Thursday, January 25, 2018

Robinson R44, N99RW, registered to and operated by Atlas Aviation LP: Accident occurred December 05, 2017 at Treasure Coast International Airport (KFPR), Fort Pierce, Florida



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Atlas Aviation LP: http://registry.faa.gov/N99RW



Location: Fort Pierce, FL
Accident Number: GAA18CA072
Date & Time: 12/05/2017, 1315 EST
Registration: N99RW
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R44
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The helicopter pilot reported that, while hovering to land on a helipad, the tail struck the ground. He added that the helicopter landed hard and rolled over onto the left side.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, main rotor blades, and tail boom.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport reported that, about 20 minutes before the accident, the wind was from 130° at 10 knots. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a tail strike and hard landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Landing flare - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Wind - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-flare/touchdown
Tailstrike

Landing
Hard landing

Roll over

Pilot Information


Certificate: Private
Age: 77, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/16/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 2300 hours (Total, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ROBINSON HELICOPTER
Registration: N99RW
Model/Series: R44 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2000
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 0793
Landing Gear Type: Skid;
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/24/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2559 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-540-F1
Registered Owner: ATLAS AVIATION LP
Rated Power: 225 hp
Operator: ATLAS AVIATION LP
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFPR, 24 ft msl
Observation Time: 1753 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 306°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 19°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots, 130°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: BOCA RATON, FL (BCT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Fort Pierce, FL (FPR)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1200 EST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: TREASURE COAST INTL (FPR)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 23 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 27.492222, -80.368056 (est)

FoxDominator, N412MF: Accident occurred January 25, 2018 near Indiantown Airport (X58), Martin County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

FoxFly Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N412MF

Location: Indiantown, FL
Accident Number: ANC18LA021
Date & Time: 01/25/2018, 1447 EST
Registration: N412MF
Aircraft: FOXFLY INC FOXDOMINATOR
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 25, 2018, about 1447 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built, FoxFly Inc., gyroplane, N412MF, sustained substantial damage after impacting terrain during takeoff at Indiantown Airport (X58), in Indiantown, Florida. The private pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to the pilot and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight was destined for the pilot's home at Tailwind Airport (FD15) in Jupiter, Florida.

According to a witness statement provided to the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the gyroplane commenced its takeoff roll at about 5,600 feet down runway 13, which is a 6,300-foot-long turf runway. The gyroplane started on the far-right side of the runway centerline, then rolled diagonally to the left side beyond the runway side markers, then turned right to parallel runway 13 and continued the takeoff roll beyond the runway end, until it hit a small ditch and then impacted an elevated road. The gyroplane then "flipped" two times while traversing the road and coming to rest on the far side on a steep canal embankment.

The witness stated that the airport wind sock was "standing straight out" from the northeast at almost a direct left to right crosswind with some gusts, and he estimated the wind to be 20 to 25 knots. He said the gyroplane never left the ground prior to impact. The witness called 911 and emergency crews were dispatched. The pilot was air evacuated to a local hospital with serious injuries. The gyroplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and rudder.

According to a statement by the certified mechanic who worked on the gyrocopter earlier that day, there were no known mechanical issues and a condition inspection was completed on the Rotax 914 UL engine, propeller assembly, rotor system, and airframe earlier that day. The pilot was planning on flying his gyroplane back home after the inspection.

The wreckage was recovered and secured for future examination.

The closest official weather observation station is Witham Field Airport (SUA,) about 15 nm northeast of the accident location. At 1447 a METAR was reporting, in part, wind, 050° at 14 knots with gusts of 25 knots. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: FOXFLY INC
Registration: N412MF
Model/Series: FOXDOMINATOR NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSUA, 18 ft msl
Observation Time: 1947 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots/ 25 knots, 50°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2500 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.3 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Indiantown, FL (X58)
Destination: JUPITER, FL (FD15) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious

Latitude, Longitude:  27.031111, -80.433333 (est)










MAN INJURED IN GYROCOPTER CRASH

One person has been airlifted to a local hospital after the gyrocopter he was piloting crashed near the end of the runway at the Indiantown Airport. It happened around 2:47pm. Investigators are still on the scene. The pilot’s name has not been released.

