Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Cessna 195, N3484V: Accident occurred September 23, 2015 at Merritt Island Airport (KCOI), Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N3484V

NTSB Identification: GAA15CA289
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 23, 2015 in Merritt Island, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 195, registration: N3484V
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane, he performed a wheel landing on the asphalt runway. The pilot stated that he landed at a speed of 70 miles per hour, and that he allowed the tailwheel to touch down on the runway at approximately 45 miles per hour. He stated that when the tailwheel touched down, the airplane rapidly veered to the left and he attempted to correct the left movement by applying right rudder as well as the brakes. Excessive braking resulted in a nose over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, wings and empennage.

Photographs provided by the FAA showed the airplane veering about 30 degrees toward the left edge of the runway. The left tire mark showed in excess of 30 feet of full tread width, dark black, rubber skid, while the right tire mark showed continual skidding of the inside (right) edge and intermittent full tread width skids. About 30 feet from where the airplane came to rest inverted, the left skid mark lightened up showing continual tread edge skidding and intermittent full tread width skids, and the airplane had turned to the right paralleling to the runway edge. No tailwheel marks were visible in the photographs. The airplane came to rest inverted about 75 feet short of the B4 intersection.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15


A husband and wife received minor injuries after a landing mishap in their vintage airplane at Merritt Island Airport on Wednesday afternoon. 

The husband, who was piloting the plane, and his wife were the only ones on board the 1948 Cessna 195. It's likely the plane flipped over after the pilot hit the brakes too hard, according to Brevard County Fire Rescue spokesperson Don Walker.

The aircraft is a so-called tail-dragger, with two main landing gear under the wing and a small, swivel wheel at the tail. Many modern light airplanes are built with a tricycle-style gear, with three wheels grouped near the nose.

The couple was transported to Cape Canaveral Hospital. Walker says they had flown to Winter Haven for lunch and were returning from that trip.The airplanes tail number indicates it is owned by a Satellite Beach man. Fire officials did not identify the man and woman injured in the mishap.

"We're pretty fortunate that minor injuries were all that resulted," said Walker.

The airport was closed until the crash scene was cleared by around 3:30 p.m. Walker noted that some fuel was also spilled on the runway.

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.


Story and video: http://www.floridatoday.com








Robertson Field Airport (4B8) Now On AM Radio

PLAINVILLE — An AM radio system that broadcasts the chatter of pilots using the town-owned Robertson Airport is now on the air.

The low-voltage transmitter system installed this summer by Boy Scout Colin Stamm for his Eagle Scout community service project has a short range of under 200 feet from the equipment on an airport apron shed.

So people who want to listen to pilot talk must be at the facility, which makes the system a perfect addition for people who come daily, park and watch small private planes and the occasional helicopter take off and land.

“I can only imagine how much interest this will create,” town airport commission chairman Byron Treado said Wednesday. “A lot of people bring children to look at the planes. I used to when my children were younger. This radio will make a trip to the airport even more exciting.”

The broadcast system is so new, no sign is up yet to tell people to tune to AM 1710. That sign will soon be in place, according to Neal Witkin, a pilot who files out of Robertson and who assisted Stamm with the project.

Witkin, a New Britain resident, said last week that this system is the first of its kind in a Connecticut airport.

The broadcast is one-way so people can hear pilots but not respond. Witkin said the transmitter that converts pilot radio to AM band is low in power so it will not interfere with aviation operations, nor did the project require special federal aviation and communications permits.

Although the talk might be a little dry for kids, if the transmissions Wednesday afternoon are any indication. Each fragment of talk began with a sharp crack that will startle listeners if the volume is high.

And the chatter is mostly some combination of letters and numbers and single words, like ” SW. 63. 055,” ” “base” and “Robertson.”

“I haven’t heard it yet. I hope to stop by this weekend,” Treado said of the system the town gave Stamm permission to install.

Stamm, who lives in Newington and became interested in aviation because his father flies as a hobby, decided on the pilot broadcast system as a project after learning about similar setups in other general aviation airports out of state.

Source:  http://www.courant.com

Search has been suspended for reported downed aircraft in Hindman, Knott County, Kentucky



HINDMAN, Ky. (WYMT) - UPDATE: 6 p.m. 

 
First responders in Knott County have called off their search that started when someone reported a plane crash.

Law enforcement officers and firefighters searched for several hours by ground and air this afternoon near the Mallie community, but found no wreckage or debris.

They told WYMT they now have evidence that a plane never went down.

Witnesses reported the crash about 11:00 Wednesday morning after seeing a plane flying uncharacteristically low, but authorities believe that plane never crashed and even though they spent most of the day on what was basically a wild goose chase, they were happy to end the search knowing that nobody was hurt.

The mountain ridge near Highway 8-99 is the area search crews combed by ground and by air, as a DEA helicopter that happened to be in the area on marijuana eradication joined the hunt.

Authorities say they can usually locate a plane by tracking the signal from its Electronic Location Transmitter, but no such signal was picked up here.

Hindman Volunteer Fire Department Chief Preston Hays said, "What that’s saying is there’s no evidence, there’s nothing being reported electronically that any aircraft in the area went down or is missing".

Knott County Sheriff Dale Richardson interviewed the two people who reported the crash and neither of them actually saw the plane hit the ground.

Richardson said, "They said the plane was flying very low and it didn’t appear it was flying correctly. It might have been weaving and wobbling a little bit and it was down below the tree tops".

The sheriff said the folks who called the crash in won’t face charges related to falsely reporting an incident. He does not believe they were trying to pull off a hoax.

Power was out in area, but it was unrelated. A tree had damaged power lines.

Original Story:

First responders in Knott County are trying to figure out what led to reports of a plane crash Wednesday.

Knott County Sheriff Dale Richardson tells WYMT someone reported an aircraft going down around 11:00 a.m. this morning near Highway 899 in the Mallie community, but an extensive search of the area turned up no wreckage or debris. The search has officially been suspended.

Local law enforcement officers, firefighters and EMS responded when the call came in of a possible plane crash, but they looked for several hours and could not find any evidence of that.

Officials enlisted the help of a nearby DEA helicopter that was in the area in marijuana eradication, but the search from the air came up empty. Witnesses told the sheriff they saw a white plane with red wings flying really low and close to the mountain, but didn't actually see it crash.

The sheriff says no charges will be filed for falsely reporting an incident. He also says no emergency transmissions are being emitted that would indicate a plane has crashed.

There were a couple power outages in the area around the same time but those were unrelated.

Story and video: http://www.wkyt.com

Boeing in Deal to Sell 300 Jets to China: Plane maker to establish a plant to finish work on single-aisle planes destined for China

The Wall Street Journal
By DOUG CAMERON

Updated Sept. 23, 2015 5:41 p.m. ET


Boeing Co. has agreed on terms to sell 300 planes to China and plans to open a facility there to finish work on its 737 jetliner that would allow it to boost production of the best-selling jet in the U.S.

The announcements Wednesday, which followed a visit by China’s President Xi Jinping to a Boeing plant near Seattle, prompted a backlash from unions and some lawmakers concerned that the company’s plan to shift more work overseas could affect jobs at Boeing’s main aircraft facilities in Washington state.

