Monday, December 14, 2015

Heavy police presence at Reagan National Airport (KDCA) for 'flagged' bag

The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority says that TSA has 'flagged' a bag at Reagan National Airport. 


An all-clear has been given at Reagan National Airport after authorities investigated a suspicious piece of luggage as a precaution late Monday afternoon.

A bomb squad responded to the scene at Terminal B, where a checked bag had required followup checks, the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority (MWAA) said. Police have investigated and cleared the bag, MWAA said around 5:10 p.m.

There were no reports of delays and the terminal was not evacuated.

Police closed off a small area of the airport on the ticketing level during the investigation, but said airport operations were continuing normally.

Story and video:  http://wjla.com


TSA says an 'Explosive Ordinance Division' is at the scene investigating the bag.

MWAA says a small area has been cordoned off, but that this situation is not affecting any airport operations and all ticket counters remain open.

Mooney M20E, N5863Q: Accident occurred December 14, 2015 near Corona Municipal Airport (KAJO), Riverside County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N5863Q

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA039 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, December 14, 2015 in Corona, CA
Aircraft: MOONEY M20E, registration: N5863Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 14, 2015, about 1341 Pacific standard time, a Mooney M20E, N5863Q, experienced a partial loss of engine power during takeoff from the Corona Municipal Airport (AJO), Corona, California. The pilot (sole occupant) was uninjured and the airplane sustained substantial damage throughout. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight and no flight plan was filed. The airplane was destined for the Chino Airport (CNO), Chino, California. 

The pilot reported that this was the airplane's first flight after a new paint application. The pilot conducted a run-up with no abnormal indications. He started the takeoff roll and about halfway down the runway the airplane lifted off at 65 MPH. The pilot kept the initial climb shallow so the airplane could gain speed and altitude; however, it was not climbing. While quickly approaching the trees at the end of the runway, the pilot observed that the RPM was lower than normal despite full power and mixture. He leveled the airplane and flew towards a low spot in trees; the airplane's wing impacted a tree and it descended rapidly into the terrain below. 

The airplane has been recovered to a secure location for further examination.
 
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Riverside FSDO-21


A Riverside Police Department helicopter located the crashed plane in the brush near Corona Municipal Airport.
COURTESY OF RIVERSIDE POLICE DEPARTMENT



A pilot escaped injury December 14, when his plane crashed shortly after takeoff from Corona Municipal Airport, the Corona Fire Department said.

It wasn't immediately clear what caused the plane to go down about an eighth of a mile west of the airport, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said. 

Firefighters said the small plane, a single-engine Mooney M20E, had extensive damage.

The plane is registered to Yorba Linda resident Steve Alvarez, according to FAA records.

It wasn't immediately clear whether Alvarez was the pilot.

The Fire Department got the report of the crash at 1:42 p.m. and led the pilot out of a swampy area about 2:40 p.m., Fire Department spokeswoman Lynn Mata said.

Firefighters entered the brushy area on foot and were assisted by people in four-wheel-drive vehicles.

The Riverside Police Department's helicopter crew found the plane in the brush.

The FAA is investigating the crash, Gregor said.

Story and photo:  http://www.pe.com


CORONA, CA- A single-engine plane crashed during takeoff from Corona Municipal Airport Monday, leaving the pilot largely unscathed but seriously damaging the aircraft.

Corona Fire Department spokeswoman Lynn Mata told City News Service that the mishap occurred about 1:40 p.m. on the west end of the airfield, located in the Prado Flood Control Basin, just north of Railroad Street.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said the Mooney M20E could not stay airborne and went down in a brush-covered area 200 yards beyond Runway 25.

It was not clear whether the Mooney’s engine quit, Gregor said.

The pilot, whose identity was not immediately released, extricated himself from the wreckage before fire crews arrived a few minutes later. There was no post-impact fire, according to Mata. However, she said the aircraft sustained significant damage.

The plane’s tail number -- N5863Q -- shows it’s 50 years old and registered to a Yorba Linda man.

Source:  http://patch.com

Grumman American AA-5 Traveler, N5894L: Incident occurred December 14, 2015 at North Perry Airport (KHWO), Pembroke Pines, Broward County, Florida



PEMBROKE PINES, Fla. (WSVN) -- A small plane skidded off the runway and to a halt at a South Florida airport, Monday-.

According to airport officials, the aircraft skid off the runway at North Perry Airport and made its way onto a grassy field where it finally stopped.

The pilot of the Grumman Traveler plane said he had an issue with his breaks and couldn't stop. 

No one on board was hurt.

Story, video and photo: http://www.wsvn.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N5894L

US Aviation Academy: Flight school looks to bring Air Force training back to Perrin

In this file photo from March 25, Chuck Wu operates the flight simulator at US Aviation Academy at the North Texas Regional Airport — Perrin Field. The academy told the Grayson County Regional Mobility Authority board on Monday that it is planning a bid that, if won, would bring U.S. Air Force pilots to NTRA for their first round of training



For nearly 30 years, pilots from both the U.S. Army and Air Force earned their wings at Perrin Air Force Base. While North Texas Regional Airport — Perrin Field’s history as a military training site is a distant memory for many, a local flight school is looking to reclaim this piece of Perrin’s past.

On Monday, officials with US Aviation Academy, a flight school with one of its campuses at NTRA, asked the Grayson County Regional Mobility Authority to support its effort to secure a 10-year contract to hold U.S. Air Force initial flight training at the airport. US Aviation Executive Vice President Mark Taylor estimated the contract value at $200 million.

