Thursday, September 28, 2017

Tulare County Sheriff's new aviation unit honors fallen pilots



Sheriff Mike Boudreaux unveiled two new aircraft and multiple drones Wednesday at the Porterville Municipal Airport, which is the new home for the Sheriff’s Aviation Support Unit.

The airport was packed with prominent members of the county such as personnel from the Visalia, Porterville, Dinuba and Farmersville police departments, Tulare County and Porterville City fire departments, the Porterville City Council, Porterville Chamber of Commerce and representatives from State Assemblyman Devon Mathis’ (R-Visalia) office among others.

Tulare County Undersheriff Robin Skiles gave the welcoming speech at the half-hour event, which was followed by a presentation of colors by the Tulare County Sheriff’s Honor Guard. Cpl. William Seymour led the Pledge of Allegiance and the Sheriff’s Chaplain Corps gave the invocation.

The highlight of the event revolved mostly around paying tribute to those who lost their lives serving Tulare County, the most recent event taking place early in 2016.



In February of 2016, Boudreaux said the Sheriff’s Office was devastated by the crash of the department’s light sport aircraft Sheriff One and the loss of Sheriff’s Pilot James Chavez and Tactical Flight Officer Scott Ballantyne. But with resolve, Boudreaux said the Sheriff’s Office has become stronger and even more committed to the service and protection of the citizens of Tulare County through aerial support. 

“The population of Tulare County has grown big enough that it demands the need for aerial support for law enforcement and to increase the safety of our communities,” Boudreaux said.

Through Boudreaux’s leadership and vision, the Sheriff’s Office has two new airplanes to keep a watchful eye over Tulare County. They are a Cessna 182, which seats four, and a Cessna 206, which seats six.   



These aircraft, Boudreaux said, are currently in the process of being outfitted with state-of-the-art law enforcement avionics.

The Cessna 182 will be the TCSO’s patrol-based plane and the Sheriff’s eyes in the sky, assisting deputies and other law enforcement agencies on the ground using high-tech surveillance equipment and cameras. Boudreaux said statistics indicate that when patrol aircraft is on duty, property crime and theft decrease while criminal apprehensions increase. These aircraft, he said, also provide superior officer safety for deputies and officers on the ground.

Boudreaux said the Sheriff’s Cessna 182 is named “Wren” in honor of Deputy John “Nick” Wren, who was the first Tulare County Sheriff’s Deputy killed in the line of duty on July 5, 1889. He was 40.

The Cessna 206 will be TCSO’s utility-based plane, taking an important role in supplementing search and rescue missions, clandestine marijuana detection operations throughout the county, inmate transportation and high-profile investigations. 



The Sheriff’s Cessna 206 is named “Tribute” in honor and in tribute to the fallen, including Ballantyne and Chavez.

Boudreaux said the insurance money from the plane crash and operational budget savings has allowed for the purchase of the aircraft.

“What you see sitting before you is $1.2 million worth of aircraft, and zero cost for taxpayers,” Boudreaux said at the event.

Both planes, Boudreaux said, provide a strengthened aviation platform and complement the success of the Sheriff’s Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) drone program. With all he’s done so far in terms of implementing aviation tools to keep residents safe, it would be an understatement to say Boudreaux is on the cutting edge of law enforcement UAV programs.

Boudreaux is the first in the state to assign UAV’s at the patrol level. The Sheriff’s Office now has a UAV and Deputy Operator assigned to every substation in the county. Just like a K9 and handler, Boudreaux said this allows for the immediate response of a UAV when needed by the Sheriff’s Office or other local agencies anywhere in Tulare County. 

Boudreaux said there are a total of eight drones and seven drone operators in the Sheriff’s UAV Unit, including five for patrol, one for detectives and one for detentions, with an additional drone dedicated for training. Heading up the UAV Program is Seymour, whom Boudreaux chose to be the first full-time operator a year ago. 



