attempting to land on is located on the property of the pilot’s father.

The pilot’s loved one refuted online claims that the pilot and his girlfriend were associated with the cannabis industry. “They are outdoor enthusiasts, adventure-seeking, hard-working individuals who got into a bad accident”, she told us.

Investigators identified the aircraft as a Maule MX-7-180C well-known amongst civilian aircraft.

Initial notes on the incident within The FAA characterized the event as an “accident” that resulted in a “serious” injury and “substantial” damage.

UPDATE 9:25 a.m. Wednesday: Information from the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Department:

On 05/30/2022 at approximately 08:45 AM, Mendocino County Sheriff’s Deputies were dispatched to a plane crash causing a fire on private property near the 16000 block of Hearst Willits Rd. near Willits, CA.  Upon arrival, deputies discovered Cal-Fire was already on scene and had extinguished the fire.

Deputies observed the plane was almost complete destroyed by fire.  Deputies were told by a witness at the scene the aircraft was an unknown make and model small passenger aircraft that had two occupants when it crashed near a landing strip on private property.

A witness at the scene reported the adult male pilot and female passenger had significant injuries and were transported by a family member of the pilot to a local hospital for medical treatment.  The pilot and female passenger were eventually transported to an out-of-county hospital for further medical treatment.

The cause of the crash was unknown at the time and the incident is being investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board. The Federal Aviation Administration was also notified of this incident.

EDI Express Turbine Express 2000 RG, N44508: Fatal accident occurred May 30, 2022 and Accident occurred May 29, 2015

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado 
Transportation Safety Board of Canada


Location: Cheyenne, Wyoming
Accident Number: CEN22FA216
Date and Time: May 30, 2022, 07:48 Local 
Registration: N44508
Aircraft: Express 2000RG 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On May 30, 2022, about 0748 mountain daylight time, an Express 2000RG airplane, N44508, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Cheyenne, Wyoming. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight.

According to preliminary information obtained by investigators, the airplane departed the Cheyenne Regional Airport/Jerry Olson Field (CYS) from runway 27, about 0744, with the intention of flying to Texas. Shortly after takeoff, the pilot declared an emergency with air traffic control (ATC) tower personnel and informed them that he had “an engine failure” and was about 4 miles south of the airport. He later reported that he would not be able to land at the airport and intended to land in a field. He also stated that he was “on fire” and asked ATC to send fire rescue. Video cameras from a local business captured a portion of the accident sequence which showed the airplane descending, near vertical, with a right roll.

The airplane collided with a storage facility. The initial impact point was a divot in the concrete. The wreckage path continued about 15 ft into a storage locker. A post crash fire ensued which consumed a majority of the airplane.

After on-scene documentation, the airplane was moved to a secure facility for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Express 
Registration: N44508
Model/Series: 2000RG 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFEW, 6160 ft msl
Observation Time: 07:58 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C /0°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 12000 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 15 knots / 22 knots, 300°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.59 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Cheyenne, WY (CYS)
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 41.132417,-104.79194

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances into a storage unit.

Date: 30-MAY-22
Time: 13:49:00Z
Regis#: N44508
Aircraft Make: EXPRESS AIRCRAFT
Aircraft Model: 2000 RG
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 1
Flight Crew: 1 fatal
Pax: 0 
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: INITIAL CLIMB (ICL)
Operation: 91
City: CHEYENNE
State: WYOMING

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290. 



Jason Aguilera (left), Senior Air Safety Investigator
National Transportation Safety Board 




CHEYENNE, Wyoming - Three (3) minutes. That is the amount of time between take-off, and a deadly crash.

According to flight records, the pilot took off from Cheyenne Regional Airport at 7:44AM on Memorial Day. The flight came to an end three minutes later at 7:47AM when the plane crashed into the Cheyenne Storage facilities.

Jason Aguilera, a Senior Air Safety Investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board was on the scene today.

“What we’re looking at right now is just kind of how it actually hit the storage facility behind us, the angle it went in, and then the damage that was resulted as a part of that. So we did a documentation yesterday, we’re finishing up today. And the wreckage is being removed to a secure facility where we’ll do follow up work on the engine and propeller.” he said when asked what the NTSB was doing at the site.

The pilot was flying what authorities called an experimental aircraft. These planes are not manufactured by major corporations, but instead by amateur. The planes are still certified by the FAA.

