Sunday, January 21, 2018

Phuket International Airport baggage handlers arrested for theft

The three baggage handlers are presented along with the stolen items. Photo: Sakoo Police


Sakoo Police Chief Col Jirasak Sieamsak told The Phuket News January 21st that Sakoo Police were notified that passengers’ items had been being stolen since December last year.

“A team of Sakoo Police led by Lt Col Salan Santisatsanakun together with a team of Phuket Tourist Police led by Maj Eakkachai Siri investigated the incidents and checked CCTV footage,” Col Jirasak said.

“Today (January 21st) Police arrested two suspects; Nirut Saksri, 29 and Manot Nakpijit, 30 both from Phichit. Police then carried out a search of a house in Sakoo and seized several items. Police also found one more suspect; Chakrit Janprasert, 23 also from Phichit,” Col Jirasak explained.

Police seized more than 100 items including laptop computers, mobile phones, whiskey, watches, sunglasses, jewelry and other items,” Col Jirasak explained.

“All three suspects admitted to stealing passengers’ items while working as baggage handlers at the airport.,” Col Jirasak noted.

“Nirut and Manot were charged with carrying forbidden limited items in to the kingdom by not passing the customs process and illegal possession of Category 5 drug (marijuana) while Chakrit was charged with possession of Category 1 drug (ya bah),” Col Jirasak said.

“The arrests came after victim(s) reported having has items gone missing from their luggage at the airport. In the past police have randomly checked baggage staff and arrested them. Sometimes passengers did not take action against as they stole small items. Sometimes passengers were not sure where they had lost their items.

“Following this incident we will increase security. In addition, we will ask baggage handlers and airport staff to join a meeting where it will be explained what will happen to tourism and what the punishments are for these kinds of criminals,” Col Jirasak added.

Story and photo ➤ https://www.thephuketnews.com

Prosperity Preacher Kenneth Copeland Acquires Private Jet Bought With Followers’ Money, Has Goal of Raising $17 Million




FORT WORTH, Texas — Prosperity preacher Kenneth Copeland recently acquired a Gulfstream V private jet, which his staff says is “debt free” because of the donations of his followers. The announcement has drawn both applause and outrage.

Copeland’s organization announced on Jan. 12 that the 81-year-old took possession of the jet, which he purchased from actor, comedian and gospel songwriter Tyler Perry.

“[T]he Holy Spirit confirmed to Brother Copeland that the Gulfstream V was the plane the Lord had set aside for KCM,” claimed Charlie Bollinger, who identified as a volunteer Elite CX Team Leader. “Right away discussions began, and Brother Copeland developed a wonderful personal relationship with the seller, Christian businessman and moviemaker Tyler Perry.”

“Soon a contract was signed, a cash deposit was paid, and the aircraft was brought to Dallas for a very thorough pre-buy inspection process, which [was] wrapped up in November,” he continued. “And praise God, it was actually during Thanksgiving week that the purchase was completed, the title was signed, and thanks to the CX Team, the cash was in the bank to mark it paid in full!”

The Elite CX Team is a group of Copeland supporters who purpose to assist the prosperity preacher financially with his stated projects. Copeland points to a 2002 “prophecy” given by friend Keith Moore of Faith Life Church in Branson, who stated that the Lord was going to raise up wealthy supporters to back Copeland.

“Thus saith the Lord: I am rallying and raising up support to you. It will far surpass all you have previously seen or known,” Moore said. “I’m joining to you new partners who are very strong financially, and they will obey Me. I’m prospering your longtime partners with supernatural increase and they will obey Me.”

Copeland opined in a video posted to YouTube that he believed that the prophecy was coming to pass with the purchase of the Gulfstream V.

While it is unclear as to how much was paid for the jet, Bollinger notes that another $2.5 million is desired to upgrade the avionics in light of soon-coming FAA standards, and that the ultimate goal is to raise $17 million, which will include constructing a hanger for the plane.

Read the post on the KCM website in full here.

“[E]arlier this year when the CX leadership team met to pray and hear from the Lord, the word we heard was harvest. Yes, harvest, harvest, harvest!” he wrote. “The Lord reminded us that, through our CX Team giving, together we have sown into KCM a Citation X, a state-of-the-art HD TV truck, and now we’ve sown a Gulfstream V—all of which are producing a bountiful harvest for every single team member.”

