Monday, July 3, 2017

Taylorcraft BC12-D, N43564: Accident occurred July 03, 2017 in Farmville, Prince Edward County, Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

http://registry.faa.gov/N43564

Aircraft force landed in a field.

Date: 03-JUL-17
Time: 17:00:00Z
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: FARMVILLE
State: VIRGINIA











PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY, Va. -- A pilot suffered serious but non-life threatening injuries when his small, private plane crashed in a field near Farmville.

Virginia State Police said the crash happened at 1:05 p.m.

"The Piper PA-15 ran out of fuel while in the air and was forced to make a crash landing into a cornfield at the intersection of Route 658 and Route 700," a Virginia State Police spokesperson said. "The impact of the crash caused the aircraft to catch fire."

The field where the plane crashed is located along the 700 block of Moore Road, near Hampden Sydney college.

The pilot, Philip Cianciolo of Wallingford, Conn., was medivac to VCU Medical Center with serious but non-life threatening injuries.

Cianciolo, who was the plane’s only occupant, was flying from North Carolina to Connecticut at the time of the crash.

Farmville fire department responded to Hampden Sydney College to set up a landing zone and Darlington Heights fire assisted at the scene of the crash.

The FAA and NTSB were notified of the crash.

http://wtvr.com






PRINCE EDWARD, Va. (WSET) -- Authorities say a small airplane crash landed in a field in central Virginia just after 1 p.m. after running out of fuel.

Virginia State Police say the pilot, Philip Cianciolo of Wallingford, Conn., was flown to VCU Medical Center in Richmond for treatment of serious but non-life threatening injuries.

Police say the Piper PA-15 ran out of fuel while in the air and was forced to make a crash landing into a cornfield at the intersection of Route 658 and Route 700. 
Cianciolo was flying from North Carolina to Connecticut at the time of the crash.

Police say the impact of the crash caused the aircraft to catch fire.

The FAA and NTSB were notified of the crash.

Prince Edward County is about 70 miles south west of Richmond.

http://wset.com







One man was injured in a plane crash on Monday afternoon around 1 pm. 

The plane came to a rest in a cornfield near the intersection of Moore Road and Five Forks Road.

The pilot was transported by helicopter to a local hospital. His injuries were described as non-life threatening.

Firefighters from Darlington Heights and Hampden-Sydney Volunteer Fire Departments responded to the scene and extinguished the remains of the airplane and the surrounding corn field.

Police identify man who tried to seize helicopter at Hillsboro Airport (KHIO), Washington County, Oregon

Holden Gorka was shot to death by officers after allegedly attempting to steal a helicopter on Monday. 



PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) — Family and friends of the man shot to death after allegedly trying to steal a helicopter said they can’t believe it.

Hillsboro Police on Wednesday said Holden Austin Gorka, 25, jumped a fence Monday to get into Hillsboro Airport and then approached a flight instructor and a friend who were inside a helicopter. He ordered them to get out, firing at least one round during the incident.

Gorka then ran off into a field where he was shot by a Hillsboro Police officer after a confrontation.

Gorka’s friends and family said it’s completely out of character for him.

According to Cody Countryman, Gorka’s best friend, Gorka never really got into any trouble. He didn’t drink or do drugs and he didn’t have a criminal record. Countryman also said Gorka was engaged.

Countryman said, “He had a rough time getting stable, but from me talking to him, sounded like things were working out for him. He was a trucker, seemed like he was enjoying it. He was making money. He was doing pretty good in life.”

Gorka also lived with Countryman for a few years. He ran away from home and was “kind of homeless,” so Countryman and his family took him in.

Hillsboro police said it appears Gorka lived in multiple cities across the country. Records show he was registered to vote in Olympia, Washington.

According to Countryman, Gorka had a difficult childhood and went from city to city after getting his GED.

Hillsboro Aero Academy said they aren’t aware of any connection between Gorka and their company. FAA records show there is no one with that name who has a pilot’s license and Countryman also said he wasn’t aware of Gorka having any experience flying helicopters.

However, police said at the time of the attempted hijacking, it seemed like Gorka knew how to operate a helicopter.

Still wrapping his head around the incident, Countryman said he remembers Gorka as “a great person.”