“The pride of bringing back Air Force training to this facility is exciting,” Taylor said. “It is a matter of pride to have the opportunity to bring this back to Texas.”

Taylor said the training was previously conducted in Texas until Doss Aviation, which currently holds the contract, moved the operations to its facility in Pueblo, Colorado.

Currently, the majority of the flight school’s students come from East Asia and train to become commercial pilots. If US Aviation is awarded the contract, the two operations will be conducted independently, Taylor said.

Perrin Air Force Base served as a training facility for pilots learning to fly the Convair F-102 Delta Dagger and other aircraft until it closed in 1971. At that time, many training operations were transferred to Randolph Air Force Base outside San Antonio.

Taylor said the school would provide what he described as “the gateway to the Air Force” — the first of four levels of pilot certification needed for Air Force pilots. The contract provides for training for between 750 and 1,950 students each year in classes ranging from 30 students to 100 students.

“Look at it like a pipeline,” Taylor said. “We are the beginning of that pipeline.”

US Aviation has conducted similar training for pilots from foreign militaries, including a class of students from Poland at its Denton location. This training included 25 hours of flight time, 25 hours of classroom training and one hour of solo flight, Taylor said.

GCRMA Board Chairman Clyde Siebman said the board is currently looking at its options for future development at the airport, but supports the initiative at this time. Siebman said as US Aviation moves forward with its proposal, it will require cooperation from the airport regarding facilities and other services. If the contract is obtained, Taylor said it would require US Aviation to construct a housing and dining facility for students.

“What we want to accomplish is to accommodate US Aviation’s attempt to obtain a greater contract without trying up the airport for the long term,” Siebman said, weighing large-scale, high-risk options against smaller, more certain opportunities.

Siebman said, if US Aviation is successful, it could be a great boon for economic growth not only at the airport, but also for the entire region. Taylor said he believes implementation of the program could mean about 125 new jobs in Texoma.

Taylor said his next step will be to speak before the Grayson County Commissioners Court and request a similar motion of support. The bid for the contract will likely be in February or March, he said, noting that incumbents typically have an advantage in seeking these contracts.

“I can think of no better place for this than a reinvigorated training location like Perrin Air Force Base,” Taylor said.

- Source: http://heralddemocrat.com

Trial delayed for alleged bomb-hoaxer on flight into Dickinson, North Dakota

BISMARCK -- The trial for a flight attendant accused of fabricating an in-flight bomb scare that prompted an emergency landing at Dickinson Theodore Roosevelt Regional Airport has been delayed.

Justin Cox-Sever of Tempe, Ariz., was scheduled for a three-day trial in federal court in Bismarck starting Tuesday. Judge Daniel Hovland granted a defense motion to delay it for two months.

The trial was rescheduled to begin Feb. 23.

Cox-Sever is accused of stuffing a bag with towels and reporting it as a suspicious package on a Delta Air Lines flight from Minneapolis to Dickinson on Sept. 9.

The airport was temporarily shut down after the plane landed.

Source:  http://www.wday.com

Eagle Creek Aviation Expands Operations



INDIANAPOLIS -  Eagle Creek Aviation Services in Indianapolis announced Monday it has completed the purchase of Montgomery Aviation's three north central Indiana locations. Eagle Creek finalized the deal after announcing its intent to purchase Montgomery Aviation earlier this year.

The purchase includes the fixed base operations flight school and maintenance facility at Indianapolis Executive Airport. It will also acquire the fixed base operations at the Frankfort / Clinton County Airport and the Grissom Aeroplex in Peru.

The Montgomery Aviation name will remain for the time being and changes to the facilities will begin over the coming months. Eagle Creek Aviation says the intent is to adjust practices and policies to better serve customers.

Eagle Creek Aviation says there are plans to expand the current maintenance, flight school, charter and aircraft sales operations at Indianapolis Executive Airport as well as placing a renewed focus on enhancing turbine maintenance. The Frankfort and Grissom locations will also see a renewed focus on developing new opportunities and incentives for customers.

"We are excited about the opportunity to expand our operations in Central Indiana, and believe they are strategic opportunities to grow our business and bring our tradition of exceptional customer service to a broader consumer base," said Eagle Creek Aviation CEO Matt Hagans. "We look forward to exceeding our customer's expectations at all our facilities."

Eagle Creek Aviation says the expansion will not affect its current operations at Eagle Creek Airpark in Indianapolis.

Source: http://www.insideindianabusiness.com

Greece privatizes island airports in €1.2bn deal

Greece has signed a €1.2bn deal transferring control of 14 regional airports to a German operator, in a striking reversal of the Syriza government’s previous tough stance against privatization.

Fraport, the Frankfurt airport operator, and Copelouzos, a private Greek contractor, were awarded a 40-year concession last year to upgrade and operate a cluster of neglected island airports that handle some two-thirds of the country’s tourist traffic.

The deal marks the biggest German investment to date in Greece and is the first large infrastructure project to be completed by Taiped, the country’s privatization agency.

Final negotiations with Fraport were frozen after the leftwing Syriza came to power in January amid a wave of anti-German sentiment over Berlin’s perceived support for implementing harsh austerity policies in Greece.

Amid deep ideological opposition within the party, Syriza initially pledged to cancel disposals of infrastructure and state-owned utilities agreed with creditors.

But the airports deal was among a handful of projects revived by Alexis Tsipras, prime minister, as a sign of Greece’s commitment to staying in the eurozone.