Martin County Sheriff's Office

MARTIN COUNTY — A man was flown to a trauma center after crashing a gyrocopter near the Indiantown Airport, according to Sheriff's Office and Fire Rescue officials. 

The man, who has not been identified, was the only person aboard the small aircraft when it crashed off Southwest Citrus Boulevard, Martin County Fire Rescue Bureau Chief Chris Stabile said.

The small helicopter-like vehicle crashed about 2:50 p.m. near the runway of the airport, according to a Sheriff's Office Facebook post. 

Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Christine Christophek said it appeared that the man tried to take off, only made it a few feet off the ground, and crashed on the embankment.

About 15 minutes later, the pilot was flown to a local trauma center, Stabile said. He was unconscious but breathing, and suffered many cuts and abrasions, Christophek said. 

Christophek added that it appeared that the man's injuries were not life-threatening.

The Sheriff's Office will hand over the investigation to the Federal Aviation Administration on Friday, Christophek said.

Story and video ➤ https://www.tcpalm.com

Piper PA-32R-300 Lance, N47863, All Pro Auto Parts Inc: Accident occurred January 25, 2018 near Florida Keys Marathon International Airport (KMTH), Monroe County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

All Pro Auto Parts Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N47863

Location: Marathon, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA070
Date & Time: 01/25/2018, 1425 EST
Registration: N47863
Aircraft: PIPER PA32R
Injuries: 4 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 25, 2018, about 1425 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-32R-300, N47863, was substantially damaged during collision with terrain following a loss of directional control at takeoff from runway 07 at Florida Keys Marathon International Airport (MTH), Marathon, Florida. The private pilot and three passengers sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The accident flight was recorded via airport surveillance video. One video revealed the airplane began its takeoff roll from a complete stop, on runway 07 and travelled about 800 ft before the nose wheel lifted from the runway. At liftoff, the nose pitched up steeply and the airplane rolled left immediately, before the it disappeared from the frame. A second video captured the takeoff from a much greater distance. The image in the frame was smaller with poorer resolution. The video revealed a steep pitch and left bank at takeoff. The climb stopped immediately after liftoff, and the airplane maintained approximately the same angle of bank as it departed the runway to its left, entered the trees, and disappeared. Several seconds later, a fireball appeared above the trees about the point where the airplane entered them.

The pilot reported to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector that the airplane "was performing well and didn't have any issues." The airplane reached approximately 60 knots on the takeoff roll when the nose wheel lifted from the runway and the airplane began an immediate left turn. He attempted to arrest the turn with rudder and aileron, but the turn continued until the airplane entered the trees.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued October 20, 2016. He reported 500 total hours of flight experience on that date.

According to FAA airworthiness and maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 1977. Its most recent annual inspection was completed October 20, 2017, at 6,156.86 total aircraft hours. The maintenance records reflected a "50-hour" inspection completed January 16, 2018.

At 1453, the weather reported at MTH included an overcast ceiling at 4,700 ft, 10 miles visibility, and winds from 050° at 18 knots. The temperature was 22° C, the dew point was 16° C, and the altimeter setting was 30.19 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was examined at the accident site by an FAA inspector and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wings and fuselage were substantially damaged by impact and postcrash fire. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N47863
Model/Series: PA32R 300
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MTH, 5 ft msl
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 18 knots, 50°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4700 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Marathon, FL (MTH)
Destination: WINTER HAVEN, FL (GIF) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 Serious
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  24.726111, -81.051389 (est)




Three of four passengers in a Piper PA-32R-300 Lance reportedly were injured Thursday afternoon after it crashed into the wooded area behind Florida Keys Marathon International Airport around 2:30 p.m.