“He’s one of the most loving and caring people I’ve ever met,” Countryman said. “He’d always be by your side no matter what. I really don’t know what drove him to do this.”

Hillsboro Police have not yet named the officers involved in the shooting.

http://koin.com


Holden Gorka as seen in his driver’s license photo from Texas as seen on July 5, 2017.
 (Hillsboro Police Department)


HILLSBORO, Ore. (AP) — Authorities in a Portland, Oregon, suburb released the identity Wednesday of a man who they say tried to steal a helicopter at gunpoint before being fatally shot by police.

Holden Austin Gorka, 25, had no known address and no known mental health or drug abuse issues, the Hillsboro Police Department said in a statement.

An autopsy was completed Tuesday but results of toxicology tests won't be ready for another two to three months, authorities said.

The name of the officer who fatally shot Gorka will be released Thursday, the statement said.

According to authorities, Gorka jumped a fence at the Hillsboro Airport on Monday and held a flight instructor and a student at gunpoint, firing at least one shot before police showed up. That shot — and possibly a second misfire — were directed away from the victims, who were in the helicopter as it was warming up for takeoff.

The man got into the helicopter, but officers arrived before he could take off. The man then ran across a street and into a field, where he was shot.

The man died at the scene shortly before noon. No other injuries were reported.

Investigators have to yet to establish the man's motive for trying to steal the helicopter, but authorities said Wednesday that he was not connected to the Hillsboro Aero Academy, the airport's flight-training school.

A witness, Christopher Neal, told reporters that he and his family were watching planes at the small airport when he saw a man walking in wearing a gray hoodie. The man looked at them and then started running toward the fence. He pulled a gray mask over his face, Neal said.

The Hillsboro Airport, established in 1928, is one of three airports operated by the Port of Portland.

It's about a 40-minute drive west of the Portland International Airport, the region's main airport.

http://www.sfgate.com





As Christopher Neal watched planes fly in and out of the Hillsboro Airport with his wife and young son, a stranger in a gray hoodie caught their eye.

With his hood up and hands in his pockets, the man walked from across Northwest Cornell Road toward a barbed-wire fence leading to airport property, Neal said. The man briefly looked at the family, then back toward the fence.

It was the beginning of a bizarre attempt to hijack a helicopter that left a gunman dead in a field across from the airport.

"For a moment, I thought to myself that it was a little warm for the big, thick, gray hoodie with the hood over him," said Neal, Public Safety Director for the Port of Portland, which owns and operates the airport. Neal said he was there on his day off because his son likes to watch planes.

The hooded man ran toward the fence, pulled a mask over his face, climbed the fence, stepped on the barbed wire at the top and went over.






Neal said he rushed his family back into their car and went to a nearby parking lot.

Within the hour, Hillsboro police said the man tried to steal a helicopter at gunpoint outside a flight school, hopped back over the fence at the sight of an officer and was fatally shot after a chase into a nearby field. 

It was 11:23 a.m. when the masked man went up to a helicopter with a flight instructor and student inside as it was warming up with its rotar spinning overhead at Hillsboro Aero Academy, said Lt. Henry Reimann, a Hillsboro police spokesman. The man opened the door, pointed a gun at the student and ordered the student out.

When the student hesitated, the man fired one round away from the helicopter and the student got out and ran away, Reimann said. He then went to the other side of the helicopter and pointed a gun at the instructor, who was also the pilot. He ordered the instructor out and then jumped in.

"At that point our sergeant showed up," Reimann said.

The man ran from the helicopter, went back over the barbed-wire fence and fled across Cornell Road near the Comfort Inn. 

A second Hillsboro police officer encountered the man in a field and shot him, Reimann said. The man died at the scene.



No other injuries were reported. Police haven't yet identified the suspect.

Flights were halted briefly but the airport was open by 1 p.m., officials said.

Andy Smith, a general aviation intern at Hillsboro Airport, said he was doing a perimeter check at the airport and when he got back into the office he picked up a call from CNN. That was the first he heard of the shooting.

He said he checked with the airport tower, which confirmed a shooting.

The Port of Portland said Hillsboro police are leading the investigation and referred all questions to them. 