As previously reported, in 2015, Copeland asserted on his television broadcast, “The Believer’s Voice of Victory,” that he flies on a private jet to avoid being bothered by “demon” passengers.

“Oral [Roberts] used to fly airlines,” he said. “But even back then it got to the place where it was agitating his spirit—people coming up to him, he had become famous, and they wanted him to pray for them and all that. You can’t manage that today [in] this dope-filled world, and get in a long tube with a bunch of demons. And it’s deadly.”




While he said that he didn’t want to fly with a “bunch of demons,” moments later, Copeland contended that he needed a private jet to help reach the lost.

“We’re in soul business here. We’ve got a dying world around us. We’ve got a dying nation around us,” Copeland proclaimed. “We can’t even get there on the airlines.”

Last month, in the midst of a series on “supernatural wealth transfer,” his organization posted to social media the exhortation to make the faith confessions, “The wealth of the sinner comes to me now,” “The Lord is increasing me more and more,” and “I call in the harvest on every seed sown.”

The announcement of the purchase of the Gulfstream V has generated mixed reaction, with some praising God for the plane and others lamenting that the money was not used to help the poor and hungry.

“My Father God is raising me to become like the Elite CX Team partners, moving His kingdom forward through prosperity. Hallelujah!” one commenter wrote.

“I am so happy it is here. I know God is going to use you and the plane to bless so many people. I am praying and believing for finances for the hanger and the runway,” another stated.

“Reminds me of the man who said, ‘I will pull down my barns and build bigger ones,'” a third wrote, referring to Christ’s words in Luke 12. “And, oh yes, whilst half the world goes to sleep each night with an empty stomach. Keep on your blindfolds all you gullible people who give to this scam. What a shame.”

“So somehow sowing the Gospel of Christ crucified and reaping a harvest of righteousness has become sowing money into an organization and reaping a harvest of sweet vehicles for said organization and its leader?” another asked.

Jesus said in Luke 12:15, “Take heed, and beware of covetousness, for a man’s life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth.”

Story, comments, video and photo ➤ http://christiannews.net

Mosquito XEL, flight operated in accordance with Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, unregistered: Accident occurred January 21, 2018 in Loxahatchee, Palm Beach County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
  
Location: LOXAHATCHEE, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA082
Date & Time: 01/21/2018, 1545 EST
Registration: UNREG
Aircraft: MOSQUITO XEL
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries:1 Serious 
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 21, 2018, about 1545 eastern standard time, an unregistered Mosquito XEL helicopter was substantially damaged after a loss of control and collision with terrain near Loxahatchee, Florida. The non-certificated pilot/owner was seriously injured. The flight was operated in accordance with Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed a private residence.

The pilot/owner was performing a test flight. This was his first flight in the accident helicopter. He performed a brief takeoff to a hover maneuver followed by a normal landing. During the second attempted takeoff and hover, the helicopter gained altitude and began yawing to the left. It reached treetop height of about 60 ft and continued to spin before descending and impacting the ground.

The single-seat helicopter was purchased by the pilot/owner in a ready to operate condition. It was equipped with a two-blade, semi-rigid main rotor system and was powered by a Compact Radial, MZ202, 60 hp engine.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responded to the accident site and inspected the wreckage. The helicopter's skids, lower fuselage, main rotor blades, and tail boom were all damaged during the accident. Review of FAA airworthiness records revealed that the helicopter was not registered and it never received an airworthiness certificate. In addition, there were no maintenance records.

At 1553, the reported weather at Palm Beach International Airport (PBI) West Palm Beach, Florida, located 12 nautical miles east of the accident site included: winds from 080° at 16 knots, 10 miles visibility, few clouds at 2,000 ft, broken clouds at 6,500 ft, temperature 24° C, dew point 18° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.14 inches of mercury.

