Saturday, September 12, 2020

Pipistrel ALPHA Trainer, N520AT: Incident occurred September 09, 2020 at Hartford-Brainard Airport (KHFD), Hartford County, Connecticut

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Bradley

Aircraft experienced a tailstrike while landing.

Freer Ideas Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N520AT

Date: 09-SEP-20
Time: 21:05:00Z
Regis#: N520AT
Aircraft Make: PIPISTREL
Aircraft Model: ALPHA TRAINER
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HARTFORD
State: CONNECTICUT

Mooney M20R Ovation 3 GX, N120GX: Incident occurred September 09, 2020 in Broward County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft lost engine power and made a forced landing on the interstate.


DWH LLC


https://registry.faa.gov/N120GX


Date: 09-SEP-20

Time: 13:45:00Z
Regis#: N120GX
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK
State: FLORIDA





WEST BROWARD, Florida (WSVN) - A small plane has made an emergency landing in Alligator Alley in West Broward.

Two people were on board the plane when an emergency message was relayed to Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport just before 10 a.m., Wednesday.

The plane took off from Naples and was headed to Fort Lauderdale when the pilot began to experience engine problems.

The plane ended up making an emergency landing at Mile Marker 41 instead of landing at the airport.

7SkyForce HD hovered over the scene where damage could be seen on the left wing of the small plane.

The wing was clipped by a landscape truck which resulted in the plane spinning and ending up off the road.

Police and fire rescue crews responded to the scene.

“They were facing some mechanical problems, and the pilot was able to safely land the airplane in the right emergency shoulder,” said Florida Highway Patrol Lt. Yanko Reyes. “As he had landed the airplane, a truck was passing by on the right shoulder and struck the left wing causing the airplane to spin around.”

A man and a woman could be seen walking around the plane and taking pictures. It is believed the two individuals were the two who were on the plane. They appear to be OK.

“The pilot and passenger, as well as the driver of the truck, are well with no injuries,” Reyes said.

The cause of the plane’s engine problems is under investigation.

https://wsvn.com

Bell 206L-1/C30P LongRanger II, N461RA: Incident occurred September 09, 2020 in Binghamton, Broome County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rochester, New York

Rotorcraft while working powerline imaging, made a precautionary landing in a field.

Ranger Aviation Leasing LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N461RA

Date: 09-SEP-20
Time: 15:37:00Z
Regis#: N461RA
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: 206
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
City: BINGHAMTON
State: NEW YORK

Cessna 172D Skyhawk, N2884U: Incident occurred September 09, 2020 in Knoxville, Tennessee





Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aircraft experienced fuel issues and made a forced landing on the interstate.

East Tennessee Pilots Club Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N2884U

Date: 09-SEP-20
Time: 14:13:00Z
Regis#: N2884U
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: KNOXVILLE
State: TENNESSEE




KNOXVILLE, Tennessee — A small plane made an emergency landing on I-640 after it ran out of fuel, according to Knoxville Police. It took off safely after refueling less about an hour later.

The Cessna 172D Skyhawk with a pilot and two passengers onboard took off from Sky Ranch Airport near Alcoa Highway and was on the way to Island Home Airport in South Knoxville when he realized he didn't have enough fuel to make it, according to Capt. D.J. Corcoran with the Knoxville Fire Dept.

The plane landed safely in the eastbound lanes of the interstate near Washington Pike around 10 a.m. No vehicles were hit when the plane came in for a landing and the plane was not damaged.

Dispatchers told 10News they had no warning from air traffic control. All of their information was coming in from witnesses who saw the plane.

Corcoran said a friend of the pilot brought fuel to the landing area and they were able to refuel the plane.

Authorities blocked the interstate, giving the pilot approximately 2,000 feet of space to safely take off. The plane was back in the air in just about an hour.

https://www.wbir.com

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N172CS: Accident occurred September 07, 2020 at Friday Harbor Airport (KFHR), San Juan County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

https://registry.faa.gov/N172CS

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 7, 2020 in Friday Harbor, WA
Aircraft: Cessna 172, registration: N172CS

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft during landing flipped over. 

