Thursday, February 14, 2019

Ryan Navion D, N384TL: Accident occurred January 20, 2019 at Harry P. Williams Memorial Airport (KPTN), Patterson, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N384TL

Location: Patterson, LA
Accident Number: GAA19CA115
Date & Time: 01/20/2019, 1345 CST
Registration: N384TL
Aircraft: NAVION NAVION
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, while on a 3-mile base leg, he encountered a flock of large birds circling. He aborted the base leg and made a rapid descent to avoid the birds, but the birds followed. The pilot continued the dive and observed power lines in the vicinity. He made an "evasive maneuver (dive down)" to avoid the power lines, but the vertical stabilizer struck the power lines, shearing off the vertical stabilizer and rudder.

The pilot maintained control, climbed, declared "mayday", and requested flight following to an airport without a crosswind for landing. He approached at a higher airspeed to reduce the left turning tendencies and, during the landing roll, the airplane veered left off the runway into an adjacent grass and mud field.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the vertical stabilizer and rudder.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/23/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/23/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1327 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1000 hours (Total, this make and model), 1327 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 15.5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4.4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: NAVION
Registration: N384TL
Model/Series: NAVION D
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1948
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: NAV-4-1384
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/03/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2838.73 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-BA
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPTN, 9 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1956 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 287°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 310°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.28 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / 0°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Gonzales, LA (REG)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Patterson, LA (PTN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1326 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: HARRY P WILLIAMS MEMORIAL (PTN)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 8 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  29.707222, -91.296389 (est)

Zenith Zodiac CH650B, N650LN: Accident occurred July 02, 2017 at Lazy B Ranch Airport (0P8), Dover, York County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N650LN 



Location: Dover, PA
Accident Number: ERA17TA233
Date & Time: 07/02/2017, 1325 EDT
Registration: N650LN
Aircraft: LAWRENCE O NOLTE ZODIAC CH650B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Runway excursion
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Flight Test 

On July 2, 2017, about 1325 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Zodiac CH650B, N650LN, was substantially damaged during landing at Lazy B Ranch Airport (0P8), Dover, Pennsylvania. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

According to the pilot, the accident flight was the first flight of the Phase 1 test period for the experimental airplane. During the flight, while on the crosswind leg of the airport traffic pattern for runway 5, the engine lost total power and the pilot noted that there was no fuel pressure indication or electrical system charge. He attempted to restart the engine with the secondary fuel pump, however, the engine would not start. He maneuvered the airplane to land on runway 5 and stated that the airplane touched down longer and faster than "normal due to a no flap condition." The airplane overran the runway, impacted a fence, and came to rest on its nose.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector who examined the airplane, the firewall and engine mounts were substantially damaged. In addition, the alternator and main circuit board were tested with no anomalies noted. The electrical wiring was examined on the airplane with no anomalies noted.

According to FAA records, the airplane was issued an experimental airworthiness certificate on December 16, 2016. The two-seat, low wing, monoplane was equipped with a Continental Motors Inc. O-200 series, 100 hp, engine. According to the airframe maintenance logbook, the most recent condition inspection was performed on June 17, 2017, at a total time of 0 hours. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accumulated 0.8 hours. According to the pilot, the airplane was equipped with primary and secondary electrically-driven fuel pumps. The airplane was not equipped with an engine-driven fuel pump. In addition, the flaps were electrically actuated.