According to FAA airman records, the pilot did not possess any FAA-issued pilot certificate. The FAA Inspector reported that the pilot had accumulated about 60 hours of dual instruction in two other make and model helicopters over the preceding 24 months. The pilot's logbook indicated that his last logged flight occurred on August 13, 2016. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: None
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None, None
Last FAA Medical Exam: Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 70 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model), 0 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MOSQUITO
Registration: UNREG
Model/Series: XEL
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2017
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate:
Serial Number: MXE1289
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 584 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: MZ202
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 60 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PBI, 20 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2053 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 90°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 16 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 80°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: LOXAHATCHEE, FL
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: LOXAHATCHEE, FL
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1545 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious

Latitude, Longitude: 26.729444, -80.311667 (est)

Location: LOXAHATCHEE, FL

Accident Number: ERA18LA082
Date & Time: 01/21/2018, 1545 EST
Registration: UNREG
Aircraft: MOSQUITO XEL
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 21, 2018, about 1545 eastern standard time, an unregistered experimental amateur-built, Mosquito XEL helicopter was substantially damaged after a loss of control and collision with terrain near Loxahatchee, Florida. The non-certificated pilot/owner was seriously injured. The flight was operated in accordance with Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed a private residence.

Witnesses reported that the pilot was performing a test flight. This was his first flight in the accident helicopter. He performed a brief takeoff to a hover maneuver followed by a normal landing. During the second attempted takeoff and hover, the helicopter gained altitude and started yawing to the left. It reached treetop height and continued to spin before descending and impacting the ground. The helicopter struck the ground on the belly, spreading the skids to both sides, then turned over on its side, causing the blades to strike the ground and shear off. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the helicopter was substantially damaged.

According to FAA and pilot records, the pilot had accrued a total of 70 hours of dual instruction in two other make and model helicopters in the previous 24 months. The pilot did not possess any FAA-issued pilot certificate. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MOSQUITO
Registration: UNREG
Model/Series: XEL
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PBI, 20 ft msl
Observation Time: 1541 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots, 70°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: LOXAHATCHEE, FL
Destination: LOXAHATCHEE, FL 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 26.729444, -80.311667 (est)





LOXAHATCHEE, Florida  (CBS12) — A small experimental helicopter crashed Sunday afternoon in Royal Ascot Estates, Palm Beach County Fire Rescue said.

The helicopter crashed while taking off from the owner's backyard on West Lancashire Drive, according to fire officials.

The pilot, an adult man, was taken to a local hospital for treatment, fire officials said. He was the only one on board.

Story and photo gallery ➤ http://cbs12.com

Iowa City Municipal Airport (KIOW) celebrates 100 years: Staff planning events for June 8-10 anniversary while envisioning future

Airmail is unloaded at the Iowa City Municipal Airport in 1920. 
(State Historical Society of Iowa)



IOWA CITY — As World War I was coming to an end and the United States was shifting its focus on aviation from warfare to peacetime uses, Iowa City flew into the airport business with its new facility.

In 1918, the Iowa City Municipal Airport opened its doors as a stop for airmail planes. Fast forward to today, and the general aviation airport is completing about 36,000 operations per year, which includes both takeoffs and landings, all while planning a centennial celebration.

“Commercial aviation in Iowa was basically born here with the airmail route,” said Michael Tharp, airport operations specialist. The Midwest route for airmail would typically go from Omaha to Chicago with a stop in Iowa City, he said.

Now, the airport is a general aviation facility, which Tarp said typically means any airport that doesn’t serve military or commercial airline flights.

As aviation use in the country grew, the airport added passenger service, which lasted up until the 1970s, Tharp said. The airport mostly serves flights such as business charters, medical transports and crop-dusting planes.


Aircraft, a Cessna Citation (left) and a Cessna 182, occupy the newest hanger built at the Iowa City Municipal Airport in Iowa City on January 19, 2018. The airport is celebrating its 100th anniversary.


The airport is home to 92 different aircraft as well as the University of Iowa’s Operator Performance Laboratory for aviation research.

“Even if you can’t see the whole aspects of aviation, there are so many ways aviation touches a community,” Tharp said. “We’re ... still serving a pretty healthy general aviation community.”

As part of the 100-year anniversary celebration, airport staff are planning events for June 8-10. While the exact details are still yet to be determined, Tharp said he wanted activities that touch on the different eras in aviation history, as well as features that explain what the future of aviation could be during the next 100 years.

“One hundred years, we obviously want to mark that. It’s not only important to the airport, we think it’s a pretty important event to the community,” Tharp said.

Tharp said he hopes the events help to get the next generation interested in aviation. He said the already-existing Young Eagles program to give children free plane rides every year already helps do that.