Stefan Schulte, Fraport chief executive, on Monday called the deal a “win-win” for “Greece and its people”.

“The project underscores the extensive know-how that Fraport will be able to provide at these 14 aviation gateways which are vital for Greece’s economy and, in particular, its huge international tourism sector,” he said.

Since seeking a rescue from international lenders in 2010, Greece has consistently fallen short of its promises to sell off as much as €50bn in state-owned assets.

The leftwing government’s misgivings about privatization were evident on Monday, with hard-left transport minister Christos Spirtzis saying he signed the concession agreement “with a great deal of pain”.

“I still disagree with the way in which these airports have been transferred ... there are terms [in the agreement] that should have been corrected,” Mr Spirtzis said.

Fraport said ownership of the 14 airports, which handled 22m passengers last year, would be retained by the Greek government throughout the concession term.

On top of the initial payment of €1.2bn next year, the Fraport-Copelouzos partnership will pay Greece an annual operating fee of €22.9m and also invest €330m in airport infrastructure by 2020.

Stergios Pitsiorlas, chairman of Taiped, said the signing of the concession sends “a strong message to everyone that the Greek economy is gaining the confidence of markets and re-entering the path of development”.

Wrapping up the airport deal opens the way for two more much-delayed infrastructure projects to be awarded to strategic investors in the next three months, according to Mr Pitsiorlas.

These are the sale of a majority stake in Piraeus port, seen as a transit hub for international container-handling groups, and in the Greek state railways organization, which links Piraeus with central and northern Europe.

Source:  http://www.ft.com

Federal Aviation Administration to Require Most Drones to Be Registered and Marked: Rules apply to virtually all consumer devices other than palm-size toys


The Wall Street Journal
By Jack Nicas
Updated Dec. 14, 2015 2:14 p.m. ET



Most drone owners will have to register their devices starting next week under rules aimed at controlling the sharp increase of unmanned aircraft in U.S. skies that officials fear threaten public safety.

The rules, unveiled on Monday, apply to drones heavier than a half-pound—which covers virtually all consumer devices other than palm-size toys. The rules require drone owners to register on a government website to receive a unique user number that they then must attach or write on any drones they own.

Users who purchased a drone before Dec. 21, when the rules take effect, will have until Feb. 19 to register. Drones purchased after Dec. 21 must be registered before their first flight. Registration costs $5 but regulators are waiving that fee for the first 30 days.

Registration is the latest step in the drone industry’s transition from a hobbyist community to a mass-market commercial industry. Regulators said they wanted to signal to drone users that the devices are more than toys and that misuse could lead to punishment.

Regulators said registration would help them hold reckless drone operators accountable and deter unsafe flights. The registration process would also put regulators in contact with drone users, enabling better education about drone rules.

”Registration will enforce the need for…users to operate unmanned aircraft safely,” Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx told reporters on Monday. Drone “enthusiasts are aviators, and with that title comes a great deal of responsibility.”

Some recreational drone users criticized the rule as a regulatory overreach. The Academy of Model Aeronautics, a decades-old model-aircraft group, said the requirement violates a 2012 law that largely prohibits the Federal Aviation Administration from regulating recreational drones. The group said the rules are “counter to Congress’s intent” and create “an unnecessary burden” for drone owners.

The FAA said it can require registration under existing aircraft-registration laws, meaning failure to register a drone technically carries the same penalties as failing to register a commercial aircraft, including fines of as much as $250,000 and a prison sentence of three years.

Those penalties would only be used in “egregious situations,” said Deputy FAA Administrator Michael Whitaker. The agency plans to enlist local law enforcement to help enforce registration, though it said it would push any unregistered users to comply rather than punish them.

The registration rules came together in just two months—an exceptionally fast timeline for aviation regulations—after Mr. Foxx initiated an expedited rule-making process in October in response to an increase in pilots’ in-flight sightings of drones.

Pilots reported drones flew closer than 500 feet to their aircraft 241 times from December 2013 to September 2015, according to a recent analysis of government data by Bard College researchers. In 28 of those cases, pilots said they had to maneuver to avoid a collision with the drone.

Some drone users questioned how registration would reduce such incidents because it is unlikely pilots would be able to read a small number on a drone as it passes in midair. “The number will only help if they actually recover the craft,” which is rare, said Peter Sachs, a Connecticut attorney who tracks drone issues.

The rules largely follow recommendations made last month by a federal task force, though the FAA added the $5 registration fee. The task force had recommended making registration free, but the FAA said laws required it to charge for any aircraft registration. Though the fee will be waived for the first 30 days, registrants will still have to enter credit-card information to verify their identity.

Task force member Brandon Torres Declet, chief executive of commercial-drone firm Measure LLC, praised regulators for their speed in creating the new rules.

The drone industry is “becoming more like manned aviation every day, and we have to come to terms with the fact that the FAA is going to continue to put additional rules and regulations in place,” he said.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsj.com

Neighbors skeptical of plan to spread out jet noise from O'Hare International Airport (KORD)



City officials offered more details Monday on a nighttime plan to spread out jet noise from O'Hare International Airport, but Chicago-area residents who attended the presentation reacted with deep skepticism.

The emerging centerpiece of the city's noise-abatement plan involves a 52-week schedule to rotate O'Hare runways used late at night each week, between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m.

The overnight rotation for arrivals and departures would not repeat the exact same runway combinations for eight weeks "to the extent possible," officials at the Chicago Department of Aviation told the fly quiet committee of the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission.

