Thursday, September 28, 2017

Tulare County Sheriff's new aviation unit honors fallen pilots



Sheriff Mike Boudreaux unveiled two new aircraft and multiple drones Wednesday at the Porterville Municipal Airport, which is the new home for the Sheriff’s Aviation Support Unit.

The airport was packed with prominent members of the county such as personnel from the Visalia, Porterville, Dinuba and Farmersville police departments, Tulare County and Porterville City fire departments, the Porterville City Council, Porterville Chamber of Commerce and representatives from State Assemblyman Devon Mathis’ (R-Visalia) office among others.

Tulare County Undersheriff Robin Skiles gave the welcoming speech at the half-hour event, which was followed by a presentation of colors by the Tulare County Sheriff’s Honor Guard. Cpl. William Seymour led the Pledge of Allegiance and the Sheriff’s Chaplain Corps gave the invocation.

The highlight of the event revolved mostly around paying tribute to those who lost their lives serving Tulare County, the most recent event taking place early in 2016.



In February of 2016, Boudreaux said the Sheriff’s Office was devastated by the crash of the department’s light sport aircraft Sheriff One and the loss of Sheriff’s Pilot James Chavez and Tactical Flight Officer Scott Ballantyne. But with resolve, Boudreaux said the Sheriff’s Office has become stronger and even more committed to the service and protection of the citizens of Tulare County through aerial support. 

“The population of Tulare County has grown big enough that it demands the need for aerial support for law enforcement and to increase the safety of our communities,” Boudreaux said.

Through Boudreaux’s leadership and vision, the Sheriff’s Office has two new airplanes to keep a watchful eye over Tulare County. They are a Cessna 182, which seats four, and a Cessna 206, which seats six.   



These aircraft, Boudreaux said, are currently in the process of being outfitted with state-of-the-art law enforcement avionics.

The Cessna 182 will be the TCSO’s patrol-based plane and the Sheriff’s eyes in the sky, assisting deputies and other law enforcement agencies on the ground using high-tech surveillance equipment and cameras. Boudreaux said statistics indicate that when patrol aircraft is on duty, property crime and theft decrease while criminal apprehensions increase. These aircraft, he said, also provide superior officer safety for deputies and officers on the ground.

Boudreaux said the Sheriff’s Cessna 182 is named “Wren” in honor of Deputy John “Nick” Wren, who was the first Tulare County Sheriff’s Deputy killed in the line of duty on July 5, 1889. He was 40.

The Cessna 206 will be TCSO’s utility-based plane, taking an important role in supplementing search and rescue missions, clandestine marijuana detection operations throughout the county, inmate transportation and high-profile investigations. 



The Sheriff’s Cessna 206 is named “Tribute” in honor and in tribute to the fallen, including Ballantyne and Chavez.

Boudreaux said the insurance money from the plane crash and operational budget savings has allowed for the purchase of the aircraft.

“What you see sitting before you is $1.2 million worth of aircraft, and zero cost for taxpayers,” Boudreaux said at the event.

Both planes, Boudreaux said, provide a strengthened aviation platform and complement the success of the Sheriff’s Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) drone program. With all he’s done so far in terms of implementing aviation tools to keep residents safe, it would be an understatement to say Boudreaux is on the cutting edge of law enforcement UAV programs.

Boudreaux is the first in the state to assign UAV’s at the patrol level. The Sheriff’s Office now has a UAV and Deputy Operator assigned to every substation in the county. Just like a K9 and handler, Boudreaux said this allows for the immediate response of a UAV when needed by the Sheriff’s Office or other local agencies anywhere in Tulare County. 

Boudreaux said there are a total of eight drones and seven drone operators in the Sheriff’s UAV Unit, including five for patrol, one for detectives and one for detentions, with an additional drone dedicated for training. Heading up the UAV Program is Seymour, whom Boudreaux chose to be the first full-time operator a year ago. 



“Cpl. Seymour is sought after by other agencies statewide and beyond for his expertise,” Boudreaux said. “Next month, he will speak at the Drone World Expo in San Jose.”
The drones, Boudreaux said, were paid for with funds from the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) program and through operational budget savings.