Tharp said that airport staff also hope to upgrade the public viewing area of the airport to a more parklike atmosphere to make it a destination for activities such as family picnics.

“That’s the whole purpose, is get them at least exposed to aviation, talk a little bit about what aviation can do, how they can get more involved,” Tharp said. “It’s one of those things where if you’re not directly involved in it, sometimes it’s hard to see the benefits.”

Story and slideshow ➤ http://www.thegazette.com

Air Tractor AT502, N301LA, registered to and operated by Pioneer Flying Service Inc: Fatal accident occurred April 18, 2016 in Kilbourne, West Carroll Parish, Louisiana

Danny Morgan
October 9, 1967 - April 18, 2016 
Danny Morgan was an Ag Pilot and had been for 16 years.



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Air Tractor, Inc; Olney, Texas
Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp.;  Longueuil, Quebec, Canada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Pioneer Flying Service Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N301LA

Location: Kilbourne, LA
Accident Number: CEN16LA154
Date & Time: 04/18/2016, 0910 CDT
Registration: N301LA
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 502
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event:  Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On April 18, 2016, about 0910 central daylight time, an Air Tractor Inc AT-502 airplane, N301LA, impacted terrain during spray operations near Kilbourne, Louisiana. The pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Pioneer Flying Service, Inc., under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, with no flight plan filed. The local flight departed a private airport about 0900. 

According to operator personnel, the pilot was conducting his second load of spray operations for the day to the same farm area, which was about ¼ mile north of the accident site. A witness near the accident noticed the airplane enter a rapid descent while in a turn until it impacted the ground. A post-crash fire ensued.

The farmer whose field was being sprayed stated the pilot was "dressing up" a field, which had a tight area shaped like a bull nose, with trees at the end. The farmer did not witness the accident. He remarked the pilot was able to spray tight areas of fields that other pilots elected not to spray. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification:  Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/15/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 13261 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2463 hours (Total, this make and model), 13261 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 100 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

The pilot, age 48, held a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. The pilot held a second-class medical certificate issued on June 1, 2015, with the restriction that he must wear corrective lenses for near vision. The date of his last flight review was March 15, 2016. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AIR TRACTOR INC
Registration: N301LA
Model/Series: AT 502
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1989
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 502-0037
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/17/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 9400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 9585 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt and Whitney
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-34G
Registered Owner: Pioneer Flying Service
Rated Power: 750 hp
Operator:  PIONEER FLYING SERVICE INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Agricultural Aircraft (137)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code:  JQBG 

The single-engine low-wing conventional-geared airplane was equipped with a Pratt and Whitney PT6A-34AG turbo-prop engine. According to the operator, the last annual inspection was performed on February 17, 2016. The airframe total time was 9,585 hours and the engine total time was 7,022 hours, with 445 hours since the last hot section inspection. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBQP, 167 ft msl
Observation Time: 0915 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 32 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 243°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 15°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 80°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.24 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Pioneer, LA (PRI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Pioneer, LA (PRI)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0900 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

At 0915, the weather observation station at Morehouse Memorial Airport (BQP), Bastrop, Louisiana, located about 32 miles southwest of the accident site, reported the following conditions: wind 080 degrees at 4 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 19°C, dew point 15°C, altimeter setting 30.24 inches of mercury. 



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 32.999722, -91.315000 

The airplane impacted a soft open field. Other than a set of electrical lines, no obstacles were in the immediate area of the wreckage. The wreckage had no signs of an in-flight impact with wires, trees, or other obstacles. The wooded area toward the sprayed field was searched for broken branches or other signs of tree impact, with none observed. 

The wreckage was confined to the immediate vicinity of the impact site. The impact crater contained pieces of engine cowling, windshield plexiglass, and the hopper top and lid. The engine penetrated about 3 ft deep into the soft soil. Radiating from the crater were impressions in the soil, consistent with impact marks from the leading edge of both wings. The wings were located about 10 feet away from these impressions. Both wings were crushed aft, with the left wing receiving more damage than the right wing. The aft fuselage and rudder showed signs of momentum toward the left side of the airplane. The ground impact markings and wreckage were consistent with a steep, nose down impact at low groundspeed. The fuselage was mostly destroyed by impact forces and a post-crash fire.