“Cpl. Seymour is sought after by other agencies statewide and beyond for his expertise,” Boudreaux said. “Next month, he will speak at the Drone World Expo in San Jose.”
The drones, Boudreaux said, were paid for with funds from the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) program and through operational budget savings.

Boudreaux said drones save money in time and resources. When used in a search and rescue mission, or if a child is missing, Boudreaux said Seymour can clear an area in minutes with his drone, while it could take hours and numerous officers without the drone.

He noted that it’s also safer to use a drone to monitor an armed barricaded suspect instead of putting deputies, or the subject, at risk for their lives. 
At the Sheriff’s Office, Boudreaux said drone usage is mission specific for finding lost children and at-risk adults, search and rescue operations as well as SWAT details, and crime scene photography. The UAV unit, he said, was developed to supplement patrol and is not used for surveillance.



“Whether patrolling high in the skies with our aircraft or responding to emergency incidents with our UAV Units, the Sheriff’s Office is making a difference in securing the safety and improving the quality of life for everyone in Tulare County,” Boudreaux said.

Tulare County Board of Supervisor Mike Ennis said it was a great day not only for Tulare County, but for its sheriff’s department and county residents.

“Taking this integral part to aircraft and putting it in the air protects not only our citizens, but protects our troops, our deputies on the ground as they pursue ways to better protect us,” Ennis said. “This sheriff’s department is on its way to being the most excellent sheriff’s department in the state.”

Porterville Police Chief Eric Kroutil said Boudreaux and his staff could have easily eliminated the county’s aviation program after the terrible loss last year, but instead asked how to make it better.

“And today you are seeing the answer to that question,” Kroutil said. “With the purchase and deployment of two aircraft to serve the communities of Tulare County, our communities and the law enforcement personnel who serve them will not only be safer, but more can be accomplished with less ground resources.”

He continued, “Both of these goals are critical in today’s environment, and with these aircraft, the ability to achieve these goals is improved with every agency in the county.”

Story:  http://www.recorderonline.com

Video:  http://www.yourcentralvalley.com

Bell 407, N509PD, Westchester County Department of Public Safety: Incident occurred September 28, 2017 - State Point Lookout, New Jersey

Rotorcraft, precautionary landing in field.

Westchester County Department of Public Safety

http://registry.faa.gov/N509PD

Date: 28-SEP-17
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N509PD
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: B407
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PUBLIC USE
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: STATE POINT LOOKOUT
State: NEW JERSEY




No injuries were reported Thursday after a Westchester County Police helicopter made an emergency landing in Alpine while trying to find two lost hikers, officials said.

The county's aviation unit was assisting with the Palisades Interstate Parkway Police search for two missing people, when the pilots radioed they had to land in the parking lot at State Line Lookout at 10:17 a.m., the parkway police said in a statement. They landed  because of smoke in the cockpit.

The helicopter made a "hard landing, skidding approximately 30 feet before coming to rest," parkway police said. The local Alpine Fire Department arrived to the scene and found no fire. 

The helicopter will be towed back to Westchester, a Westchester County Police spokesperson said.

Palisades Interstate Parkway Police said Wednesday night the department was searching for two lost hikers north of State Line Lookout. On Thursday, they found Sin Kim and Jeung Kim, both 75, just after 12:15 p.m. They refused medical aid.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.northjersey.com

American Legend AL18, N200XW, C & D Aviation LLC: Accident occurred September 27, 2017 in Bessemer, Jefferson County, Alabama

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama

C & D Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N200XW

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA561
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 27, 2017 in Bessemer, AL
Aircraft: AMERICAN LEGEND AIRCRAFT CO AL18, registration: N200XW

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances.

Date: 27-SEP-17
Time: 16:18:00Z
Regis#: N200XW
Aircraft Make: AMERICAN LEGEND AIRCRAFT FO
Aircraft Model: 18
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BESSEMER
State: ALABAMA

Eurocopter AS-350B-2, N515ET, Chaparral Air Group: Accident occurred September 27, 2017 at Fullerton Municipal Airport (KFUL), Orange County, California

Chaparral Air Group: http://registry.faa.gov/N515ET 

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA562
14 CFR Public Aircraft
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 27, 2017 in Fullerton, CA
Aircraft: EUROCOPTER AS 350, registration: N515ET

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Rotorcraft crashed under unknown circumstances on runway 24 while hovering.