Investigators will be looking into the pilot, the plane, weather and more to try to determine a cause for the crash.

A preliminary report is expected to be released 15 days after the accident happened.

Investigations involving fatalities can take 12-24 months to complete.




CHEYENNE, Wyoming –  An EDI Express Turbine Express 2000 RG experimentally amateur built airplane crashed at around 8 a.m. Monday into a storage unit on Crook Avenue, near Nationway.

The crash appeared to have caused a relatively small blaze that was extinguished within about half an hour. Besides the pilot, there were no other fatalities.

The pilot of the aircraft was its sole occupant. The person, who authorities did not identify by name, has died, according to an update the Cheyenne Police Department distributed by email at around 1 p.m.

The individual was an adult male, CPD spokesperson Alex Farkas said by phone Monday afternoon. "No further injuries have been reported," according to the police department's news release.

The airplane had taken off from Cheyenne Regional Airport and was headed to Texas, according to National Transportation Safety Board spokesperson Jennifer Gabris. "An NTSB investigator arrived on scene this afternoon," Gabris wrote in an email to the Wyoming Tribune Eagle.

The county coroner's office has received the body of the pilot, Coroner Rebecca Reid said in a brief phone interview. She said that it might take a few days to get a positive identification. Once that occurs, the coroner's office will notify that individual's family, she told the WTE.

First responders from multiple agencies had been on the scene, authorities had said earlier Monday. By early afternoon, CPD personnel had remained there only to direct traffic, Farkas said. "We are no longer documenting what’s happening at the scene. It's been turned over" to federal authorities, she said by phone.

Cheyenne Fire Rescue had worked to extinguish the blaze at Cheyenne Storage, 616 Crook Ave. At around the time of the crash, CFR had sent six fire engines to the location, and they were able to contain the fire at around 8:30 a.m., authorities said.

Some 30 firefighters went to the location "during the initial incident, but currently two (investigative and commander) fire personnel are here," Andrew Dykshorn, CFR's division chief of operations, wrote in an email to the WTE at around 2:30 p.m. "There is one storage unit that was involved in the incident."

Initially at the time of the crash-landing, "there was a full police response to the crash, everyone who was on shift responded (10-12 officers) for traffic control and investigation," police spokeswoman Farkas wrote to the WTE. "Some officers from the previous shift remained on the clock to cover other calls for service in town."

Cheyenne Storage

When the plane crashed, Cheyenne Storage was closed to customers, a co-owner said by phone Monday afternoon; she would not provide her name.

As she spoke with the WTE, she said that another co-owner was speaking with a representative of the NTSB. At the time of the crash, the co-owner was at the business, although he did not see the incident, the fellow co-owner recounted.

"No one here was hurt, just the pilot," the business owner said by phone. She said that the storage facility's office, from where she was speaking, was not damaged.

Part of Nationway remained closed. "They were starting to clear things up" in the early afternoon, Farkas said. "Definitely sometime today, the road should be open again; hoping (for) this evening." Residents were being asked to remain away from the area so as not to interfere with first responders.

As the CPD's early-afternoon news release said, "the scene is still active and has now been turned over to the National [Transportation] Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration."

Federal investigation

Both the FAA and the NTSB "will investigate" what happened, an FAA spokesperson wrote in an email to the WTE.

"The NTSB will be in charge of the investigation and provide additional updates," the FAA spokesperson added in his email. The NTSB has a regional office in Denver, according to the agency's website. 

In approximately 15 business days, the NTSB will release a preliminary report on the crash, spokesperson Gabris said by phone.

The initial report will contain all of the factual information that is known about the incident, Gabris said. A final report, with an analysis and suggesting a probable cause of the crash, would typically be released within a year or two, the spokeswoman estimated.

Part of the NTSB's "investigation will be to request radar data, weather information, maintenance records and the pilot’s medical records. NTSB investigators will look at the human, machine and environment as the outline of the investigation," Gabris wrote in her later email.

In addition to CFR, CPD and the Laramie County coroner's office, Wyoming Air National Guard Fire, the Cheyenne-Laramie County Emergency Management Agency and the Laramie County Fire Authority were described as being among "the partnering agencies assisting with the initial investigation."

Clarification: An earlier online version of this report said that the NTSB could release its initial report around June 15. Given the agency expects to issue the document in about 15 business, not calendar, days, the actual date of release would be later in June. This reference has been removed from an updated version of this article.