All control surfaces were located and identified, except for the vertical stabilizer. The only piece of the vertical stabilizer that was located was a short piece of the stabilizer rear spar that remained attached to the lower portion of the rudder. The lower hinge point of the rudder was found fully intact with minimal damage. The end of the wire deflector cable that was attached to the top of the stabilizer was found underneath the cockpit wreckage. Multiple pieces of fire-damaged aluminum were identified as possible vertical stabilizer components, but none could be confirmed. A witness mark was observed on the top fuselage skin that corresponded to the shape of the vertical stabilizer's leading edge.

The wings flaps were in the full up position. Flight control continuity was confirmed to the extent possible, with several components consumed by the fire or cut by emergency response personnel during the pilot's extrication. The aileron/rudder interconnect system, which is a system of cables that connect the rudder pedals to the aileron controls to assist the pilot with coordinated flight, had been removed from the airplane.

The engine was damaged by the post-crash fire, with the inlet case fractured, causing complete separation of the accessories gearbox from the engine. Rotational signatures were observed throughout the compressor and power turbines and adjacent static components, consistent with the engine rotating under power during impact. There was no evidence of pre-impact anomalies of the engine, airframe, or propeller.

Due to fire damage, data from a GPS unit found in the wreckage could not be downloaded. 

Medical And Pathological Information

During his last FAA medical examination, the pilot reported heterophoria (cross-eyes), previous treatment for a kidney stone, and long-standing hypertension. He also reported using nisoldipine, valsartan, and hydrochlorothiazide, commonly sold with the names Sular and Diovan-HCT. Used to treat his blood pressure, none of these medications are generally considered impairing.

According to the autopsy report from the West Carroll Parish Coroner's Office in Oak Grove, Louisiana, the cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries and the manner of death was accident. The heart weighed 550 grams and was enlarged due to concentric left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). The left wall of the ventricle was reported as 1.8 cm thick; measurements in other areas were not reported. Average for a man with the pilot's weight of 282 pounds is 443 grams with a range of 335-584 grams; average left ventricular wall thickness is about 1.3 cm. LVH is commonly caused by longstanding hypertension. Toxicology performed by the FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory identified valsartan in urine and cavity blood. Valsartan is described above.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA154
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Monday, April 18, 2016 in Kilbourne, LA
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 502, registration: N301LA
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 18, 2016, about 0910 central daylight time, an Air Tractor Inc. AT-502 airplane, N301LA, was destroyed after impact with terrain near Kilbourne, Louisiana. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Pioneer Flying Service Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial spraying flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, with no flight plan filed. The local flight departed a private airport about 0900.

According to operator personnel, the pilot was conducting his second load of spray operations to the same farm area. A witness located near this farm stated she noticed the airplane in a turn and subsequently enter into a rapid descent until impacting the ground. The Federal Aviation Administration inspector responding to the accident site reported the airplane impacted into an open field with a steep nose down attitude.

At 0915, the weather observation station at Morehouse Memorial Airport (BQP), Bastrop, Louisiana, located about 32 miles southwest of the accident site, reported the following conditions: wind 080 degrees at 4 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 19 degrees C, dew point 15 degrees C, altimeter setting 30.24 inches of mercury.

Zetta Jet: Former staff 'still owed funds'

Some of the 40 employees in Singapore let go by luxury jet operator Zetta Jet after its sudden closure say they are still owed expenses and paid leave.

The company was incorporated here in 2015 and had offices in the United States.

It was ordered by a US court to stop operating on November 30 last year despite an attempt to rescue it financially and keep operations going.

Zetta Jet ran into trouble when its US and Singapore-based shareholders were embroiled in a legal tussle after the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in the US in mid-September last year.

Singapore-based staff of Zetta Jet, who included pilots and cabin crew and those in finance, sales and operations, had followed the unfolding events closely.

An operations employee told The Straits Times: "Some of us were concerned when we started hearing rumors in August.  But we were assured that all would be fine."

Another employee said: "There were also issues with Zetta Jet (corporate) credit cards in the final months. So, many of the crew used their personal (credit) cards to keep things working."

It includes paying for Uber rides with their personal cards instead of the corporate cards.

In mid-November, staff in the US and Singapore received a letter via e-mail from Zetta Jet's US shareholders, Mr. James Seagrim and Mr. Matthew Walter.