In addition, city aviation officials and their consultants fleshed out a still conceptual plan to direct pilots to execute turns shortly after taking off from O'Hare's new east-west parallel runways late at night.

The goal behind quickly changing aircraft course headings within roughly 6 miles of the airfield, when planes are at low altitude, is to navigate over the least populated areas, officials said. They said performance-based navigation technology is making such surgically executed maneuvers increasingly possible without compromising safety.

The Federal Aviation Administration has not reviewed or approved preliminary ideas, officials said.

The next major step in the process will be for the O'Hare noise commission to accept or modify the city's plan. The city would then submit a formal proposal to the FAA.

No timetable has been provided for implementing any changes.

Meanwhile, many noise-weary residents have still not given up on pressuring Rahm Emanuel's administration to retain all four of O'Hare's diagonal runways as a tool to disburse jet noise over wider areas and provide relief to communities directly east and west of the airport.

City Aviation Commissioner Ginger Evans, who did not attend Monday's meeting at the aviation department headquarters at O'Hare, has ruled out reversing plans to permanently close two of the diagonal runways.

One diagonal was shut down in August and the second will be closed no later than 2019 — to make way for construction of a sixth east-west parallel runway, set to open in 2020, as well as create room for the opening of a western access roadway into the airport, officials said.

The city has not identified funding to build the sixth parallel, and American Airlines and United Airlines have repeatedly stated that they do not support further runway construction at this time.

A spokesman for Evans said Monday that the commissioner "continues productive discussions with our airline partners."

The city's plan to ask the FAA to direct pilots to make sharp turns to thread a needle over industrial areas and forest preserves bordering residential areas is a poor substitute aimed at "trying to achieve headings as if the diagonal runways are still there," said Al Rapp, a member of Fair Allocation in Runways, a group seeking to save the two diagonals.

Schiller Park Mayor Barbara Piltaver, who is a member of the noise commission, asked the fly quiet committee: "How are we going to find consensus if Chicago is dead set on closing certain runways?"

Wood Dale resident Mary Straka was the only citizen who testified during the public comment part of Monday's meeting to say that she was encouraged by the specifics of the city's runway rotation plan.

But Straka, who said she lives about a block away from a runway that opened in 2013, said the city needs to compromise instead of dictating to city and suburban residents how O'Hare noise will be addressed.

"What we are experiencing in Wood Dale is not noise," Straka told the fly quiet committee. "It's total abuse."

Source:  http://www.chicagotribune.com

Canadian man in helicopter drug-smuggling ring pleads guilty

SEATTLE — A Canadian man has pleaded guilty to a conspiracy charge for his involvement in a ring that used low-flying helicopters to smuggle cocaine and marijuana across the U.S. border in 2008 and 2009.

After fighting extradition for years, Sean William Doak pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Seattle on Monday.

Prosecutors say the conspiracy was headed by Colin Hugh Martin, who has yet to be brought to the U.S.

The group used helicopters leased through a front company to fly hundreds of pounds of marijuana at a time into remote forest clearings in Washington state.

The pilots would meet drivers bringing shipments of cocaine up from the Los Angeles area, and fly that back into British Columbia.

One pilot, Sam Lindsay-Brown, committed suicide in the Spokane County Jail after he flew into a setup.

Source:  http://www.kirotv.com

Rans S-12 Airaile, N6202N: Fatal accident occurred December 12, 2015 at Chilhowee Gliderport (92A) Benton, Polk County, Tennessee

Gary Wayne Church:   http://registry.faa.gov/N6202N

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA068
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, December 12, 2015 in Benton, TN
Aircraft: MCCORKLE ROBERT B RANS S 12 AIRAILE, registration: N6202N
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 12, 2015, about 1440 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built RANS S-12 Airaile, N6202N, was substantially damaged when it impacted the ground shortly after taking off from Chilhowee Gilderport (92A), Benton, Tennessee. The sport pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the flight to a private airstrip in Athens, Tennessee. The personal flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. 

According to witnesses, the airplane was the third in a group of three to take off from runway 21. Witnesses noted that after the takeoff, the airplane made a "rapid" or "steep" climb, at the top of which, it began a left turn. One witness noted that it then entered a "steep wingover-like 180-degree turn reversing to the north." The airplane was then in "in a low energy state," about 150 feet in the air, at a high rate of descent, with "the left wing [then] lowering in what can only be described as a ½ to ¾ turn spin, impacting the ground with the left wing and nose." 

Another witness noted that the airplane "appeared to stall, hovered for a split second and twisted in a nose dive into [a] sod field." A third witness stated, "the airplane was in a 70-80 degrees of bank. It subsequently "descended rapidly then 'nosed over' and impacted the ground in a near vertical attitude." A fourth witness, in her office at the time, stated, "I heard the crash; the sound of the engine was loud and even right up to the moment of impact." 

Due to the accident's proximity to a road and the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector's arrival the next day, permission was granted to move the wreckage to behind an airport building. The FAA inspector's subsequent examination of the airplane did not reveal any preexisting mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Nashville FSDO-19

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov

 


BENTON, Tenn. -- The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating a fatal crash involving an Rans S-12 Airaile aircraft near Benton. 

Media outlets report that the crash happened Saturday at the Chilhowee Gilderport, killing pilot Gary Church. Sheriff Steve Ross says the two-seater aircraft went down around 12:30 p.m.

