Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Taunton Municipal Airport (KTAN) commission meetings moved to City Hall amid discord

Meetings of the city’s Airport Commission will now be televised and held at the interim City Hall at 141 Oak Street.


In this file photo, Airport Commissioner William Maganiello, left, talks with members of the Taunton Pilots Association, with President Melinda Paine-Dupont at right.



TAUNTON — Meetings of the city’s Airport Commission will now be televised and held at the interim City Hall at 141 Oak St.

The commission’s next meeting is set for 7 p.m., Jan. 27, continuing its regular meeting schedule on the last Wednesday of the month.

The board typically met inside the Leonard F. Rose SRE building at the East Taunton-based airport on Westcoat Drive. The building is a large structure that doubles as an airport property maintenance garage and a meeting room whose walls and ceilings display airport memorabilia.

City Councilor Estele C. Borges, chairman of the Committee on the Needs of the Airport, announced the change of location at Tuesday night’s City Council meeting.

Moving the airport commission’s location to a site where meetings can be televised brings greater transparency to the monthly board meeting — and a more comfortable location for commission members and the public, including area pilots. The working relationship between some members of the seven-person airport commission, airport management and area pilots has become fractious.

A Jan. 25 meeting is set for the entire City Council to hear the concerns of the pilots, who last month submitted a petition of no confidence in how the airport is being run. Eighty people signed the petition.

Meanwhile, the state Department of Transportation’s Aeronautics division has selected the Taunton Municipal Airport as one local airport slated for a new building. The project is in its earliest stages, with state officials recently notifying the airport commission and airport management of the award.

Money for the new building comes via a statewide Airport Administration Building program. Construction of the new building at the airport may begin in fiscal year 2017, according to airport commission minutes posted on the city’s website. That’s because although the project is planned, groundbreaking is subject to approval of the annual MassDOT capital budget.

Source:  http://www.tauntongazette.com

Enstrom F-28F, N756H, BRD Equipment LLC: Accident occurred January 13, 2016 in Ritter Butte, Grant County, Oregon

NTSB Identification: GAA16LA100 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, January 13, 2016 in Ritter Butte, OR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/16/2016
Aircraft: ENSTROM F-28, registration: N756H
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the commercial pilot, the purpose of the flight was predator animal control in an area of adjoining ranches. The pilot stated that, during the flight, the fuel indicator began bouncing back and forth and reading erratically. Subsequently, the pilot used his watch to time the fuel burn to determine when he had to return to the fuel point. As the pilot was about to return to the fuel point, the fuel indicator stabilized, indicating that the fuel tank was about one-quarter full, and the pilot then flew toward the fuel truck. When the helicopter was about 100 ft above the terrain, the low fuel indicator illuminated, followed by the loss of engine power. The pilot estimated that about a 20-mph tailwind existed, so he performed a 180-degree turn to point the helicopter’s nose into the wind while entering an autorotation. After completing the 180-degree turn, the pilot did not see any flat or open terrain and chose to land on a rocky outcropping. While the pilot was trying to avoid landing in trees, the helicopter impacted terrain, which resulted in the helicopter sustaining substantial damage to the fuselage and main rotor gear box. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s improper fuel management, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion and subsequent impact with terrain.

On January 13, 2016, about 1000 Pacific standard time, an Enstrom F-28F helicopter, N756H, impacted terrain while maneuvering at a low altitude, about 5 miles southeast of Ritter, Oregon. The pilot sustained serious injuries and the passenger had no injuries. The helicopter was registered to BRD Equipment LLC of Adams, Oregon, and operated by Southern Helicopter Company of Pendleton, Oregon, as a personal local flight under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site about the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from and was destined to returned to a private residence near Ritter, OR. 

According to the pilot, the purpose of the flight was for predator animal control in an area of adjoining ranches. The pilot stated that, during the flight, the fuel indicator began "bouncing back and forth and read erratically". The pilot reported that consequently, he used his watch to time his fuel burn to know when he had to return to the fuel point. As the pilot was about to return to the fuel point, the fuel indicator stabilized with about one quarter of a tank of fuel and the pilot flew in the direction of the fuel truck. The pilot stated he was about 100 feet above the terrain when the low fuel indicator illuminated and subsequently the engine lost power. The pilot estimated he had a 20 mile per hour tailwind and performed a 180 turn to point the nose of the helicopter into the wind while auto rotating. After completing the 180 turn, the pilot did not see any flat or open terrain and chose to land on a rocky outcropping trying to avoid landing in trees and impacted terrain.

During impact the helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and main rotor gear box.

NTSB Identification: GAA16LA100
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, January 13, 2016 in Ritter Butte, OR
Aircraft: ENSTROM F-28F, registration: N756H
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in suppor
t of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 13, 2016, about 0940 Pacific standard time, an Enstrom F-28F helicopter, N756H, impacted terrain while maneuvering at a low altitude, about 5 miles southeast of Ritter, Oregon. The pilot sustained serious injuries and the passenger had no injuries. The helicopter was registered to BRD Equipment LLC of Adams, Oregon, and operated by Southern Helicopter Company of Pendleton, Oregon, as a personal local flight under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site about the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from and was destined to returned to a private residence near Ritter. 