They said that they were shocked and disappointed by a US Court's refusal to sanction an investment proposal by Scout Aviation, which had agreed to pump in up to US$8.5 million (S$11.2 million) in financing.

Signed by both US shareholders, the email stated that both Mr. Seagrim and Mr. Walter had no idea why the financing package was not approved.

"Unfortunately, due to the company's limited liquidity, we will only be able to pay salary through November 30, 2017."

Prior to the Chapter 11 filing, Zetta Jet had accused its former managing director, Mr. Geoffery Cassidy, of fraud.

The company lodged a lawsuit in the US against the Australia-born Mr. Cassidy, alleging that it was forced to restructure its debts because Mr. Cassidy had misappropriated funds from the company, among other claims.

It also alleged that Mr. Cassidy had "wrongfully deprived Zetta Jet and/or Zetta Jet USA Inc of at least US$20 million to US$30 million".

Mr. Cassidy, who was based in Singapore and removed as director in August last year, denied the allegations and secured an injunction in Singapore to stop the Chapter 11 move but the US court did not recognize it.

In a November 16 letter to employees, Mr. Cassidy refuted Zetta Jet's accusations of fraud, corruption and unauthorized use of company jets.

While the final chapter of the Zetta Jet saga has yet to be written due to pending lawsuits, a plan to hire former employees may have already been hatched.

A private jet operator with Singapore-based US directors is believed to be recruiting former Zetta Jet employees.

It is understood that the company has a fleet of seven to nine aircraft.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.straitstimes.com

Air Tractor AT-602, N967JB, registered to and operated by Bootheel Air Services LLC: Fatal accident occurred July 07, 2016 in Kennett, Dunklin County, Missouri

Jack William Short
July 06, 1968 - July 07, 2016 
Jack Short was the owner and operator of Bootheel Ag Air Services LLC. 


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Ann, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Bootheel Ag Air Services LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N967JB 

Location: Kennett, MO
Accident Number: CEN16LA260
Date & Time: 07/07/2016, 0650 CDT
Registration: N967JB
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT-602
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

On July 7, 2016, at 0650 central daylight time, an Air Tractor Inc AT-602, N967JB, collided with power lines and terrain during an aerial application of a field about 4 miles northeast of Kennett, Missouri. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Bootheel Air Services LLC under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight last departed from Hornersville Memorial Airport (37M), Hornersville, Missouri, about 0541.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, a chemical loader stated that the airplane was loaded at 37M with 375 gallons of liquid chemical applicant to spray a 75-acre corn crop field, which was adjacent to a bean field. There were no witnesses to the accident.

The accident site was located near electrical lines that were oriented in an east/west direction and in the middle of the corn field that was being sprayed by the airplane. Two of the electrical lines were severed and a third damaged near the east edge of the field. A section of the airplane spray boom was bent around and hanging from the damaged, third electrical line. There was a ground scar consistent with the airplane's impact with terrain approximately 1,000 feet from the severed/damaged electrical line and in the bean field adjacent to the corn field. Approximately 50 feet from the severed/damaged lines, there were sections of right wing and aileron on the ground. The ground scar extended in the bean field and inn a northerly direction for approximately 200 feet. There were several propeller strikes in the ground near the beginning of the wreckage path.

The propeller blades, propeller hub, engine, and landing gear were found separated from the airplane. The fuselage, remaining wing, and empennage were located near the end of the wreckage path. The cockpit and tail section had an approximate tail-to-nose heading oriented towards the south.

Examination of the flight control confirmed flight control continuity. The engine turbine blades display signatures consistent with engine power. Fuel quantity could not be verified, but a fuel spill was noted underneath the wing section. There was no evidence of remaining spray chemical solution on scene. The shoulder harness air bag restraint system was deployed.

The 48-year-old pilot had reported multiple orthopedic surgeries and use of medication for high cholesterol to the FAA. At the time of his last aviation medical examination, diabetes was diagnosed and treatment with metformin initiated. The aviation medical examiner questioned records from a recent hospitalization that stated the pilot had anxiety/depression but was told this was not a current diagnosis and that he had not been on medication in years. According to the autopsy performed by Mineral Area Pathology LLC, the cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries and the manner of death was accident. No significant natural disease was identified. Toxicology testing identified acetaminophen, chlorpheniramine, citalopram and its metabolite n-desmethylcitalopram, dextromethorphan and its metabolite dextrorphan in liver. Acetaminophen and chlorpheniramine were found in cavity blood and the rest were found in muscle. Acetaminophen was identified in urine.

