Thursday, April 21, 2016

Town removes plane from resident’s Oceanside, New York, driveway


Hal Guretzky stands in front of the Cessna he keeps at his home in Oceanside, New York.




Hempstead Town crews on Thursday removed a single-engine private airplane parked in front of an Oceanside home after the owner was cited for repeated violations of town codes.

The wings of the plane in Harold Guretzky’s Yale Street driveway were removed and its body taken to the town’s storage facility after the Hempstead building department earlier this month cited “the potential danger presented by the storage of a plane in a residential neighborhood.”

Town officials have been seeking to remove the plane since July, after neighbors’ complaints about the 24-foot-long Cessna and radio towers he attached atop the home. The town’s building department reported the violation “deems the storage of a plane unsafe.” The radio towers also were said to be unsafe.

Guretzky, 70, was told to remove the plane by April 19 or face seizure by the town and removal of a radio tower. Town officials said Guretzky was served with several notices of violation, which were posted on his home and sent by certified mail, warning of the possible removals.

The town’s commissioner of engineering’s office cited high winds earlier this month that the report said lifted the plane 3 feet off the ground while it was tied down. The storm also toppled one of the radio towers.

Guretzky, reached Thursday by phone, said he was driving in Wyoming on his way back to New York from California and was unaware of the plan to remove the plane. He said he had asked his lawyer to seek a stay of the order until he returned.

Guretzky said his plane was protected by the Federal Aviation Administration. He also said he was prepared to sue the town over the seizure of the plane.

“I wish I was there,” an irate Guretzky said. “Why should they bother my poor little airplane? Don’t mess with this old fart. If I have to protect my property, I’ll do what has to be done.”

Guretzky’s Garden City-based attorney Marc Ialenti said he was unaware the plane was being taken apart and argued the town needed a judge’s order.

The town filed a complaint April 5 in Nassau County District Court to remove the plane, citing violations for unlawful storage of an airplane without a permit and having an unauthorized radio tower. A hearing was adjourned Tuesday and rescheduled for May 12.

But town officials said the hearing will continue. They said they were able to seize the plane without a court order because it posed an immediate danger of “uplifting, falling, collapsing or causing damage and injury to the occupants and/or adjacent property,” as stated in the engineering report.

Story and video:  http://www.newsday.com

Mooney M20K 231, N97119, MC Air Inc: Fatal accident occurred April 21, 2016 at Woodland State Airport (W27), Woodland, Washington

MCAIR INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N97119

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09


NTSB Identification: WPR16FA095
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Woodland, WA
Aircraft: MOONEY AIRCRAFT CORP. M20K, registration: N97119
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 21, 2016, about 1445 Pacific daylight time, a Mooney M20K, N97119, was substantially damaged during its departure from Woodland State Airport (W27), Woodland, Washington. The rear seat passenger was fatally injured; the commercial pilot and front seat passenger received serious injuries. The airplane was registered to MC AIR Inc., and was operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight. Although visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, an instrument flight plan was filed for the cross country flight, which was destined for Renton Municipal Airport (RNT), Renton, Washington. The personal flight was originating at the time of the accident. 

According to a video of the accident flight, the airplane began a takeoff roll from runway 32. The airplane approached the departure end of the runway and entered a nose high attitude as the left main landing gear lifted from the runway surface. After the airplane departed the asphalt runway, it maintained a steep angle of attack and then settled into grass about 75 feet from the airport perimeter fence. At this time the engine harmonics changed, consistent with a decrease in engine power. The airplane subsequently collided with the fence and then impacted the rising face of a berm. According to a witness, the airplane reached an altitude of approximately 4 feet during the attempted departure.

The airplane came to rest on top of a berm about 500 feet from the departure end of runway 32 at W27. An initial impact point (IIP) was identified by a crater that measured about 8 feet long. Both main landing gear, were located on the rising face of the berm about 37 feet beyond the airport perimeter fence. The main wreckage, comprised of all four corners of the airplane, was about 5 feet beyond the IIP and remained intact and was oriented on a heading of 320 degrees magnetic. Both propeller blades displayed chordwise striations along their respective leading edges. Propeller Blade A exhibited a slight aft bend and was tangled in a portion of the airport perimeter fence. Propeller Blade B did not display any bending. 

The rudder, elevator and aileron control tubes were traced from their respective control surfaces to the cockpit. The elevator jackscrew displayed 6 threads, consistent with a takeoff position. 