Date: 27-SEP-17
Time: 17:05:00Z
Regis#: N515ET
Aircraft Make: EUROCOPTER
Aircraft Model: AS350
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
Flight Number: FLINT34
City: FULLERTON
State: CALIFORNIA






FULLERTON – A practice maneuver went awry Wednesday morning and led to a helicopter's hard landing at Fullerton Airport, which prompted emergency personnel to respond but no one was hurt, authorities said.

An experienced pilot, accompanied by another pilot who is a training instructor, was attempting a maneuver at 10 a.m. in which the helicopter’s hydraulic system is shut off while it hovers 3-feet off of the ground, said Kathy Schaefer, a division chief for the Fullerton and Brea fire departments.

The helicopter started spinning and the training pilot, who has 30 years of years of experience, took over the controls, shut the helicopter’s engine off and landed on the runway.

The pilot who was originally behind the control was undergoing annual training.

A small amount of fuel leaked from the Long Beach-based helicopter following the hard landing. The impact sheared off the helicopter’s tail.

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the incident, Schaefer said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.ocregister.com

Beech C99 Airliner, N237SL, Alpine Air Express: Incident occurred September 27, 2017 at Monte Vista Municipal Airport (KMVI), Rio Grande County, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Alpine Aviation Inc:  http://registry.faa.gov/N237SL

Aircraft experienced a right engine issue and landed fast then went off the end of the runway.

Date: 28-SEP-17
Time: 01:15:00Z
Regis#: N237SL
Aircraft Make: BEECHCRAFT
Aircraft Model: 99
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: ALPINE AIR EXPRESS
Flight Number: AIP1841
City: MONTE VISTA
State: COLORADO


Aircraft landed off end of runway.

Date: 28-SEP-17
Time: 01:15:00Z
Regis#: N237SL
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 99
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Flight Number: AIP1841
City: MONTE VISTA
State: COLORADO

Cessna 172S, N5523V: Incident occurred September 27, 2017 at Flagler Executive Airport (KFIN), Palm Coast, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft struck a bird on takeoff.


Dolphin Leasing  LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N5523V


Date: 27-SEP-17

Time: 14:22:00Z
Regis#: N5523V
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: PALM COAST
State: FLORIDA

Cub Crafters CC-19-180, N53XC: Accident occurred September 27, 2017 in Kalispell, Flathead County, Montana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

http://registry.faa.gov/N53XC

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA572
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 27, 2017 in Kalispell, MT
Aircraft: CUB CRAFTERS INC CC19-180, registration: N53XC

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed on landing.

Date: 27-SEP-17
Time: 15:55:00Z
Regis#: N53XC
Aircraft Make: CUB CRAFTERS
Aircraft Model: C19
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: KALISPELL
State: MONTANA

Hickox Andys Autogyro, N152AH: Fatal accident occurred September 28, 2017 near Umatilla Municipal Airport (X23), Lake County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N152AH

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA339
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, September 28, 2017 in Umatilla, FL
Aircraft: HICKOX ANDY ANDYS GYROPLANE, registration: N152AH
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 28, 2017, about 1122 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built gyroplane, N152AH, impacted a wooded area near Umatilla, Florida. The private pilot was fatally injured and the gyroplane was destroyed. The gyroplane was being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the local flight which originated about 1000 from Bob White Field Airport (X61), Zellwood, Florida.

A witness at a nearby bee farm reported seeing the gyroplane fly over his position in a north-northwesterly direction. The witness reported the engine was running, and he heard 2 popping sounds, followed 1 large pop sound, and then the engine lost total power. At that time, while about 50 to 60 ft above the tree tops, the witness observed a large main rotor blade separate. The gyroplane began descending and he lost sight but then heard an impact. He drove to the accident site and informed the property owner of the accident.

