Sunday, October 2, 2016

Zenith STOL CH-701, N768HA: Accident occurred October 02, 2016 in Berryton, Monmouth Township, Shawnee County, Kansas

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N768HA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA003
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 02, 2016 in Berryton, KS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/15/2016
Aircraft: ANDREW HAROLD STOL CH 701, registration: N768HA
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the landing on a grass runway at his private property, he "crabbed for the [cross] wind but did not neutralize the rudder pedals soon enough." He further reported that when the airplane touched down, the airplane veered off the runway to the right and the nose wheel collapsed in soft mud. During the runway excursion, the right wing impacted terrain and was substantially damaged.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observing system about the time of the accident, 5 nautical miles north of the accident site, recorded the wind at 160 degrees true at 4 knots. The pilot reported that he landed in a northeast direction.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll in crosswind conditions, which resulted in a runway excursion.

The pilot reported that during the landing on a grass runway at his private property, he "crabbed for the [cross] wind but did not neutralize the rudder pedals soon enough." He further reported that when the airplane touched down, the airplane veered off the runway to the right and the nose wheel collapsed in soft mud. During the runway excursion, the right wing impacted terrain and was substantially damaged.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observing system about the time of the accident, 5 nautical miles north of the accident site, recorded the wind at 160 degrees true at 4 knots. The pilot reported that he landed in a northeast direction.

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA003
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 02, 2016 in Berryton, KS
Aircraft: ANDREW HAROLD STOL CH 701, registration: N768HA
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the landing on a grass runway at his private property, he "crabbed for the [cross] wind but did not neutralize the rudder pedals soon enough." He further reported that when the airplane touched down, the airplane veered off the runway to the right and the nose wheel collapsed in soft mud. During the runway excursion, the right wing impacted terrain and was substantially damaged.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observing system about the time of the accident, 5 nautical miles north of the accident site, recorded the wind at 160 degrees true at 4 knots. The pilot reported that he landed in a northeast direction.




TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) -- A small sport plane made an unexpected landing in a Topeka neighborhood Sunday afternoon.

Kansas Highway Patrol was called to the scene around 4:00 p.m., where they found the plane sitting on a private runway near 45th and Paulsen.

KHP Trooper Raymond Ramirez told 13 NEWS the pilot, James Long, was the only person inside and that he was not injured.

"There is minor damage to airplane. It just landed hard and bent its nose wheel, causing it to tip and also hit the propeller and wing," said Trooper Ramirez.

He said plane crashes are very uncommon in our area, having responded to only a handful in his 15 year career.

Long spoke with 13 NEWS after his plane crashed. He said he was adjusting for the crosswind, but the nose ended up dragging along the ground for a stretch.

"I was depressed because I know it's a lot of money to repair my plane. I wasn't hurt or scared at all, I knew immediately what had happened," said Long.

Long said he enjoys flying frequently, and is already anxious to get his plane in the air again.

Story and video:  http://www.wibw.com



A small plane sustained damage as it landed in a private airfield at S.E. 45th and Paulen Road, about 2.5 miles east of the Topeka city limits.

The incident was reported around 3:30 p.m. Sunday, according to the Kansas Highway Patrol’s crash log.

The pilot, 67-year-old James Long, of Berryton, wasn’t injured.

Emergency crews on the scene said the pilot “nosed in.”

The pilot was attempting to land west to east when the plane came across a slight crosswind. Long adjusted for the crosswind. The plane touched down and Long continued to adjust for the crosswind instead of allowing the plane to coast in the direction it was traveling, the crash log indicated. The plane’s landing gear bent and the right wing struck the ground.

Source:  http://cjonline.com

Cirrus SR22, N176CF: Once again, Leath's conduct raises questions

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY: http://registry.faa.gov/N176CF












Iowa State University President Steven Leath still doesn’t get it.

In July, The Des Moines Register reported that Leath had purchased 145 acres of property from a company controlled by one of his bosses, Iowa Board of Regents President Bruce Rastetter. When questions arose as to whether the 2015 land deal compromised their professional relationship, Leath initially refused to answer the Register’s questions.

“My personal life, and my wife’s personal life, are nobody else’s business,” he said. “I do not understand what makes this anything more than a private decision by my wife and me to purchase land for private use by our family.” The Board of Regents dutifully followed suit, calling the land deal a “private” matter.

Both conveniently ignored the fact that it was Leath and Rastetter who crossed the line that separates the professional from the personal when they entered into the million-dollar land deal.