Boudreaux said drones save money in time and resources. When used in a search and rescue mission, or if a child is missing, Boudreaux said Seymour can clear an area in minutes with his drone, while it could take hours and numerous officers without the drone.

He noted that it’s also safer to use a drone to monitor an armed barricaded suspect instead of putting deputies, or the subject, at risk for their lives. 
At the Sheriff’s Office, Boudreaux said drone usage is mission specific for finding lost children and at-risk adults, search and rescue operations as well as SWAT details, and crime scene photography. The UAV unit, he said, was developed to supplement patrol and is not used for surveillance.



“Whether patrolling high in the skies with our aircraft or responding to emergency incidents with our UAV Units, the Sheriff’s Office is making a difference in securing the safety and improving the quality of life for everyone in Tulare County,” Boudreaux said.

Tulare County Board of Supervisor Mike Ennis said it was a great day not only for Tulare County, but for its sheriff’s department and county residents.

“Taking this integral part to aircraft and putting it in the air protects not only our citizens, but protects our troops, our deputies on the ground as they pursue ways to better protect us,” Ennis said. “This sheriff’s department is on its way to being the most excellent sheriff’s department in the state.”

Porterville Police Chief Eric Kroutil said Boudreaux and his staff could have easily eliminated the county’s aviation program after the terrible loss last year, but instead asked how to make it better.

“And today you are seeing the answer to that question,” Kroutil said. “With the purchase and deployment of two aircraft to serve the communities of Tulare County, our communities and the law enforcement personnel who serve them will not only be safer, but more can be accomplished with less ground resources.”

He continued, “Both of these goals are critical in today’s environment, and with these aircraft, the ability to achieve these goals is improved with every agency in the county.”

Story:  http://www.recorderonline.com

Video:  http://www.yourcentralvalley.com

Bell 407, N509PD, Westchester County Department of Public Safety: Incident occurred September 28, 2017 - State Point Lookout, New Jersey

Rotorcraft, precautionary landing in field.

Westchester County Department of Public Safety

http://registry.faa.gov/N509PD

Date: 28-SEP-17
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N509PD
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: B407
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PUBLIC USE
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: STATE POINT LOOKOUT
State: NEW JERSEY




No injuries were reported Thursday after a Westchester County Police helicopter made an emergency landing in Alpine while trying to find two lost hikers, officials said.

The county's aviation unit was assisting with the Palisades Interstate Parkway Police search for two missing people, when the pilots radioed they had to land in the parking lot at State Line Lookout at 10:17 a.m., the parkway police said in a statement. They landed  because of smoke in the cockpit.

The helicopter made a "hard landing, skidding approximately 30 feet before coming to rest," parkway police said. The local Alpine Fire Department arrived to the scene and found no fire. 

The helicopter will be towed back to Westchester, a Westchester County Police spokesperson said.

Palisades Interstate Parkway Police said Wednesday night the department was searching for two lost hikers north of State Line Lookout. On Thursday, they found Sin Kim and Jeung Kim, both 75, just after 12:15 p.m. They refused medical aid.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.northjersey.com

American Legend AL18, N200XW, C & D Aviation LLC: Accident occurred September 27, 2017 at Bessemer Airport (KEKY), Jefferson County, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Bessemer, AL
Accident Number: GAA17CA561
Date & Time: 09/27/2017, 1100 CDT
Registration: N200XW
Aircraft: AMERICAN LEGEND AIRCRAFT CO AL18
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis 

The flight instructor, who was providing instruction to the student pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane, reported that, during the landing roll, the student failed to maintain directional control, and the airplane swerved right and then left. He added that, during the attempted remediation of the second swerve, the tail started to rise with an "associated tire squeal." Subsequently, the propeller struck the ground, and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The flight instructor also reported that he believed that "the student inadvertently got on the brakes." 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's incorrect application of the brakes and subsequent failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll. Contributing to the accident was the flight instructor's delayed remedial action.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause) 