A passenger told Florida Highway Patrol Lt. Kathleen McKinney the Piper PA-32R-300 Lance was taking off, traveling north, when it was caught by a gust of wind and blew over into the wooded stretch between the runway at Florida Keys Marathon International Airport, mile marker 52 bayside, and Aviation Boulevard.

It caught on fire but it’s not clear if the fire broke out before or after it crashed.

The pilot, Roch Aoust, 65, of Panama City Beach and two passengers, Derrick Kelley, 53, and Danny Gilileo, 49, both of Auburndale, Fla., were taken to Ryder Trauma Center in Miami via the county’s Trauma Star air ambulance helicopters. The fourth passenger, Tony Lewis, 60, of Lakeland, had minor injuries but was not airlifted.

The plane leaked 90 gallons of fuel, McKinney said, and the airport is still closed. However, the plane is well off the runway and not a hazard. But emergency vehicles are still tending to the plane and fuel leak she said.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the Piper PA-32R-300 Lance is owned by All Pro Auto Parts of Auburndale, Fla., east of Lakeland.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.flkeysnews.com




MARATHON (CBSMiami) — A small plane crashed in the Florida Keys Thursday afternoon.

The Piper PA-32R-300 Lance was taking off from Marathon Airport’s runway around 3:30 p.m. That’s when, according to a passenger, the plane was lifting off and was caught by a gust of wind that caused the plane to be blown over into the tree line on the west side of the runway.

The plane crashed into the woods and caught fire, sources said.

Four people were injured in the wreck.

Two people were taken to Ryder Trauma Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital.

The injuries are not burn related but primarily broken bones, according to sources.

None of the injuries are considered life-threatening.

Authorities have identified those injured as Pilot Roch Aoust, 65, of Panama City; Tony Lewis, 60, of Lakeland; Derrick Kelley, 53; and Danny Gilileo, 49, of Auburndale, Florida.

The airport was closed down for a short time after the crash but has since reopened.

The aircraft is registered to All Pro Auto Parts Inc. of Auburndale, Florida. The plane can carry up to seven passengers.

The FAA is investigating the incident. The NTSB will determine the cause of the crash.

Story and video  ➤  http://miami.cbslocal.com





MARATHON, Fla. (NBC) - Three people were airlifted to a Miami hospital after a small plane crashed near the Marathon airport in the Florida Keys Thursday.

Four people were on board the Piper PA-32R-300 Lance plane when it crashed in a wooded area on the backside of the airport, Monroe County Sheriff's Office officials said.

According to the Florida Highway Patrol, a passenger said the plane was attempting to take off when it was caught by a gust of wind, which blew the plane into the tree line near the runway.

Three of the four on board, including the pilot, were taken by helicopter to Jackson Memorial Hospital's Ryder Trauma Center as trauma alerts, officials said.

Monroe County Sheriff's Officials say the pilot was identified as 65-year-old Roch A. D Aoust, of Panama City Beach. The injured passengers were 53-year-old Derrick Kelley and 49-year-old Danny Gilileo, both of Auburndale. The fourth passenger, 60-year-old Tony Lewis, of Lakeland, suffered minor injuries.

The plane was reported to catch fire, but the fire was quickly extinguished. The airport was closed to air traffic Thursday afternoon.

The Department of Environmental Protection was notified due to a 90-gallon fuel spill. The FAA was also responding to the scene.

No other details were immediately known. The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wjhg.com

Some details from Florida Highway Patrol, the investigating agency in the plane crash:

A Piper Lance, single engine plane was attempting to take off from Marathon Airport traveling north on runway 7. 

According to one of the passengers, as they lifted off, the plane was caught by a gust of wind causing the plane to be blown over into the tree line on the west side of the runway.

DEP was notified due to a 90 gallon aviation fuel spill. 

The FAA was responding from Homestead. 

The airport is still closed, however, the plane is well off the runway and not a hazard but emergency vehicles are still tending to the plane and fuel leak.