Nearly the full length of one main rotor blade was found about 193° and 333 ft from the main wreckage. The wreckage was recovered and the fractured main rotor blade were retained for further examination.


Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov 

Jim Pensinger

UMATILLA – Authorities have released the name of the gyrocopter pilot who died Thursday when his aircraft crashed in the woods near County Roads 450A and 44A.

The pilot was James Pensinger, 73, of Apopka, according to Lt. John Herrell with the Lake County Sheriff’s Office.

“He loved aviation. He did everything to stay in it,” said Roger Dubbert, a customer representative with Zenith Aircraft Co., an aircraft kit-building company in Missouri.

Pensinger built several airplanes over the past 15 years, and even went to China to work on a plane, Dubbert said.

Zenith does not sell a gyrocopter.

Pensinger, who had a page on Zenith’s flyer page, described himself as a retired electrical engineer.

His Facebook page said he graduated from Georgia Tech. He is from Johnstown, Pa. He is formerly from Afton, Tenn.

At one point he is listed as married on his Facebook page, but at another point, divorced, and last year it stated that he was in a new relationship.

He also describes himself as a watercolorist and was interested in drones.

His plane went down at 11:21 a.m. at 3335 N. County Road 44A.


http://www.dailycommercial.com



UMATILLA, Fla. - A pilot was killed Thursday when an experimental plane crashed in Lake County, deputies said.

The fatal crash was reported at 11:21 a.m. at 38335 N. County Road 44A in Umatilla.

Deputies said Friday that the pilot was James Pensinger, 73, of Apopka. No one else was on the aircraft.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.clickorlando.com




UMATILLA, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35) - The pilot of a an experimental aircraft died following a crash on Thursday, the Lake County Sheriff's Office said.

Deputies responded to 38335 North County Road 44A in Umatilla at approximately 11:21 a.m. after reports were received that an aircraft had crashed. 

One person on board the aircraft was located and that person was pronounced dead at the scene. 

"Witnesses describe hearing a loud pop, and I believe they actually reported seeing some of the parts flying off," explained Lt. John Herrell, with the Sheriff's Office.

"Ultimately, the aircraft came to rest near the wood line ... luckily, no one on the ground was injured."

Story and video ➤ http://www.fox35orlando.com

LAKE COUNTY, Fla. —  One person is dead after an experimental gyroplane crashed in Lake County, deputies said.

The Lake County Sheriff's Office said they received reports of the crash on North County Road 44 A in Umatilla just before 11:30 a.m. on Thursday.

Deputies said the pilot, who was the only one on the aircraft, died.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

The name of the pilot killed has not yet been released.


Story and video ➤ http://www.wesh.com

LAKE COUNTY, Fla. (WESH) – One person is dead after an experimental gyroplane crashed in Lake County, deputies said.

The Lake County Sheriff’s office said they received reports of the crash on North County Road 44 A in Umatilla just before 11:30 a.m. on Thursday.

Deputies said the pilot, who was the only one on the aircraft, died.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

The name of the pilot killed has not yet been released.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://wfla.com

Cessna T210N Turbo Skylane, N7357C: Incident occurred September 27, 2017 at Lincoln Airport (KLNK), Lancaster County, Nebraska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Aircraft landed gear up.

http://registry.faa.gov/N7357C

Date: 27-SEP-17
Time: 20:40:00Z
Regis#: N7357C
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LINCOLN
State: NEBRASKA

Airbus A321, American Airlines: Incident occurred September 27, 2017 in Dallas, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Aircraft struck a bird in flight.

Date: 27-SEP-17
Time: 03:10:00Z
Regis#: AAL2263
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: 321
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES
Flight Number: AAL2263
City: DALLAS
State: TEXAS

Mooney M20J, N217RW: Incident occurred September 27, 2017 at Georgetown Municipal Airport (KGTU), Williamson County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aircraft crashed on landing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N217RW

Date: 27-SEP-17
Time: 22:30:00Z
Regis#: N217RW
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: 20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: GEORGETOWN
State: TEXAS

Embraer ERJ-145, Envoy Air: Incident occurred September 27, 2017 at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (KDFW), Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Aircraft struck a bird on runway.