CHEYENNE, Wyoming — The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration have taken over the scene of a plane crash that killed one person this morning, officials said.

The Cheyenne Police Department and Cheyenne Fire Rescue responded at around 8 a.m. today to 616 Crook Ave., where an experimental aircraft crashed into Cheyenne Storage, the department said in a news release.

According to the Experimental Aircraft Association, amateur-built aircraft built by individuals and licensed by the FAA receive the experimental designation.

An investigation by multiple agencies determined the pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. No other injuries have been reported, police said.

Authorities have not released the identity of the pilot.

The storage facility caught fire as a result of the crash, and the fire department deployed six engines to fight it. The fire was contained at about 8:30 a.m.

The scene remains active, police said. It has been turned over to the NTSB and FAA.

Partnering agencies in the initial investigation included Cheyenne Fire Rescue, Cheyenne Police Department, Wyoming Air National Guard Fire, American Medical Response, Cheyenne/Laramie County Emergency Management Agency, Laramie County Coroner and Laramie County Fire Authority, police said.





UPDATE 12:45 p.m.: The pilot of an experimental aircraft that crashed in East Cheyenne on Monday sustained fatal injuries in the accident, according to a joint news release from the Cheyenne Police Department and Cheyenne Fire Rescue.

But the release does not name the pilot, adding that the crash will be investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

According to the release, the crash was reported around 8 a.m. at Cheyenne Storage at 616 Crook Avenue. Cheyenne Police and Cheyenne Fire Rescue responded to the scene, and firefighters battled a blaze that had been ignited at the storage facility by the crash. Six fire engines were deployed, and the fire was contained by 8:30 a.m.

The release says

"Cheyenne Fire Rescue, Cheyenne Police Department, Wyoming Air National Guard Fire, American Medical Response, Cheyenne/Laramie County Emergency Management Agency, Laramie County Coroner, Laramie County Fire Authority are the partnering agencies assisting with the initial investigation."

Other than the pilot, no injuries have been reported in connection with the crash.

Original Post: Cheyenne Police say an experimental aircraft has crashed in the area of Cheyenne Storage at 616 Crook Avenue

Details are still sketchy at this hour, but the aircraft was believed to have one person aboard. At the last report, the eastbound lane of Nationway was closed, and people were being asked to avoid the area.

We'll report more information as it becomes available.





CHEYENNE, Wyoming — The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration have taken over the scene of a plane crash that killed one person this morning, officials said.

The Cheyenne Police Department and Cheyenne Fire Rescue responded at around 8 a.m. today to 616 Crook Ave., where an experimental aircraft crashed into Cheyenne Storage, the department said in a news release.

According to the Experimental Aircraft Association, amateur-built aircraft built by individuals and licensed by the FAA receive the experimental designation.

An investigation by multiple agencies determined the pilot, who was the sole occupant, sustained fatal injuries. No other injuries have been reported, police said.

Authorities have not released the identity of the pilot.

The storage facility caught fire as a result of the crash, and the fire department deployed six engines to fight it. The fire was contained at about 8:30 a.m.

The scene remains active, police said. It has been turned over to the NTSB and FAA.

Partnering agencies in the initial investigation included Cheyenne Fire Rescue, Cheyenne Police Department, Wyoming Air National Guard Fire, American Medical Response, Cheyenne/Laramie County Emergency Management Agency, Laramie County Coroner and Laramie County Fire Authority, police said.





CHEYENNE, Wyoming — A pilot died after an experimental aircraft crashed in east Cheyenne, Wyoming, on Monday morning.

Around 8 a.m. Monday, the Cheyenne Police Department and Cheyenne Fire Rescue responded to a report of an aircraft crash at Cheyenne Storage, located at 616 Crook Avenue, about 9 miles north of the Colorado-Wyoming border.

When authorities arrived, they found an experimental aircraft had crashed and the pilot — the only person in the aircraft — had died at the scene, police said.

The crash started a fire at the storage facility, which firefighters were able to contain by 8:30 a.m.

The scene remained active as of 1 p.m. The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

In addition to the Cheyenne police and fire departments, the Wyoming Air National Guard Fire, American Medical Response, Cheyenne/Laramie County Emergency Management Agency, Laramie County Coroner, and Laramie County Fire Authority also helped with the initial investigation.

No other details were available as of 1:45 p.m. Monday.





One person died Monday when an experimental plane crashed in Cheyenne, authorities there said. 