The 1453 recorded weather observation at Scappoose Industrial Airpark (SPB), Scappoose, Oregon included wind 070 degrees true at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 22 degrees C, dew point 08 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.71 inches of mercury.




Two Washington residents injured in Thursday's plane crash at Woodland Airport have been identified and released from the hospital, and authorities have changed their description of the fatal accident.

The pilot of the single-engine aircraft, Angus Walker, 52, of Woodinville and front-seat passenger, Jacob Kuper, 36, of Enumclaw were found outside the aircraft and both suffered serious injuries, according to a Monday press release from the Woodland Police Department. 

They were treated and released from PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center late last week. 

Rear-seat passenger Marc Messina, 56, of Renton was found dead inside the cabin of the plane, a Mooney 20K that was owned by McAir Inc. of Woodinville. 

According to the press release, the aircraft attempted to take off in a northbound direction. However, it failed to gain adequate lift and crashed into an eight-foot chain link fence and striking a berm at the Woodland Waste Water Treatment Plant off the north end of the runway. The cause of the crash is unknown.

Officials initially speculated that the plane crashed during an emergency landing.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the incident. 


Original article can be found here: http://tdn.com


Marc Messina (left). (Photo: Jim Linkous)

WOODLAND, Wash. — There is a story behind the picture (above), now stored on Jim Linkous' cellphone. He and longtime friend, Marc Messina, along with a couple other people had spent the day fishing for salmon. Instead, as the picture shows, they ended up catching a clam.

It's now one of the last pictures he has of 56-year-old Messina.

"I never, ever thought that we would have this happen an hour after we were off the water," Linkous told KATU News.

The next cellphone image Linkous would capture would be the moments before the deadly plane crash Thursday afternoon at Woodland Airport -- killing Messina and injuring both the pilot and another passenger. Linkous has since handed over the video to crash investigators.

According to Linkous, he had dropped Messina, the pilot and another passenger off at the airport after a day on the water and decided to run and get them water. By the time he got back, they were already taxiing.

"The aircraft just could not get off enough lift. It got maybe 5-6 feet in the air and the pilot, really did it heroically, he took the aircraft back down, hit a fence to try and slow them and hit the berm and they came to rest, but it was horrific impact," Linkous said.

Calling 911 on the way, Linkous quickly ran over only to eventually pull the pilot from the plane. He sat with Messina, who he says was already gone.

In the day since the crash, Linkous finds himself thinking back to that wonderful day on the water, just hours before the crash and remembering his friend of 15-years, "I sort of think (of him) like an Italian family should be -- just this wholesome and connected -- and you know, full of love and joy and generosity and that was Marc."

"Marc is probably honestly one of the best guys that I have ever met in my life,"

Messina, who lived in Seattle, but was raised in Portland, was married with three daughters. He was in town after visiting his daughter in southern California.

Linkous says both the pilot and the other passenger are still recovering.


Story and video:  http://katu.com




The person who died in a plane crash at Woodland State Airport Thursday afternoon was identified as a Renton man.

The Cowlitz County Coroner ‘s Office identified Marc Sebastian Messina, 56, as the man who died after the plane he was in, a Mooney M20K, went off the runway, through a fence and up an embankment.

The crash, reported at about 3 p.m., injured two other passengers aboard the plane, but their identity and conditions have not been released.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer said that the plane crashed under unknown circumstances and that both the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Messina co-founded CTS and leads the business team. His prior experience includes having been a General Manager for both Airborne Express and Expanets. With an Executive MBA from the University of Washington, Messina is a Marketing and Business Process expert leading strategic thinking in understanding and implementing technologies for a specific business need.

Original article can be found here: http://www.columbian.com


Marc Messina (left) with longtime friend, Jim Linkous. (Photo courtesy: Jim Linkous)



Marc Messina, 56, of Renton. (Photo courtesy of a friend)

WOODLAND, Wash. (AP) — The man who died in a small plane crash north of Portland, Oregon, Thursday has been identified.

The Cowlitz County Coroner’s Office identified 56-year-old Marc Sebastian Messina, of Renton, as the man who died. The medical examiner said Messina was the rear-seat passenger and died upon impact.

Officials say two others were injured in the crash in which the single-engine Mooney M20K drove off the end of the runway, through a fence and up an embankment. Officials haven’t released the names or conditions of those injured.