Date: 27-SEP-17
Time: 10:55:00Z
Regis#: ENY3391
Aircraft Make: EMBRAER
Aircraft Model: EMB145
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: ENVOY
Flight Number: ENY3391
City: DALLAS
State: TEXAS

ABM: More than 1,000 airport workers to be laid off

ATLANTA - ABM is laying off 1,179 people effective November 15 at the Atlanta airport.

A WARN notice was posted for ABM's facility at 6000 N. Terminal Parkway in Atlanta, 30320, according to information listed on the Georgia Department of Economic Development WARN website. That's an address for Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, according to Google Maps.

ABM representatives did not immediately return emails and a call by Atlanta Business Chronicle. GDEcD did not immediately respond to an email.

New York-based ABM provides facility services such as janitorial, electrical and lighting, energy, facilities engineering, HVAC and mechanical, landscape and turf, and parking to properties including airports, schools, hospitals and manufacturing plants. In the aviation industry, ABM serves both airlines and airports. For airports, it offers cleaning services, energy, EV charging stations, facilities maintenance, parking and transportation, passenger services, retail services and security services. It serves airline clients with services including aircraft, cargo, airlines cleaning, passenger and security.

ABM has revenues of approximately $5.1 billion and more than 130,000 employees in 350-plus offices throughout the United States and more than 20 international locations. In Georgia, ABM has locations in Alpharetta, College Park and Columbus in addition to Atlanta, according to its website.

Last week, Delta Air Lines Inc. cancelled a contract for plane fueling services in Atlanta that had been in place since the mid-1990s. The airline will instead provide those services in-house.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.11alive.com

Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport (KBTR), Louisiana: Gulf Coast Aviation is expanding their New Orleans flight school to include teaching Baton Rouge the joy of flying

Baton Rouge, Louisiana (PRWEB) September 28, 2017


Gulf Coast Aviation is expanding their New Orleans flight school to include teaching Baton Rouge the joy of flying. Celebrating with an Open House this Saturday, September 30th, 1pm to 4pm, at the Baton Rouge Airport, the flight school is inviting everyone to register for a free Discovery Flight, tour the facility, and talk with flight instructors about how easy it is to learn to fly. Visitors can actually sit inside the Cessna 172 G1000 glass cockpit aircraft which has the latest technology in flight training.

General Manager Mary Cusimano says, "Gulf Coast Aviation is the only Federal Aviation Administration Part 141 Flight School in Baton Rouge, which means we can help a wide variety of students learn to fly and obtain their private pilot’s license, commercial or instrument rating."

The flight school is authorized by the US Department of Homeland Security to issue M-1 visas and can train international pilots. The school also has an agreement with the Veterans Administration and can train veterans and military personnel. Students can also learn to fly while earning a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautics due to a partnership with Liberty University.

Gulf Coast Aviation trains using the state-of-the-art, scenario-based training program that is exclusively available only to Cessna Pilot Centers. This multimedia, internet training program allows students to progress at their own pace and retain more information. The program makes excellent use of the building blocks of learning approach. First, simple skills are taught then with each proceeding lesson those skills are reviewed and then combined to form more advanced skills, allowing students to progress through training with confidence and minimal expense. While most schools offer a ground school class which covers course information separate from flight lessons, this program integrates each ground school lesson with its corresponding flight lesson, and offers a video preview of each lesson so that students know what to expect before they start. This unique process moves students faster toward realizing their dream of flying. To register for Saturday’s Open House, go to https://goo.gl/hj81ZV.

About Gulf Coast Aviation-Baton Rouge
Located inside of Signature Flight Support:
4225 Chuck Yeager Ave-Suite 201
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70807
https://www.facebook.com/gulfcoastaviation
http://www.gulfcoastaviation.com

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.prweb.com

White Township, Warren County, New Jersey: Farmer who's suing county fair ... The balloons scare my livestock!