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Student pilot (Cause)
Delayed action - Instructor/check pilot (Factor)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Nose over/nose down 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 42, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Helicopter; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/15/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/22/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 11108 hours (Total, all aircraft), 9 hours (Total, this make and model), 7989 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 267 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 82 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: None
Age: 36, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 9 hours (Total, all aircraft), 9 hours (Total, this make and model), 9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AMERICAN LEGEND AIRCRAFT CO
Registration: N200XW
Model/Series: AL18 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2016
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport
Serial Number: AL-1208
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 128.4 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Titan
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: CC-340
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEKY, 699 ft msl
Observation Time: 1553 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 4°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 20°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots, 340°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:Bessemer, AL (EKY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Bessemer, AL (EKY)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1000 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: BESSEMER (EKY)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 699 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 05
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6007 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Touch and Go; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.311667, -86.926111 (est)

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama

C & D Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N200XW


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location:  Bessemer, AL
Accident Number:  GAA17CA561
Date & Time:  09/27/2017, 1100 CDT
Registration:  N200XW
Aircraft:  AMERICAN LEGEND AIRCRAFT CO AL18
Aircraft Damage:  Substantial
Defining Event:  Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

The flight instructor, who was providing instruction in the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during the landing roll, the student pilot failed to maintain directional control and the airplane swerved right and then left. He added that, during the attempted remediation of the second swerve, the tail started to rise with an "associated tire squeal." Subsequently, the propeller struck the ground and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The flight instructor also reported that, it was his belief that "the student inadvertently got on the brakes."

Eurocopter AS-350B-2, N515ET: Accident occurred September 27, 2017 at Fullerton Municipal Airport (KFUL), Orange County, California

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Long Beach, California 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N515ET 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Fullerton, CA
Accident Number: GAA17CA562
Date & Time: 09/27/2017, 1000 PDT
Registration: N515ET
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER AS 350
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Public Aircraft 

The check pilot reported that he was administering an annual standardization check ride in the public use helicopter.

The last maneuver evaluated was a hydraulic failure that would terminate by accomplishing a simulated run-on landing.

The maneuver was initiated when the check/evaluated pilot established an out of ground effect (OGE) hover on the downwind leg of the pattern. The check-pilot engaged the hydraulic test button on the center console to "simulate a hydraulic failure." The evaluated pilot lowered the nose and established forward airspeed to maintain aircraft controllability. He maintained stabilized forward flight on the downwind leg, and the check-pilot disengage the hydraulic test button. The check pilot moved the hydraulic cut off switch to the off position, and the hydraulic system was disengaged. The evaluated pilot remained on the controls and established a shallow approach until about 3ft above the runway.

Over the runway, the evaluated pilot allowed the helicopter's airspeed to decrease, and the check-pilot stated, "Keep the speed up." The evaluated pilot responded by lowering the nose, however, an uncontrollable rapid left yaw ensued.

The check-pilot took control of the helicopter and attempted to keep the helicopter over the runway, but the nose pitched down, and the main rotor blades struck the ground. The check pilot decreased the fuel control and the helicopter settled upright on the runway.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the windscreen above the cabin, the tailboom and tail rotor drive system.

The METAR at the accident airport during the time of the accident reported that the wind from 250° at 3kts, the skies were clear, and the temperature was 72°F.

According to the Operator's Flight Manual:

In case of loss of hydraulic pressure, the recommended safety speed range is from 40 to 60 kt.

CAUTION:

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CARRY OUT HOVER FLIGHT OR ANY LOW SPEED MANEUVER WITHOUT HYDRAULIC PRESSURE ASSISTANCE. THE INTENSITY AND DIRECTION OF THE CONTROL FEEDBACK FORCES WILL CHANGE RAPIDLY. THIS WILL RESULT IN EXCESSIVE PILOT WORKLOAD, POOR AIRCRAFT CONTROL, AND POSSIBLE LOSS OF CONTROL.

There were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that were identified as a result of this investigation. 