Witnesses say the Rans S-12 Airaile hit a patch of air causing it to veer and then crash into the ground. A group of bystanders attempted to help save Church before first responders arrived.

The FAA says it will release more information once the details are finalized. Church's body was sent to Nashville for an autopsy.

Story and video:   http://www.timesfreepress.com
 
Gary Wayne 

December 12, 2015


Gary Wayne Church, age 61, of Athens, passed away tragically in an airplane accident on Saturday, December 12, 2015 in Polk County, Tennessee. Gary was born in North Carolina to the late George Donald and Iva Lee Cannon Church and spent the majority of his life in McMinn County. 


Gary attended Covenant Christian Fellowship and was a man of great faith. He never met a stranger and was devoted to his county. He is known as a remarkable artist and musician. He was an avid hunter and enjoyed flying his plane. 


He is survived by his wife of 41 years, Debra (Debbi) Seibert Church of Athens; children, Israel Church and Heather Henderson of Athens; Rachel Anderson and Husband Mike of Hixson; Joel and wife Meghan Church of Athens; Micah and wife Courtney Church of Knoxville; and Jonathan and wife Kayla Church of Etowah; brothers, George “Donny” Church and wife Linda of Patterson, NC, Mike Church of Hudson, N.C.; sisters Charlotte Buff of Hudson, NC and Brenda Green and husband Dean of Gaffney, S.C. Fourteen grandchildren, several nieces, nephews, and other extended family members also survive. 


Funeral services will be held Wednesday, December 16, 2015 from the chapel of Serenity Funeral Home and Cremation Center of Etowah at 7 p.m. with Brother Steve Ward officiating. 


Family and friends will gather at 11 am on Thursday at Piney Grove United Methodist Church Cemetery for the committal service.


The family will receive friends from 5-7p.m. at the funeral home prior to the service on Wednesday.


Visit the Wayne family guestbook and leave a message of comfort.


Source: http://www.memorialsolutions.com



BENTON (WATE) – Witnesses said a small aircraft crashed right after taking off at Chilhowee Gilderport just North of Benton in Polk County, Tennessee.

The plane crashed at the end of the runway at around 2:45 p.m. Saturday according to the Polk County Sheriff’s Office. The pilot, Gary Wayne Church, 61, of Athens, was killed according to WTVC.

Church was flying a RANS S-12 Airaile experimental aircraft, according to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Deputies said Church was the sole occupant of the aircraft and he was pronounced dead on the scene.

The FAA’s Nashville office is investigating what caused the crash.

Funeral services for Church will be held Wednesday, December 16 from the chapel of Serenity Funeral Home and Cremation Center of Etowah at 7:00 p.m. Family will receive friends from 4-7 p.m. at the funeral home prior to the service.

The committal service is Thursday at 11:00 a.m. at Piney Grove United Methodist Church Cemetery. Online condolences may sent to serenityfunerals.com.

According to his obituary, Church spent the majority of his life in McMinn County. It states that Church “attended Covenant Christian Fellowship and was a man of great faith. He never met a stranger and was devoted to his county. He is known as a remarkable artist and musician. He was an avid hunter and enjoyed flying his plane.”

In 2013, the FAA recognized Church with an inclusion in the prestigious FAA Airmen Certification Database. The database, which appears on the agency’s website, names Church and other certified pilots who have met or exceeded the high educational, licensing and medical standards established by the FAA.

Source:  http://wate.com

Polk County — NewsChannel 9 has learned that an Athens man was killed over the weekend in Polk County after the small sports aircraft he was in crashed. Polk County EMS Director Steven Lofty says the victim is Gary Wayne Church of Athens.  The accident happened Saturday afternoon at about 2 p.m. at Chilhowee Gliderport in Benton.  Lofty says witnesses saw the aircraft veer and then hit the ground.  Bystanders say it was upside down when they got to it.  They righted it and tried to render aid.  The victim was declared dead by emergency responders.  His body was sent to Nashville for an autopsy.  The FAA is involved in the investigation into the cause of the crash.

Source:  http://newschannel9.com

Cessna 210F Centurion, N1891F: Incident occurred December 12, 2015 in Haskell County, Texas

Date:     12-DEC-15
Time:     00:50:00Z
Regis#:     N1891F
Aircraft Make:     CESSNA
Aircraft Model:     210
Event Type:     Incident
Highest Injury:     None
Damage:     Unknown
Flight Phase:     LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office:     FAA Lubbock FSDO-13
City:     HASKELL
State:     Texas

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, HASKELL, TX

http://registry.faa.gov/N1891F

Cessna 310Q, N647TW: Incident occurred December 13, 2015 in Batavia, Clermont County, Ohio

Date:     13-DEC-15
Time:     23:40:00Z
Regis#:     N647TW
Aircraft Make:     CESSNA
Aircraft Model:     310
Event Type:     Incident
Highest Injury:     None
Damage:     Unknown
Flight Phase:     LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Cincinnati FSDO-05
City:     BATAVIA
State:     Ohio

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, NOSE WHEEL COLLAPSED, BATAVIA, OH

http://registry.faa.gov/N647TW


North American Navion, N8849H: Fatal accident occurred November 10, 2016 (and) Incident occurred December 12, 2015 at Blairstown Airport (1N7), Warren County, New Jersey

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Sam Singer: http://registry.faa.gov/N8849H

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA042
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Blairstown, NJ
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN NAVION, registration: N8849H
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 10, 2016, about 0915 eastern standard time, a North American Navion, N8849H, was substantially damaged following a loss of control during engine startup at Blairstown Airport (1N7), Blairstown, New Jersey. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by the private pilot as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to Capital City Airport (CXY), Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

According to a mechanic who witnessed the accident, the pilot/owner last flew the accident airplane in December 2015, when it experienced a gear-up landing at 1N7. The airplane remained at the airport while the mechanic repaired damage from the gear-up landing. The repairs were completed and the airplane was supposed to be ferried to CXY for an annual inspection during the day prior to the accident. A different pilot was going to ferry the airplane, but poor weather postponed the flight. That pilot was not available on the day of the accident and the owner/pilot elected to fly the airplane to CXY himself.