Acetaminophen is an analgesic and fever reducer available over the counter in many products; it is commonly marketed as Tylenol. Chlorpheniramine is a sedating antihistamine available over the counter in many cold, cough, and allergy preparations. It carries this warning, "May impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery)."

Citalopram is a prescription antidepressant medication often marketed with the name Celexa. It carries this warning, "In studies in normal volunteers, citalopram in doses of 40 mg/day did not produce impairment of intellectual function or psychomotor performance. Because any psychoactive drug may impair judgment, thinking, or motor skills, however, patients should be cautioned about operating hazardous machinery, including automobiles, until they are reasonably certain that citalopram therapy does not affect their ability to engage in such activities." N-desmethylcitalopram is its primary metabolite.

Major depression itself is associated with significant cognitive degradation, particularly in executive functioning. The cognitive impairment often resolves as the emotional symptoms resolve. The FAA requires that pilots treated for depression undergo specific testing to ensure their cognitive functioning is intact and they are using a non-impairing antidepressant. The FAA's Guide for Aviation Medical Examiners states "The use of a psychotropic drug is disqualifying for aeromedical certification purposes – this includes all antidepressant drugs, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). However, the FAA has determined that airmen requesting first, second, or third class medical certificates while being treated with one of four specific SSRIs may be considered. The Authorization decision is made on a case by case basis. The Examiner may not issue." The four potentially allowable antidepressants are fluoxetine (Prozac), escitalopram (Lexapro), sertraline (Zoloft), and citalopram (Celexa).

Dextromethorphan is a cough suppressant available over the counter in many products. At usual dosing, it is not considered impairing. Dextrorphan is its primary metabolite.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Center
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/01/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:  11/18/2014
Flight Time:  3982.1 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2.7 hours (Total, this make and model), 3982.1 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AIR TRACTOR INC
Registration: N967JB
Model/Series: AT-602
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2014
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 602-1243
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/07/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 12500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 1025.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-60AG
Registered Owner: BOOTHEEL AG AIR SERVICES LLC
Rated Power: 1050 hp
Operator: BOOTHEEL AG AIR SERVICES LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)
Operator Does Business As: BOOTHEEL AG AIR
Operator Designator Code: ZHUG

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TKX, 262 ft msl
Observation Time: 0655 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 45°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear / 15000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 24°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots, 210°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hornersville, MO (37M)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hornersville, MO (37M)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0541 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire:  None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  36.290000, 89.986389 (est)



NTSB Identification: CEN16LA260
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Thursday, July 07, 2016 in Kennett, MO
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT-602, registration: N967JB
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 7, 2016, at 0650 central daylight time, an Air Tractor Inc AT-602, N967JB, collided with power lines and terrain during an aerial application of a field about 4 miles northeast of Kennett, Missouri. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Bootheel Air Services LLC under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight last departed from Kennett, Missouri at time unknown.

Lis Hendrickson: Chief Flight Instructor and Operations Director of Fly Duluth / Duluth Flying Club (KDLH)

With a clipboard on a leg, Lis Hendrickson pilots a Cirrus SR22 with the plane’s sidestick controller. 


Lis Hendrickson has two hangars and an airstrip at her home.

She also has three planes: a Cessna 170, a Cessna 120 and a Piper Super Cub. (The latter has floats and skis on the wheels right now, she said.)

Hendrickson is chief flight instructor and operations director of Fly Duluth / Duluth Flying Club, a privately owned pilot training center. Before that, she wore other hats: chief flight instructor at Lake Superior College, a corporate pilot for Cirrus, flight instructor at Cloquet Airport.

When she's not teaching, she's working with the Federal Aviation Administration, writing flight lessons, ensuring their planes are up on their maintenance and communicating with students.

And she tries to fly as often as possible — but it wasn't always like that.


Lis Hendrickson walks around a Cirrus SR22 after a recent flight.


"I started learning how to fly when I was 30," said the 60-year-old. Before that, Hendrickson was in restaurant management. When her daughter was old enough, she decided to chase her childhood dream.