Now the Associated Press has reported that Leath, a certified pilot, has used a university-owned airplane for trips that are largely personal in nature, and that Leath failed to reimburse the school for damage caused to the plane last summer.

It also appears that two years ago, the Iowa State University Foundation purchased a different aircraft that it immediately gave to the school for its use. Whether by design or mere happenstance, this arrangement resulted in ISU acquiring a $2.4 million plane without going through the usual public-bidding, public-notice and board-approval requirements normally associated with big-ticket purchases.

So far, the university’s explanations have been utterly lacking, and Leath’s comments again demonstrate a striking lack of awareness as to the propriety of his own actions.

It was in July of last year that Leath, a certified pilot, hopped aboard the university's Cirrus SR22 and flew himself and his wife to Ashe County, N.C., where he owns a home. Leath says he met with a “potential donor" for about four hours during his 11-day trip.

As reported by the AP’s Ryan Foley, Leath stopped in Illinois to refuel the plane on his way back from North Carolina. During a "hard landing," he caused a significant amount of damage to the plane. University officials say that four months later Leath paid for expenses associated with the flight, but the school's foundation picked up the tab for $12,000 in aircraft repairs. No claim was made to the university's insurance company. (The foundation also paid $2,200 to send another aircraft to Illinois to pick up the Leaths and ferry them back to Iowa.)

Sometime last fall, Leath told Rastetter about the damage to the plane, but it appears Rastetter never passed that information on to his fellow regents. State records indicate Leath has reimbursed the university for other trips to North Carolina, paying a rate of $125 per hour, which is about half of what some private companies bill.

All of this came to light just nine days ago. Leath has since announced that he will be donating $16,000 to the ISU Foundation to cover the costs associated with repairs and storage for the Cirrus.

Here’s where it gets surreal: At roughly the same time these disclosures forced Leath to start writing five-figure checks to the ISU Foundation, the university president looked up from his checkbook and expressed great indignation at the "inaccurate allegations that suggest I may have violated university policy and/or state law."

Now the school's former senior vice president, Warren Madden, who had previously told the AP that ISU would never let Leath fly himself in “one of our planes because of the insurance and liability issues,” says he either misspoke or the reporter misunderstood him.

But regardless of what Madden said, there are undeniable liability issues related to the school’s president piloting a university-owned aircraft for trips that are primarily personal in nature. There's also the question of why the university pays for such flights with the  foundation’s Greater University Fund — a discretionary account controlled by Leath to be used to meet the school's "most critical needs, such as student scholarships, faculty needs and program support."

Unfortunately, it’s highly unlikely that the Board of Regents will do anything about any of this. That’s no surprise, as it’s a board in name only, with Rastetter — Leath’s confidant and defacto real estate agent — calling the shots.

Leath says he wants to put the matter to rest with his payment to the foundation, and he promises that he will never again fly any “state-owned aircraft.”

What’s telling is that he still doesn’t acknowledge any sort of wrongdoing. What’s more, he characterizes his reimbursement for flight-related expenses as a “donation” to the nonprofit foundation, as if it’s a magnanimous act of charity.

His words and actions, combined with the 2015 land purchase, suggest that Leath still doesn’t grasp the most basic tenets of public accountability.

The regents may not expect that of a university president, but the people of Iowa certainly do.

Source:   http://www.desmoinesregister.com

Piper PA-32R-301 Saratoga SP, N782TM, Smith Family Aviation LLC: Fatal accident occurred October 02, 2015 in Westminster, South Carolina



WARSAW — The Warsaw community is remembering a tragic anniversary this weekend. It was a year ago on Oct. 2 when a small private plane that took off from the Warsaw airport crashed in South Carolina.

Four prominent members of the community were on board and were killed. The crash claimed the lives of Warsaw councilman Charlie Smith; his son Scott Smith, a Warsaw attorney; Tony Elliott, a race-car driver who lived in Warsaw; and Scott Bibler, a former Tippecanoe Valley High School educator who had just taken on a new role as a counselor.

The men were headed to the Notre Dame football game at Clemson.

Friday when the Indiana Bicentennial Torch Relay went through Warsaw, the Tippecanoe Valley athletic director participated in the ceremony in memory of Scott Bibler.

Today at the Warsaw Community Church, where some of the funerals were held, the pastor spoke to the congregation about this solemn anniversary.

Mark Terrell was a friend and colleague of Bibler and a neighbor of Elliott. This has been a tough day for him.

"It's amazing how fast the year has gone by, and they are still missed," Terrell said, "We miss them. I miss their smiles. I miss their laughter. Both of them were incredibly filled with life. When you have people like that who are bigger than life, it is hard for people to fill that void."