Boeing said it plans to team with state-controlled Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China, or Comac, in building an aircraft-completion center in China for 737 jets. The timing of first deliveries and the location of the factory, where workers will paint the fuselage and install seats and in-flight entertainment systems on the 737, have yet to be finalized, Boeing said.

The company said it wouldn’t reduce employment on the 737 program in Washington, but union members protested outside the factory during Mr. Xi’s visit.

“I am disappointed that once again, Boeing is moving more operations out of Washington state,” said Democratic state Rep. June Robinson in a statement, adding it should be easy for Boeing to show net job creation in the state from the China plan.

Rival Airbus Group SE, which already assembles some A320 jets in China, is also establishing a similar facility to finish work on its A330 twin-aisle jets.

The new plant would be Boeing’s first big manufacturing facility overseas and would mark a milestone for its presence in China, which is fast becoming its most important market.

The plane maker didn’t immediately detail how many of the 300 jets in Wednesday’s announcement, which have a sticker price of $38 billion before discounts, were already in its backlog. Boeing’s shares ended 4 p.m. trading down 1.7% at $131.67.

Boeing listed orders as of Aug. 31 for 157 jets designated for Chinese customers, although analysts said numerous other existing orders from China are included among “unidentified” customers in its total backlog of 5,710 planes.

China’s air-travel market has continued to grow despite the cooling of the broader economy, with analysts forecasting it needs several hundred additional planes a year to keep up with demand. Boeing has projected that about 20% of demand for large passenger jets over the next 20 years will come from China.

Boeing said China Aviation Supplies Holding Co., which orders planes on behalf of a number of airlines, agreed to commitments for 190 of its single-aisle 737s and 50 widebody planes. The aircraft leasing arms of Industrial & Commercial Bank of China Ltd. and China Development Bank each agreed to buy 30 more 737s.

Boeing last month upgraded its forecast for China’s plane demand to 6,330 new jets with a sticker price of $950 billion over the next 20 years. About 70% of those planes would be directed at growth rather than replacing older aircraft, the company said.

Boeing and Airbus Group SE have a roughly 50/50 split of the Chinese market and are deepening their ties with the country’s aerospace industry.

Scott Kennedy, a deputy director at the Center for Strategic & International Studies, said the planned Boeing deals were likely to be one of the few substantive announcements for U.S. business from the state visit.

“Expectations are appropriately low,” he said, adding that some U.S. companies have been frustrated with the pace of economic reform in China.

“They are not going to get in the face [of the president], but they are passing notes behind the scenes,” Mr. Kennedy said.

While U.S. heavy-machinery makers have been forced to curtail production as demand from China slipped, the commercial-jet sector is more robust.

China is now investing heavily to develop its own passenger-jet industry, and Comac is developing the C919 plane to compete with the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320. It includes engines from a joint venture between General Electric and France’s Safran SA and parts from other Western suppliers. While years behind schedule, it has secured commitments for more than 500 jets, orders that might otherwise flowed to Airbus or Boeing.

China accounted for roughly a quarter of Boeing’s single-aisle jet deliveries this year and is expected to claim a large share of future orders. But the company has lost ground in recent years to Airbus, which delivered the first of its rival A320 jets from an assembly plant in Tianjin in 2009.

—Carlos Tejada and Jon Ostrower contributed to this article.

Original article can be found here: http://www.wsj.com

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Vans RV-6A, N215DG: Accident occurred September 22, 2015 Deckerville, Sanilac County, Michigan

Date: 22-SEP-15
Time: 18:26:00Z
Regis#: N215DG
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV6
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Minor
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA East Michigan FSDO-23
City: DECKERVILLE
State: Michigan

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, NEAR DECKERVILLE, MI


http://registry.faa.gov/N215DG



The Sanilac County Sheriff's Office just issued the following news release:

The Sanilac County Sheriff’s Office responded to a report of an airplane crash near the intersection of Ruth Road and Custer Road in Bridgehampton Township.

On Tuesday, September 22, 2015, at about 2:26 p.m., Sanilac Central Dispatch received a 9-1-1 call reporting that a plane had just crashed in a farm field.

Emergency personnel from the Carsonville Fire Department, Sanilac EMS and sheriff’s office responded to the scene and found that a 69-year-old male subject and a 64-year-old female subject, both of Harrison Township, made it out of the plane and were walking around.

According to Deputy Chad Adams, the initial investigation revealed that the male pilot and passenger had just left the Sandusky airport when they started experiencing mechanical problems.

The pilot stated that he attempted to make it back to the Sandusky Airport, however, then decided on attempting an emergency landing on Ruth Road.

Due to traffic conditions on Ruth Road, he had to cancel and veer off into a field.

He then lost control due to the mechanical problem, thus crashing upside down in the farm field southeast of the intersection of Ruth and Custer roads.

The pilot and passenger, who were both conscious and alert, were transported by Sanilac EMS to McKenzie Memorial Hospital for treatment of injuries.

The plane is described as red and white, two seat, single engine assembled aircraft.

The sheriff’s office was assisted on scene by the Carsonville Fire Department, Sanilac EMS and the Sandusky Airport.

The names of the individuals are being withheld pending the ongoing investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Source:  http://www.michigansthumb.com

Boeing Addresses Concerns Over China Plant • Ahead of Xi Jinping visit, company said it is in talks to extend partnership, according to memo

The Wall Street Journal
 By Jon Ostrower
Updated Sept. 22, 2015 7:40 p.m. ET



Boeing Co. sought to assuage employee concerns over its plans for a new plant in China that was expected to be announced as part of the visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping to a company factory on Wednesday.

The new plant would be Boeing’s first big manufacturing facility overseas, and would mark a milestone for its presence in China, which is fast becoming its most important market.

The facility is expected to handle only final steps in completing work on 737 single-aisle jets ordered by Chinese customers, according to a person familiar with discussions on the venture.

China accounted for roughly a quarter of Boeing’s single-aisle jet deliveries this year and is expected to claim a large share of future orders, but the company has lost ground in recent years to Airbus Group SE, which delivered the first of its rival A320 jets from an assembly plant in Tianjin in 2009 and now claims around half of the Chinese market.

The prospect of Boeing moving some work to China such as painting jets and completing their flight tests has riled Boeing’s unions.

Boeing hasn’t yet announced the planned facility, but Ray Conner, chief executive of its commercial airplanes unit, alluded to it Tuesday in an internal memo viewed by The Wall Street Journal.

“We are in important discussions with Chinese partners about our strategic partnership in China and also possible sales agreements,” Mr. Conner said. “I want to assure you that agreements we may reach with our Chinese partners will not result in layoffs or reduce employment for the 737 program in Washington state.”

A location for the planned facility has yet to be selected, but it would install seats, in-flight entertainment systems, and some galleys and lavatories, as well as the custom paint job for each airline, said the person familiar with the plans. Each jet will then be flown on production flight trials before delivery. Because it will take several years to establish, The facility will mostly handle Boeing’s new 737 Max jets, which begin delivery in 2017.