During the morning of the accident, the mechanic taxied the airplane from the hangar to the fuel pump. During which, he performed an engine run-up and did not notice any anomalies with the airplane. The mechanic added that he had performed several run-ups while the airplane was at 1N7 and never experienced any anomalies with the throttle control or brakes. After fueling the airplane and completion of a preflight inspection, the pilot/owner started the engine and it went immediately to full power. The engine remained at full power and the airplane taxied at high speed into a tree.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The inspector noted that the throttle, propeller, and mixture controls were all in the full forward position. The hydraulic and alternate air controls were in the retracted position. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The pilot/owner, age 73, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on January 30, 2016. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 1,445 hours.

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable tricycle-gear airplane, serial number NAV-4-849, was manufactured in 1947. It was powered by a Continental IO-520, 285-horsepower engine, equipped with a constant-speed Hartzell propeller. The pilot purchased the airplane in 2009. Its most recent annual inspection was completed on August 21, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated approximately 2,052 total hours of operation and the engine had accumulated about 417 hours since major overhaul. The airplane had been operated for about 14 hours from the time of the last inspection, until the accident.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email  assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Samuel Singer



Samuel Singer was a decisive man, a quality a former colleague said served him well in the business world.

So how the 73-year-old pilot could have failed to act in the small plane crash that took his life Thursday is a mystery to Rich Faherty.

The fellow aviator who worked with Singer for some 20 years was among the first to learn Singer's plane had crashed about 9:30 Thursday morning at a Blairstown Township airport in northern Warren County. Another pilot had called him, saying emergency officials needed his help to get in touch with Singer's family.

Authorities have said the plane finished refueling, then went full-throttle across the runways before crashing into trees. Singer, of Warren Township in Somerset County, was pulled from the wrecked aircraft and flown to Morristown Medical Center, where he later died.

"As a pilot, the first thing you think of is if the plane suddenly went full throttle, what would you do? ... I would assume Sam would have the same mental checklist," Faherty said Friday. "The fact that Sam didn't stop the plane before it struck the trees makes me believe that something else prevented him from going through the mental checklist."

Faherty is the executive vice president of administration at BioReference Laboratories, where Singer worked for 30 years. Under Singer's guidance as chief financial officer, the company based in Elmwood Park — which provides testing services for physicians, hospitals and other clinics — went from making $1 million a year to almost $1 billion by the time he retired in 2015, Faherty said.

Singer's family said that he served in the U.S. Army, both active duty and reserves, for about 20 years starting in the 1960s. He was a father to five and a grandfather to three, devoted to his local Catholic parish and other charities. Three of his children have or are working at BioReference, Faherty said.

Singer served for nine years as a trustee at Mount St. Mary Academy, a Catholic prep school for girls in Watchung.

"The death of Sam Singer is a profound and devastating loss for the Mount St. Mary Academy community," the school said in a statement Friday. "He demonstrated a steadfast devotion to the academy's mission and values and was deeply devoted to his Catholic faith. He was a loyal friend and member of our family who will always be appreciated and missed."

A post from October on the school's Facebook page congratulated him on his retirement from the board, noting that his four daughters all graduated from the school and a granddaughter is applying there.

Singer had gotten into flying later in life, Faherty said. Federal Aviation Administration records say he got his license in 2011, though Faherty said his colleague had been flying for 10 years, frequently logging hours in the sky.

FAA records also say Singer owned the plane that crashed Thursday, a North American Navion fixed-wing, single-engine craft manufactured in 1947. The same plane was involved in a crash last December at the airport.

Faherty said it is part of the piloting community to meet up at various airports — he had met Singer and others at Blairstown Airport before.

When he heard of the crash, Faherty got in touch with Singer's wife. At the time, he said, it sounded serious but not fatal.

It wasn't until Thursday night that Faherty said he found out from another former colleague that Singer was gone. The Warren County Prosecutor's Office on Friday said Singer died of blunt force trauma, and his death was ruled an accident.

"It's really sad," Faherty said. "This is a man who was a wonderful family man, a great business associate, someone I worked with for many years. ... I missed him because he had retired. I used to see him virtually every day.


"I know how much he loved to fly," he continued. "Certainly, no one would ever have expected this to happen to him. ... The last thing you want to do is have a car accident in your plane. And that's virtually what this was."

Story, comments and photo gallery: http://www.lehighvalleylive.com

---Fatal Plane Crash Update---

At 9:23 AM, police responded to the Blairstown Airport for a plane crash. Upon arrival police found the pilot, identified as Samuel Singer of Warren Township, entrapped with serious injuries. Blairstown Hose Company and police used the jaws of life to extricate the pilot from the aircraft. Atlantic Air 1 transported the pilot to Morristown Medical Center where the pilot later passed away from his injuries. A witness stated the plane had just been refueled and the plane went full throttle across both runways and into the trees. It's still unclear what caused the plane to be in full throttle. The FAA is still investigating the cause of the crash. Blairstown Ambulance Corps, Paramedics from Atlantic, Warren County Prosecutor's Office, Warren County Hazmat, and Blairstown OEM also assisted at the scene.