Source:   http://wsbt.com

From left to right: Tony Elliot, Charlie Smith, Scott Smith. 


Scott Bibler


Charles "Charlie" Smith

Scott Smith



Scott Smith, his father Charlie Smith and friend Tony Elliott at a Notre Dame football game.

Scott Bibler and family pose for a photo, posted on Bibler's Facebook page. Bibler was one of four men killed on October 2, 2015 when a plane from Warsaw crashed in South Carolina. 

Tony Elliott

Scott Bibler


Kosciusko County's Charles Smith, 71, and son Scott Smith, 44, pose for a picture at a Green Bay Packers game.

Scott A. Smith, left and his father, Charles D. Smith.

 Scott  Bibler


Tony Elliott









Smith Family Aviation LLC:  http://registry.faa.govN782TM
  
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA West Columbia FSDO-13

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA001 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 02, 2015 in Westminster, SC
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32R-301, registration: N782TM
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On October 2, 2015, about 1512 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-32R-301, N782TM, collided with terrain following an in-flight breakup near Westminster, South Carolina. The private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The airplane was registered to Smith Family Aviation LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Warsaw Municipal Airport (ASW), Warsaw, Indiana and was destined for Oconee County Regional Airport (CEU), Clemson, South Carolina.


According to preliminary information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration, the airplane was at 6,000 feet above mean sea level (msl), approaching ZEYLM intersection to hold for the RNAV runway 7 approach at CEU. The pilot was subsequently cleared for the approach and reported that the airplane was established outbound on the procedure turn. The controller subsequently queried the pilot when he did not report inbound on the approach; no response was received. Radar contact was lost over Lake Hartwell, on the Georgia-South Carolina border, about 2,200 feet msl.


Local residents reported hearing and seeing the airplane prior to the accident. One witness heard a loud "boom," followed by white pieces of debris falling into the lake. Another witness saw the airplane descending vertically, in a spiral motion, until it disappeared behind a tree line. Another witness reported that the engine was running until ground impact. Several witnesses reported the event to 911, and the wreckage was located by first responders shortly thereafter.


The pilot, age 71, held a private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument airplane ratings. He reported 1,448 hours total flight time on his most recent application for an FAA third-class medical certificate, dated October 17, 2013.


The main wreckage was found inverted in a wooded area, about 50 yards north of the shoreline of Lake Hartwell, near Westminster. Damage to trees was indicative of a near-vertical descent angle at impact. There was no fire. The main wreckage consisted of the main cabin, cockpit, engine, propeller, left wing, and the inboard half of the right wing. About 10 percent of the empennage was recovered near the south shoreline the lake, near Toccoa, Georgia. At the time of this writing, the outboard portion of the right wing and the remainder of the empennage have not been located.


The wreckage was retained for further examination.

American Airlines Weekend Technology Transfer Appears to Go Well: Company reports no flight delays or cancellations as a result of IT shift



The Wall Street Journal
By SUSAN CAREY
Oct. 2, 2016 3:38 p.m. ET


American Airlines Group Inc., which over the weekend surmounted a major information-technology challenge, said Sunday it was “really pleased” with the transition but isn’t “declaring mission accomplished yet.”

The nation’s largest airline by traffic moved all of its pilots and planes onto a single “flight operating system” on Friday night into Saturday. The cutover, which brought merger partner’s US Airways pilots onto the American IT platform, was the latest step in integrating the two companies, which merged in late 2013.

An American spokeswoman said there were no cancellations or disruptions of flights over the weekend because of the IT shift. That hadn’t been anticipated since this transition was internal, having to do with the way American schedules planes and pilots across the merged company. Until now, the US Airways pilots and the planes from the former subsidiary were scheduled separately.

The Allied Pilots Association, the union that represents the 15,000 pilots at the combined airline, said Sunday that the transition was a success in terms of “passengers getting to their destinations on time, and safely,” a spokesman said. But the IT switch also gave rise to some pilot-scheduling errors that ran afoul of the union’s contract and Federal Aviation Administration rules, he said.

The union is scheduled to meet Monday with American to go over how the transition went and how the company is going to respond to the union’s concerns, he said.