More than 25 businesses operate at the 950-acre airport, including flight schools, corporate flight departments, aircraft charter services and air ambulance services. It was established in 1928.

http://www.oregonlive.com

Decades after woman jumped from a plane, skeletal remains may solve her disappearance

Landscapers discovered adult skeletal human remains alongside a wooded Palmetto Bay nature trail on June 26th.



For more than two decades, mystery has surrounded the disappearance of Christine Pascale, a troubled one-time pilot who hurled herself, without a parachute, from a small plane in an apparent suicide attempt over South Miami-Dade.

Investigators never found her body.

But Pascale’s relatives got a spark of hope last week when workers discovered skeletal remains hidden in the brush of a 22-acre nature preserve next to the Palmetto Bay Village Center on Old Cutler Road.

It might take months for forensic anthropologists to identify the skeletal remains, which were found in pieces as workers cleared out invasive plants. The bones are too old to yield DNA for testing. But Miami-Dade homicide detectives and the medical examiner’s office are exploring the possibility that Pascale’s body might have finally surfaced.

“I’m just hoping that it is her. I always wonder where she is. Even if it’s a fatality, that is still my sister’s body. I want her to have a nicer resting place,” said her sister, Michelle Pascale Venega, who spoke to a detective on Monday.

“I know it’s been some years, but I always think about what happened.”

The 26-year-old Pascale leaped to her presumed death from a Cessna on Dec. 3, 1994.

That day, Pascale hired a plane ride at the Opa-locka airport, directing the pilot to fly over Southwest 184th Street and Old Cutler Road, close to where her parents lived. Pascale told the pilot she wanted to take some aerial photographs.

Pascale jumped when the plane reached 5,000 feet, according to a National Transportation Safety Board report.

“I noticed her reaching for something on the rear seat. I assumed it was a camera … A little while later, I heard what sounded like a yell and felt wind in the cabin and noise simultaneously,” pilot Hodelin F. Rene told federal investigators at the time.

“I immediately turned toward the sound, and she was already partly out of the airplane, and when our eyes met, she jumped out.”

Pascale’s body would have plummeted at 120 miles an hour, with the young woman conscious during the free fall. It would have taken her about 15 seconds to hit the dirt or the mangroves of Biscayne Bay, experts told the Miami Herald in 1994.

Venega says she still believes her older sister “fell off” the plane.

“She was taking aerial shots and supposedly the door opened; they said it was suicide, but I don’t think it was,” Venega said. “I don’t think she was depressed. All we know is the Cessna called it in that he lost control of the plane when the door opened.”

Just days before she fell to her death, Pascale had tried jumping out of another aircraft flying over South Miami-Dade, in the vicinity of the former Burger King headquarters, a National Transportation Safety Board report says. She was unsuccessful.

Pascale’s short life was marred by mental-health problems.

Records show that would-be pilot began “as a sickly child and grew into a disruptive and violent-tempered adult, living in failure and fantasy, yelling curses and threats, arrested often for disorderly conduct and occasionally for worse things,” the Herald reported in 1994.

Pascale pretended to be a jet pilot and aviation business woman but her license only qualified her to fly a single-engine propeller-driven plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration later revoked it because Pascale lied about her medical history. Since childhood, she had lived on one kidney, and the FAA believed she was schizophrenic, dishonest, compulsive and dangerous .

Pascale’s home life in east Perinne was marked by domestic disputes and a tortured relationship with her father. Police records listed arrests for disorderly conduct, bouncing checks, cheating landlords and two felonies — sticking a man with a knife and fork and forging prescriptions for tranquilizers and painkillers. Pascale even went to jail for punching her younger sister.

“The worst call was from the FAA, telling us that Christine made a report of a missing plane that our son was on, and the plane crashed. We told them that we don’t have a son, and Christine is a very sick girl,” her father told the Miami Herald back then. “They asked us if she lied a lot, and we said she is a constant liar.”

Vanega hopes the remains are indeed her sister.

“Since there is no closure, my mom in her head thinks she is alive, and I know that’s her way of just coping with it. She thinks she had a parachute on and survived and just ran away,” Venega said. “I know it doesn’t make sense at all, but maybe just finding her it will bring closure.”