Check Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Helicopter; Instrument Airplane; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/05/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/05/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 8259 hours (Total, all aircraft), 918 hours (Total, this make and model), 6705 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 128 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 27 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/11/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/15/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3915 hours (Total, all aircraft), 158 hours (Total, this make and model), 3663 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 55 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 31 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: EUROCOPTER
Registration: N515ET
Model/Series: AS 350 B2
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2001
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 3425
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 5
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/11/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4960 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 4636 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Turbomeca
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: Arriel 1D1
Registered Owner: CHAPARRAL AIR GROUP
Rated Power: 9783 hp
Operator: CHAPARRAL AIR GROUP
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFUL, 96 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 85°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 17°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  6 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 250°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.89 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Haze; No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: LONG BEACH, CA (LGB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Fullerton, CA (FUL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0920 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: FULLERTON MUNI (FUL)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 96 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 24
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3121 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing; Simulated Forced Landing; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 33.871944, -117.979722 (est)






FULLERTON – A practice maneuver went awry Wednesday morning and led to a helicopter's hard landing at Fullerton Airport, which prompted emergency personnel to respond but no one was hurt, authorities said.

An experienced pilot, accompanied by another pilot who is a training instructor, was attempting a maneuver at 10 a.m. in which the helicopter’s hydraulic system is shut off while it hovers 3-feet off of the ground, said Kathy Schaefer, a division chief for the Fullerton and Brea fire departments.

The helicopter started spinning and the training pilot, who has 30 years of years of experience, took over the controls, shut the helicopter’s engine off and landed on the runway.

The pilot who was originally behind the control was undergoing annual training.

A small amount of fuel leaked from the Long Beach-based helicopter following the hard landing. The impact sheared off the helicopter’s tail.

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the incident, Schaefer said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.ocregister.com

Beech C99 Airliner, N237SL, Alpine Air Express: Incident occurred September 27, 2017 at Monte Vista Municipal Airport (KMVI), Rio Grande County, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Alpine Aviation Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N237SL

Aircraft experienced a right engine issue and landed fast then went off the end of the runway.

Date: 28-SEP-17
Time: 01:15:00Z
Regis#: N237SL
Aircraft Make: BEECHCRAFT
Aircraft Model: 99
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: ALPINE AIR EXPRESS
Flight Number: AIP1841
City: MONTE VISTA
State: COLORADO


Aircraft landed off end of runway.

Date: 28-SEP-17
Time: 01:15:00Z
Regis#: N237SL
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 99
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Flight Number: AIP1841
City: MONTE VISTA
State: COLORADO

Cessna 172S, N5523V: Incident occurred September 27, 2017 at Flagler Executive Airport (KFIN), Palm Coast, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft struck a bird on takeoff.


Dolphin Leasing  LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N5523V


Date: 27-SEP-17

Time: 14:22:00Z
Regis#: N5523V
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: PALM COAST
State: FLORIDA

Cub Crafters CC-19-180, N53XC: Accident occurred September 27, 2017 at Glacier Park International Airport (KGPI), Kalispell, Flathead County, Montana

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N53XC

Location: Kalispell, MT
Accident Number: GAA17CA572
Date & Time: 09/27/2017, 1300 MDT
Registration: N53XC
Aircraft: CUB CRAFTERS INC CC19-180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

According to the pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane, he was inexperienced flying this make and model. The pilot reported that, during the landing roll on asphalt, the tundra tire-equipped airplane yawed to the left, and he corrected with "significant" right rudder. He reported that he inadvertently engaged the right toe brake when he applied right rudder, "which led to a very rapid and unsustainable correction." The airplane ground looped to the right, and the left wing struck the ground.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and aileron.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's inadvertent brake application during the landing roll, which resulted in a loss of directional control. 

Findings

Aircraft
Brake - Unintentional use/operation (Cause)
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Unnecessary action - Pilot (Cause)
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Total experience w/ equipment - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Attempted remediation/recovery

Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)


According to the pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane, he was inexperienced flying this make and model.

The pilot reported that during the landing roll on asphalt, the tundra tire-equipped airplane yawed to the left and he corrected with a "significant" right rudder. He reported that he inadvertently engaged the right toe brake when he applied right rudder, "which led to a very rapid and unsustainable correction."