Airbus has assembled more than 200 jets in Tianjin near Beijing and is also building a completion center in China for its larger A330 planes—work it promised as part of a deal for up to 75 aircraft.

While China has become its single-largest growth market, Boeing has resisted siting an assembly plant there to retain the efficiencies of its existing plant in Renton, Wash., and to avoid disturbing its often strained labor relations.

“Any shift of aerospace jobs from our bargaining unit or Washington state causes grave concern,” the bargaining unit for the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers in Seattle said in a statement last week.

The lure of the China market has already led other large U.S. capital goods makers such as Caterpillar Inc. and Joy Global Inc. to assemble equipment there. General Electric Co., which makes engines for Boeing jets, last week said it would move final assembly of some power turbines to China from the U.S., citing the loss of financial sales support from the Export-Import Bank. Boeing and GE have led the battle to reauthorize Ex-Im, which has been closed to new business for almost three months.

While Chinese firms are already big suppliers for Boeing and Airbus planes, previous efforts to deepen ties with its aerospace sector have floundered. McDonnell Douglas opened a facility near Shanghai to assemble its MD-80 jets in the mid-1980s, but Boeing curtailed the effort following its 1997 merger with McDonnell.

China is now investing heavily to develop its own passenger jet industry, and though the state-backed Comac C919 plane includes engines from a joint venture between GE and France’s Safran SA and parts from other Western suppliers, it is years behind schedule.


Original article can be found here: http://www.wsj.com

New Mexico man aims to break world record in the sky



MORIARTY, N.M. (KRQE) – Jon Sharp has been a pilot for three decades, winning races at air shows for years. Now, he wants to take his flying game to the next level. 


“I’m hoping to put up big enough numbers where nobody gets to them for a while,” said Sharp.

He’s talking about beating a speed record for planes that weigh under 2,300 pounds. He’ll attempt to break the record in his team’s own creation, The Nemesis.

“Records are made to broken, and it’s always great to be the fastest person there is. So that’s what we’re here to do, be the fastest,” said Sharp.

He’ll hit the skies on Wednesday when he attempts a 3-kilometer course over the Moriarty Municipal Airport.

“He’ll fly across the runway, two times in each direction, we’ll measure the speed in which he’s flying, and determine if he flew fast enough to break the existing record,” said Brian Utley of the National Aeronautic Association.

That existing record for a small single-engine plane is 356 mph.

Jon’s confident that by the end of the week his name will be next to a few new records.

“We’re just more prepared now, when we did our record last time in Osh Kosh. We were not set up correctly, we just wanted to get a record,” said Sharp.

If all goes well, Wednesday won’t only be a victory for Jon but also the Moriarty Municipal Airport.

“Having Jon here and The Nemesis, really means a lot of the community of Moriarty and this airfield, because we’re already famous in the glider world, and now we’ll be famous in the power world,” said Bob Hudson, manager of Moriarty Municipal Airport.

Story and video:  http://counton2.com

Pilot Reports Lasering While Flying Over Casper Mountain

The pilot of a commercial plane flying north over Casper Mountain on Monday night reported someone on the mountain had used a laser along the the flight path as he was preparing to land at the airport.

The pilot reported the laser was coming from an area of three broadcasting towers on the mountain, Sgt. Aaron Shatto said Tuesday.

Pointing lasers at airplanes can cause temporary night blindness in pilots, rendering them unable to see their instruments, said Mike Hendershot, chief of public safety at the Casper-Natrona County International Airport.

“It could have catastrophic results,” Hendershot said.

The incident happened about 7:30 p.m. The pilot radioed the report to the control tower, which in turn notified him and the Sheriff’s Office,Hendershot said. “A Skywest flight from Denver to Casper stated they were illuminated by a green laser.”

The airport, following protocol, notified the Transportation Security Administration, which notified the Federal Bureau of Investigation, he said.

Shatto said a deputy on the mountain checked the tower site on Tower Road, and went to KTWO Road, but did not find any vehicles.

After the plane landed, Hendershot said the pilot and copilot said they saw a vehicle with its lights and two bursts from the laser. “It was not directed at the aircraft, but it was in the vicinity.”

Because it apparently was not a deliberate act, it will be reported as suspicious, Hendershot said.

He was not aware of other incidents of people pointing lasers at airplanes in Natrona County or elsewhere in Wyoming, he said.

But this has been a problem elsewhere, Hendershot said.

Because of the increasing popularity of the laser pointers and the potential damage, the Federal Aviation Administration Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 made it a federal felony to knowingly point the beam of a laser at an aircraft, according to a 2014 FBI report. The crime is punishable by up to five years in prison.

The beam from a 5 milliwatt laser pointer is narrow close up. But it can reach up to a mile and grow in diameter to several feet. Pilots have reported the effect is like a camera flash going of in a darkened car, according to the report.

Source:  http://k2radio.com

NFL First Major U.S. League to Win FAA Permission to Use Drones

The National Football League can use drones to shoot films, documentaries and television segments, becoming the first major sports league to receive such permission from the Federal Aviation Administration. 

The exemption, which precludes filming games, comes three months after the FAA said it was probing NFL teams, including the Dallas Cowboys and New York Giants, for their use of drones. 

It’s illegal to fly unmanned aircraft for any commercial purpose without first receiving a federal green light.

In a Sept. 17 letter, the FAA granted the league’s NFL Films permission to use drones but with several conditions and limitations. 

Among them: Drones must weigh less than 55 pounds (25 kilograms) including payload, fly no more than 400 feet (122 meters) above the ground and travel no faster than 100 miles per hour (87 knots). 

NFL Films revolutionized the way football games are chronicled, taking viewers inside the game and emphasizing the sport’s power and beauty, often in slow motion. 

The division produces TV programs, films and documentaries, not live broadcasts. NFL and college football coaches have praised drone footage for giving them a vantage point of the on-field action that previously didn’t exist. 

Fox used drones in its coverage of this year’s U.S. Open golf tournament at Chambers Bay Golf Course outside Seattle. 

The FAA exemption allows NFL Films to operate drones only over empty stadiums, precluding their use on game days when the stands are packed with fans, said Kurt Wimmer, NFL Films’ outside counsel.

Drones won’t be used to film practice, NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said. 

“NFL Films has a long history of embracing and employing the latest technology,” McCarthy said in an e-mail.

Source: http://www.bloomberg.com

North State Aviation to begin hiring for 109 Lenoir County jobs within weeks

The president of Winston-Salem-based North State Aviation said Tuesday that his company will begin hiring the first of 109 new jobs for a new maintenance center at the N.C. Global TransPark in Lenoir County within the next three to four weeks. 

Charlie Creech, president of North State Aviation, said the positions for the new aircraft center will mostly be mechanics and technicians who will work on aviation repair, maintenance and overhaul services at a one-bay hangar with more than 20,000 square feet. Workers will also be needed in the stock and tool rooms.

He said the more than 400 jobs located in Winston-Salem will remain at the Smith Reynolds Airport, where North State Aviation is the largest tenant and has a total of six bays that are 17,000 square feet each.