The pilot reported the battery that was used on the amateur-built airplane was a lithium motorcycle battery and "not intended for use on aircraft." In addition, he had charged that battery with a charger that was specifically not recommended for use on lithium batteries. Since he was attempting to charge the battery with an incompatible charger, he thought that he probably started the flight with "low battery charge." Then, when the alternator was trying to recharge the battery, it overheated, and the battery subsequently shut down, resulting in a loss of electrical power to the airplane. Furthermore, the airplane was not equipped with a backup battery, which he reported could have prevented the accident if it was installed. Lastly, he stated that there was no mechanical malfunction of the airplane, that there was an electrical problem "due to the use of a battery not designed for this application and improper maintenance on that battery." 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/09/2017
Flight Time:  400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 277.7 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 0.3 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0.3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: LAWRENCE O NOLTE
Registration: N650LN
Model/Series: ZODIAC CH650B NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2016
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental Light Sport
Serial Number: 65-8990
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/17/2017, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 1 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 0.8 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors Inc
ELT:  C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-200 series
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: THV, 486 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1253 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 203°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Dover, PA (0P8)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Dover, PA (0P8)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1300 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: LAZY B RANCH (0P8)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 450 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 05
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2600 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing; Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.022500, -76.816667 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA233
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 02, 2017 in Dover, PA
Aircraft: LAWRENCE O NOLTE ZODIAC CH650B, registration: N650LN
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 2, 2017, about 1325 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Zodiac CH650B, N650LN, was substantially damaged during landing at Lazy B Ranch Airport (0P8), Dover, Pennsylvania. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

According to the pilot, the accident flight was the first flight of the Phase 1 test period for the experimental airplane. During the flight, while on the crosswind leg of the airport traffic pattern for runway 5, the engine lost total power and the pilot noted that there was no fuel pressure indication or electrical system charge. He attempted to restart the engine with the secondary fuel pump, however, the engine would not start. He maneuvered the airplane to land on runway 5 and stated that the airplane touched down longer and faster than "normal due to a no flap condition." The airplane overran the runway, impacted a fence, and came to rest on its nose.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector who examined the airplane, the firewall and engine mounts were substantially damaged.

According to FAA records, the airplane was issued an experimental airworthiness certificate on December 16, 2016. The two-seat, low wing, monoplane was equipped with a Continental Motors Inc. O-200 series, 100 hp, engine. According to the airframe maintenance logbook, the most recent condition inspection was performed on June 17, 2017, at a total time of 0 hours. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accumulated 0.8 hours. According to the pilot, the airplane was equipped with primary and secondary electrically driven fuel pumps. In addition, the flaps were electrically actuated.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Rand KR-2, N269HJ: Accident occurred June 30, 2017 at Skypark Estates Airpark (18FD), Baker, Okaloosa County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama
Continental Motors Group; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N269HJ




Location: Baker, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA220
Date & Time: 06/30/2017, 1238 EDT
Registration: N269HJ
Aircraft: Nunley KR2
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 30, 2017, about 1238 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built KR2, N269HJ, was destroyed following a collision with terrain at Skypark Estates Airpark (18FD), Baker, Florida. The commercial pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that he was preparing for a local flight as part of the 40-hr phase I test period. The airplane had a total of 12 hours accumulated time and he was the registered builder of the airplane. The preflight operations were normal, he performed an engine run-up, and taxied to the end of the runway for departure. The fuel tank contained 10 gallons of fuel. The takeoff was normal until about half way down the runway, when the engine "sputtered and hesitated" and lost power. He was past the point where he could land on the runway, so he looked for a place to perform a forced landing. He initiated a right turn to avoid nearby houses, but, the wind was out of the north and pushed him to the left. He steepened the turn; however, he realized he needed more power to remain airborne. He stated that the engine never stopped running, but it was not producing enough power. He did not recall the actual impact due to his injuries.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate for rotorcraft and gyroplane. He did not hold an airplane single-engine landrating. He stated in an interview that he was ready to take his sport pilot certificate check ride; however, he was unable to complete it due to weather cancelations. He reported 2,000 hours total flight time, including 500 hours in "ultralights."

A witness was on the airfield and observed the airplane as it took off on runway 27. About 300 to 500 ft agl, after takeoff, the engine sputtered and changed sound. This occurred as the pilot began a 45º climbing turn to the right. The pilot then began a "tight" turn to the left and the airplane descended toward the ground. The witness reported that the engine appeared to be running throughout the accident sequence and may have been near idle power during the descent.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The wings separated from the airframe and were found fragmented. The engine, firewall, and propeller separated from the forward fuselage. The empennage remained attached to the aft fuselage. There was no fire.