Anyone with information on the 1994 death of Christine Pascale can contact Miami-Dade’s homicide bureau at 305-471-2400.

http://www.miamiherald.com

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N707PP

NTSB Identification: MIA95LA032
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Saturday, December 03, 1994 in MIAMI, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/31/1995
Aircraft: CESSNA 172D, registration: N707PP
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he was in cruise flight at 5,000 feet agl and had slowed to 70 mph. The passenger stated that she was taking off her headset and moving her seat back so she could get a good photograph. The pilot heard what sounded like a yell, and simultaneously felt wind and noise in the cabin. He looked towards the sound, and observed the passenger partially out of the airplane. When their eyes met, she jumped. Review of ATC transcripts verified that the pilot departed and returned to the departure airport without any intermediate stops. Another pilot wrote a letter to the Safety Board describing a similar incident that occurred 4 days prior to the accident with the same passenger. During that flight, she unlatched the door gunner's safety belt while sitting on the floor with her feet outside the airplane on the landing gear. At the time, she was wearing a parachute with a hidden automatic opener on the reserve parachute. She was subsequently pulled back into the airplane by a safety crewmember and restrained for the return flight. The passenger's airman and medical certificates had been revoked 8/12/91 for failing to disclose a history of, among other conditions, a personality disorder and for the taking of numerous prescribed medications.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The passenger committed suicide.

On December 3, 1994, about 1246 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172D, N707PP, registered to Hodelin F. Rene, operating as a 14 CFR Part 91 aerial photography flight, reported to FAA air traffic control while in cruise flight, that his female passenger jumped out of the airplane in the vicinity of Miami, Florida. The passenger was not located and is presumed to be fatally injured. The airplane was not damaged. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Opa Locka Airport, Opa Locka, Florida, about 1 hour 6 minutes before the accident.

Charles J. Flowers, President of Flowers Air Charter, Opa Locka, Florida, stated his office was contacted on three separate occasions in November 1994, by Christine M. Pascale, who asked to rent an airplane with a pilot to take some aerial photographs. Mr. Flowers stated he was unable to support her request, and he contacted a private owner, Hodelin F.Rene, who agreed to make the flight.

The pilot, Hodelin F. Rene, stated he arrived at Flowers Air Charter, on December 3, 1994, at about 1000, and was introduced to his passenger by Mr. Flowers. Miss Pascale stated she wanted to take several pictures of a couple of houses in the Cutler Ridge area, and drew a circle around the area on an aeronautical chart. He went to Terminal One, taxied his airplane to Flowers Air Charter, and did a preflight inspection. The passenger did her own preflight inspection, and asked several questions about the operations of the right passenger door. They departed Opa Locka Airport and flew to the area previously marked on the map. He leveled off at 5,000 feet agl, slowed the airplane to 70 mph, and asked her where she wanted to go. She stated she would look outside to make sure. A short time later, she stated she was going to take off the headset and move the seat back so she could get a good shot. He then heard what sounded like a yell, felt wind and noise simultaneously in the cabin area. He looked towards the sound, she was already partly out of the airplane, and when their eyes met, she jumped out. "I was in total amazement, shock and just froze for a moment, not knowing what to do. I could not believe what had happened. After about ten seconds, I called ATC and requested a descent as I struggled to close the door." He then informed ATC that he would like to declare an emergency, that his passenger had jumped out of the airplane.

Review of communications on December 3, 1994, for the time period between 1640 UTC (1140 EST) to 1807 UTC (1307 EST) between Miami ATCT, Fort Lauderdale South Arrival/Departure Radar, Arrival/Departure Interphone, South Departure Radar, Opa Locka ATC Tower, and N707PP indicate the airplane departed Opa Locka Airport, landed at Opa Locka Airport without any intermediate stops and confirmed ATC statements made by the pilot.

Mr. Thomas D. Manning, Skydive, Inc., Homestead, Florida, wrote a letter to the NTSB on December 4, 1994, stating that Christine M.Pascale attempted to jump out of his airplane on November 29, 1994, while on an aerial photography flight in the vicinity of Burger King Headquarters, on Old Cutler Road in Miami, Florida. After landing at the Homestead General Aviation Airport, Homestead, Florida, a confrontation ensued, and the Metro Dade Police Department was called. Mr. Manning informed the two police officers who responded to the call that he thought Miss Pascale was trying to commit suicide.