Date: 07-SEP-20
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N172CS
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: FRIDAY HARBOR
State: WASHINGTON

Helio H-295-1400 Super Courier, N68857: Accidents occurred September 10, 2020 and September 25, 2016

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska 

Wright Air Service Inc


Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Thursday, September 10, 2020 in Fairbanks, AK
Aircraft: Helio H 295, registration: N68857

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft struck trees during takeoff at Fairbanks International Airport (PAFA), Alaska.  

Date: 10-SEP-20
Time: 23:15:00Z
Regis#: N68857
Aircraft Make: HELIO
Aircraft Model: H295
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: FAIRBANKS
State: ALASKA 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Location: Delta Junction, AK
Accident Number: ANC16LA071
Date & Time: 09/25/2016, 1600 AKD
Registration: N68857
Aircraft: HELIO H-295
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled

Analysis

The airline transport pilot was departing from an 800-ft-long remote, unimproved airstrip that had accumulated between 1 and 2 inches of wet snow. He stated that the airplane seemed to accelerate normally but that it failed to become airborne at his established go/no-go decision point (about 400 ft down the airstrip). With about one-third of the airstrip remaining, he realized that, if he rejected the takeoff, he would be unable to stop the airplane on the remaining airstrip due to the wet snow. So, the pilot chose to continue the takeoff through the low brush at the end of the airstrip. The airplane became airborne, settled back to the ground, and then became airborne again. The main landing gear impacted brush on a small embankment, and the airplane then began to settle. The pilot saw a clear area ahead of the airstrip that led into a creek bed; he reduced the power to idle and held full-aft pressure on the control yoke. The airplane settled to the surface in a three-point attitude and came to rest in the creek bed, which resulted in substantial damage to the vertical stabilizer.

The pilot stated there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's decision to take off from a wet, snowy airstrip and his delayed decision to abort the takeoff, which resulted in a runway excursion.

Findings

Aircraft
Takeoff distance - Capability exceeded (Cause)

Personnel issues
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)
Delayed action - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Snow/slush/ice covered surface - Effect on personnel (Cause)
Snow - Effect on operation (Cause)
Object/animal/substance - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information 

On September 25, 2016, about 1600 Alaska daylight time, a tundra tire-equipped Helio Courier H-295 airplane, N68857, sustained substantial damage following a runway excursion during takeoff from a remote, unimproved airstrip about 35 miles southwest of Delta Junction, Alaska. The certificated airline transport pilot, the sole occupant of the airplane, sustained no injury. The airplane was registered to Bursiel Equipment, Inc., Fairbanks, Alaska, and was being operated by Wright Air Service, Fairbanks, as a visual flight rules (VFR) on-demand commercial flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a VFR flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from the Fairbanks International Airport, Fairbanks, about 1500.

During a telephone interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge on September 26, the pilot stated that airplane landed at the 800-foot gravel airstrip near the East Fork of the Little Delta River about 1540 to transport moose meat for a customer to Fairbanks. The moose meat was weighed at 625 pounds before being loaded into the airplane. The pilot reported on the NTSB Form 6120.1 Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report that about 1-2 inches of wet snow had accumulated on the gravel airstrip and winds originated from the north/northeast estimated at 7 knots. Additionally, marginal visual flight rules conditions were reported by the pilot as 5 statute miles with light snow. He reported he calculated his takeoff weight at 3400 pounds with a "middle center of gravity location."