According to the pilot, the purpose of the flight was predator control in an area of adjoining ranches. The pilot stated that, during the flight, the fuel indicator began bouncing back and forth and read erroneously. The pilot stated that consequently, he used his watch to time his fuel burn to know when he had to return to the fuel point. As the pilot was about to return to the fuel point, the fuel indicator stopped bouncing and he flew in the direction of the fuel truck. The pilot stated he was about 95 feet above the terrain when the low fuel indicator illuminated and subsequently the engine lost power. The pilot estimated he had a 15 knot tailwind and performed a 180 degree turn to point the nose of the helicopter into the wind while autorotating. After completing the 180 degree turn, the pilot estimated he was 15 to 20 feet above the ground and tried to flare, but "came down fast and hard" and impacted terrain.

During impact the helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and main rotor blades.



The wreckage of a Enstrom F-28F helicopter was found near Ritter Butte Lookout in northern Grant County.

The wreckage of a Enstrom F-28F was found near Ritter Butte Lookout in northern Grant County

The wreckage of a Enstrom F-28F helicopter was found near Ritter Butte Lookout in northern Grant County.


Two ambulances responded to a helicopter crash in Grant County Wednesday, transporting two men to Blue Mountain Hospital in John Day.

The wreckage of a 1988 Enstrom helicopter was found near Ritter Butte Lookout in northern Grant County. The crash was reported at 10:06 a.m. Wednesday, January 13. The pilot of the helicopter, Cliff A. Hoeft, 60, Pilot Rock, and a passenger, Cody Cole, 34, Monument, were transported by ambulance to Blue Mountain Hospital in John Day. Hoeft was later transferred by aircraft to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend.


RITTER — A helicopter pilot and his passenger were injured in a crash near Ritter Butte Wednesday morning.

Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer said a helicopter being used to hunt coyotes ran out of fuel and crashed into several juniper trees on a rock outcropping on property owned by Paul Walton, Ritter, about a half-mile southwest of the Ritter Butte Lookout and one-and-a-half miles west of Highway 395 in northern Grant County.


The crash was reported at about 10:06 a.m. Jan. 13, and the sheriff’s office, along with ambulances from Long Creek and John Day, were dispatched to the scene.


Palmer said, when he arrived on the scen
e, members of the Long Creek Fire Department were packing the helicopter pilot, Cliff A. Hoeft, 60, Pilot Rock, several hundred yards to an awaiting ambulance.

The single passenger, Cody J. Cole, 34, Monument, walked away from the crash, Palmer said, but both men were transported to Blue Mountain Hospital in John Day. Hoeft was later transferred by aircraft to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend.


Palmer, who conducted the initial investigation, said the men were “lucky to be alive.” He said the 1988 Enstrom helicopter, registered to BRD Equipment in Adams, was heavily damaged and is considered a total loss.


Palmer said the helicopter and pilot were hired by a number of people who were hunting coyotes on adjoining properties in the area. He said different passengers were taking turns shooting from the helicopter, and the crash occurred within about 1,000 yards of where the aircraft had been landing near the group of hunters.


Story and photo gallery: http://www.bluemountaineagle.com

Beechcraft Baron 95-B55, G-RICK: Fatal accident occurred May 03, 2015 in Dundee, United Kingdom

Dundee Airport to introduce safety measures after last year’s fatal plane crash


John McKinnon (left) and Andrew Thompson (right) 





New safety measures are to be introduced at Dundee Airport after two people died in a small plane crash.

Andrew Thompson, 37, and John MacKinnon, 53, died in May 2015 when the Beechcraft Baron 95-B55 aircraft crashed near the village of Abernyte in Perthshire.

There was low cloud and heavy rain in the area at the time - described as instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) - meaning the pilot had to fly primarily by reference to instruments.

An Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB ) report concluded a mix-up of distances between the onboard GPS system and distance measuring equipment (DME) from the runway caused the pilot to start his descent too early.

Investigators said: "The aircraft collided with high ground 6.7 nm (nautical miles) to the west of Dundee Airport whilst conducting an instrument approach to runway 09 in IMC.

"Evidence indicates that the pilot probably mistook the distances on his GPS, which were from the NDB (non directional radio beacon), as DME distances from the threshold of runway 09 and therefore commenced his descent too early.

"Anecdotal evidence suggests that mistaking GPS distance from the 'DND' NDB with DME distance is a common error made by pilots. The operator of Dundee Airport is taking safety actions, intended to prevent a recurrence."

The AAIB report added: "Dundee Airport has high ground on the approach, an offset NBD and no radar surveillance.

"This combination can result in a pilot inadvertently letting down to the NDB instead of the runway in IMC conditions, with no effective 'safety net'.

"Aviation should, however, in so far as possible, be an 'error tolerant' environment."

The airport operator, Highlands and Islands Airports (HIAL), has commissioned a safety survey to consider relocating the remote NDB and other measures.

All incoming aircraft now also hear the broadcast: "Pilots are reminded that the NDB and DME are not co-located".

The aircraft was travelling from Inverness to Dundee for scheduled maintenance checks when it lost contact with air traffic controllers just a few miles west of the hub.

The wreckage of the small plane was found near the village of Abernyte about four hours after it went missing.

Mr. Thompson was from Chester in Cheshire, and MacKinnon from Ross-shire.