Review of airman records on file with the FAA Airmen Certification Branch, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, revealed the passenger, Christine M. Pascale, was issued private pilot certificate No. 85526189, on October 22, 1990, with ratings for airplane single engine land. The Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, issued an emergency order of revocation of any airman pilot certificate or airman medical certificate held by the passenger on August 12, 1991. The airman and medical certificates were revoked for falsification of airman medical application dated March 23, 1990, October 27, 1990, and general medical condition. She failed to disclose that she had a history of the following: a. Seizures b. Personality disorder c. Uncontrolled hypertension d. Myasthenia gravis e. Asthma f. Stroke g. Steroid dependency h. Multiple allergies i. Cerebral hemorrhage secondary to ruptured aneurism j. Taking numerous prescribed medications.

Air Tractor Inc AT-502B, N6135P, Coastal Flying Service Inc: Accident occurred July 02, 2017 in Edna, Jackson County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston

Coastal Flying Service Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N6135P

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA385
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Sunday, July 02, 2017 in Edna, TX
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 502B, registration: N6135P

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft during aerial application, struck an antenna and force landed in a field.

Date: 02-JUL-17
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N6135P
Aircraft Make: AIR TRACTOR
Aircraft Model: AT502
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: EDNA
State: TEXAS

Cirrus SR20, N456LB, Advanced Transportation Company LLC: Incident occurred July 01, 2017 at Francis S. Gabreski Airport (KFOK), Suffolk County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Farmington

Advanced Transportation Company LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N456LB

Aircraft landed and sustained unknown damage.

Date: 01-JUL-17
Time: 15:10:00Z
Regis#: N456LB
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: GABRESKI
State: NEW YORK

Beech 76 Duchess, N8013Y: Incident occurred June 30, 2017 at Solberg–Hunterdon Airport (N51), Readington Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown

http://registry.faa.gov/N8013Y

Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 30-JUN-17
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N8013Y
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE76
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: READINGTON
State: NEW JERSEY

de Havilland Dash 8-400, N419QX, Horizon Air: Incident occurred July 02, 2017 at Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport (KBZN), Gallatin County, Montana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena

Horizon Air Industries Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N419QX

Aircraft on takeoff experienced a birdstrike. Damage to pitot tube. No injuries.

Date: 03-JUL-17
Time: 01:36:00Z
Regis#: QXE2489
Aircraft Make: DEHAVILLAND
Aircraft Model: DH8D
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Aircraft Operator: HORIZON
Flight Number: QXE2489
City: BOZEMAN
State: MONTANA

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, N96579, Civil Air Patrol Inc: Minneapolis–Saint Paul International Airport (KMSP), Hennepin County, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis

Civil Air Patrol Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N96579

Aircraft on landing rollout, went off the runway.

Date: 30-JUN-17
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N96579
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MINNEAPOLIS
State: MINNESOTA

Bell 206B, N60KH, Kash Helicopter Services LLC: Accident occurred June 30, 2017 in Uniontown, Union County, Kentucky

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Kash Helicopter Services LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N60KH

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA402
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, June 30, 2017 in Uniontown, KY
Aircraft: BELL 206, registration: N60KH

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Rotorcraft struck a wire and crashed to the ground.

Date: 30-JUN-17
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N60KH
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: B206
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: UNIONTOWN
State: KENTUCKY

Micco MAC-145B, N692AS: Incident occurred July 01, 2017 in Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City

http://registry.faa.gov/N692AS

Aircraft force landed in a field. 

Date: 01-JUL-17
Time: 11:40:00Z
Regis#: N692AS
Aircraft Make: MICCO
Aircraft Model: MAC145
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TOPEKA
State: KANSAS




TOPEKA, Kan. (KSNT)- A small plane with two passengers made an emergency landing in a cornfield on Saturday morning in Topeka.

Solider Township Fire Department and Kansas Highway Patrol responded to the scene. It happened around 11:30 in North Topeka behind the Azura Credit Union on Highway 24, just east of 75 Highway.

Shiloh Burris with the Solider Township Fire Department said there were no injuries to the passengers and no hazards to be concerned about.