2 passengers and the pilot were airlifted to Ryder Trauma in Miami, with serious injuries.

Pilot: Roch A. D Aoust, 65, Panama City Beach, Fl
Right Front: Derrick H. Kelley, 53, Auburndale, Fl
Right Rear: Danny A. Gilileo, 49, Auburndale, Fl
Left Rear: Tony R. Lewis, 60, Lakeland, Fl (Not airlifted, minor injuries)

MCSO - Florida Keys

Some additions and corrections:

Three people are being airlifted. The airport is closed to air traffic at this time. The plane was a Lance Piper, tail number N47863.

Patients are being taken to the Ryder Trauma Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami.

Original story:

Small plane crashes in Marathon

A small plane with four people on board crashed on the back side of the Marathon airport, in a wooded area.

Preliminary reports are two of the four people are being classified as “trauma alerts” and will be airlifted by Monroe County’s Trauma Star helicopter to a Miami hospital.

The plane was reported to have caught fire, but the fire was extinguished quickly. There should be no impact on air traffic into and out of the airport.  No further information is available at this time. The Florida Highway Patrol is responding to investigate.

de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver, N1544: Accident occurred January 24, 2018 in Kodiak, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Ketchikan, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Andrew Airways Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N1544

Location: Kodiak, AK
Accident Number: ANC18LA025
Date & Time: 01/24/2018, 1220 AKS
Registration: N1544
Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND BEAVER DHC 2
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled 

On January 24, 2018, about 1220 Alaska standard time, a DeHavilland DHC-2 airplane, N1544, sustained substantial damage following a loss of directional control while landing on an unimproved airstrip, near Kazakof Bay on Afognak Island, Alaska. The airplane was registered to and operated by Andrew Airways Incorporated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 visual flight rules flight. The commercial pilot sustained no injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight departed Kodiak Airport (PADQ), Kodiak, Alaska about 1200 for the roughly 23 nautical mile flight to Kazakof Bay.

According to the pilot, after overflying the unimproved airstrip, he landed to the west into an estimated 7 knot wind. The touchdown was normal, however when he applied the brakes during the ground roll, the airplane "veered hard to the right." The airplane departed the right side of the airstrip, collided with alder bushes and small spruce trees, and came to rest against a dirt embankment. The right main landing gear separated from the gear box which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage.

The closest official weather observation station is PADQ. At 1153, a METAR was reporting, in part, wind 280° at 16 knots, gusting 32 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clouds and ceiling clear; temperature 21° F; dew point 5° F; altimeter 29.76 inches of Mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: DEHAVILLAND
Registration: N1544
Model/Series: BEAVER DHC 2 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: ANDREW AIRWAYS INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter Air Carrier (135)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: D4NA 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PADQ, 80 ft msl
Observation Time: 2053 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 22 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -6°C / -15°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 16 knots/ 32 knots, 280°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.75 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Departure Point: KODIAK, AK (ADQ)
Destination: Kodiak, AK

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:  1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  58.117778, -152.553056 (est)

Lancair 360, N270MH: Incident occurred January 24, 2018 at Treasure Coast International Airport (KFPR), Fort Pierce, St. Lucie County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Landing gear collapsed upon landing, nose wheel assembly detached from strut causing prop strike to runway.

http://registry.faa.gov/N270MH

Date: 24-JAN-18
Time: 16:45:00Z
Regis#: N270MH
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: LANCAIR 360
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: FT PIERCE
State: FLORIDA

Maule M-6-235 Super Rocket, N56548: Accident occurred January 24, 2018 at Boerne Stage Field Airport (5C1), San Antonio, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N56548


Analysis 

According to the pilot, during taxi at night, he turned off his anti-collision lights because they were, "creating a disco effect." On the taxiway, and heading to his hangar, he noticed an automobile that was converging on the same taxiway. The pilot expected the automobile to turn off the taxiway. When the vehicle did not turn, the pilot increased the throttle and turned the lights on and off to get the drivers attention. However, the automobile and the airplane collided.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the forward right-side fuselage and the right-wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The ground vehicle driver's decision to drive on an active taxiway at night and failure to yield to taxiing aircraft, resulting in a collision with a taxiing aircraft.