The engine was examined by an FAA inspector and a representative from the engine manufacturer. The engine exhibited impact damage predominantly on the under and left sides. The two-blade, fixed pitch, wooden propeller remained attached to the hub and the hub remained attached to the crankshaft. The propeller blades were shattered into numerous pieces.

The carburetor exhibited impact damage. It was broken free from the induction system and the inlet fuel line was separated. The throttle control arm was found loose on the throttle control shaft; however, there was impact damage to the area and the pre-accident condition could not be determined. The carburetor was disassembled, and the internal components were undamaged. The fuel inlet screen was clean.

The left magneto remained attached to the engine with impact damage evident to the distributor section. When rotated manually, it would produce spark on one post. It was removed and examined; the distributor was impact-damaged, and the distributor gear was displaced from impact forces. The right magneto was undamaged and remained attached to the engine. It was rotated manually and produced spark on all leads and in the correct order.

The top spark plugs were removed for examination. The bottom spark plugs exhibited impact damage. The top plug electrodes exhibited minimal wear and light gray color when compared to a Champion inspection chart.

The engine was rotated manually; internal continuity was confirmed, and compression and suction were observed on the No. 1 and No. 3 cylinders. Internal inspection of the cylinder components revealed normal operating and wear signatures. The No. 2 cylinder exhibited impact damage. Further disassembly revealed a fractured mounting stud under the intake valve and the exhaust valve was stuck in the open position. The mounting stud was determined to be from the carburetor and showed signatures of separation during the impact sequence. The exhaust valve was removed and was bent from impact. The No. 4 cylinder also exhibited impact damage to the head with damage to the valves. Other than impact damage, the internal components of the No. 2 and No. 4 cylinders revealed normal operating and wear signatures.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 49, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Gyroplane; Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/12/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 2000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 12 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Nunley
Registration: N269HJ
Model/Series: KR2
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2017
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 8362
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O-170
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CEW, 213 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1753 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 120°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2700 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 25°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Baker, FL (18FD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Baker, FL (18FD)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1238 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Skypark Estates Airpark (18FD)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 250 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3015 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 30.854167, -86.667222 (est)



NTSB Identification: ERA17LA220
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 30, 2017 in Baker, FL
Aircraft: Nunley KR2, registration: N269HJ
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 30, 2017, about 1238 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built KR2, N269HJ, was destroyed following a collision with terrain at Skypark Estates Airpark (18FD), Baker, Florida. The commercial pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

A witness was on the airfield and observed the airplane as it took off on runway 27. About 300 to 500 ft agl, after takeoff, the engine sputtered and changed sound. This occurred as the pilot began a 45º climbing turn to the right. The pilot then began a "tight" turn to the left and the airplane descended toward the ground. The witness reported that the engine appeared to be running throughout the accident sequence and may have been near idle power during the descent.
The airplane collided with the ground and first responders assisted the pilot out of the wreckage.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The wings separated from the airframe and were found fragmented. The engine and propeller separated from the forward fuselage. The empennage remained attached to the aft fuselage.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Vans RV-10, N865HB: Accident occurred June 26, 2017 at Blairsville Airport (KDZJ), Union County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N865HB


Location: Blairsville, GA
Accident Number: ERA17LA217
Date & Time: 06/26/2017, 1400 EDT
Registration: N865HB
Aircraft: BARNES RICHARD B/HOWE MICHAEL VANS RV 10
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 26, 2017, at 1400 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Vans RV-10, N865HB, was substantially damaged during a runway excursion after landing at Blairsville Airport (DZL), Blairsville, Georgia. The airline transport pilot and a passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which departed Lumpkin County-Wimpys Airport (9A0), Dahlonega, Georgia about 1345, and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he completed a landing to runway 26, retracted the flaps, and applied takeoff power to complete a touch-and-go landing. The nose turned to the right, the pilot corrected with a left rudder application, but the airplane continued to the right. The pilot reduced engine power, aborted the takeoff, and applied left braking but the airplane continued to the right, departed the runway, and travelled through a "depression" before coming to rest. As the main landing gear dropped into the depression, the tail section struck the ground which substantially damaged the tail structure.