According to online crash reports from KHP, the two passengers are from Texas.

KHP Dispatch says the plane was traveling from Kansas City to Denver and lost oil pressure causing the emergency landing.

Lancair LC42-550FG, N191DW, V I Holdings LLC: Incident occurred July 02, 2017 at Lewiston–Nez Perce County Airport (KLWS), Idaho

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane

V I Holdings LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N191DW

Aircraft on taxi, struck light. Damage to gear.

Date: 02-JUL-17
Time: 22:30:00Z
Regis#: N191DW
Aircraft Make: LANCAIR
Aircraft Model: LC42
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: LEWISTON
State: IDAHO

Cessna 172G Skyhawk, N4482L: Accident occurred July 02, 2017 at Ryan Airfield (KRYN), Tucson, Pima County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

http://registry.faa.gov/N4482L

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA380
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 02, 2017 in Tucson, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N4482L

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft on landing, sustained substantial damage.

Date: 02-JUL-17
Time: 17:30:00Z
Regis#: N4482L
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TUCSON
State: ARIZONA

Cessna 414A Chancellor, N514LP, Invader Aviation LLC: Accident occurred July 01, 2017 at St. Johns Industrial Air Park (KSJN), Apache County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Invader Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N514LP

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA378
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 01, 2017 in St Johns, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 414, registration: N514LP

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft on rejected takeoff, went off the end of the runway.

Date: 01-JUL-17
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N514LP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C414
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
City: SAINT JOHNS
State: ARIZONA

Piper PA-17 Vagabond, N4600H: Incident occurred July 01, 2017 in Beaver Falls Township, Renville County, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

http://registry.faa.gov/N4600H

Aircraft force landed in a field.

Date: 01-JUL-17
Time: 17:50:00Z
Regis#: N4600H
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA17
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MORTON
State: MINNESOTA


MORTON — A small airplane made an emergency landing Saturday afternoon in a bean field in Renville County.

The pilot, Harvey Buller, 75 of Mountain Lake, was not injured and the plane was not damaged.

The incident happened around 12:50 p.m. when the Renville County Sheriff's Office received a report of a small aircraft in a field two miles north of Morton in Beaver Falls Township.

A deputy arrived at the scene, which was south of County Road 2 and west of U.S. Highway 71, and discovered a small plane had landed in a bean field.

Buller told deputies he had been flying the 1948 Piper aircraft north from Jackson when he encountered engine problems and needed to make an emergency landing.

Buller was not injured and the aircraft did not sustain any damage during the landing.

The aircraft was eventually removed from the scene.

The incident remains under investigation by the sheriff's office and the Federal Aviation Administration.

http://www.wctrib.com

International Civil Aviation Organization experts arrive in Nepal to conduct air safety audit



July 3rd, 2017

A two-member expert team of the International Civil Aviation Organization (Icao) arrived in Nepal on Sunday to monitor the status of corrective measures taken by Nepal to address significant safety concerns (SSC) related to operations and other aspects of the civil aviation sector.

The United Nations aviation watchdog, Icao, monitors Nepal’s aviation safety oversight capabilities through the Icao Coordinated Validation Missions (ICVM). The mission is generally invited by a state when it is fully confident that it has fully complied with international safety standards.

Icao operation expert Captain Eugene Voudri and airworthiness expert Edmund Bohland will begin the much-needed audit of the country’s civil aviation industry from Tuesday, said Rajan Pokhrel, deputy director general of the Civil Aviation Authority of Nepal (Caan). The audit will end on July 11.

Among eight critical elements of aviation safety—primary legislation, organisation and safety oversight functions, personnel licensing, aircraft operations, airworthiness of aircraft, aerodromes, air navigation system, and accident and incident investigation—four will be audited by the Icao experts. They are legislation, organisation, operations and airworthiness. 

“Icao did not consider it necessary to conduct audits in three areas—personnel licensing, navigation system and aerodromes—as our performance is sound,” Pokhrel said. Accident and incident investigation did not come under the scope of audit due to unsatisfactory progress made by Nepal.

In July 2013, an Icao mission visited Nepal to validate the corrective measures taken by the country to address the deficiencies pointed out by the global aviation watchdog in 2009.