“Nobody is going down there from here; we’re going to be hiring locally down there,” he said of the new park jobs.

Creech said members of the senior management team, including himself, will remain in Winston-Salem, where the company was founded in 2010.

The new North State Aviation salaries will vary by position, but the average will be $39,688 per year. That’s higher than the average annual wage in Lenoir County of $32,164.

The company will also invest $900,000 mostly in upfits to the hangar, Creech said.

Creech said the N.C. Global TransPark hangar can hold a plane as large as a Boeing 737-900, which is the largest aircraft that North State works on at its Smith Reynolds Airport facility in Winston-Salem.

North State Aviation eyed facilities in South Carolina, but determined that the Kinston facility was “perfect for us” due to a variety of factors including nearby community colleges that both have aviation programs as well as military installations that the company can recruit from, Creech said. The 2,500-acre industrial park has access to an airport, rail and highways such as Interstate 95 and Interstate 40.

He said the park is also home to a “magnificent” airport with a 2-mile runway.

Source:  http://www.bizjournals.com

Papal ‘No Fly Zone’ grounds planes for Pottstown Municipal Airport (N47) Day



POTTSTOWN >> One might expect to see airplanes in the air during the annual Municipal Airport Day this Saturday, but that will not be the case.

And you can thank Pope Francis for that.

Organizers of Saturday’s affair announced Tuesday that due to a No Fly Zone — known as a “Temporary Flight Restriction” — being imposed by the Federal Aviation Administration in a 30-mile zone around Philadelphia, planes will be grounded during the annual event.

Pottstown Municipal Airport is right at the edge of that zone.

The restriction lasts from 9 a.m. Saturday through 9:30 p.m. Sunday.
 

“These restrictions severely limit operations at all airports in the area, meaning no flight lessons, no skydiving, no balloon rides, and a long list of other prohibited aerial activities,” wrote organizer Deb Penrod.

“Almost 30 public-use airports are included in this safety net, including Pottstown Municipal Airport,” wrote Penrod.

“The TFR was fully anticipated by local pilots, although the extended duration may have been a bit surprising,” she wrote.

Rather than try to change the date, “the organizers elected to hold Municipal Airport Day on its traditional date, which has been the last Saturday in September for several years,” according to Penrod.

“There are several other aviation events at this time of year which occupy the pilots who participate, and there have also been quite a few other Pottstown-area events that tied up local volunteers and energies,” she said by way of explaining the decision.

Airplanes will still be available for up-close and personal inspections, pilots and student pilots will still be available.

“So what do you call an Airport Day with no airplanes in the air?” Penrod asked.

“Call it a good day for free hot dogs before or after you visit the many other events that day in the Pottstown area,” she said, noting that the Can-Jam at Sly Fox Brewery “will be right around the corner.”

Source:  http://www.pottsmerc.com

Monday, September 21, 2015

Why planes, helicopters and drones can't fly over Disneyland



There are consequences for flying over Disneyland, Disney California Adventure or Walt Disney World.

The theme parks have the same protection as the White House, the Kennedy Space Center, and live sporting events when it comes to restricted airspace.

As the Orange County Mosquito and Vector Control District learned earlier this month, anyone planning to fly over the theme parks needs a special waiver approved by the Federal Aviation Agency and the Transportation Security Administration.

The Control District canceled plans to spray a pesticide to kill West Nile-carrying mosquitoes in eight Orange County cities because the company it hired for the job lagged in getting a permit in time for the scheduled flight over Disneyland. It takes up to five business days to get an approval, the FAA says.

“TSA will vet the pilots and passengers and then send the waiver request to the FAA for further review and final determination,” said Ian Gregor, a spokesman at the FAA.

The Anaheim parks and Walt Disney World received flight-restriction status after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The 2003 bill also prohibits aircraft from flying over live sporting events in stadiums that have a seating capacity of 30,000 or more.

The ban includes any unmanned remote-controlled devices such as drones. Nothing can fly below 3,000 feet and within three miles of Disneyland and Walt Disney World. Those are the only theme parks in the United States to have no-fly zone designations.

“We believe airspace restrictions enhance public safety in places where large groups gather, including theme parks and sports stadiums," said Suzi Brown, a Disneyland spokeswoman.

There are exceptions.

Law enforcement, medical, and military aircraft are exempt from the restriction as long as they are in contact with air traffic control.

Consequences for flying low over the theme park includes a potential $10,000 fine, and/or the pilot, passengers, or operator being detained by law enforcement officials.

Although the no-fly zones exist for safety’s sake, they are another layer that keeps reality outside Disney’s borders, helping the guests focus on fantasy.

Walt Disney himself had a 20-foot-foot-high berm built around Disneyland to protect its guests from views of the outside world.

Source:  http://www.ocregister.com

Officials: Plane Lands Safely At Philadelphia International Airport (KPHL) After Bird Strike

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – A plane has landed safely at Philadelphia International Airport after the crew reported that a bird struck the aircraft’s windshield, according to officials.

The FAA says the incident was reported at about 6:31 p.m. Monday.

American Airlines says Flight #1889 was traveling from Charlotte Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina to Bradley International Airport in Connecticut when it reported that a bird struck the aircraft’s windshield.

The flight diverted to Philadelphia International Airport and landed safely without incident, according to American Airlines.

American Airlines says the Airbus 319 was replaced with an Airbus 320 and the 114 passengers and five crew members departed Philadelphia at 7:38 p.m.

Officials there were no reported injuries.

The aircraft was taken out of service and the aircraft windshield is being replaced, according to American Airlines.

The FAA will investigate.

Source:  http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com

Aero Commander 680-E, N222JS: Accident occurred September 21, 2015 at Boise Air Terminal/Gowen Field (KBOI), Idaho

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA265
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 21, 2015 in Boise, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER 680 E, registration: N222JS
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was conducting a personal flight. He reported that he did not recall what happened the day of the accident. One witness, who was former pilot, reported that he saw the airplane fly over his house and that the engines sounded as if they were “out of sync.” A second witness, who lived about 5 miles away from the airport, reported that she saw the airplane flying unusually low. She added that the engines sounded terrible and that they were “popping and banging.” A third witness, who was holding short of the runway waiting to take off, reported that he saw the airplane approaching the runway about 75 ft above ground level (agl). He then saw the airplane descend to about 50 ft agl and then climb back to about 75 ft agl, at which point the airplane made a hard, right turn and then impacted terrain. 