The Columbian reports (http://goo.gl/f8V4fE ) the plane is registered to a Woodinville corporation and was bound for Renton.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer says the plane crashed under unknown circumstances. The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.


Woodland is about 30 miles north of Portland, Oregon.






One person was killed and two others were injured after a small aircraft ran off the runway at the Woodland State Airport, Woodland Mayor Will Finn said.

Emergency personnel were called to the scene about 3 p.m., with firefighters arriving to find that a single-engine plane had gone off the end of the runway, through a fence and up an embankment, Clark County Fire & Rescue Spokesman Tim Dawdy said.

Injured patients inside the plane were taken to area medical centers, Dawdy said. Three people were in the plane, but he couldn’t comment on their conditions.

Authorities on scene said that the plane, a Mooney M20K registered to a corporation in Woodinville, was bound for Renton.

Federal Aviation Administration Spokesman Allen Kenitzer said that the plane crashed under unknown circumstances. Both the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Finn said services from the wastewater treatment plant, just north of the airport, will not be disrupted for citizens of Woodland.

Washington State Patrol said the plane remained in the landing strip area and did not impact Interstate 5 but that looky-loos caused a traffic hazard by slowing their speeds in the area.

Woodland State Airport, owned by the Washington State Department of Transportation, is east of Interstate 5 on the north side of the North Fork Lewis River. It has one paved runway, 1,953 feet long and 25 feet wide, but no hangars or structures. It averages 69 takeoffs or landings per week, according to airnav.com, a website for private pilots.

A handful of incidents have been reported at the Woodland airport over the last 20 years, according to Columbian files. In June 1996, a Kalama man piloting an ultralight aircraft was killed during a failed takeoff. In June 2003, a plane taking off in gusty wind veered off course and slammed into the runway, but no one was killed. In September 2007, a plane that had taken off from Pearson Field in Vancouver attempted to make an emergency landing at Woodland after the engine quit, but landed short in a raspberry field. No one was injured.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.columbian.com











WOODLAND, Wash. – One person died and two people were injured after a small plane went off a runway and crashed at the Woodland State Airport Thursday afternoon, according to Clark County fire officials.

Woodland Mayor Will Finn said one person was killed in the crash. The extent of the other passengers' injuries was not immediately released.

The plane crashed through a fence and was resting against a small hillside when authorities arrived. At least two of the wheels were broken from the fuselage.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the Mooney M20K crashed under "unknown circumstances." 

Original article can be found here:   http://www.kgw.com











WOODLAND, Wash. — One person died and two others are injured after a small plane ran off the Woodland State Airport runway Thursday afternoon.

Fire officials say a Mooney M-20 single-engine plane went off the runway just before 3 p.m., crashed into a fence and went up an embankment.

The extent of the two individuals' injuries is unknown. The victim, who was a passenger in the plane, has not yet been identified.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer says the plane crashed under unknown circumstances. Both the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

According to online records, the plane wasn't supposed to take off until 4:45 p.m.

It's owned by McAir Inc. based in Woodinville, Wash.

The airport is about 30 miles north of Portland.

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://katu.com

Bell 47G-2A, N64702: Accident occurred April 21, 2016 in Los Fresnos, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Additional Participating Entity:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Hendrickson Flying Service Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N64702

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA161 
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Los Fresnos, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: BELL 47G-2A, registration: N64702
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the operator, the commercial pilot of the helicopter was performing an aerial application flight when the helicopter struck a set of power lines that ran perpendicular to the field being sprayed. The operator stated that the lines were obscured due to trees.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inability to see and avoid the power lines because of trees obscuring his view.

On April 21, 2016, about 1112 central daylight time, a Bell 47G-2A, N64702, collided with power lines, impacted terrain, and caught fire near Los Fresnos, Texas. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, was seriously injured. The helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Hendrickson Flying Service, Inc, Rochelle, Illinois, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from Weslaco, Texas, at an undetermined time.

The following account of the accident is based up a report submitted by the operator because the pilot was seriously injured and was in the hospital: The pilot was spraying a cotton field between two sets of power lines that ran parallel to his flight path. The helicopter struck a third set of power lines that ran perpendicular to the field being sprayed. The power lines were obscured by trees. A ground fire erupted after the accident, resulting in the helicopter being destroyed.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA161
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Los Fresnos, TX
Aircraft: BELL 47G-2A, registration: N64702
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 21, 2016, about 1112 central daylight time, a Bell 47G-2A, N64702, collided with power lines, impacted terrain, and caught fire near Los Fresnos, Texas. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, was seriously injured. The helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Hendrickson Flying Service, Inc, Rochelle, Illinois, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from Weslaco, Texas, at an undetermined time.