The pilot held airline transport, flight engineer, flight instructor, and private pilot certificates with ratings for airplane single engine, multiengine, and rotorcraft helicopter. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class medical certificate was issued May 9, 2017. He reported 21,000 total hours of flight experience of which 100 hours was in the accident airplane make and model.

The four-place, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 2010 and powered by a Lycoming XIO-540D4A5, 260-hp engine. The most recent condition inspection was completed on April 7, 2017 and the airplane had accrued 365 total aircraft hours.

The airplane was configured with a castering nose landing gear and steering was accomplished by asymmetrical braking. The main landing gear was equipped with wheel pants, and according to the pilot, the tires could not be serviced with the wheel pants installed.

At 1400, the weather recorded at Western Carolina Regional Airport (RHP) at 1,696 feet elevation, 21 miles north of DZL, included clear skies, wind from 030° at 3 knots, and visibility 10 statute miles. The temperature was 25°C, and the dew point was 13°C. The altimeter setting was 30.18 inches of mercury.

The airplane was examined at the scene by an FAA aviation safety inspector. Examination revealed that the rudder and the tail structure just forward of the rudder were substantially damaged. The right main landing gear wheel pant was removed, and examination revealed that the tire and the innertube had each rotated independently of each other on the rim, and that the innertube valve stem was severed.

The pilot reported no deficiencies with the handling and performance of the airplane. The only mechanical malfunction/failure cited by the pilot was, "Right main tire lost all pressure."

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Flight Engineer; Private
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/04/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/09/2017
Flight Time:  21000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 100 hours (Total, this make and model), 15000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 45 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BARNES RICHARD B/HOWE MICHAEL
Registration: N865HB
Model/Series: VANS RV 10 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2010
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 40093
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/09/2017, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2700 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 480 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: XIO-540D4A5
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRHP, 1696 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 21 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1800 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 17°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 30°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Dahlonega, GA (9A0)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Blairsville, GA (DZJ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1345 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: BLAIRSVILLE (DZJ)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1907 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 26
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5004 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 34.860000, -83.991667 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA217
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 26, 2017 in Blairsville, GA
Aircraft: BARNES RICHARD B/HOWE MICHAEL VANS RV 10, registration: N865HB
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 26, 2017, at 1400 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Vans RV-10, N865HB, was substantially damaged during a runway excursion after landing at Blairsville Airport (DZL), Blairsville, Georgia. The airline transport pilot and a passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which departed Lumpkin County-Wimpys Airport (9A0), Dahlonega, Georgia about 1345 and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he completed a landing to runway 26, retracted the flaps, and applied takeoff power to complete a touch-and-go landing. The nose turned to the right, the pilot corrected with a left rudder application, but the airplane continued to the right. The pilot reduced engine power, aborted the takeoff, and applied left braking but the airplane continued to the right, departed the runway, and travelled through a "depression" before coming to rest. As the main landing gear dropped into the depression, the tail section struck the ground which substantially damaged the tail structure.

The pilot held airline transport, flight engineer, flight instructor, and private pilot certificates with ratings for airplane single engine, multiengine, and rotorcraft helicopter. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class medical certificate was issued May 9, 2017. He reported 21,000 total hours of flight experience of which 100 hours was in the accident airplane make and model.

The four-place, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 2010 and powered by a Lycoming XIO-540D4A5, 260-hp engine. The most recent condition inspection was completed on April 7, 2017 and the airplane had accrued 365 total aircraft hours.

The airplane was configured with a castering nose landing gear and steering was accomplished by asymmetrical braking.

At 1400, the weather recorded at Western Carolina Regional Airport (RHP) at 1,696 feet elevation, 21 miles north of DZL, included clear skies, wind from 030° at 3 knots, and visibility 10 statute miles. The temperature was 25°C, and the dew point was 13°C. The altimeter setting was 30.18 inches of mercury.

The airplane was examined at the scene by an FAA aviation safety inspector. Examination revealed that the rudder and the tail structure just forward of the rudder were substantially damaged. The right main landing gear wheel pant was removed, and examination revealed that the tire and the innertube had each rotated independently of each other on the rim, and that the innertube valve stem was severed.