The mission carried out an on-site audit from July 10-16. Unsatisfied with Nepal’s progress, the UN supervisory body had given the significant safety concern (SSC) tag to Nepal’s aviation sector in its audit report in August 2013. 

It had raised the red flag on ‘operations’, among the eight critical elements of safety oversight, due to sharp rise in the number of air accidents and incidents between 2009 and 2012. In those years, at least two passenger aircraft had crashed per year.

Since July last year, an Icao expert has been assisting Nepal on ‘operations’ front under Icao’s Safety Fund that aims to improve civil aviation safety globally. Likewise, experts from the French Civil Aviation Authority (DGAC) has been assisting Nepal to help strengthen its aviation safety oversight since May, as safety concerns have emerged as a key challenge for the burgeoning airline industry. 

The aviation regulator had revoked the Air Operator Certificate (AOC) of 42 airlines since the implementation of AOC-Requirement Regulation 2012. The Caan had issued or renewed AOCs of 19 different airlines in 2016. Among them, 10 are fixed-wing and nine are rotor wing or helicopter operators.

“We are hopeful that Nepal’s air safety credentials will be reinstated,” said Pokhrel. “There could be some minor issues, but we don’t foresee any major issue because a lot has already been implemented as compared to previous audits.”

Nepal had performed poorly in effectively implementation of air safety oversight systems, appearing way down on the safety list among 46 Asian countries. 

The 2013 audit report had pointed out that Nepal’s score of 55.01 percent in effective implementation (EI) of critical elements of safety oversight system was way below the Asia and the Pacific average of 59.9 percent. The EI has now improved to 58.1 percent. 

After conducting the audit, the mission is expected to produce a preliminary report in September. 

Caan decided to invite the audit mission after getting the go-ahead from the Combined Action Team (CAT) of Icao’s Asia and the Pacific office in Bangkok. A six-member CAT mission provided assistance to Caan from November 22-25 last year to evaluate Nepal’s performance in air safety and make preparations prior to conducting the audit.

International airlines and travellers hesitate to travel to a country whose air safety has been questioned by Icao.

http://kathmandupost.ekantipur.com

North American T28, N9103F, registered to and operated by Trojan Corporation: Fatal accident occurred July 02, 2017 near Moorhead Municipal Airport (KJKJ), Clay County, Minnesota (and) Incident occurred March 29, 2016 in Fargo, Cass County, North Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Trojan Corporation: http://registry.faa.gov/N9103F

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA250
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 02, 2017 in Moorhead, MN
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN T-28A, registration: N9103F
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 02, 2015, about 1810 central daylight time, a North American T-28A airplane, N9103F, registered to and operated by Trojan Corporation, Grand Forks, North Dakota, struck a light pole and impacted terrain while on landing approach to Moorhead Municipal Airport (JKJ), Moorhead, Minnesota. The private pilot, the sole occupant on board, was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The flight was being operated as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight, and no flight plan had been filed. Day visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site about the time of the accident. The flight originated from Hector International Airport (FAR), Fargo, North Dakota, at 1800, and was originally en route to Lyons Field (47Y), Pelican Rapids, Minnesota.

Shortly after departing FAR, the pilot told the tower controller that he wanted to divert to JKJ. No reason was given. Witnesses saw the airplane flying at low altitude and heard the engine running prior to striking a light pole at a truck waystation, located about 2 miles south of runway 12. The right wing was severed at the root. There was no fire.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Mark Yaggie







MOORHEAD -- Sons of a Breckenridge area man who died Sunday evening, July 2, in a plane crash near Moorhead remembered their father on Monday, July 3, as a proud backer of his family’s athletic efforts and as a maker of things when he became restless.

“He was always building stuff,” said Trevor Yaggie, 16, remembering his father, Mark, 41, who died when the plane he was piloting crashed in a field just west of the Moorhead airport.

Clay County Sheriff Bill Bergquist said Monday that Yaggie died at the scene.

Austin, 18, the eldest of Yaggie’s three sons and a recent graduate of Fargo’s Shanley High School, said his dad was a frequent visitor at sporting events to show support for his boys, which include son, Dylan, 13.

“He was always there, cheering us on,” Austin Yaggie said.