The following account of the accident is based up a report submitted by the operator because the pilot was seriously injured and was in the hospital: The pilot was spraying a cotton field between two sets of power lines that ran parallel to his flight path. The helicopter struck a third set of power lines that ran perpendicular to the field being sprayed. The power lines were obscured by trees. A ground fire erupted after the accident, resulting in the helicopter being destroyed.




NEAR SAN BENITO — The pilot of a crop dusting helicopter remains in a San Antonio hospital. He received serious injuries after crashing in a Cameron County field.

Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration will be at the crash site on Friday. Their job will be to figure out how and why the helicopter crashed.

Thursday’s crash was an event unexpected by all involved.

“I heard this boom. I turned around and I saw the helicopter go down,” Jeannie Guajardo said. Her husband, James Guajardo, described the moment the helicopter crashed in their field near FM 803 and Ebony Road.

“I saw a gentleman kind of stumbling out. I ran to him, I get him by the arms. He was all burned up. I walked him to my truck and tell him to go ahead and lay down in my backseat,” James Guajardo said. Jeannie called 911, as her husband helped the pilot.

The pilot works for the Hendrickson Flying Service. The company was hired by the Texas Boll Weevil Eradication Foundation to spray cotton fields around the Valley.

Lindy Patton is president and CEO of the foundation. He said he’s glad the pilot survived the crash.

“We're very relieved that he was at least able to walk away,” Patton said. “I know he had some injuries, and I think he's been sent to San Antonio, I've heard. But our thoughts and prayers are with him and his family. I don't know the pilot myself. I did look at some of his information when we certified the contractor and his aircraft and his pilots, and he had extensive flying time. I think it was over 5,000 hours of flying time.”

Patton said they don’t decided how much experience a helicopter pilot should have.

“It’s up to the independent contractor; it's his business, his private business,” Patton said. “As long as they have the flying time and can do a good job for us, and to my knowledge, they've done a really good job. We've never had any issues.”

Patton said despite Thursday’s crash, their work in the Valley is not over,

Currently, the full identity of the pilot is unknown. It is known that he is from Alabama and working for the Illinois-based aviation company.

It was last known that the pilot was in critical condition at a San Antonio hospital.

Story and video:  http://www.krgv.com




Authorities are at the scene of a helicopter crash that happened late this morning outside Los Fresnos.

The accident occurred at about 11:30 a.m. on FM 803 and Ebony Road, said Cameron County Sheriff Omar Lucio.

Lucio said the helicopter pilot was able to get out of the aircraft before it burst in to flames. 

The unidentified pilot has been transported to Valley Baptist Medical Center in Harlingen. He is in critical condition. He is expected to be flown to a San Antonio hospital for further treatment, said Los Fresnos Fire Chief Gene Daniels.

Authorities said the helicopter clipped the power lines in the area and crashed. 

A man in a nearby home heard the impact and called 9-1-1.

Cameron County sheriff’s deputies, Texas Department of Public Safety troopers, local firefighters and Magic Valley Electric Company are at the scene.

Original article can be found here: http://www.brownsvilleherald.com





NEAR SAN BENITO – A 61-year-old helicopter pilot from Alabama is in San Antonio after crashing Thursday morning.

The crash happened between Los Fresnos and San Benito city limits on FM 803 and Ebony Road.

The remains of the crop duster helicopter are still on the private property. The Federal Aviation Administration will visit the scene on Friday.

Los Fresnos Fire Chief Gene Daniels said they received the call at around 11:30 a.m.

“EMS and fire department both responded when we got here. We had the helicopter on fire; the male subject that had been burned has been moved away from the fire. He actually walked away from the helicopter. We had a grass fire where the power lines went down, and the helicopter was on fire. So we had one truck working on the grass fire, the other truck was on the helicopter itself,” Daniels said.

The Los Fresnos Fire Department was able to completely put out both fires. Authorities inform the helicopter hit some power lines before hitting the ground.

DPS Sgt. Johnny Hernandez said the pilot remains in critical condition. He suffered severe burns on 75 percent of his body.