Source: http://www.thecourier.co.uk





NTSB Identification: CEN15WA221
Accident occurred Sunday, May 03, 2015 in Dundee, United Kingdom
Aircraft: BEECH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION BEECH 95-B55, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On May 3, 2015, at 1113 coordinated universal time, a Beech 95-B55 airplane, G-RICK, impacted terrain while on approach to the Dundee Airport (EGPN), Dundee, Scotland. The pilot and one passenger were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight.


At 1120, an automated weather reporting facility at EGPN reported, wind from 90 degrees at 22 knots, visibility 5,000 meters with moderate rain, ceiling broken at 900 feet, broken at 1,600 feet, temperature 7° Celsius (C), dew point 6° C, and 996 millibar.


The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the government of the United Kingdom. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the government of the United Kingdom. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:


Air Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB)

Farnborough House
Berkshire Copse Road
Aldershot, Hampshire
GU11 2HH, United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0)1252 510300

Fax: +44 (0)1252 376999
https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/air-accidents-investigation-branch

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, G-BHXK: Fatal accident occurred April 04, 2015 in Loch Etive, United Kingdom

Couple killed in Easter plane crash after pilot "lost control"

Newlyweds Dr. Margaret-Ann and David Rous



Question marks remain over the cause of a fatal Easter plane crash which claimed the lives of a Dundee couple, as investigators said it appears the pilot became disorientated and “lost control”.

Dr. Margaret Ann Rous, a 37-year-old GP, and her 28-year-old husband David Rous, an engineer, were killed when a light aircraft struck the hillside at Glen Etive in Argyll on April 4 last year.

They had been en route from Dundee to Tiree to spend the Easter weekend with Dr. Rous’ family.

Today, an Air Accidents Investigation Branch report into crash said investigators had uncovered “no specific cause” for the tragedy.

However, it added that it appeared Mr Rous, who was piloting the Piper Cherokee, had suffered “some form of spatial disorientation” and that the accident “followed a loss of control, possibly in cloud”.

Despite obtaining his private pilot's license less than a year earlier, in June 2014, Mr Rous was considered to have "above average" skills and had accumulated more than 130 flying hours by the time of the crash.

Visibility was deteriorating as the plane flew over Argyll and investigators believe that Mr Rous had realised it would not be possible to continue to Tiree and had decided to return to Dundee instead, although he did not communicate this to air traffic control.

Mr. Rous commenced a "controlled, and initially level, right turn" over Glen Etive but this quickly "developed into a spiral dive, consistent with some sort of spatial disorientation".

Around 40 seconds later the aircraft struck the slopes of Beinn nan Lus in a 45-degree nosedive, at high speed. Both Mr and Dr Rous were killed instantly

The report states: "It is likely that the aircraft, prior to or during the right turn, had entered cloud or that the pilot had experienced some loss of, or false, visual horizon. The gentle right turn is likely to have been the commencement of a deliberate turn back to the east or from carrying out some cockpit activity...this in turn may have led to him becoming disorientated."

Investigators added that the poor weather may also have caused airframe icing, which could also be a factor in the crash.

Meanwhile, new safety measures are to be introduced at Dundee Airport after two people died in a small plane crash.

Andrew Thompson, 37, who had previously lived in Bearsden, near Glasgow, and John MacKinnon, 53, from Ross-shire, died in May 2015 when the G-Rick Beech Baron aircraft crashed near the village of Abernyte in Perthshire.
     
There was low cloud and heavy rain in the area at the time, meaning the pilot had to fly primarily by reference to instruments. An AAIB report concluded a mix-up of distances between the onboard GPS system - calculated based on the airport's non directional radio beacon (NDB) and distance measuring equipment from the runway caused the pilot to start his descent too early.

The airport operator, Highlands and Islands Airports (HIAL), has commissioned a safety survey in light of the findings.

Source: http://www.heraldscotland.com

NTSB Identification: CEN15WA191
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Saturday, April 04, 2015 in Loch Etive, United Kingdom
Aircraft: PIPER AIRCRAFT CORPORATION PIPER PA-28-140, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On April 4, 2015, at an unknown time, a United Kingdom registered Piper PA-28-140 airplane, G-BHXK,impacted mountainous terrain near Lock Etive, Oban, Argyll, and Bute, United Kingdom.The two occupants were fatally injured.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the government of the United Kingdom. Further information may be obtained from:

Air Accidents Investigation Branch
Farnborough House
Aldershot, Hampshire
GU11 2HH, United Kingdom