The aircraft crashed at Cheyenne Storage, southeast of downtown, at about 8 a.m., according to a joint statement from Cheyenne police and fire. The pilot, the only occupant, died.

No other injuries were reported.

The crash ignited a fire at the storage facility, which crews contained in about a half hour.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration will investigate.





CHEYENNE, Wyoming (WNE) — A single-engine experimental plane crashed at around 8 a.m. Monday into a storage unit on Crook Avenue, near Nationway.

The crash appeared to have caused a relatively small blaze that was extinguished within about half an hour. Besides the pilot, there were no other fatalities.

The pilot of the aircraft, which federal air authorities described as an Express 2000 RG, was its sole occupant. The person, who authorities did not identify by name, has died, according to an update the Cheyenne Police Department distributed by email at around 1 p.m. Monday.

The individual was an adult male, CPD spokesperson Alex Farkas said by phone Monday afternoon.

“No further injuries have been reported,” according to the police department’s news release.

The airplane had taken off from Cheyenne Regional Airport and was headed to Texas, according to National Transportation Safety Board spokesperson Jennifer Gabris.

Coroner Rebecca Reid said in a brief phone interview that it might take a few days to get a positive identification of the pilot.

Both the FAA and the NTSB will investigate the incident, an FAA spokesperson wrote in an email to the WTE. In approximately 15 business days, the NTSB will release a preliminary report on the crash, Gabris said.

A final report, with an analysis and suggesting a probable cause of the crash, will be released within a year or two, the spokeswoman estimated.











Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Glendale, Arizona 
Accident Number: WPR15LA179
Date and Time: May 29, 2015, 15:42 Local 
Registration: N44508
Aircraft: BURR EXPRESS 2000 RG 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear collapse 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The private pilot reported that, following a normal landing in the experimental amateur-built airplane, he applied beta thrust to decelerate the airplane and lightly applied the brakes. Suddenly, the left main landing gear collapsed, and the airplane swerved to the left. The airplane departed the runway surface and the left wing impacted a runway sign. Postaccident examination revealed that the left main landing gear actuator heim rod failed where the threads met the rod end; however, the rod was not made available for further examination, and the reason for the landing gear collapse could not be determined.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A collapse of the left main landing gear for reasons that could not be determined based on the available information.

Findings
Not determined (general) - Unknown/Not determined

Factual Information

On May 29, 2015, about 1542 mountain standard time, a Burr Express 2000 RG, N44508, experienced a landing gear collapse during the landing roll at Glendale Municipal Airport (GEU) in Glendale, Arizona. The private pilot and one passenger were uninjured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the rudder and elevators. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from GEU at about 1500.

The pilot reported that he landed the airplane onto the runway normally. He applied beta thrust to decelerate the airplane and started to brake lightly. Suddenly, the left main landing gear collapsed and the airplane swerved to the left. The airplane departed the runway surface and the left wing impacted a runway sign. It traversed along the dirt when the right landing gear collapsed and the tail impacted the ground before sliding to a rest.

During a postaccident examination by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector it was revealed that the left main landing gear actuator heim rod failed where the threads meet the rod end. Given the location of the heim rod, the inspector was unable to view the fracture surface while the component was installed on the airplane. In addition, the inspector noted that the hydraulic line to the gear actuator was ripped.

The National Transportation Safety Board Investigator-in-charge attempted to obtain the heim rod for further examination, however, the pilot had already repaired the airplane and the part was no longer available.

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll Landing gear collapse (Defining event)
Landing-landing roll Runway excursion

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: November 22, 2013
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: February 1, 2008
Flight Time: (Estimated) 739 hours (Total, all aircraft), 40 hours (Total, this make and model), 600 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BURR 
Registration: N44508
Model/Series: EXPRESS 2000 RG NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2008
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental (Special)
Serial Number: 0101RG
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle 
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: May 26, 2015 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 48 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Turbo prop
Airframe Total Time: 48 Hrs as of last inspection 
Engine Manufacturer: P & W Canada
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-20
Registered Owner:
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: GEU,1071 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 15:45 Local
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 10000 ft AGL
Visibility 20 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  / None
Wind Direction: 210° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 38°C / -7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Glendale, AZ (GEU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Glendale, AZ (GEU)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 15:00 Local 
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Glendale Municipal Airport GEU 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1071 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 19 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7150 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.522777,-112.290557 (est)