Hot air balloons may want to steer clear of Lisa Van Horn's farm during next year's Warren County Farmers' Fair.

The White Township farmer is suing the county fair -- which includes a hot air balloon festival -- for allegedly frightening her livestock on multiple occasions, and at least once inciting a stampede.

The annual weeklong fair marked its 80th year this summer, when it ran from late July into early August. Each year, the balloon festival includes events including tethered and free-flying rides, along with some special races -- one where balloonists try to drop bean bags on a giant X, and another where they drop of bicyclists who have to find their way back to the fairgrounds.

Up to 30 balloons were launching each night of fair weather during this year's fair.

It is organized by the Warren County Farmers' Fair Association, which is named as the sole defendant in the lawsuit filed Sept. 19 at state Superior Court in Belvidere.

The association did not return a call for comment Wednesday.

Van Horn's farm is located in the 100 block of Foul Rift Road in White Township, about seven miles -- as the balloon flies -- from the fairgrounds in Harmony Township. Online listings label the farm's address as RiverView Ranch, which provides boarding for horses and riding lessons.

The lawsuit specifically refers to the 2015 farmers' fair, when several animals were injured and at least one calf killed in a stampede allegedly caused by balloons flying over the farm. Some flew low or landed on the property, the sight of the balloons and sound of their burners scared the animals, the lawsuit says.

Complaints in years before went unheeded, the document says. Each year, the farm must allegedly cancel riding lessons and decline boarders during the fair.

The lawsuit charges the fair with counts of negligence and trespassing, seeks liability that would repay damages and an injunction to prevent the fair from flying balloons over her property.

Problems with the balloons have not been "as extreme" since 2015, said Daniel Dugan, Van Horn's attorney. However, they still want the farm designated, essentially, as a no-fly zone.

"We were really hoping to resolve this matter without going to court," Dugan said. "We were stonewalled at every turn."

Story, comments and photo gallery ➤ http://www.nj.com

Upstate South Carolina's smaller airports pack a big economic punch



A mere three miles from downtown, Anderson Regional Airport manager Justin Julian often feels secluded.

"Half the people in the county don't know we have an airport," Julian said Wednesday, "and the other half don't know what we do here."

Even the half that has been on the ARA's 704-acre campus for an air show typically knows little about operations on a normal day, Julian said Wednesday.

"I think there's a perception that one or two planes a day land here, and that it's a rich guy's playground," Julian said. "I don't think anyone knows that we do about 30,000 planes a year."

About 80 planes arrive or depart from ARA daily, which makes it one of the 10 busiest of the state's 54 general aviation airports. And like many regional airports, it is more familiar to sports teams, performers and celebrities from outside the region than to Anderson residents.

Seventeen of Clemson's 18 athletic teams (all except football), use ARA regularly, as do all Atlantic Coast Conference visitors other than football. (Football teams need larger planes that require longer runways.) Among its visitors of the past year are President Donald Trump, entrepreneur Bill Gates, U.S. Sens. Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, and dozens of entertainers who have performed in Anderson, Greenville and Clemson.

High-profile travelers prefer the time-saving, stress-avoiding setting of the small airport, Julian said.  "And typically, organ donation teams and medical transport teams can get in and out of here a lot quicker (than using a commercial airport)."

Corporate activity keeps the Upstate at the top of South Carolina's economic numbers. In a state where 44 of the airports had less than a $5 million impact in the last FAA survey, five Upstate ports — Downtown Greenville, Donaldson, Anderson, Oconee and Pickens — combined for an economic impact of $287 million.

A big piece of the small-airport activity involves business, which keeps runways at all six of the Upstate's general-aviation airports busy. Of state's the 10 busiest, according to the FAA, six are in the Upstate.

"Corporate aviation is huge in the Upstate," said South Carolina Aeronautics (SCA) Executive Director James Stephens. "By and large, the community doesn't see it because those flights aren't the commercial airports, and most people don't understand what the general aviation airports are used for."