The pilot stated that after conducting a pre-takeoff contamination check of the airplane, the flaps were set to 30 degrees, the trim set for takeoff, and the before takeoff checklist was completed. He positioned the airplane for a departure to the north, prior to locking the tail wheel, confirming the flaps and trim were set, and selecting a go/no-go point about 400 feet down the airstrip. The pilot began the takeoff sequence and reported that the initial indications were for a normal takeoff through the selected go/no-go decision point. With about one third of the airstrip remaining, the pilot realized the airplane would not become airborne at the designated go/no-go decision point and that he would be unable to stop in the remaining distance if he rejected the takeoff due to the snow on the airstrip. He elected to continue the takeoff through the low brush at the end of the airstrip in an attempt to gain more airspeed. He reported that the airplane became airborne, settled back to the surface, before becoming airborne again. The main landing gear impacted brush on a small embankment and the airplane began to settle. The pilot observed a clear area ahead of the airstrip that lead into a creek bed; he reduced the power to idle, and held full aft pressure on the control yoke. The airplane settled to the surface in a three-point attitude, and came to rest in the creek bed with a left wing low attitude. Upon exiting the airplane in the creek bed, the pilot noted that the wind had become calm and the snow fall had stopped.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the vertical stabilizer.

The pilot stated there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest weather reporting facility was the Allen Army Airfield, Fort Greely, Alaska, about 35 miles northeast of the accident site. At 1559, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) was reporting in part: wind, calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition, scattered clouds 1,300 feet, broken clouds 3,200 feet; temperature 37 degrees F; dew point 36 degrees F; altimeter 29.93 inHg.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Helio H-295 Airplane Flight Manual

The Helio H-295 Airplane Flight Manual includes various performance charts for determining the values for takeoff ground run and takeoff distance to clear a 50-foot obstacle. The performance chart for determining the values for the takeoff ground run has correction factors for wet grass and soft turf, but not for wet snow. The performance chart for determining the values for the takeoff distance to clear a 50-foot obstacle does not incorporate any correction factors for the pilot to utilize.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Soft Field Operations

The Federal Aviation Administration has published FAA-H-8083-3A Airplane Flying Handbook (2004). This document discusses takeoff considerations from soft fields and states in part:

Takeoffs and climbs from soft fields require the use of operational techniques for getting the airplane airborne as quickly as possible to eliminate the drag caused by tall grass, soft sand, mud, and snow, and may or may not require climbing over an obstacle. The technique makes judicious use of ground effect and requires a feel for the airplane and fine control touch. Soft surfaces or long, wet grass usually reduces the airplane's acceleration during the takeoff roll so much that adequate takeoff speed might not be attained if normal takeoff techniques were employed.

Takeoff and Obstacle Clearance Considerations

The Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand has published Takeoff and Landing Performance (2011). This document discusses takeoff and obstacle clearance considerations and states in part:

Grass, soft ground or snow increase the rolling resistance and therefore the takeoff ground run will be longer than on a sealed or paved runway.

Plan to clear obstacles on the climb out path by at least 50 feet. Consider what your aircraft climb gradient is likely to be as part of your takeoff performance calculations – especially if terrain, wires, and the possibility of downdraughts are factors in the climb out path.

History of Flight

Takeoff
Miscellaneous/other (Defining event)

Runway excursion
Collision during takeoff/land 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age:42, Male 
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/16/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/28/2016
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 13500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1800 hours (Total, this make and model), 11300 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 300 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 110 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: HELIO
Registration: N68857
Model/Series: H-295
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1463
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/06/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.:3800 lbs 
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3090.2 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: GO-480-G1D6
Registered Owner: Bursiel Equipment, Inc.
Rated Power: 295 hp
Operator: Wright Air Service
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter Air Carrier (135); On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: Wright Air Service
Operator Designator Code: HYTA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PABI, 1277 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 31 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2359 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 66°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1300 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3200 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 3°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Rain
Departure Point: FAIRBANKS, AK (FAI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: FAIRBANKS, AK (FAI)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:1500 AKD 
Type of Airspace: Class G; Military Operation Area

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 63.788889, -146.798611 (est)

View of airplane in creek. 

 View of airplane in creek. 

 View of windshield separation. 

 View of vertical stabilizer. 

 View of vertical stabilizer. 

 View of vertical stabilizer.


Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N19813: Accident occurred September 07, 2020 at New Castle Airport (KILG), Wilmington, Delaware

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Boeing Employees Flying Association Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N19813

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 7, 2020 in WILMINGTON, DE
Aircraft: Cessna 172, registration: N19813

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft experienced hard landing damaging the propeller.