Beech B36TC Bonanza, N4BA: Fatal accident occurred April 1, 2010 at Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport (MGY), Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN10FA180
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 01, 2010 in Dayton, OH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/20/2011
Aircraft: BEECH B36TC, registration: N4BA
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Approximately 1 minute after takeoff, as the airplane was about 1 mile southwest of the airport, the pilot reported an engine failure to air traffic controllers and initiated a return to the airport. One witness, located about 1 mile west of the airport, reported that the sound of the engine changed abruptly; noting that the engine seemed to lose power completely. Another witness, located near the airport, observed the airplane approach from the west and turn to align with the downwind runway. During the turn, the left wingtip struck the ground and the airplane impacted short of the runway. A postimpact fire ensued. Although the pilot initiated a return to the airport, an interstate highway and an open grass area short of the runway were both potentially available for an emergency landing. A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the No. 1 (aft) main crankshaft bearing failed due to unknown circumstances. The progressive failure of the bearing likely precipitated secondary failures of the crankcase through-bolt and the fuel pump coupling, which resulted in a complete loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The complete loss of engine power due to failure of the No. 1 main bearing, and the secondary failure of a crankcase through-bolt and the fuel pump drive coupling. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's decision to attempt a return to the airport for a downwind forced landing, despite having an interstate highway and an open grass area short of the runway as available emergency landing sites.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 1, 2010, at 1253 eastern daylight time, a Beech B36TC Bonanza, N4BA, impacted terrain short of the runway during a forced landing following a loss of engine power at the Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport (MGY), Dayton, Ohio. A post-impact fire ensued and the airplane was destroyed. The pilot and sole passenger on-board sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to Poelking LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight departed from MGY about 1250. The intended destination was DuPage Airport (DPA), West Chicago, Illinois.

The pilot initially contacted Dayton Approach Control while he was on the ground at MGY and requested an IFR clearance to DPA. However, before a clearance was issued, the pilot informed the controller that he needed to return to the ramp due to a magneto problem. Thirty minutes later, the pilot again contacted Dayton Approach while on the ground at MGY and requested a clearance to DPA. A clearance was issued at 1248 and the flight was released for takeoff at 1249.

At 1251:11 (hhmm:ss), the pilot contacted Dayton Approach Control. He informed the controller that they were airborne and climbing through 1,300 feet mean sea level (msl). At 1251:32, the controller replied that radar contact was established 1 mile south of MGY. However, 14 seconds later, the pilot stated that he was “going to circle around for a landing” at MGY because a “compartment [had] come open.” The controller acknowledged and cleared the flight to return to MGY. At 1252:16, the pilot stated that he was declaring an emergency due to an engine failure.

Radar data depicted the airplane tracking the Runway 20 extended centerline after takeoff. The initial radar data point was recorded at 1251:05 and indicated that the airplane was near the departure end of Runway 20 at 1,300 feet msl. About 1251:42, the airplane entered a right turn and remained in that turn until the final data point, which was recorded at 1252:46. At that time, the airplane was approximately 1/2 mile southwest of the Runway 2 threshold at 1,200 feet msl, and on an approximate magnetic course of 094 degrees. The radar track data indicated that the airplane was within 1/4 mile of an interstate highway during the right turn.

A witness reported that she was working in her yard, about 1 mile southwest of the airport, when the accident airplane flew over. Initially, the sound of the engine was completely normal. However, the routine engine sound changed abruptly, noting that the engine seemed to completely cut out. She added that the engine did not sputter, or increase and decrease pitch, during that time. The change in engine sound caused her to look up. She reportedly observed the airplane in a right turn with an estimated bank angle of 45 degrees. The airplane was heading northwest when she first saw it. It remained in that right turn until she lost sight of it, at which time it was on an easterly heading. She added that nothing about the airplane seemed unusual except for the abrupt change in the engine sound and a lower than normal flight profile.

Additional witnesses reported observing the airplane approach the airport from the west with the landing gear in the retracted position. They stated that the airplane banked to the left in an apparent attempt to line-up with runway 2. The left wingtip struck the ground and the airplane impacted an open grass area south of the runway. A post impact fire ensued.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 50, held a private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument airplane ratings. He was issued a third-class airman medical certificate on March 26, 2009, with a restriction for corrective lenses. FAA records indicated that the pilot added an instrument rating to his private pilot certificate on August 31, 2009.

The pilot’s flight time logbook was not available to the NTSB. On his instrument rating application, the pilot noted a total flight time of 182.5 hours, with 102.7 hours of instruction received. He reported a total of 93.1 hours in B36TC airplanes at the time of that exam.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a 1983 Beech B36TC (Bonanza), serial number EA-356. It was a six-place, single-engine airplane, with a retractable tricycle landing gear configuration. The airplane was powered by a 300-horsepower Continental TSIO-520-UB turbo-charged engine, serial number 515941. It was equipped with a 3-bladed, constant speed (adjustable pitch) McCauley model 3A32C406 propeller assembly, serial number 983648.

Maintenance records indicated that an annual inspection was completed on March 11, 2010, at a total airframe time of 2,283.9 hours. The records noted that the engine had accumulated 997.8 hours since overhaul at the time of the annual inspection. There was no record of maintenance issues subsequent to the annual inspection.

Maintenance records also indicated that aluminum fragments were found in the filter during an oil change conducted in July 2009. The engine was disassembled as a result and several piston pins were found to be frozen. The connecting rods were repaired and new cylinders were installed. The airplane was subsequently returned to service with no further issues noted.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

Weather conditions recorded by the MGY Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) at 1253 were: Clear skies; 10 miles visibility; winds from 210 degrees at 9 knots, gusting to 22 knots; temperature 22 degrees Celsius; dew point 9 degrees Celsius, altimeter 29.98 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Dayton-Wright Brothers (MGY) was a non-towered airport; served by a single runway. Runway 2-20 was 5,000 feet long by 100 feet wide and constructed of asphalt. The approach area to Runway 2 consisted of an open grass area extending approximately 1,000 feet from the threshold. A localizer antenna was located in this area on the runway centerline about 900 feet from the threshold. 