Findings

Personnel issues
Incorrect action selection - Other/unknown (Cause)

Environmental issues
Dark - Effect on personnel
Ground vehicle - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Taxi
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Ground collision (Defining event)

Location: Boerne, TX
Accident Number: GAA18CA111
Date & Time: 01/24/2018, 1850 CST
Registration: N56548
Aircraft: MAULE M 6
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

According to the pilot, during taxi at night, he turned off his anti-collision lights because they were, "creating a disco effect."

On the taxiway, and heading to his hangar, he noticed an automobile that was converging on the same taxiway. The pilot expected the automobile to turn off the taxiway. When the vehicle did not turn, the pilot increased throttle and turned the lights on and off to get the drivers attention. However, the automobile and the airplane collided.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the forward right-side fuselage and the right-wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/16/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/16/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 577 hours (Total, all aircraft), 188 hours (Total, this make and model), 511 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MAULE
Registration: N56548
Model/Series: M 6 235
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1983
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 7444C
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/03/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1206.8 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-W1A5D
Registered Owner: ALAS VIEJAS LLC
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: ALAS VIEJAS LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSAT, 789 ft msl
Observation Time: 0051 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 134°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 25000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / -7°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.42 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Dilley, TX (24R)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Dilley, TX (24R)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1812 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: BOERNE STAGE FIELD (5C1)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1383 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5006 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  29.723333, -98.694444 (est)

Schweizer 269C-1, N3947C, operated by Pelican Flight Training LLC: Accident occurred January 24, 2018 near Downtown Fort Lauderdale Heliport (DT1), Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N3947C


Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA068
Date & Time: 01/24/2018, 1656 EST
Registration: N3947C
Aircraft: SCHWEIZER 269C
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On January 24, 2018, about 1656 eastern standard time, a Schweizer 269C-1, N3947C, operated by Pelican Flight Training LLC., was substantially damaged during an forced landing after takeoff from the Downtown Fort Lauderdale Heliport (DT1), Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The flight instructor and student pilot were not injured. The flight was operated in accordance with Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight that was destined for North Perry Airport (HWO), Hollywood, Florida.

According to the flight instructor, the purpose of the flight was to demonstrate radio communication procedures to the student pilot, who was enrolled in an air traffic control training program. The flight departed HWO and after about 35 minutes of flight time, the helicopter landed uneventfully at the DT1 rooftop helipad. The student pilot exited the helicopter for a few minutes to take photographs, the flight instructor kept the engine running at 2,500 rpm, and once the student re-entered the helicopter, the instructor entered a hover to depart the helipad.

The flight instructor reported that he demonstrated a maximum performance takeoff procedure; the helicopter gained altitude, started traveling forward, and as the helicopter approached the edge of the rooftop, simultaneously, the low rotor rpm light and horn activated. The helicopter started sinking and he immediately lowered the collective and attempted to add throttle, which did not stop the descent, so he repeated the procedure a second time, and realized that he already had full throttle applied. The sink continued, and he performed an autorotation landing to a street below and ahead of the helicopter's flight path.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, the flight instructor held commercial pilot and flight instructor certificates with ratings for rotorcraft-helicopter and instrument-helicopter. His most recent second-class medical certificate was issued in May 2017.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the two-seat, skid-equipped, helicopter, was manufactured in 2008, and was equipped with a Lycoming HIO-360-G1A, 180-horsepower engine. The most recent annual and 100-hour inspection was performed in September 2017. The engine had accumulated 297.1 hours since the last major overhaul in April 2015.