BLAIRSTOWN — The pilot injured when his plane went off the runway and struck trees at Blairstown Airport on Thursday morning died at the hospital Thursday evening, according to police.

Samuel Singer, 63, of Warren Township, Somerset County, died at Morristown Medical Center as a result of his injuries.

The North American Navion aircraft crashed around 9:30 a.m. Thursday.

The pilot had finished refueling the aircraft and was preparing to take off when the plane went full throttle, shot across the runway and hit trees on the outskirts of the runway, according to Lt. Scott Johnsen of Blairstown police. Investigators will determine if the issue was caused by mechanical or operator error.

Singer was extracted from the plane by Blairstown Police officer Paul Choe and a member of Blairstown Hose Company. He was flown to Morristown Medical Center. Johnson said the pilot suffered broken bones.

The Federal Aviation Administration, Blairstown Hose Company, Atlantic Health Systems, Blairstown EMS, Blairstown police and Warren County Hazmat responded to the scene.


Source: http://www.njherald.com





A pilot sustained major injuries during a runway mishap Thursday morning at Blairstown Airport that resulted in his single-engine aircraft leaving the runway and crashing into trees, according to Blairstown police.

Lt. Scott Johnson said the crash occurred while the pilot was taxiing onto a runway and the plane somehow "got stuck in full-throttle position."

An Associated Press article previously cited Federal Aviation Administration officials reporting that the plane struck trees and crashed while landing. The plane, in fact, crossed two runways while still on the ground and before crashing into nearby trees, Johnson said.

The injured pilot was airlifted to Morristown Medical Center by Atlantic Ambulance's Air 1 helicopter, according to Johnson. The pilot was not identified and his condition is unknown.

Township police and members of the Blairstown Hose Co. and Office of Emergency Management responded and extricated the pilot from the wreckage, according to Johnson. The Blaistwon Ambulance Corps, haz-mat unit and the FAA also responded to the scene.  The crash is still under investigation.

Source:   http://www.dailyrecord.com




























A small plane struck a tree while landing about 9:15 a.m. Thursday at Blairstown Airport, the Blairstown Township fire chief said.

The pilot survived and was being removed from the plane by medical personnel just after 9:30 a.m., Chief Darren Occhiuzzo confirmed by text.

The plane was leaking fuel and Warren County's hazardous materials team was called in, county Public Safety Director Frank Wheatley said.

The pilot was loaded into a medical helicopter just before 10 a.m., Occhiuzzo said. The pilot was taken to Morristown Medical Center, according to Wheatley.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration search based on the plane's registration number, N8849H, the North American Navion is owned by Sam Singer, of Warren, New Jersey, in Somerset County. 

The fixed-wing single-engine plane was built in 1947, according to the FAA.

It was not immediately confirmed that Singer was piloting the craft at the time of the crash. Calls to a number listed for his home went unanswered Thursday afternoon.

The same plane was involved in a incident last December at the airport.  Township police, fire and emergency medical personnel responded Thursday, as will the FAA, Occhiuzzo said.

Source:   http://www.lehighvalleylive.com




BLAIRSTOWN, N.J. - The pilot of a plane suffered multiple injuries when the aircraft crashed at an airport in Warren County, New Jersey, on Thursday.

The single-engine plane somehow got stuck in full throttle and went across two runways at the Blairstown Airport before hitting some trees around 9:30 a.m., according to Blairstown police Lt. Scott Johnsen, who said that the plane did manage to get a few feet off the ground before the crash.

"It was just like a weird sound like a crash,” said Blairstown resident, Chris Wester. “Thought it was a car accident."

The pilot was taken to a hospital with broken bones, but his injuries are not considered to be life-threatening, Johnsen said.

Police have not released the name of the pilot or where he was heading to.

The pilot was the only person on the four passenger, North American Navion aircraft and emergency crews used the jaws of life to remove him from the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration is leading the investigation. 

Story and video:  http://www.wfmz.com




FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Allentown FSDO-05

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, BLAIRSTOWN, NEW JERSEY

Date:     12-DEC-15
Time:     15:45:00Z
Regis#:     N8849H
Aircraft Make:     NORTH AMERICAN
Aircraft Model:     NAVION
Event Type:     Incident
Highest Injury:     None
Damage:     Minor
Flight Phase:     LANDING (LDG)
City:     BLAIRSTOWN
State:     New Jersey

Globe GC-1B Swift, N78067: Accident occurred December 11, 2015 at Lake Elmo Airport (21D), St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA061 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 11, 2015 in Lake Elmo, MN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/03/2016
Aircraft: GLOBE GC 1B, registration: N78067
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, before departure, he performed an engine run-up with carburetor heat applied, and no anomalies were noted. The pilot departed for the personal local flight, and when the airplane reached about 100 ft above ground level, the engine power decreased from 2,400 to 1,600 rpm, so he executed a forced landing to a field. 