The helicopter was operating under the Texas Boll Weevil Eradication Foundation. It’s a foundation dedicated to remove the insect from cotton fields.

Daniels said the department had to be cautious when putting out the fire due to the chemical the chopper was carrying.

“You have to be conscious of what chemicals are carrying, identify them quickly in case they’re a hazard,” Daniels said. “There was less than 10 gallons of chemical in the helicopter.”

The scene is clear of any hazard. The fire department will continue to monitor the scene all throughout the day and night.

Story and video:  http://www.krgv.com

Mooney M20C Ranger, N6870N, Robert W. Brinkley, DO, Inc., PC: Accident occurred April 21, 2016 near William R. Pogue Municipal Airport (KOWP), Sand Springs, Osage County, Oklahoma

ROBERT W. BRINKLEY DO INC PC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6870N

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA164
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Sand Springs, OK
Aircraft: MOONEY M20C, registration: N6870N
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 21, 2016, about 1148 central daylight time, a Mooney M20C single-engine airplane, N6870N, was substantially damaged after it impacted trees and terrain during initial climb near William R. Pogue Municipal Airport (OWP), Sand Springs, Oklahoma. The pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to Robert W Brinkley, DO, Inc., PC; Tulsa, Oklahoma and was operated by a private individual, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed and a flight plan had not been filed. At the time of the accident the airplane was departing OWP for a flight to Ponca City Regional Airport (PNC), Ponca City, Oklahoma.

The pilot reported that immediately after take-off to the north, the engine coughed and he had a complete loss of engine power. The pilot quickly made a "mayday" emergency radio call. The airplane descended and impacted trees less than a mile to the northeast from OWP. The airplane came to rest inverted and the impacts resulted in substantial damage to both wings, both ailerons, the fuselage, the empennage, and the tail surfaces. Several witnesses heard the radio call and responded to the scene. Emergency medical personnel arrived and extricated the pilot from the wreckage.

The closest official weather reporting station was at KTUL, Tulsa, Oklahoma; located 13 miles east from the accident location, At 1153 the automated surface observation system at KTUL reported wind from 320 degrees at 11 knots, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 4,000 feet above ground level (agl), few clouds at 25,000 feet agl, temperature 21 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 10 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of mercury.




SAND SPRINGS — A man was injured Thursday after a small plane crashed shortly after taking off from William R. Pogue Municipal Airport, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol said.


The single-engine aircraft crashed upside down in a heavily wooded area north of the airport moments after taking off, said trooper Jim Armstrong noting the landing gear was still down when it happened.

The pilot was trapped inside the plane about 40 minutes, until rescue crews could cut down several trees and branches in order to extricate him, Armstrong said.

He was taken by ambulance to the airport, then by helicopter to an area hospital. He was listed in good condition on Thursday afternoon, Armstrong said.

He said the pilot's injuries could have been much worse considering the plane crashed upside down among trees.

The pilot was the only person on board, Armstrong said.

The plane is a Mooney M20C Ranger registered to a Tulsa physician.

Authorities received a call about the crash about 11:40 a.m. and arrived at the scene about 15 minutes later, Armstrong said.

Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration in Oklahoma City were en route to take over the investigation of the crash from the OHP, Armstrong said.

Authorities had the site of the crash cordoned off from the public about a half-mile away on rural 138th West Avenue.

The airport is located a few miles northwest of Sand Springs, in Osage County.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.tulsaworld.com




SAND SPRINGS, Okla. – A single engine aircraft was forced to land among the trees just north of the William R. Pogue Airport Thursday afternoon.

Oklahoma Highway Patrol says the pilot of the aircraft was alert and transported to a nearby hospital but is in fair condition. 

According to OHP, the plane went down in a wooded area near 138th West Avenue, north of the airport.