The pilot reported no deficiencies with the handling and performance of the airplane. The only mechanical malfunction/failure cited by the pilot was, "Right main tire lost all pressure."

Aero Commander 200D, registered to a private company and operated by the pilot, N929DM: Accident occurred June 24, 2017 near Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (KECP), Panama City, Bay County, Florida



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Vestavia Hills, Alabama
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N929DM



Location: Panama City, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA212
Date & Time: 06/24/2017, 1300 CDT
Registration: N929DM
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER 200D
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 24, 2017, about 1300 central daylight time, an Aero Commander 200D, N929DM, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing while approaching Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (ECP), Panama City, Florida. The pilot and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to a private company and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the flight was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from the Malden Regional Airport (MAW), Malden, Missouri, about 1030.

The pilot stated that he topped off the airplane's four fuel tanks (20 gallons each, 18.5 gallons usable) prior to the estimated 2 hour and 20-minute flight. He started the engine, taxied, and took off on the left main fuel tank and climbed to 7,000 ft mean sea level (msl), burning about 18 gph. When he leveled off at 7,000 ft msl, he set engine power to a 15.5 gph fuel burn rate. The pilot said he had to deviate around weather but used a stop watch to remind him to switch tanks every 30 minutes, which he said he did during the entire flight. He cycled from the left main tank over to the left auxiliary tank after he leveled off at 7,000 ft msl. He then switched to the right auxiliary tank, then the right main tank, before switching back to the left main fuel tank for the remainder of the flight. About 20 minutes after switching to the left main tank, the engine lost power when he was five miles from the airport at an altitude of about 2,000 ft mean sea level (msl) (about 1,930 above ground level).

The pilot said the "engine was still running but not producing hardly any power, if any" and he was unable to maintain altitude, so he prepared to make a forced landing on a highway. During this time, he adjusted the mixture control and brought the throttle full forward, but to no avail. The pilot said he did not turn on the auxiliary fuel boost pump or switch fuel tanks as per the emergency checklist, and instead focused on trying to make a safe landing in a clearing between a set of power lines and a forest. He also thought he had about 20 minutes of fuel remaining in the left tank and did not consider the loss of power to be fuel related.

The airplane stalled right before touchdown and landed hard on the right main landing gear. The pilot said the engine lost complete power before touchdown. The airplane skidded, turned around and came to rest upright on a southwesterly heading resulting in substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage.

A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the left main fuel tank was intact and absent of fuel. The outboard section of the left wing, that housed the left auxiliary fuel tank, was bent up and partially separated. A small amount of fuel was observed in the left auxiliary tank and a sheen of fuel was observed under this portion of wing when it was recovered. The right wing also sustained impact damage, but the fuel tanks were not compromised. About 13 gallons of fuel were drained from the right wing auxiliary tank and about 11.5 gallons were drained from the right main tank.

Postaccident examination of the engine revealed it had sufficient oil and the spark plugs exhibited normal wear as per the Champion Check-A-Plug chart. An internal inspection of each cylinder via a lighted borescope revealed each of the cylinder's valves were intact and exhibited normal combustion deposits. The engine was rotated via manual rotation of the propeller and valve train continuity and thumb-compression were established on each cylinder. The spark plugs were re-installed, and the engine was prepped to be test-run on the airframe utilizing the airplane's own fuel system.

About 5-gallons of fuel were placed in the left main fuel tank and no leaks from the tank or its associated plumbing were observed. However, in preparation to start the engine, when the electrical fuel boost-pump was turned on to pressurize the fuel system, fuel sprayed from the b-nut that connected the main fuel supply line to the fuel manifold fitting. The b-nut was cross-threaded on the fitting and connected by about three threads. The fuel supply line was loose and not properly seated to the fitting. About six threads on the fitting were exposed, of which, two of the threads were shiny (clean) in appearance and the other four were dark from exposure to dirt and oil. There was no anti-tamper putty observed on the b-nut and fitting. No fuel stains were observed on the b-nut, fire sleeve, or surrounding area. The b-nut was tight on the fitting and had to be removed using a wrench. The b-nut was re-installed, and the engine started immediately and ran through its entire power-band without hesitation.