The east side of Runway 2 was bordered by an open grass area about 500 feet wide. Commercial/business areas bordered the airport to the south. Residential areas bordered the airport to the east. A residential area was located about 1,200 feet east of the Runway 2 threshold, with an open grass area between the threshold and the nearest residences.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Initial ground impact was on the airport property about 860 feet south-southwest of the Runway 2 threshold. The debris path was oriented on an approximate 024-degree magnetic bearing. The main airplane wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, engine, empennage, and wings, came to rest about 179 feet from the initial impact point. Grass scorched by the post impact fire extended to approximately 120 feet north-northeast of the main wreckage.

The nose section of the airplane was fragmented. The upper portion of the fuselage and aft fuselage structure remained. The lower fuselage was consumed by the postimpact fire. The engine had separated from the airframe. It came to rest inverted with the main wreckage. The propeller assembly was separated from the engine crankshaft flange. The propeller blades remained attached at the hub. The left wing tip separated from the airframe and came to rest about 75 feet south of the main wreckage. The empennage was partially separated from the aft fuselage. The vertical stabilizer, with the rudder attached, had separated from the empennage. The flight controls and flaps sustained damage consistent impact forces and the postimpact fire.

No anomalies consistent with a pre-impact failure or malfunction of the airframe were observed. A teardown examination of the engine was conducted subsequent to the accident. (A summary of those findings is included later in this report.) 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy of the pilot was performed by the coroner’s office of Montgomery County, Ohio, on April 5, 2010. The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute forensic toxicology report was negative for all substances in the screening profile.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Teardown examination of the engine revealed that the #1 (aft) main bearing had failed. Specifically, the right half of the #1 main bearing was fractured into 5 pieces. A portion of the right bearing was located under the left bearing. In addition, the lower, aft crankcase through-bolt was fractured near mid-length. Finally, the fuel pump drive coupling and the standby alternator drive shaft were fractured.

Metallurgical examination of the #1 main bearing revealed damage consistent with contact of the fracture faces between other bearing sections. No fracture features were visible.

The crankcase through-bolt was fractured at one of the o-ring grooves at the case split line. The adjacent o-ring was hardened and partially charred. The cadmium surface plating was bubbled and solidified into surface beads on either side of the split line. The fracture surface exhibited features and deformation patterns consistent with bending over-stress. The overstress region appeared to emanate from a crescent-shape area that exhibited intergranular separation. Cadmium was identified on portions of the crescent-shaped area.

The fuel pump coupling was fractured at the reduced diameter shear section. The fracture surface exhibited crack arrest lines and surface topography consistent with high-stress reverse bending fatigue. The standby alternator driveshaft was also fractured at a reduced diameter section. Otherwise, the driveshaft appeared straight and undamaged. The fracture surface exhibited features consistent with rotational bending fatigue fracture.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Director of Maintenance at the fixed base operator (FBO) met the accident pilot when he returned to the ramp with a rough magneto. The pilot informed the maintenance director that the drop in engine speed exceeded limitations on one of the magnetos, and that he did not observe any drop on the second magneto.

The maintenance director got in the airplane and conducted a run-up. He stated the engine started without hesitation, and went to 1,200 or 1,300 rpm. He conducted at least two magneto checks and the drop in engine speed was about 100 rpm. Engine operation was smooth the entire time.

The pilot reportedly commented to the mechanic that he had been idling for a long time and had not leaned the mixture. He noted that he did not observe any issues with the operation of the engine or the magnetos during the time he was in the airplane.

The airplane flight manual specifies a maximum drop in engine speed of 150 rpm during a magneto check.

Airport records indicate that the accident airplane was fueled with 61.6 gallons of 100 low lead aviation fuel about 1815 on March 31, 2010; the evening prior to the accident flight.


Tom Hausfeld and his daughter Kacie were killed April 1, 2010, when the plane he was piloting crashed at Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport just after takeoff.
~

DAYTON —

Dayton Flyers volleyball coach Tim Horsmon remembers Kacie Hausfeld as one of the most well-liked players on the team when he coached her as a freshman in 2007. Her teammates respected her. She competed. She was smart.

“She was an unbelievable kid,” Horsmon said.

Hausfeld, 21, died with her dad Tom, 50, in a plane crash on April 1, 2010, at Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport. The single-engine plane Tom was piloting crashed after takeoff on the way to Chicago.

In the years since, Kacie’s memory has lived on at UD. The team presents the Kacie Hausfeld Teammate Award every season. Now, a $1.2 million gift to the volleyball program by her mom Lori Hausfeld and the family will help preserve her legacy even longer.

The Dayton volleyball program held a special place in the family’s heart then and still does today.

“I’ve thought about doing something for the last few years,” Hausfeld said. “The university has been so important to me. It was very important to Kacie and Tom. They loved the school. Even after the accident, (UD was) just so supportive. I wanted something to give back to UD because they gave so much back to me and my daughter.”

The money will allow the program to do a number of things at the Frericks Center, such as upgrading the seating and the sound system. UD also plans to build a team lounge. It will be named after Kacie, an Alter High School graduate.

“She was such a social kid,” Horsmon said. “That’s going to be a great spot to remember her.”

Hausfeld, of Springboro, said when she first approached UD about making a donation, the university figured she was talking in the $100,000 to $200,000 range. She shocked UD when she told them she was thinking bigger — much bigger.