Although a postaccident examination of both engines revealed no evidence of a mechanical failure or malfunction that would have precluded normal operation, the witnesses’ described what appeared to be an engine problem. It is likely that one or both of the engines was experiencing some kind of problem and that the pilot subsequently lost airplane control. The pilot reported in a written statement several months after the accident that, when he moved the left rudder pedal back and forth multiple times after the accident, neither the torque tubes nor the rudder would move, that he found several of the rivets sheared from the left pedal, and that he believed the rudder had failed. However, postaccident examination of the fractured rivets showed that they exhibited deformation patterns consistent with overstress shearing that occurred during the accident sequence. No preimpact anomalies with the rudder were found.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control following an engine problem for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of both engines and the rudder revealed no malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N222JS

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA265
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 21, 2015 in Boise, ID
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER 680 E, registration: N222JS
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 21, 2015 about 1620 mountain daylight time, an Aero Commander 680-E, N222JS, impacted terrain while attempting to land at the Boise Air Terminal/Gowen Field (BOI), Boise, Idaho. The commercial pilot, sole occupant, sustained serious injuries and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Weiser Municipal Airport (S87), Weiser, Idaho at an unknown time. 

The pilot reported that he does not recall what happened the day of the accident. 

One witness reported he observed the airplane fly over his house, he mentioned that the engines sounded as if they were out of sync. A second witness who lives about 5 miles away from the airport reported she observed the airplane flying abnormally low; the engines sounded terrible, they were popping and banging. A third witness, who was holding short of the runway waiting to takeoff, reported that they observed the airplane approaching the runway about 75 feet above the ground. They saw the airplane descend to about 50 feet, then climb back up to about 75 when the airplane suddenly made a hard right turn and impacted terrain.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 63, held a commercial pilot certificate for airplane single- and multi-engine land, and single-engine sea, as well as an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate issued on August 8, 2012. The pilot held a second-class medical certificate issued April 13, 2015, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses and possess glasses for near/intermediate vision. The pilot estimated that he had 18,000 total hours, 2,500 of which were in the airplane make and model. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The seven seat, high wing, retractable-gear airplane, serial number 680E-721-28, was manufactured in 1959. It was powered by two Lycoming GSO-480-B1A6 engines, and equipped with Hartzell Propeller controllable pitch propellers. Review of copies of maintenance logbook records showed an annual inspection was completed on October 10, 2014 at a recorded tachometer reading of 784 hours, with 487 hours since left engine major overhaul, and 412 hours since right engine major overhaul. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

An onscene examination of the airplane was conducted by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector.

The first identified point of impact was in the gravel just south of taxiway "A"; gravel and scratch marks were spread across the taxiway, and slice marks were noted in the gravel just north of the taxiway. In addition, there were other disruptions in the gravel along with small fragments of the wing tips and other airframe pieces. The airplane came to rest on top of, and slightly on the other side of, a fence on the north side of the airport and taxiway "A". 

The airframe was heavily damaged. The inspector observed no fuel in the left and right wing fuel tanks; and due to the position of the airplane, he was unable to observe the fuel within the main fuel tank. The fuel selector for both engines were selected to the center tank. The right engine propellers were still secured to their hub, and the engine sustained minimal damage. The left engine propeller hub had separated from the engine; all three blades sustained mostly forward bending. 

During the recovery process, the recovery crew removed about 11-12 gallons of fuel from the center fuel tank. 

TESTS AND RESEARCH

A postaccident examination of the airplane's engines was completed by representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration and Lycoming engines. There were no indications of preimpact anomalies with either engine. 

The left engine was still secured to the airframe, however, the propeller gearbox and assembly was found separated. All propeller blades were bent forward, and exhibited leading edge damage. The top spark plus were removed and displayed "worn out-normal" signatures when compared to the Champion Aviation Check a Plug Chart AV-27. The engine was rotated by hand; thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders and engine drive train continuity was established throughout. 


The right engine was still secured to the fuselage. The propeller hub and blades remained attached, and the blades were found mostly straight. One blade exhibited chordwise scratches, and a second blade had leading edge scratches, both of which were on the outboard about 10 inches of the blade. The third blade exhibited minor leading edge damage. The top spark plugs were removed and displayed "worn out-normal" signatures when compared to the Champion Aviation Check a Plug Chart AV-27. The engine was rotated by hand; thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders and engine drive train continuity was established. 

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA265
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 21, 2015 in Boise, ID
Aircraft: AERO COMMANDER 680 E, registration: N222JS
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On September 21, 2015 about 1620 mountain daylight time, an Aero Commander 680-E, N222JS, impacted terrain under unknown circumstances while attempting to land at the Boise Air Terminal/Gowen Field (BOI), Boise, Idaho. The commercial pilot (sole occupant) sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage throughout. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and it is unknown if the pilot filed a flight plan. The flight originated from BOI at an unknown time. 


A witness on the airport reported that they observed the airplane approaching the runway about 75 feet above the ground. They saw the airplane descend to about 50 feet, then climb back up to about 75 feet when it suddenly made a hard right turn and descended into the ground near the taxiway.


The airplane has been recovered to a secure location for further examination.




Jim Metzger



BOISE -- The manager of the Weiser Municipal Airport was badly injured in a plane crash at the Boise Airport Monday afternoon.

A Weiser city official confirmed Jim Metzger was flying the plane. He was the only person on board.

"I know he has a lot of hours in the pilot's seat," said Nate Marvin, public works director for the city of Weiser. "He's been a real asset to the airport. Very easy going and he's enthusiastic. He wants to see the airport grow and improve."

The FAA and NTSB are investigating the cause of the crash.

A Boise Airport spokesperson says the pilot was landing when the plane banked right before crashing on the northern side of the airfield.

Metzger was taken to Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, where he is listed in critical condition.

Family members tell us the 63-year-old has already been through one surgery and he has a long road ahead.

"We just all wish him the best and hope he gets healed up fast," added Marvin.

Story and video: http://www.ktvb.com

 


The manager of the Weiser Municipal Airport was the pilot of a private plane that crashed Monday afternoon while landing at the Boise Airport. 

Jim Metzger was injured when his Aero Commander 680-E plane banked away from the runway and crashed at the north end of the airfield at about 4:20 p.m.

Metzger was alone in the seven-seat plane. He was taken to a local hospital. No information on Metzger’s condition was immediately available Tuesday.

Metzger was hired in February to manage the Weiser airport. He formerly operated a maintenance facility at Grove Field Airport in Camas, Wash., east of Vancouver. A city official confirmed Metzger was the pilot of the plane that crashed.

The plane is registered to Metzger and his wife, Susan Metzger, at an address in Washougal, east of Camas, according to records from the Federal Aviation Administration.

Metzger is certified as a commercial pilot and mechanic, according to the FAA. He has flight ratings for single- and multi-engine planes and single-engine seaplanes. He is also instrument rated.

The crash is under investigation by the FAA, airport officials said. It’s unclear whether the National Transportation Safety Board will also conduct an investigation.

The airfield closed for about 40 minutes after the crash, disrupting commercial and private plane flights into and out of the Boise Airport until shortly after 5 p.m. Two Boise-bound commercial flights were diverted, and some outbound flights had to delay their takeoff times.





BOISE - One man was injured Monday afternoon after a crash at the Boise Airport, an airport spokesman said.

The crash was reported at around 4:20 p.m. on the north side of the airfield, spokesman Sean Briggs said.

According to Briggs, the crash involved a small, twin-engine plane.

One man was on board.

He was transported to a local hospital. The extent of injuries is undetermined.

The crash did not happen on the runway, Briggs said, but on the north end of the airfield.