The spokeswoman for Fort Worth, Texas-based American said the company is running a round-the-clock hotline manned by management pilots to help regular aviators cope with the new rules, an adjustment that mostly affects US Airways aviators. She also said “hundreds” of IT support staffers are still out in the field in crew rooms, at airports and in the carrier’s operations centers to assure that the transition continues to be smooth.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wsj.com

Boeing 737-400: Accident occurred October 04, 2016 in Aldergrove, United Kingdom

NTSB Identification: ENG17WA001
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 04, 2016 in Aldergrove, United Kingdom
Aircraft: BOEING 737, registration:
Injuries: Unavailable

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On October 4, 2016, a Boeing 737-400 experienced a partial right main gear failure during the landing roll at Belfast International Airport (EGAA), Aldergrove, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. The flight originated from East Midlands Airport (EGNX), Leicester, United Kingdom.

The incident is being investigated by the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) of the United Kingdom. All inquiries should be directed to:

Air Accidents Investigation Branch
Farnborough House
Berkshire Copse Road
Aldershot, Hampshire
GU11 2HH, United Kingdom

Website: http://www.aaib.gov.uk/

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the United Kingdom AAIB.

Dead-stick landing – Blaine Paxton Hall

If flying is a metaphor for life, have you ever done a dead-stick landing?

A dead-stick landing is one in which the aircraft has lost all its propulsive power and the pilot is forced to land.

“Dead-stick” does not refer to the flight controls. It refers to the propeller, which if moving through air without engine power, will just “windmill.” And in the old days, propellers were “wooden sticks.”

After seeing the inspiring movie “Sully,” I went home to search for my Pilot’s Logbook and other memorabilia of my flying days. I first soloed Oct. 23, 1980, in a 4-place Beech Sundowner named N2077C

My instructor taught me such techniques and maneuvers as “slipping” the aircraft down into a short-field over trees or power lines, or short-field take-offs, or “turns around a point.”

In ground school I learned the specs and V-speeds for my aircraft —including the speeds I’d be happy to know in the event of engine failure. But a student pilot was never forewarned on what day he’d be required to perform a dead-stick landing.

One day in the air my instructor clicked the keys left and pulled them out. OK fine; this is the long-expected day when I have to demonstrate a dead-stick landing. And glider pilots do it every time. I figured if we got into trouble, the keys could be reinserted and the engine restarted.

But the instructor threw the keys up on the dashboard. And as I watched them slide down into the air vents, I knew we were really going to do a dead-stick landing.

Earlier that day, in my pre-flight check, I’d lifted off the gas caps and peered into the iridescent, rainbow-colored, greasy-smelling fuel tanks. I’d circled the plane inspecting each item and checking it off the pre-flight list.

Then in the cockpit, I’d “stood on the brakes,” and run up the engine to its max, causing the plane to quiver like a dead, beautiful butterfly on a moving windshield. Then I’d slowly shoved the throttle into the firewall causing the plane to joyously skip down the runway and leap into the air, embracing the wind with wings out-stretched.

Some of us, due to life’s exigencies, know what it is to be forced out of a straight and level flight path of life. We know what it is to have just minutes to assess life’s total engine failure, safely ditch our aircraft and land our life in an unknown field.

First thing one must do in a dead-stick landing is pull up the nose to bleed off airspeed, slowing the airplane to best glide speed. This is so non-intuitive that the inexperienced pilot must force himself to do it. What?! I’ve just lost all engine power, and you’re telling me to pull up the nose to what feels precipitously close to stall speed?! Yes, you must – and quickly!

Then in the next few moments one must select a field. We look for possible hidden ravines. We stay far away from power lines. And we hope for the best. And if we’ve really been paying attention to life, we instinctively know which way the wind is blowing, and correctly land the aircraft into the wind.

After pulling up the nose, I trimmed it off to best glide speed. Then I spotted my field and contrived a mental image of an airport traffic pattern above it. Then I gently spiraled down to traffic pattern altitude of 1200 feet.

I entered my “traffic pattern” on the crosswind leg, then dipped left entering downwind leg, imagining a hangar to my left. Turning left again, the left aileron up, I banked onto base leg.

Constantly watching my airspeed and gaging the seat of my pants with respect to the ground; I put “flaps all down” and turned final approach, centering the nose down an imaginary runway.

With slow airspeed, the controls felt mushy in my hands, making the plane difficult to maneuver. Things got busy in the cockpit; I heard crashing cymbals, blasting trumpets and banging drums. Approaching the ground, the plane felt dangerously fast and clumsy. I braced for impact; and we hit the ground with a thud, while horsing up the nose for all I was worth.

Now dear reader; as the left-seat, 4-stripe pilot of my life now for 64 trips around the sun, I tell you this: When take-offs equal landings, and you are alive to tell of it — that’s a good day – and a life with which you should be at peace.

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com