The weather conditions reported about the time of the accident at Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL), Fort Lauderdale, Florida, which was located about 3 miles south of the accident site, included wind at 030° at 8 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, sky conditions scattered at 2,700 ft and broken at 6,000 ft above ground level, temperature 23°C, and dew point 21°C.

The helicopter landed hard on a street about 700 ft east, and about 110 ft below the rooftop helipad. During the landing, the helicopter's tail rotor and tail boom sustained substantial damage.

During a postaccident examination conducted by an FAA inspector, the engine cylinder compression was checked with the engine at ambient temperature. Each cylinder produced a normal result, except for the No. 4 cylinder, which produced 20/80. As the pressure gauge was being evaluated during the test, a "metallic snap or click" was heard by the inspector, and the pressure jumped to 40/80. The engine was then cranked with the electric starter for about 15 seconds, and the No. 4 cylinder compression rose to 78/80. The engine was started with its existing fluids and accessories and produced idle power. Both magnetos produced an acceptable drop in rpm during the test.

Further examination of the No. 4 cylinder by the FAA inspector revealed that the exhaust valve stem had a thick coating of lead and carbon deposit build up but moved freely out of its valve guide. The intake valve was found sticking in its valve guide and had to be removed with a drift punch hammer. The intake valve stem displayed scarring and scratches and had significant carbon deposit build up. A subsequent wobble test was performed on the No. 4 cylinder intake and exhaust valve; the exhaust valve displayed normal side play, but the intake valve had no side play, which was abnormal.

According to engine overhaul records, four factory new cylinders were installed on the engine in April 2015. According to the mechanic who had performed the past three annual and 100-hour inspections on the helicopter, none of the cylinders were removed during the inspections, nor would it be routine for him to do so.

According to the flight instructor, who routinely flew the accident helicopter on training flights, about 3 months prior to the accident, he experienced a "knocking" sensation that could be felt through the flight controls. The flight instructor reported that he did not believe it was anything serious, but he verbally reported the event to the flight school's mechanic. According to the flight instructor, the mechanic said that he should report it if it happens again. During a postaccident interview, the flight instructor further reported to an FAA inspector that 3 days prior to the accident, while flying in the accident helicopter straight and level, he would occasionally feel a "tiny bump."

The Textron Lycoming Service Instruction, No. 1425A, dated January 19th, 1988, Suggested Maintenance Procedures to Reduce the Possibility of Valve Sticking, stated in part:

Field experience has shown that engine oil contamination increases the possibility of sticking and/or stuck valves. This situation occurs when the contaminants in the engine lubrication oil become deposited on the valve stems, restricting the valve movement, and resulting in intermittent engine hesitation or miss. If corrective action is not taken to remove the deposits, a valve could become stuck causing engine damage.

The service instruction further stated in part that, operating in high ambient temperatures, slow flight with reduced cooling, or high lead content of fuel, can promote deposit build-up reducing valve guide clearance and result in valve sticking. If any of the conditions are present or hesitation is observed, the service instruction recommended inspection and cleaning of the valves.

There was no maintenance record found that this service instruction, or that a cleaning of the valves, had been performed. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/25/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/20/2017
Flight Time: 700 hours (Total, all aircraft), 244 hours (Total, this make and model), 631 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 115 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 39 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: None
Age: 26, Male
Airplane Rating(s):
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 37 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1 hours (Total, this make and model), 37 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 21 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: SCHWEIZER
Registration: N3947C
Model/Series: 269C 1
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2008
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 0343
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/27/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2297 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: HIO-360-G1A
Registered Owner: HELOCRAFT HOLDING CO INC.
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: Pelican Flight Training LLC.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFLL, 65 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 189°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2700 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 21°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots, 30°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:  FORT LAUDERDALE, FL (DT1)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: HOLLYWOOD, FL (HWO)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1655 EST
Type of Airspace: Class C

Airport Information

Airport: DOWNTOWN FORT LAUDERDALE (DT1)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 114 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 26.120556, -80.140000 (est)