The airplane ground looped to the right and the left wing struck the ground.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and aileron.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/08/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/07/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1496 hours (Total, all aircraft), 24 hours (Total, this make and model), 1365 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CUB CRAFTERS INC
Registration: N53XC
Model/Series: CC19-180 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2017
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: CC19-0014
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 22 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-C1G
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGPI, 2973 ft msl
Observation Time: 1955 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 219°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 8°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.26 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Kalispell, MT (GPI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Kalispell, MT (GPI)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1330 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: GLACIER PARK INTL (GPI)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 2976 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 02
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:  9007 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  48.310556, -114.256111 (est)

Hickox Andys Autogyro, N152AH: Fatal accident occurred September 28, 2017 near Umatilla Municipal Airport (X23), Lake County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N152AH

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA339
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, September 28, 2017 in Umatilla, FL
Aircraft: HICKOX ANDY ANDYS GYROPLANE, registration: N152AH
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 28, 2017, about 1122 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built gyroplane, N152AH, impacted a wooded area near Umatilla, Florida. The private pilot was fatally injured and the gyroplane was destroyed. The gyroplane was being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the local flight which originated about 1000 from Bob White Field Airport (X61), Zellwood, Florida.

A witness at a nearby bee farm reported seeing the gyroplane fly over his position in a north-northwesterly direction. The witness reported the engine was running, and he heard 2 popping sounds, followed 1 large pop sound, and then the engine lost total power. At that time, while about 50 to 60 ft above the tree tops, the witness observed a large main rotor blade separate. The gyroplane began descending and he lost sight but then heard an impact. He drove to the accident site and informed the property owner of the accident.

Nearly the full length of one main rotor blade was found about 193° and 333 ft from the main wreckage. The wreckage was recovered and the fractured main rotor blade were retained for further examination.


Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov 

Jim Pensinger

UMATILLA – Authorities have released the name of the gyrocopter pilot who died Thursday when his aircraft crashed in the woods near County Roads 450A and 44A.

The pilot was James Pensinger, 73, of Apopka, according to Lt. John Herrell with the Lake County Sheriff’s Office.

“He loved aviation. He did everything to stay in it,” said Roger Dubbert, a customer representative with Zenith Aircraft Co., an aircraft kit-building company in Missouri.

Pensinger built several airplanes over the past 15 years, and even went to China to work on a plane, Dubbert said.

Zenith does not sell a gyrocopter.

Pensinger, who had a page on Zenith’s flyer page, described himself as a retired electrical engineer.

His Facebook page said he graduated from Georgia Tech. He is from Johnstown, Pa. He is formerly from Afton, Tenn.

At one point he is listed as married on his Facebook page, but at another point, divorced, and last year it stated that he was in a new relationship.

He also describes himself as a watercolorist and was interested in drones.

His plane went down at 11:21 a.m. at 3335 N. County Road 44A.


http://www.dailycommercial.com



UMATILLA, Fla. - A pilot was killed Thursday when an experimental plane crashed in Lake County, deputies said.

The fatal crash was reported at 11:21 a.m. at 38335 N. County Road 44A in Umatilla.

Deputies said Friday that the pilot was James Pensinger, 73, of Apopka. No one else was on the aircraft.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.clickorlando.com




UMATILLA, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35) - The pilot of a an experimental aircraft died following a crash on Thursday, the Lake County Sheriff's Office said.

Deputies responded to 38335 North County Road 44A in Umatilla at approximately 11:21 a.m. after reports were received that an aircraft had crashed. 

One person on board the aircraft was located and that person was pronounced dead at the scene. 

"Witnesses describe hearing a loud pop, and I believe they actually reported seeing some of the parts flying off," explained Lt. John Herrell, with the Sheriff's Office.

"Ultimately, the aircraft came to rest near the wood line ... luckily, no one on the ground was injured."

Story and video ➤ http://www.fox35orlando.com

LAKE COUNTY, Fla. —  One person is dead after an experimental gyroplane crashed in Lake County, deputies said.

The Lake County Sheriff's Office said they received reports of the crash on North County Road 44 A in Umatilla just before 11:30 a.m. on Thursday.

Deputies said the pilot, who was the only one on the aircraft, died.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

The name of the pilot killed has not yet been released.


Story and video ➤ http://www.wesh.com

LAKE COUNTY, Fla. (WESH) – One person is dead after an experimental gyroplane crashed in Lake County, deputies said.

The Lake County Sheriff’s office said they received reports of the crash on North County Road 44 A in Umatilla just before 11:30 a.m. on Thursday.

Deputies said the pilot, who was the only one on the aircraft, died.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

The name of the pilot killed has not yet been released.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://wfla.com