Still, airport operations were shut down for about 40 minutes, Briggs said - from about 4:20 p.m. to just after 5 p.m.

Briggs said it was unclear whether the plane was taking off or landing. What caused it to crash was also unknown.

Boise fire and police, as well as airport personnel, were on scene, and Briggs said the FAA's Flight Standard Office is conducting a preliminary investigation.

The Flight Standard Office will release its findings to the NTSB, Briggs said, and then the NTSB will determine whether to also conduct an investigation.

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.ktvb.com

A small twin-engine airplane crashed at the north end of the Boise Airport’s air field late Monday afternoon, injuring the pilot and severely damaging the plane.

The crash was reported about 4:20 p.m. near Allscott Aviation, according to Ada County Dispatch.

The crash was reported to dispatch by the FAA, a dispatcher said.

The pilot was the only person in the plane, and information was not immediately available about how the crash happened or how badly the pilot was injured, Boise Airport spokesman Sean Briggs said.












Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N347SP, Certified Flyers: Accident occurred September 21, 2015 near Butter Valley Golf Port Airport (7N8), Bally, Berks County, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: Federal Aviation Administration/Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania 


Aviation Accident Factual Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Certified Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N347SP

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA366
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 21, 2015 in Bally, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N347SP
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight. Several witnesses reported observing different sequences of events. One witness reported seeing the airplane fly in a 90° right bank turn for about 10 seconds as it maneuvered underneath power lines and between two utility towers. After passing under the power lines, the airplane leveled and then impacted the ground. Another witness reported that the airplane was at a lower-than-normal altitude and seemed to be flying “erratically” and “aggressively,” and that, at one point, it was “flying on its side.” Another witness reported seeing the airplane flying with one wing pointing toward the ground. The witness statements are consistent with low-altitude aerobatic maneuvers. Although some bystanders reported that the engine sputtered and lost power and the pilot reported that a loss of engine power occurred, postaccident examination of the airframe and engine, which included a successful engine test run, revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Toxicological testing of the pilot’s specimens revealed that he had high levels of a sedating benzodiazepine, alprazolam, within the toxic range. Additionally, he had a low level of a second sedating benzodiazepine, lorazepam. Both these medications are used to treat significant anxiety disorders, which are associated with performance deficits, particularly in high-workload spatial tasks. It is likely that the pilot’s underlying psychiatric disorders and the medications he was using to treat them impaired his judgement, executive functioning, and psychomotor skills and contributed to the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain altitude during low-level aerobatic maneuvers. Contributing to the accident were the pilot's improper decision to attempt the low-level aerobatic maneuvers and his impairment due to psychiatric conditions and the medications he was using to treat them.




On September 21, 2015, about 1830 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N347SP, operated by Certified Flyers, was substantially damaged during a collision with terrain, while maneuvering after takeoff from Butter Valley Golf Port (7N8), Bally, Pennsylvania. The commercial pilot incurred minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to Morristown Municipal Airport (MMU), Morristown, New Jersey.

According to the pilot's written statement, he flew from MMU to 7N8 uneventfully. He then departed 7N8 for a return trip to MMU. During initial climb, about 800 feet above ground level, the airplane experienced a partial loss of engine power, with the tachometer indicating about 1,500 rpm. The pilot attempted to land straight ahead, but due to powerlines, he made a left descending turn. He did not think he would be able to glide the airplane back to the airport and elected to land in a nearby field. During the landing, the landing gear struck a fence and the airplane came to rest inverted in the field.

According to a witness, who worked at 7N8, he saw a white airplane with a blue and yellow stripe land between 1800 and 1830. The airplane approached faster and in a tighter traffic pattern than other airplanes that he typically observed land at the airport. The airplane made a sharp turn over parked airplanes on its approach to the runway. The airplane's right wing then dipped low over the runway, but did not contact it. The wings subsequently leveled as the engine noise increased. The witness added that the airplane must have touched down further down the runway as he did not see it land, but saw it taxiing back on the runway for another takeoff. He did not see the subsequent takeoff.

Another witness, who lived near the accident site, stated that he was in his backyard between 1815 and 1830, when he heard a small airplane, which he observed was white and yellow flying toward his property at a lower altitude than normal. The witness added that the airplane seemed to be flying erratically and at one point was "flying on its side." The witness further stated that he was concerned for the safety of the airplane and his house as he watched the abnormal flight, during which the pilot seemed to be flying aggressively for several minutes. He did not witness the impact, but added that he did not hear any abnormal engine sounds.

A third witness, who also lived near the accident site, reported that he was sitting in his living room and noticed an airplane that was not flying normally. Specifically, one wing was pointed toward the ground and the other pointed toward the sky. The airplane then disappeared behind a fence row and dust rose in the air. The witness assumed the airplane had crashed and attempted to drive to the site and offer assistance; however, he soon saw emergency responders and concluded that they would assist.

A fourth witness stated that he was working on a farm near the accident site at the time of the accident. He was operating a skid-loader at the time, and could not hear the airplane's engine noise or the lack of it. He watched the airplane fly in a 90-degree right bank turn for about 10 seconds, "wingtip to wingtip," as it maneuvered underneath powerlines and in between two utility towers. After passing under the powerlines, the airplane leveled and impacted the ground.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the right wing and that the right main landing gear had collapsed, consistent with a right wing low impact. He observed impact marks in the soybean field, consistent with a high-angle right bank turn toward and under the powerlines. The inspector also noted a strong odor of fuel at the accident site. When the airplane was subsequently up-righted and recovered, the inspector observed that both fuel tanks were almost full.

A fuel sample was recovered from the engine driven fuel pump after the wreckage was recovered to a storage facility. A small amount of dirt was noted on the outside of the fuel line near the pump fitting; however, the fuel sample was consistent with 100-low-lead aviation gasoline and absent of any visible contamination. A successful test-run of the engine was subsequently performed. A fuel supply was plumbed from a container to the engine driven fuel pump due to a damaged lower fuel sump. The engine did not start on the first attempt as the electric fuel pump was damaged in the accident and could not supply fuel to prime the engine. Ether was then used as primer for the engine on the second attempt. During the second attempt, the engine started immediately and ran continuously without hesitation at multiple power settings, including full power. The engine was run for several minutes and then shut down.

Toxicology testing performed by the FAA's Bioaeronautical Research Laboratory on blood and urine specimen obtained during the pilot's initial postaccident medical care identified alprazolam in urine and blood (0.123 ug/ml) as well as its metabolite, alpha-hydroxyalprazolam in urine. Lorazepam was identified in urine and blood (0.03 ug/ml). In addition, sertraline and its metabolite desmethylsertraline were identified in urine and blood and ondansetron was found in urine.

The pilot's most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on April 7, 2015. On the application for that certificate, he reported no medical conditions or medications to the FAA.