A review of the maintenance logbooks revealed the last annual inspection on the engine was performed on September 13, 2016, at a total time of 774.78 hours. At the time of the accident, the engine had accrued about 25.22 hours since the annual inspection. The airplane's last annual inspection was completed on February 2, 2017, at a total time of 2,850.68 flight hours.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical was issued on September 11, 2015. The pilot reported a total of 252.2 flight hours, of which, 20.2 hours, were in the accident airplane.

The weather conditions reported at ECP at 1328 included wind from 220 degrees at 8 knots, gusting to 18 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds 2,900 ft, broken clouds 3,800 ft, temperature 30° degrees C, dewpoint 23° C, and a barometric altimeter setting of 30.04 inches of mercury. The field elevation at ECP is 64 feet msl.

Per the airplane's Owner's Manual, page 4-2, ENGINE FAILURE, it states, "Should engine failure occur, the first step in any procedure is to lower the nose, set up and maintain a safe flying airspeed. Some of the most probable causes of engine failure are: fuel starvation, ignition malfunction, loss of oil and engine seizure. Some of the symptoms usually appear prior to complete engine failure. 

If the engine shows a decrease in power, starts running rough, or completely loses power, perform the following check:

1) Check that the fuel selector is on a usable tank. If necessary to switch tanks, retard the throttle, switch to desired tank.

2). Turn fuel boost pump "ON", advance throttle slowly until power is regained, and then turn OFF fuel boost pump.

3). Place mixture full rich and then lean to altitude if necessary.

4) Check ignition switch to "BOTH" position

5) Check all engine instruments. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 32, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/11/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  252.2 hours (Total, all aircraft), 20.2 hours (Total, this make and model), 161.7 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 75.4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 16.8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2.6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AERO COMMANDER
Registration: N929DM
Model/Series: 200D D
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 304
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/02/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 29 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2879.9 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors Inc
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-520A (32B)
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ECP, 68 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1328 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 340°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2900 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3800 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots / 18 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 220°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.34 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Malden, MO (MAW)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Panama City, FL (ECP)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1030 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: NORTHWEST FLORIDA BEACHES INTL (ECP)
Runway Surface Type: Dirt
Airport Elevation: 68 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry; Vegetation
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 
VFR Approach/Landing:  Forced Landing; Full Stop; Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  30.000000, -85.000000 (est)



NTSB Identification: ERA17LA212
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 24, 2017 in Panama City, FL
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER 200D, registration: N929DM
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 24, 2017, about 1300 central daylight time, an Aero Commander 200D, N929DM, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing while approaching Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (ECP, Panama City, Florida. The pilot and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to a private company and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the flight was operated on a visual flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from the Malden Regional Airport (MAW), Malden, Missouri, about 1030.

The pilot stated that he was on a 5-mile final for runway 16 at an altitude of about 2,000 ft mean sea level (msl), when he heard a "muffled bang" come from the engine. The engine then lost partial power. The pilot said he turned off the autopilot, trimmed for best glide, and prepared to make a forced landing on a highway since he knew he would be unable to make the runway. During this time, the pilot adjusted the mixture control to troubleshoot the problem and brought the throttle full forward, but to no avail. The pilot said he did no turn on the auxiliary fuel boost pump or switch fuel tanks, and instead focused on trying to make a safe landing.

The pilot stated that the airplane descended quickly and he ended up landing in a clearing between a set of power lines and a forest. The airplane stalled right before touchdown and landed hard on the right main landing gear. The airplane skidded, turned around and came to rest upright on a southwesterly heading. The pilot said that he recalled hearing "silence" just prior to touchdown and believes that the engine had stopped producing power before impact.

A review of on-scene photographs revealed that both wings and the fuselage were substantially damaged. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The weather conditions reported at ECP at 1328 included wind from 220 degrees at 8 knots, gusting to 18 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds 2,900 ft, broken clouds 3,800 ft, temperature 30° degrees C, dewpoint 23° C, and a barometric altimeter setting of 30.04 inches of mercury.