Yaggie was a farmer in the Breckenridge area and also operated a spray plane business.

His sons say their father’s hobbies included collecting vintage warplanes that he took to air shows as a way of honoring veterans.

They said the plane he was flying when he crashed was a Trojan T-28, a type of plane used to train pilots starting in the 1950s.

Yaggie’s parents, Jeri and David, said that for the past several years their son had been working with them on transitioning the farming operation to ensure it continued into the next generation.

Jeri Yaggie said her son loved to fly old warbirds and “felt very strongly the importance of passing on that era of history to future generations.”

Mark Yaggie’s uncles, Don and Richard, described him as very aggressive when it came to projects he wanted to do and that he was not afraid to try new things.

His friend Sara Blaufuss described Yaggie as very loyal to friends and said the most important things in his life were faith, family, farming and flying.

Yaggie’s plane went down near the Moorhead airport on the south side of Interstate 94, according to the Clay County Sheriff’s Office.

The crash was reported at 6:05 p.m. Sunday.

It was unknown if the two-seat private plane was trying to land at the time of the crash.

Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration are handling the crash investigation.

Mark Yaggie and his family are well known in the Breckenridge community and the Yaggie name is associated with a number of businesses, including farming and trucking.

In recent years, a family charitable trust was set up by a number of Yaggie family members that, according to an article that appeared in the Wahpeton Daily News in 2016, included Mark Yaggie’s father, David.


http://www.stevenscountytimes.com


Update: The Clay County Sheriff’s Office released the name of the pilot killed in a crash near the Moorhead airport.

Mark Yaggie, 41 years old, lives in Breckenridge, Minnesota.

The FAA says the plane was a North American T-28, which is a vintage military trainer.   

Yaggie was attempting to land at the Moorhead airport when the plane went down.

Mark is a 2017 member of the Fargo Air Museum Board.

CLAY COUNTY, Minn. — The pilot of a small vintage plane is dead after crashing in a field near the Moorhead airport south of I–94.

Authorities were called about the crash just after 6 p.m.

The pilot was the only person in the plane.

When the fire department and Clay County authorities arrived on scene, fuel was leaking from the engine but was quickly stopped.

Authorities are unsure if the single engine plane had just taken off or was in mid–flight.

Officers on scene spoke to some witnesses and are now waiting for the FAA to take over the investigation.

“On arrival of everybody, they found that the plane had went down out on the cornfield, which kind of hindered the process of everybody getting out to the scene of the crash,” said Lt. Mark Empting, who is with the Clay County Sheriff’s Office. “Right now, we are currently investigating it to see what happened. The FAA has been notified and they are on their way here as well.”

The investigation is ongoing.

This latest incident follows a fatal crop spraying plane crash last week near Gwinner.

Rescue crews are responding to reports of a plane crash east of Moorhead and just south of I-94 near the weigh station.

http://www.kvrr.com







MOORHEAD - A small plane crashed by the Interstate 94 weigh station here not long after 6 p.m. Sunday, a Clay County Sheriff’s Department spokesman said.

The plane went down in a field just west of the Moorhead airport on the south side of the interstate, Sgt. Josh Schroeder said.

A call came into the Red River Regional Dispatch Center at 6:05 p.m.

It was unknown if the two-seat private plane was trying to land at the time of the crash.

Schroeder said the single-engine plane appeared to be a vintage warbird-type aircraft.

The plane had one man on board, Schroeder said. He said the condition of the pilot was not being released as of 9:30 p.m. Sunday.

Witnesses said they saw a gurney behind an ambulance with a cover over the top, WDAY-TV reported.

First responders from several agencies were at the scene, including the Moorhead Police Department, Clay County Sheriff’s Department, Minnesota State Patrol and F-M Ambulance.

Authorities on the scene said there was fuel leaking from the plane, but it did not catch fire, WDAY reported.

Schroeder said investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration had taken over the crash investigation.

http://www.wday.com

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fargo, North Dakota 

Aircraft on landing, struck the propeller.
  
Date: 29-MAR-16
Time: 16:45:00Z
Regis#: N9103F
Aircraft Make: NORTH AMERICAN
Aircraft Model: T28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: FARGO
State: North Dakota