Alprazolam is a benzodiazepine medication available as a Schedule IV controlled substance used to treat anxiety disorder and panic disorder. It is commonly marketed with the name Xanax. The drug information includes this instruction to providers: "Because of its CNS depressant effects, patients receiving alprazolam tablets should be cautioned against engaging in hazardous occupations or activities requiring complete mental alertness such as operating machinery or driving a motor vehicle." The usual therapeutic dose range is between 0.0060 and 0.0200 ug/ml; levels above 0.100 are considered toxic.

Lorazepam is another benzodiazepine medication available as a Schedule IV controlled substance, indicated for the treatment of anxiety disorders or for the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depressive symptoms. It is commonly marketed with the name Ativan. Lorazepam carries specific warnings including, "Use of benzodiazepines, including lorazepam, both used alone and in combination with other CNS depressants, may lead to potentially fatal respiratory depression. Use of benzodiazepines, including lorazepam, may lead to physical and psychological dependence. As with all patients on CNS-depressant drugs, patients receiving lorazepam should be warned not to operate dangerous machinery or motor vehicles and that their tolerance for alcohol and other CNS depressants will be diminished. The usual therapeutic range is between 0.1600 and 0.2700 ug/ml. Sertraline is an antidepressant marketed with the name Zoloft.





NTSB Identification: ERA15LA366
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 21, 2015 in Bally, PA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N347SP
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 21, 2015, about 1830 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N347SP, operated by Certified Flyers, was substantially damaged during collision with terrain, while maneuvering after takeoff from Butter Valley Golf Port (7N8), Bally, Pennsylvania. The commercial pilot incurred minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to Morristown Municipal Airport (MMU), Morristown, New Jersey. The flight departed 7N8 about 1830.

According to the pilot's written statement, he flew from MMU to 7N8 uneventfully. He then departed 7N8 for a return trip to MMU. During initial climb, about 800 feet above ground level, the airplane experienced a partial loss of engine power, with the tachometer indicating about 1,500 rpm. The pilot attempted to land straight ahead, but due to powerlines, he made a left descending turn. He did not think he would be able to glide the airplane back to the airport and elected to land in a nearby field. During the landing, the landing gear struck a fence and the airplane came to rest inverted in the field.

According to a witness, who worked at 7N8, He saw a white airplane with a blue and yellow stripe land between 1800 and 1830. The airplane approached faster and in a tighter traffic pattern than other airplanes that typically land there. The white airplane made a sharp turn over parked airplanes on its approach to the runway. The airplane's right wing then dipped low over the runway, but did not contact it. The wings subsequently leveled as the engine noise increased. The witnesses added that the airplane must have touched down further down the runway as he did not see it land, but saw it taxiing back on the runway for another takeoff. He did not see the subsequent takeoff.

Another witness, who lived near the accident site, stated that he was in his backyard between 1815 and 1830, when he heard a small white and yellow airplane flying toward his property at a lower altitude than normal. The witness added that the airplane seemed to be flying erratically and at one point was "flying on its side." The witness further stated that he was concerned for the safety of the airplane and his house as he watched the abnormal flight, during which the pilot seemed to be flying aggressively for several minutes. He did not witness the impact, but added that he did not hear any abnormal engine sounds.

A third witness, who also lived near the accident site, reported that he was sitting in his living room and noticed an airplane that was not flying normally. Specifically, one wing was pointed toward the ground and the other pointed toward the sky. The airplane then disappeared behind a fence row and dust rose in the air. The witness assumed the airplane had crashed and attempted to drive to the site and offer assistance; however, he soon saw emergency responders and concluded that they would assist.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed substantial damage to the right wing and that the right main landing gear had collapsed, consistent with a right wing low impact in a soybean field. He also noted a strong odor of fuel at the accident site. When the airplane was subsequently uprighted and recovered, the inspector observed that both fuel tanks were almost full. The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: FAA/FSDO; Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Factual Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Certified Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N347SP

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA366 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 21, 2015 in Bally, PA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N347SP
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 21, 2015, about 1830 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N347SP, operated by Certified Flyers, was substantially damaged during a collision with terrain, while maneuvering after takeoff from Butter Valley Golf Port (7N8), Bally, Pennsylvania. The commercial pilot incurred minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to Morristown Municipal Airport (MMU), Morristown, New Jersey.

According to the pilot's written statement, he flew from MMU to 7N8 uneventfully. He then departed 7N8 for a return trip to MMU. During initial climb, about 800 feet above ground level, the airplane experienced a partial loss of engine power, with the tachometer indicating about 1,500 rpm. The pilot attempted to land straight ahead, but due to powerlines, he made a left descending turn. He did not think he would be able to glide the airplane back to the airport and elected to land in a nearby field. During the landing, the landing gear struck a fence and the airplane came to rest inverted in the field.

According to a witness, who worked at 7N8, he saw a white airplane with a blue and yellow stripe land between 1800 and 1830. The airplane approached faster and in a tighter traffic pattern than other airplanes that he typically observed land at the airport. The airplane made a sharp turn over parked airplanes on its approach to the runway. The airplane's right wing then dipped low over the runway, but did not contact it. The wings subsequently leveled as the engine noise increased. The witness added that the airplane must have touched down further down the runway as he did not see it land, but saw it taxiing back on the runway for another takeoff. He did not see the subsequent takeoff.

Another witness, who lived near the accident site, stated that he was in his backyard between 1815 and 1830, when he heard a small airplane, which he observed was white and yellow flying toward his property at a lower altitude than normal. The witness added that the airplane seemed to be flying erratically and at one point was "flying on its side." The witness further stated that he was concerned for the safety of the airplane and his house as he watched the abnormal flight, during which the pilot seemed to be flying aggressively for several minutes. He did not witness the impact, but added that he did not hear any abnormal engine sounds.

A third witness, who also lived near the accident site, reported that he was sitting in his living room and noticed an airplane that was not flying normally. Specifically, one wing was pointed toward the ground and the other pointed toward the sky. The airplane then disappeared behind a fence row and dust rose in the air. The witness assumed the airplane had crashed and attempted to drive to the site and offer assistance; however, he soon saw emergency responders and concluded that they would assist.

A fourth witness stated that he was working on a farm near the accident site at the time of the accident. He was operating a skid-loader at the time, and could not hear the airplane's engine noise or the lack of it. He watched the airplane fly in a 90-degree right bank turn for about 10 seconds, "wingtip to wingtip," as it maneuvered underneath powerlines and in between two utility towers. After passing under the powerlines, the airplane leveled and impacted the ground.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the right wing and that the right main landing gear had collapsed, consistent with a right wing low impact. He observed impact marks in the soybean field, consistent with a high-angle right bank turn toward and under the powerlines. The inspector also noted a strong odor of fuel at the accident site. When the airplane was subsequently up-righted and recovered, the inspector observed that both fuel tanks were almost full.

A fuel sample was recovered from the engine driven fuel pump after the wreckage was recovered to a storage facility. A small amount of dirt was noted on the outside of the fuel line near the pump fitting; however, the fuel sample was consistent with 100-low-lead aviation gasoline and absent of any visible contamination. A successful test-run of the engine was subsequently performed. A fuel supply was plumbed from a container to the engine driven fuel pump due to a damaged lower fuel sump. The engine did not start on the first attempt as the electric fuel pump was damaged in the accident and could not supply fuel to prime the engine. Ether was then used as primer for the engine on the second attempt. During the second attempt, the engine started immediately and ran continuously without hesitation at multiple power settings, including full power. The engine was run for several minutes and then shut down.