She earned her pilot license in three months, she said, explaining, "A year is a normal time span."

Flying is not just manipulating the controls. Ground training covers the basic systems in an airplane; you also have to learn how to fly in different weather patterns, the language of the airports and how to navigate with GPS.

"When I first started, I couldn't do anything but fly the airplane," she said. Your brain is so full of information, it's tough to multitask, and getting comfortable communicating with air traffic controllers takes a while. She recalled a time her flight instructor told her to announce she was making a maneuver into the headset. "I look over at him and I say, 'I can't, I'm turning,'" she said with a laugh.

Hendrickson uses her experiences with her students and the instructors she oversees, and she models her teaching style after Bill Amorde at the Superior Airport.

"He's still the person that I look up to and try to emulate," she said. He's a designated pilot examiner, he has so much experience in many different kinds of airplanes, and he'll give real-world experience that nurtures confidence.

"When I'm with a student or we're on a stage check, they'll look at me and they'll say, 'Is this right?' And instead of answering their direct question, what I will say is, 'Does this sound right to you? Do you think that you're ready to take off?'" This teaches them how to be a pilot in command, and that calm step-by-step thought process will save your life, she said.


Flight instructor Lis Hendrickson pilots a Cirrus SR22 over Lake Superior recently.


A large motivator to teach is to give back to aviation, she said, and a bonus is watching a person move from zero hours in the sky to hitting what she calls an epiphany about flying. "It feeds my soul," she said.

Christy Newcomb is a customer service representative at Monaco Air Duluth, where she works with Hendrickson. Since childhood, Newcomb was drawn to flying. "This isn't something I wanted to do for a career. It's something just for me," she said by email.

Newcomb earned a private pilot license with Hendrickson as her ground school and flight instructor. During her first solo flight, the two were practicing landings, when Hendrickson told Newcomb to pull in to a near control tower base.

"She rummaged around in the back seat of the aircraft, then opened the door (with the aircraft still running) hopped out and said, 'Go do three more.' She closed the door and walked away.

"It's in that moment you wonder if you're truly capable of doing these landings on your own. After you make those landings ... it's a huge boost to your self-esteem."


Lis Hendrickson checks a sample of fuel from a Cirrus SR22 to ensure that it’s clear of water. The precaution is part of a preflight inspection.


Melissa Lange has known Hendrickson since she was a flight instructor at Lake Superior College. Today, with Hendrickson as her boss, Lange also works as an instructor, and the two share the same passion for teaching.

Guiding someone who has never been in or flown a plane to their first solo flight, that's at the heart of what Lange does, she said. "From takeoff to landing, it's exciting," she said.

And for Hendrickson, flight instruction is a family affair.

It was her father, Nils Grover, who instilled a love of flying in her. As a kid, he'd take her to the Duluth or Superior airport, where they'd watch the planes. Decades later, Hendrickson became his teacher. "He was proud to tell everybody that 'My daughter is my flight instructor.'"

Teaching her father was easy; he learned quickly because he loved it. He also did a lot of self-study and practicing on flight simulators.

"We think alike," Hendrickson said. "We were so close that we were able to finish each other's sentences, and we were thinking the same ways."


Nils Grover


When he got sick last year, Hendrickson said she had to quit work completely to take care of him. "In one month, he was gone," she said. But the family connection lives on for Hendrickson, who flies to visit her daughter and two grandchildren in Eau Claire, sometimes only for a lunch. (The flight is 40 minutes.) She also started to teach her granddaughter the aircraft ropes when she was 6.

Being in the business for this long, Hendrickson has seen many changes in plane navigation and autopilot capabilities.

"What hasn't changed is ... people are not expecting a woman pilot," she said. "I grew up in the '60s and '70s; it just doesn't bother me."

One challenge in the field is that fewer people are flying. Earning a pilot certificate takes a lot of commitment, time, effort and money, she said. "I think that's why people think flying is for rich people. It's not ... it's $200 an hour. If that's all you do, it's fine. If you want to go hunting, fishing, snowmobiling or sailing, of course, you can't do it."

Flying brings a new outlook, she said.

"Other little things down on the ground, don't matter because you're up in the air, and you could make a life-or-death decision. It's a huge, life-changing perspective,"
 she said.

Story and photo gallery ➤ http://www.duluthnewstribune.com