The SCA is in the midst of a comprehensive study on the state's 54 general aviation and six commercial airports that will be completed in 2018. He doesn't expect it to differ dramatically from the 2006 study compiled by Wilbur Smith Associates of Columbia, an infrastructure consulting firm.

It reflected robust activity among regional airports in the Upstate, where, after experiencing significant business loss in the recession of 2008, arrivals and departures are on the rise.

"A lot is based on the economy. We're next to a booming city, and that will get you a lot of air traffic," said Greenville Downtown Airport associate director Lara Kaufmann. "We're not back to where we were before the recession, but a lot of people are flying in and out."

While more attention goes to the large jets that bring commercial flights to GSP — more than 58,000 flights are expected there in 2017 — a combined 255,000 planes are expected to land and depart at general aviation airports in Anderson, Greenville Downtown, Donaldson, Oconee and Pickens County.

"We have a lot more planes come in here than people would think," said Oconee Regional Airport manager Jeff Garrison, who gets significant business from residents in the North Carolina mountain towns of Highlands and Cashiers, and plenty from the growing economic engine of Clemson University.

"A lot of our activity has to do with Clemson home football games. On game days, we'll have 40, 50, 60 or 70 planes in here, which helps our numbers," Garrison said. "But in recent years, it seems like we've had a lot more students and their parents flying in. And more business from people who live on the lake (Hartwell)."

Like the downtown airports in Greenville and Spartanburg, Anderson once welcomed commercial flights. The legacy of that history is two 150-foot-wide runways, one of them 6,000 feet long.

The extra 1,000 feet of runway enables 737 jets to land at Anderson, as well as the Bombardier Global Express, the largest corporate aircraft. One of those 17-capacity planes, which are valued at $62.3 million, flew into ARA from Las Vegas for last year's Clemson-Notre Dame football game.

Like most general aviation airports, runways are busiest on weekdays, when corporate executives can save time and avoid stress at the smaller venues.

"If you're an executive going to a general-aviation airport, you walk up to the plane, board, and you're in the air within 10 minutes," Stephens said. "You can land pretty close to the plant you wanted to see, get there in a short drive and in a few hours you can be flying back home — all in less time than flying into a major airport."

"It's easy to get in and easy to get out," said Anderson County Administrator Rusty Burns of the Anderson port, which operates without help from tax dollars. "Some days, you'll see five or six corporate jets are on the runway."

At the Pickens County Airport near Liberty, where a new terminal was built in 2009, first-year manager Carlos Salinas calls small airports "the launch pad for business in the Upstate.

"A good bit of our traffic is CEO types who come from Florida or the Midwest to do business in the Upstate," said Salinas, whose port averages 65 operations a day.

Salinas, a former Air Force pilot, said recent technology has helped. Planes that were too heavy to launch from the airport's 5,000-foot runway 20 years ago can do so now because newer aircraft are lighter and more fuel-efficient.

Talk of replacing the 61-year-old terminal in Anderson, and refurbishing its longest runway, raises Burns' hope of additional revenue. A new terminal, offering rental space, would offer the potential of increased revenue and traffic. Ramp fees were recently waived in an effort to increase fuel sales at the airport, which embraced 29,790 operations in 2016.

More importantly, Burns said, a new terminal would make Anderson more attractive to potential industry.

"It's a big advantage in corporate recruiting," Burns said. "When a company is thinking about relocating, one of the first things they ask about is airport access."

Original article  ➤ http://www.independentmail.com

What the Hell Is Joon? An Impeccably Designed New Airline Says It’s Not All About Flying ··· Is this our ticket out of travel hell?


Remember when Virgin Airlines launched, all the lofty promises it made to ban mediocrity from our traveling experience, and how sad we all were when it vanished into the horizon?

Five months later, we’re trapped in the hinterlands of air travel—where seats get skinnier, cabin baggage is almost nonexistent, and that one airline we literally just booked for our last trip went bankrupt overnight, leaving us stranded in an overheated airport without explanation … or even an apologetic employee to explain what gives to 20 angsty people dragging luggage and burdensome U-shaped pillows through the no-man’s-land of MIA.