Toxicology testing performed by the FAA's Bioaeronautical Research Laboratory on blood and urine specimen obtained during the pilot's initial postaccident medical care identified alprazolam in urine and blood (0.123 ug/ml) as well as its metabolite, alpha-hydroxyalprazolam in urine. Lorazepam was identified in urine and blood (0.03 ug/ml). In addition, sertraline and its metabolite desmethylsertraline were identified in urine and blood and ondansetron was found in urine.

The pilot's most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on April 7, 2015. On the application for that certificate, he reported no medical conditions or medications to the FAA.

Alprazolam is a benzodiazepine medication available as a Schedule IV controlled substance used to treat anxiety disorder and panic disorder. It is commonly marketed with the name Xanax. The drug information includes this instruction to providers: "Because of its CNS depressant effects, patients receiving alprazolam tablets should be cautioned against engaging in hazardous occupations or activities requiring complete mental alertness such as operating machinery or driving a motor vehicle." The usual therapeutic dose range is between 0.0060 and 0.0200 ug/ml; levels above 0.100 are considered toxic.

Lorazepam is another benzodiazepine medication available as a Schedule IV controlled substance, indicated for the treatment of anxiety disorders or for the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depressive symptoms. It is commonly marketed with the name Ativan. Lorazepam carries specific warnings including, "Use of benzodiazepines, including lorazepam, both used alone and in combination with other CNS depressants, may lead to potentially fatal respiratory depression. Use of benzodiazepines, including lorazepam, may lead to physical and psychological dependence. As with all patients on CNS-depressant drugs, patients receiving lorazepam should be warned not to operate dangerous machinery or motor vehicles and that their tolerance for alcohol and other CNS depressants will be diminished. The usual therapeutic range is between 0.1600 and 0.2700 ug/ml. Sertraline is an antidepressant marketed with the name Zoloft.







NTSB Identification: ERA15LA366
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 21, 2015 in Bally, PA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N347SP
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 21, 2015, about 1830 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N347SP, operated by Certified Flyers, was substantially damaged during collision with terrain, while maneuvering after takeoff from Butter Valley Golf Port (7N8), Bally, Pennsylvania. The commercial pilot incurred minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the planned flight to Morristown Municipal Airport (MMU), Morristown, New Jersey. The flight departed 7N8 about 1830.

According to the pilot's written statement, he flew from MMU to 7N8 uneventfully. He then departed 7N8 for a return trip to MMU. During initial climb, about 800 feet above ground level, the airplane experienced a partial loss of engine power, with the tachometer indicating about 1,500 rpm. The pilot attempted to land straight ahead, but due to powerlines, he made a left descending turn. He did not think he would be able to glide the airplane back to the airport and elected to land in a nearby field. During the landing, the landing gear struck a fence and the airplane came to rest inverted in the field.

According to a witness, who worked at 7N8, He saw a white airplane with a blue and yellow stripe land between 1800 and 1830. The airplane approached faster and in a tighter traffic pattern than other airplanes that typically land there. The white airplane made a sharp turn over parked airplanes on its approach to the runway. The airplane's right wing then dipped low over the runway, but did not contact it. The wings subsequently leveled as the engine noise increased. The witnesses added that the airplane must have touched down further down the runway as he did not see it land, but saw it taxiing back on the runway for another takeoff. He did not see the subsequent takeoff.

Another witness, who lived near the accident site, stated that he was in his backyard between 1815 and 1830, when he heard a small white and yellow airplane flying toward his property at a lower altitude than normal. The witness added that the airplane seemed to be flying erratically and at one point was "flying on its side." The witness further stated that he was concerned for the safety of the airplane and his house as he watched the abnormal flight, during which the pilot seemed to be flying aggressively for several minutes. He did not witness the impact, but added that he did not hear any abnormal engine sounds.

A third witness, who also lived near the accident site, reported that he was sitting in his living room and noticed an airplane that was not flying normally. Specifically, one wing was pointed toward the ground and the other pointed toward the sky. The airplane then disappeared behind a fence row and dust rose in the air. The witness assumed the airplane had crashed and attempted to drive to the site and offer assistance; however, he soon saw emergency responders and concluded that they would assist.


Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed substantial damage to the right wing and that the right main landing gear had collapsed, consistent with a right wing low impact in a soybean field. He also noted a strong odor of fuel at the accident site. When the airplane was subsequently uprighted and recovered, the inspector observed that both fuel tanks were almost full.
======

A small airplane made a crash landing in eastern Berks County on Monday evening, kicking up dust as it hit the ground in a farm field not far from a small airfield.

Early emergency radio reports from the scene were that the pilot survived the 6:35 p.m. landing along Route 100 north of Bally, but information on his condition was not available.

Karen Bauer, who lives one Wheeler Lane across Route 100, said her husband was on the phone looking out a window when he spotted the plane in trouble.

"He said, 'It's going to crash,'" she said, and then she saw the aircraft go down.

Firefighters, paramedics and police rushed to the scene, where they found the pilot in a Cessna 172S Skyhawk plane that had not broken up.

FAA spokeswoman Arlene Salac said the plane landed on the east side of Route 100 in Washington Township. Reports put it less than 1,000 feet from the Bally borough line.

Bauer said she and her husband hoped the pilot straightened out the plane just enough before touching down.

"I could see it at the tops of the trees," Bauer said. "We could see it swing around and make a turn. We're near Butter Valley Air Strip, so we see lots of planes, but we knew this one wasn't going to make it.

"We were inside the house. We couldn't hear anything," she added. "But we could clearly see that the plane was at angle that it was going to go down. Then we saw the dust in the air."

The Bauers ran down their driveway to make sure others were aware of the emergency landing, and within seconds they heard sirens.

Bauer said she was not sure what kind of farm field the plane landed in, but because she could see the cockpit and wings with binoculars, she said it probably was a pumpkin field, where the crops grow low.

State police were expected to meet with FAA officials on the scene Tuesday. The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the cause of the crash.


WASHINGTON TWP. >> A single-engine airplane crashed in a cornfield near Route 100 Monday evening, sending the pilot to the hospital.

No other injuries were reported when the small plane crashed around 6:30 p.m.

The unidentified pilot was transported to Lehigh Valley Hospital near Allentown for treatment of unspecified injuries. Sources at the scene said the pilot’s injuries were serious but did not appear life-threatening.

The pilot was the only occupant of the plane, which crashed near the towers for high tension electric lines, according to state police from the Reading barracks, which patrols Washington Township.

The plane struck the ground violently and flipped over, according to witnesses. It did not catch fire and no fuel leaked but its engine compartment was visibly mangled.

It could not be determined if the pilot was trying to land at the nearby Butter Valley Golf Port when the plane crashed. It’s the closest airfield to the crash site.

The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to conduct an investigation into the crash starting Tuesday.