Date: 07-SEP-20
Time: 19:42:00Z
Regis#: N19813
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WILMINGTON

State: DELAWARE 

Aircraft landed hard and incurred damage to the propeller and nose gear.

Date: 07-SEP-20
Time: 19:42:00Z
Regis#: N19813
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WILMINGTON
State: DELAWARE

Cessna 182P Skylane, N21488: Accident occurred August 17, 2020 in Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia

Clik Services LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N21488

NTSB Identification: ERA20CA301
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 17, 2020 in Savannah, GA
Aircraft: Cessna 182, registration: N21488

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Cessna 414, N698D: Accident occurred August 30, 2020 at Ray Community Airport (57D), Macomb County, Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Belleville, Michigan

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Yuli Services Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N698D

Location: Ray, MI
Accident Number: CEN20LA372
Date & Time: 08/30/2020, 1700 UTC
Registration: N698D
Aircraft: Cessna 414
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On August 30, 2020, about 1700 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 414 airplane, N697D, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at the Ray Community Airport (57D), near Ray, Michigan. The pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

A witness, who was a pilot with multiengine experience, reported seeing the airplane taxi onto runway 28 for departure. The airplane stopped on the runway and then the engines went to full power. The airplane accelerated and started to veer to the left and then over corrected to the right and at that point it was going to exit the runway. The the nose of the airplane came up and the airplane attempted to fly in ground effect with both wings wallowing near stall. One wing eventually dropped and the airplane pancaked sideways near the end of runway 28 in the grass field.

The airplane sustained substantial damage including crushing damage to its forward fuselage. The nose of the airplane was bent upward and rearward.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N698D
Model/Series: 414 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MTC, 580 ft msl
Observation Time: 2055 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 15°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 140°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5500 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.89 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:

Beechcraft G35 Bonanza, N4636D: Accident occurred September 07, 2020 near Canyon Lake Airport (34TS), Comal County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf



Location: Canyon Lake, TX

Accident Number: CEN20LA380
Date & Time: 09/07/2020, 1247 CDT
Registration: N4636D
Aircraft: Beech 35
Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On September 7, 2020, about 1247 central daylight time, a Beech G35 airplane, N4636D, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Canyon Lake, Texas. The pilot and one passenger were seriously injured. A second passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.


The pilot reported to a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector that while enroute to the Canyon Lake Airport (34TS) the engine lost all power a few minutes after he switched the fuel selector to the left main fuel tank. The pilot attempted a forced landing to a clearing but struck trees on the edge of the clearing and the airplane impacted the ground. The airplane incurred substantial damage to its fuselage and both wings.


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Beech

Registration: N4636D
Model/Series: 35 G35
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BAZ, 658 ft msl
Observation Time: 1751 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots / , 210°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Fort Stockton, TX (FST)
Destination: Canyon Lake, TX (34TS)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Serious

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:







CANYON LAKE, Texas - Construction workers rushed to rescue two adults and a child after their plane crashed north of Canyon Lake this Labor Day.

Hugo Sanchez was on lunch break with his crew when he said they saw the small plane flying about 15 to 20 feet above a home on Primrose Path.

He said they thought it was going to land on the home. Instead, the Beechcraft G35 Bonanza crashed into a field. Sanchez said his crew immediately ran to help while calling 911.

At the scene, they found a man, woman and a little girl, who they say looked to be around five.

Sanchez said they helped all three victims until paramedics arrived.

Sanchez said he wonders how long the victims might have been without help, if he and his crew had not witnessed the crash

He says the crash was silent, it appeared like the engine had gone out and there was no fire after.

Sanchez told us the woman had a gash on her forehead and the man was bleeding from his ear. Both were flown to a hospital in Kyle, Texas.

"The baby, she didn't have any injuries, but she did seem scared," Sanchez said.

The girl was released to a parent, who arrived at the scene after the crash.

Sanchez said he thinks the three were very lucky. As of Monday night, we've learned the plane took off from Fort Stockton. This is the second plane traveling from west Texas in the last five months to crash at Canyon Lake. The Federal Aviation Administration is taking over the investigation.

https://news4sanantonio.com