“They’re like, ‘That’s fantastic,’” Hausfeld said.

Tom Hausfeld was a successful businessman. He retired in 2006 after selling his business, Auto Disposal Systems Inc., of Dayton. He was well known for his charitable giving before his death.

Horsmon’s return to Dayton helped spur Hausfeld’s donation. He left for the head coaching job at the University of Maryland in the spring of 2008. Kacie played her final two seasons for Kelly Sheffield. Horsmon came back to the Flyers in December 2013, and at his first home match in 2014 against Nebraska, he saw Hausfeld in the stands.

“I turned around at the beginning of the match,” Horsmon said. “I don’t now why. I never really look behind the bench. I saw Lori. she caught my eye. We waved. I got a hold of her after the match and said, ‘Let’s go grab some lunch.’

“I hadn’t really had a chance to sit down with her after what happened with Kacie and Tom and share how I was feeling, that I wished I were here during that time. I think that turned into her wanting to do something for the program and her doing something in Kacie’s memory.”

Dayton already has a successful volleyball program. The Flyers have won the Atlantic 10 regular-season title 12 times since 1998 and have won the conference tournament a league-record 10 times. They made their 11th NCAA tournament appearance in 2015.

The gift, Horsmon said, “allows us to show a commitment to our volleyball program and our players that not too many other programs get to do. When we’re recruiting against Big Ten programs and SEC and ACC And Big 12, it puts us in that arena with what they’re doing. It’s a special donation. It’s a special opportunity.”

Source: http://www.mydaytondailynews.com


Tom & Kacie Hausfeld


Tom Hausfeld and his daughter Kacie.

Lori, Kacie, Ali and Tom Hausfeld (left to right) are pictured. Tom Hausfeld, 50, and his daughter Kacie, 21, were killed April 1, 2010 when the plane he was piloting crashed at Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport just after takeoff.


No. 14 Kacie Hausfeld, of Dayton, sets the ball against St. Louis in 2009. Kacie died in a plane crash April 1, 2010.
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Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N737EZ: Fatal accident occurred January 12,2016 near Fox Stephens Field - Gilmer Municipal Airport ( KJXI) Gilmer, Upshur County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N737EZ

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA083 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, January 13, 2016 in Gilmer, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N, registration: N737EZ
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 13, 2016, about 0105 central standard time, a Cessna 172N, N737EZ, was located in a wooded area about 0.5 nautical miles south/southwest of runway 36 at Fox Stephens Field - Gilmer Municipal Airport (JXI), Gilmer, Texas. The airplane was found by a Texas Department of Public Safety Officer during a search with the Gilmer Police Department for an airplane that was reported by a family member to be overdue. The private non-instrument rated pilot was fatally injured and a passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane received substantial damage to the wings, fuselage, and empennage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan nor receiving any air traffic control services. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that departed from Sulphur Springs Municipal Airport, Sulphur Springs, Texas on January 12, 2016 about 1915 and was returning to JXI.

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Dallas FSDO-05




KLTV.com - Tyler, Longview, Jacksonville |ETX News




TYLER, TX (KLTV) -

An East Texas woman is sharing her story of survival.

Pamela Lucky survived a plane crash Tuesday in Upshur County that killed her husband and stranded her for hours. 

She invited our cameras into her hospital room to tell us about her husband and the reason she knew she had to survive. 

“I held his hand until they found us. Five hours it took them to find us and I never left his side. I held his hand. I talked to him the whole time because that was my baby. My baby," Lucky said.

Lucky said she still struggles to remember all of the details of the plane crash. But some moments she said she'll never forget.

"Every time I close my eyes I see a picture of him. Because this man loved me with everything he had," she said.

Lucky said she and her husband Samuel spent the day in Sulphur Springs with family. 

She said at least once a month they would take a trip in his Cessna 172 Skyhawk. 

They were just a quarter mile away from the Gilmer Municipal Airport runway before the crash. 

"We were making a loop around the airport and it happened so fast neither one of us had time to say anything. He didn't know what happened I didn't know what happened," Lucky said.

Lucky said she was able to get out her seatbelt, hopeful that she could call for help. 

"Is it going to kill me because I'm falling real far? But I didn't care I wanted to call 911 so I could find the phone and get help for him," Lucky said.

Lucky said  they would have been married for two years this Valentine’s Day.

"I was his sweetheart. And he wanted everybody to know that I was his sweetheart that's why we got married on Feb. 14," Lucky said.

While she's grateful to be among friends and family, she said that "If I could change places with him I would, because he was just that kind of man."

She believes her love for him and their family gave her the strength she needed to survive the unthinkable. 

"I really thought I was going to die out there, I really did. But I knew he didn't want me out there," Lucky said.

The cause of the plane crash has not been determined.

A preliminary report from the NTSB could be available as early as next week.


Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.kltv.com





UPSHUR COUNTY (KYTX) - One person is dead and another person was hospitalized after the plane they were on went down in Upshur County. 

DPS identified the pilot as 73-year-old Samuel Oliver Lucky of Gladewater. He was pronounced dead at the scene. His passenger, 57-year-old Pamela Rickman Lucky also of Gladewater was sent to ETMC in Tyler in ICU where her condition has been upgraded to fair.