Flying sucks. We are frisked. No one cares if we live or die. There is no one to turn to for help.

But maybe—just maybe—hope is rising again, in the form of Air France’s Joon.

The difference this time? Flying isn’t the main thing it offers. Under the unlikely heading “Also an Airline,” and with some chic footwork from agency BETC Paris, this sassy new player is offering a “total travel experience” for a younger, more demanding set of globetrotters.

Read more here:  http://www.adweek.com

Cape Girardeau Regional Airport (KCGI), Missouri: Manufacturer and dealer representatives make pitch for corporate aircraft

Shannon Davis, left, and Robert Cork sit in the cockpit of a Quest Kodiak aircraft Wednesday during the Great Planes Air Expo at Cape Girardeau Regional Airport. 


On a warm, windy afternoon at the Great Planes Air Expo, area executives strolled between aircraft parked at Cape Girardeau Regional Airport, talking with manufacturer and dealer representatives about the features and possibilities of corporate aircraft.

KCAC Aviation of Kansas City, Missouri, presented seven planes from manufacturers Cessna, Cirrus, Beechcraft, Piper and others, KCAC marketing director Mike Turner said.

“They run the gamut from business jets to propeller-powered aircraft,” Turner said.

“Our customers are busy executives who typically don’t have time to attend the big aviation shows,” Turner said. “We bring planes closer to them” with shows such as this one.

One yellow-and-black-striped turboprop plane from Quest Kodiak was designed as a “mission plane,” Turner said, with wide rubber wheels to operate on grass or gravel landing strips and a cargo pod under the fuselage.


Ed Buchheit looks into the cabin of a plane Wednesday during the Great Planes Air Expo at the Cape Girardeau Regional Airport.


What Turner called Cessna’s “entry-level” corporate jet, a white craft called the Citation M2, was parked nearby.

“It has a smaller fuselage, but it fills the corporate-jet role without being a much bigger plane,” Turner said.

A smaller cargo bay would hold luggage but not as much cargo as the mission plane, he said.

As the wind picked up, Turner said the weather at Cape Girardeau was better than the sales expo he had earlier in the day.

He said KCAC held an expo Wednesday morning at Springfield, Missouri, where it was raining and overcast.

“This is much nicer,” he said.

Turner said they’ll move to St. Louis next for an expo today.

Cape Girardeau Regional Airport has hosted these shows before in the eight years KCAC has held shows across the upper Midwest, Turner said.

“It seems to be a very good location for us,” Turner said.

It’s about connecting with the right people, he said, and adding value to a company’s service for its employees and its customers.


Spectators look at aircraft Wednesday during the Great Planes Air Expo at the Cape Girardeau Regional Airport.


“We’ve seen some high-quality people today already,” Turner said about 45 minutes into the expo.

Turner said commercial airlines can access about 500 airports nationwide, but there are 5,000 airports in the United States.

He said a private aircraft has greater capability to allow executives to get much closer to their destination.

According to a company news release, nearly 75 percent of takeoffs and landings at U.S. airports are by private aircraft, “and the majority take place at airports commercial airlines cannot access.”

There are other benefits, Turner said.

Aircraft can be a tax write-off for a business, he said, as it’s a depreciable, capital asset.

Of course, there are safety regulations that must be followed, and the Federal Aviation Administration is strict on their observation.

But as part of the purchasing process, KCAC would arrange for training in those regulations and other aspects of owning a company aircraft.

For Turner, though, he said there’s value in saving executives the hassles of commercial air travel.

“I’m spoiled,” he said, laughing, but he recently had to fly from Kansas City to Nashville, Tennessee. The flight took 11 1/2 hours, he said.

“It was a total waste of time,” he said, as that flight would have been considerably shorter with a private aircraft, and an executive’s time is valuable.

“This is a much faster method than any other transportation,” Turner said.

Story and photo gallery ➤ http://www.semissourian.com