A postaccident examination of the airplane and engine revealed that the throttle body separated from the air intake manifold due to overload likely associated with impact. The fuel nozzle and primary venturi were missing from the carburetor and were not located. Although the engine could likely have started without these components installed, it is unlikely that it could have produced much more than idle power. Sliding marks on the sides of the throttle body revealed evidence of contact with the legs of the primary venturi. The contact marks had areas free of black deposits whereas areas adjacent to the marks were covered with deposits, indicating that a primary venturi had been installed until recently. The deposits on either side of the marks were not disturbed, indicating that the primary venturi did not rotate out of position; therefore, the primary venturi either fractured in service or was separated and lost from the throttle body after the carburetor was disassembled during the initial postaccident examination.

The Federal Aviation Administration had previously issued an airworthiness directive (AD), which required that the accident make and model carburetor be inspected at each annual, 100-hour, or progressive inspection to determine if the primary venturi was loose or missing. According to the maintenance logbooks, the last inspection conducted in accordance with the AD occurred about 1.5 months and 1 flight hour before the accident. 

Although the weather conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to the formation of carburetor icing at cruise power, it is not likely that carburetor ice caused the venturi or fuel nozzle to break because the pilot had used carburetor heat during the run up and the engine was operating at takeoff power. The accident is consistent with a loss of engine power due to the carburetor’s primary venturi, fuel nozzle, or both separating after takeoff. The reason for the separation could not be determined. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power due to the carburetor’s primary venturi, fuel nozzle, or both separating after takeoff.

On December 11, 2015, about 1400 central daylight time, a Globe GC-1B airplane, N78067, conducted a forced landing into a field shortly after departure from the Lake Elmo Airport (21D), St. Paul, Minnesota. The private rated pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damaged. The airplane was registered to Phoenix Flyers, LLC, Stillwater, Minnesota, and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident. 

The pilot reported that the engine start-up and run-up were "great" and no anomalies were noted; carburetor heat was tested during the run-up. The pilot initiated the takeoff and the airplane climbed to about 100 ft above ground level (agl) when the engine power decreased from 2,400 rpm to 1,600 rpm. The pilot maneuvered the airplane to the right to avoid trees and made a forced landing to a field. The pilot noted that carburetor ice might have caused the loss of engine power and he did not have time to apply carburetor heat after the loss of power.

The pilot reported that the airplane had 1 hour of time in operation since the last annual inspection was accomplished on October 27, 2015. 

At 1353, the St. Paul Downtown Airport weather observation, located about 9 miles southwest of the accident site, recorded wind from 090 degrees at 8 knots, 10 miles visibility, overcast cloud layer at 1,600 ft, temperature 37° F, dew point 32° F, and altimeter setting 29.75 inches of mercury. The carburetor icing probability chart included in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention, indicated that the airplane was operating in an area that was associated with a serious risk of carburetor ice accumulation at cruise power settings.



A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector performed a postaccident examination of the engine with the assistance of an engine mechanic. The examination revealed that the two-piece carburetor primary venturi was missing and subsequently could not be located during the course of the investigation. 

The carburetor was sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory, Washington, DC, for an examination, which revealed that the throttle body was fractured at the intake manifold attachment flange consistent with overstress fracture of cast aluminum. The fuel nozzle was not located in the nozzle installation hole within the fuel bowl piece and no portion was located in the screw threads. Gaskets associated with the nozzle and the gasket between the fuel bowl and the throttle body were also missing. The primary venturi portion of the two-piece venturi was missing. Sliding contact marks with a lip of material were observed at three locations on the throttle body adjacent to the main venturi, corresponding to contact with the three legs of the primary venturi. The contact marks had areas free of black deposits while areas adjacent to the marks were covered with deposits and the deposits on either side of the marks had not been disturbed. The interior of the air intake housing was viewed through the various available ports and none of the missing parts were found in the housing.

According to a representative of the carburetor manufacturer, the engine would likely start without these components, but it was unlikely that the engine would make much more than idle power without the parts installed.

Airworthiness Directive (AD) 98-01-06

According to AD 98-01-06, Precision Airmotive Corporation (now Marvel-Schebler Aircraft Carburetors) MA-3SPA carburetors with a two-piece venturi are to be inspected at each annual, 100-hour, or progressive inspection to determine if the primary venturi is loose or missing. According the maintenance logbooks, the last inspection per AD 98-01-06 that occurred before the accident was documented as accomplished on October 27, 2015.
 
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15


PHOENIX FLYERS LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N78067

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA061
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, December 11, 2015 in Lake Elmo, MN
Aircraft: GLOBE GC 1B, registration: N78067
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 11, 2015, about 1400 central daylight time, a Globe GC-1B airplane, N78067, lost engine power and the pilot made a forced landing into a field after departure from the Lake Elmo Airport (21D), St. Paul, Minnesota. The private pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Phoenix Flyers, LLC, Stillwater, Minnesota, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident. 

In a statement provided by the pilot, he reported that the engine start-up and run-up were great and no anomalies were noted; carburetor heat was applied during the run-up The pilot initiated the takeoff and the airplane climbed to about 100 feet above ground level (agl) where the engine power decreased from 2,400 rpm to 1,600 rpm. The pilot maneuvered the airplane to the right to avoid trees straight ahead and made a forced landing to a field. The pilot noted that carburetor ice might have caused the loss of engine power. 

At 1353, the St. Paul Downtown Airport weather observation, located about 9 miles southwest, reported wind from 090 degrees at 8 knots, 10 miles visibility, overcast cloud layer at 1,600 feet, temperature 37° F, dew point 32° F, and altimeter setting 29.75 inches of mercury. 

The airplane has been retained for further examination.