According to DPS Troopers on the scene, Gilmer Police heard a woman screaming when they drove by the area. Pamela’s screams led them to the crash site around 1:30 a.m. It’s been determined Pamela had been sitting stuck in the plane for hours in the cold before she was found.

Troopers determined the plane went down around 7:45 p.m. Tuesday after it was overdue at Fox Stephens Airport Gilmer Airport.

The single-engine Cessna 172 went down in a field off of Hwy 271 near Eagle Road, just south of Gilmer, according to DPS officials. The plane is registered out of Gregg County, according to FAA records.

The FAA had notified Upshur County of a missing plane earlier Tuesday evening that had left the airport in Sulphur Springs en route to Gilmer that had not shown up.

The National Transportation Safety Board has also been notified of the crash and will lead the investigation.
 
In September 2013, Pilot Samuel Oliver received top honors when he was recognized by the FAA for exceeding safety standards.


Source:  http://www.cbs19.tv








Santa Monica Municipal Airport (KSMO), California: Court date set for City’s ongoing lawsuit against the Federal Aviation Administration



City Hall’s dogged attempts to restrict or outright close the Santa Monica airport will continue in March with a hearing to determine the City’s fundamental obligation to operate an airport.

City Hall filed a lawsuit in 2013 alleging that the federal government had no claim to the land occupied by the airport and therefore, the FAA could not require Santa Monica to continue to operate the airport. A judge dismissed the City’s case, but City Hall has appealed and opening arguments in the appeal will be heard on March 11, at 9 a.m. at the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in Pasadena.

The suit was filed under the, Quiet Title Act and is a class of lawsuit utilized by a property owner to negate any future claims to the land by other individuals. In this case, the City of Santa Monica is asking the courts to verify the City has sole possession of the land thereby preventing the federal government from ever taking control should airport operations cease.

In filing the lawsuit, the City alleged the federal government had no claim to the land, had not expressed a desire to make a claim to the land, that any claim that might have been made had been abandoned and that any attempt to mandate operation of the land was a violation of the Fifth Amendment.

Judge John F. Walter sided with the federal government in a 2014 ruling that said the statute of limitations had expired on the City’s ability to file a quiet title claim while also overruling all of Santa Monica’s arguments in favor of the suit.

Under the law, plaintiffs have up to 12 years to file a claim once notified of a competing claim by the government.

“The Court concludes that the record unquestionably demonstrates that the City knew, or should have known, that the United States claimed an interest in the Airport Property as early as 1948,” he said in his ruling.

The 1948 date is based on a contract known as the Instrument of Transfer that gave Santa Monica control over airport operations. Walter said subsequent interactions between the FAA and the city showed an ongoing claim by the federal authorities.

“Accordingly, the Court concludes that the United States has not abandoned its claimed interest in the Airport Property. Thus, because the City knew or should have known that the United States claimed a reversionary interest in the title to the Airport Property as early as 1948 and certainly more than twelve years ago, the statute of limitations has expired, and the City’s claim under the Quiet Title Act is time-barred,” he wrote.

He also dismissed the city’s constitutional concerns, saying the city had failed to take action to remedy those concerns or that the foundation for those concerns was invalid.

Santa Monica’s appeal essentially restates its initial assertions: The federal government has no claim, any claim they might have had was abandoned, the City’s case was filed within 12 years of the Federal Government making a claim in 2008 and that the court is unable to make a ruling on the statute of limitations without also addressing the merits of the case.

The March 11 date will feature opening arguments by each side, but a ruling is not expected at that time.

Santa Monica recently lost a separate legal fight with the FAA over mandated operations at the airport. In that case, the City had claimed it had the authority to close SMO in 2015, however the FAA ruled that acceptance of grant money extended that date to at least 2023. The city is considering appealing that ruling.

Original article can be found here:  http://smdp.com

Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 717-22A, N479HA: Incident occurred January 13, 2016 in Kahului, Maui County, Hawaii

Date: 13-JAN-16
Time: 01:13:00Z
Regis#: N479HA
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 717
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Aircraft Operator: HAL-Hawaiian Airlines
Flight Number: HAL226
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Honolulu FSDO-13
City: KAHULUI
State: Hawaii

N479HA HAWAIIAN AIRLINES FLIGHT HAL226 BOEING 717 AIRCRAFT LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT WITH SMOKE IN THE COCKPIT, NO INJURIES, DAMAGE UNKNOWN AS IT WAS DISCOVERED AN EXTINGUISHED FIRE IN THE CARGO. KAHULUI, HAWAII


HAWAIIAN AIRLINES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N479HA

Does autopilot dull the skills of U.S. airline pilots?

The National Transportation Safety Board said the pilots of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 were confused by the plane’s technology, which directly resulted in the 2013 crash as the plane landed in San Francisco.



Pilots are so used to using automation technology in the cockpit that experts are worried that some of them lack the skills to manually fly planes.

That concern was summarized by the inspector general at the U.S. Department of Transportation, who took the Federal Aviation Administration to task this month, saying the agency does not know how many pilots are capable of actually taking the controls if their electronic systems go dark.

“While airlines have long used automation safely to improve efficiency and reduce pilot workload, several recent accidents, including the July 2013 crash of Asiana Airlines flight 214, have shown that pilots who typically fly with automation can make errors when confronted with an unexpected event or transitioning to manual flying,” the inspector general said in a letter to the FAA .

Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crashed while the pilots were attempting a landing at San Francisco International Airport. The National Transportation Safety Board determined that the crew’s reliance on automation was a contributing factor.

“We’ve recommended that pilots have more opportunity to practice manually flying the aircraft,” said Robert L. Sumwalt, who spent 32 years as an airline pilot before joining the NTSB in 2006, pointing to the issues raised by his own agency.

The FAA responded to the inspector general’s letter with a commitment to enhance training requirements.

“A well-trained flight crew is the single most important safety asset on any flight,” the Air Line Pilots Association said in response to the inspector general’s letter. “Airline pilots’ skills are continuously monitored throughout their careers. ALPA supports the Federal Aviation Administration’s proven effectiveness in its oversight of pilot training.”

The auto­pilot, developed by Sperry Corp. in 1912, is so ubiquitous that pilots commonly refer to it as “George.” It’s a safe bet that even before the captain turns off the seat belt sign, “George” is flying the plane.

Twentieth-century pilots had to enter much of the data needed for their auto­pilot systems, but now much of it is electronically uploaded into the plane’s flight management system. Cockpits are so loaded with electronics that planes virtually fly themselves, although the FAA requires pilots to be hands-on for takeoffs and landings while a plane is below 500 feet.

In addition to the auto­pilot, pilots use a new system known as En Route Automation Modernization, which governs their routing and helps them get around congested air space and bad weather.

“The changes that have been made in the past decade have been monumental,” Sumwalt said.

But there are situations in which a pilot’s skill at the controls will determine the fate of the airplane. When pilots respond successfully, the event makes no news. When they don’t, however, their failure can make for gruesome reading.

In 2009, a Colgan Air flight from Newark to Buffalo crashed after its pilots fumbled when a stall warning went off. The crash killed 50.

The same year, an Air France plane en route from Brazil to Paris crashed into the Atlantic Ocean after the auto­pilot malfunctioned and crew error caused the plan to stall. All 228 aboard died.

And in 2014, an AirAsia plane crashed into the Java Sea after the auto­pilot kicked off in bad weather and the pilot’s bad decision put the plane into a stall that led to 162 deaths.

In the 2013 Asiana Airlines crash, the plane clipped a seawall while landing in San Francisco, killing three and injuring 187.

“We talked about the pilot’s over-reliance on the auto throttle system” in the NTSB report on the crash, said Sumwalt, who flew for Piedmont Airlines and US Airways, logging 14,000 flight hours.

“The general rule of thumb is that any time you’re not sure what the automation is doing, you should disconnect and fly manually,” he said.

Well aware that gadgetry had overtaken the role of the pilot in the cockpit, the FAA in 2013 told airlines they needed to promote hands-on flying to be sure that pilots keep their skills up. But the inspector general, in a letter to the FAA, said the agency had not followed up to make sure they did.

“FAA has not determined whether air carriers have increased manual flying opportunities as a result of issuing its recommendation to the industry,” the inspector general’s letter said. “FAA has not ensured that air carrier training programs adequately focus on manual flying skills.”

In responding to the letter, the FAA said it would develop guidance for the airlines on appropriate training and set standards to ensure pilots demonstrate that they have maintained their hands-on skills.

Original article can be found here: https://www.washingtonpost.com

NTSB Identification: DCA13MA120
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 129: Foreign operation of Asiana Airlines
Accident occurred Saturday, July 06, 2013 in San Francisco, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/03/2015
Aircraft: BOEING 777-200ER, registration: HL7742
Injuries: 3 Fatal, 50 Serious, 137 Minor, 117 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators traveled in support of this investigation and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The Safety Board's full report is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Pages/aviation.aspx. The Aircraft Accident Report number is NTSB/AAR-14/01.

On July 6, 2013, about 1128 Pacific daylight time, a Boeing 777-200ER, Korean registration HL7742, operating as Asiana Airlines flight 214, was on approach to runway 28L when it struck a seawall at San Francisco International Airport (SFO), San Francisco, California. Three of the 291 passengers were fatally injured; 40 passengers, 8 of the 12 flight attendants, and 1 of the 4 flight crewmembers received serious injuries. The other 248 passengers, 4 flight attendants, and 3 flight crewmembers received minor injuries or were not injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a postcrash fire. Flight 214 was a regularly scheduled international passenger flight from Incheon International Airport (ICN), Seoul, Korea, operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 129. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The flight crew's mismanagement of the airplane's descent during the visual approach, the pilot flying's unintended deactivation of automatic airspeed control, the flight crew's inadequate monitoring of airspeed, and the flight crew's delayed execution of a go-around after they became aware that the airplane was below acceptable glidepath and airspeed tolerances. 

Contributing to the accident were (1) the complexities of the autothrottle and autopilot flight director systems that were inadequately described in Boeing's documentation and Asiana's pilot training, which increased the likelihood of mode error; (2) the flight crew's nonstandard communication and coordination regarding the use of the autothrottle and autopilot flight director systems; (3) the pilot flying's inadequate training on the planning and executing of visual approaches; (4) the pilot monitoring/instructor pilot's inadequate supervision of the pilot flying; and (5) flight crew fatigue, which likely degraded their performance.