Story and video:  http://www.kjrh.com

Cessna 150J, N51242: Accident occurred April 21, 2016 near Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (KRVS), Bixby, Oklahoma

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

http://registry.faa.gov/N51242 

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA162
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Bixby, OK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/06/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 150J, registration: N51242
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was relocating the recently-purchased airplane, and stated that he departed on the 3-hour flight with full fuel tanks, which provided an endurance of about 5 hours.  During the descent to the destination airport, the pilot advanced the mixture control to full rich, applied carburetor heat, and began to retard the throttle; the engine then suddenly experienced a total loss of power. The pilot restarted the engine multiple times, but the engine would not sustain power. The pilot subsequently conducted a forced landing to a road, during which the airplane struck a sign, resulting in substantial damage. A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the wings had been removed for transport, and an unquantified amount of fuel was drained from the fuel tanks. The gascolator contained 2 to 3 ounces of fuel. The fuel line to the carburetor was removed and no fuel residue was observed. The carburetor was disassembled and the bowl contained about one ounce of fuel. The engine was rotated by hand and displayed continuity and compression throughout. Although a compression test revealed that the Nos. 1 and 2 cylinders displayed low compression, the test was conducted on a cold engine, which was contrary to manufacturer guidance and could have provided unreliable readings. No other anomalies were observed with the engine, and a definitive reason for the loss of power could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined, as the fuel state of the airplane at the time of the accident could not be verified, and postaccident examination of the engine did not provide adequate information.

On April 21, 2016, about 1515 central daylight time, a Cessna 150J airplane, N51242, made a forced landing to a road following a loss of engine power near Bixby, Oklahoma. The airline transport rated pilot was not injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Rolla National Airport (VIH), Rolla, Missouri about 1220 and was on final approach to Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (RVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

According to a statement provided by the pilot, the airplane was purchased prior to departure from VIH and the fuel tanks were topped off. During the initial descent to RVS, about 2,300 ft above ground level (agl), the pilot advanced the mixture control to full rich, applied carburetor heat, and began to retard the throttle when the engine suddenly experienced a total loss of power. The pilot completed the restart procedures and the engine started again. When the pilot advanced the throttle and the engine reached 1,700 rpm, the engine lost power again. After a second restart, the engine reached 1,350 rpm and lost power a final time. The pilot declared an emergency and descended toward a road. Prior to touch down, a car pulled out onto the road so the pilot climbed to avoid the car, then quickly descended to avoid power lines. The airplane's left wing impacted a road sign; the airplane spun and came to rest adjacent to a parking lot. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and fuselage. 

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that the airplanes wings had been removed and an unmeasured amount of fuel was drained from the fuel tanks prior to his arrival. 

A postaccident engine examination was completed by an airplane mechanic with oversight from another FAA inspector. The gascolator mounted to the firewall contained 2 to 3 ounces of fluid. The fluid was blue and clear with no visible contaminants. The carburetor heat box was removed and was unobstructed. The carburetor and induction intakes were unobstructed. The fuel line to the carburetor was removed and no fuel residue was observed. The carburetor was disassembled and the bowl contained about one ounce of fuel. There was not enough fuel to allow the float to rise. A cylinder compression test was completed with the engine cold and revealed the following: No. 1 cylinder 34 pounds per square inch (PSI), No. 2 cylinder 30 PSI, No. 3 cylinder 56 PSI, No. 4 cylinder 60 PSI. The standard minimum pressure for the test was 46 PSI. No exhaust or intake valve leakage was noted.

A review of the engine maintenance records revealed that an annual inspection was completed on October 1, 2015, at 4,890.67 hours of total time in service, 3,376.67 hours of tachometer time, and 1,638.77 hours since major overhaul. At the time of the annual inspection the differential compression test values were noted as: No. 1 77/80, No. 2 76/80, No. 3 78/80, No. 4 77/80. The No. 3 cylinder had excessive valve leakage so the cylinder was removed, the exhaust and intake valves were replaced, and the cylinder reinstalled. The No. 3 cylinder was retested and the noted compression value was 78/80. 

On February 25, 2016, a pre-buy inspection was completed on behalf of the previous owner, at which time a cylinder compression check was completed. The new owner purchased the airplane with a clause the he could have his own pre-buy inspection completed within 30 days of the purchase date. That pre-buy inspection was not completed due to the accident.



NTSB Identification: CEN16LA162
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Bixby, OK
Aircraft: CESSNA 150J, registration: N51242
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 21, 2016, about 1515 central daylight time, a Cessna 150 airplane, N51242, made a forced landing to a road following a loss of engine power near Bixby, Oklahoma. The airline transport rated pilot was not injured and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Rolla National Airport (VIH), Rolla, Missouri about 1220 and was on final approach to Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (RVS), Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

According to a statement provided by the pilot, the airplane was purchased prior to departure from VIH and the fuel tanks were topped off. During the initial descent, about 2,300 ft above ground level (agl), the pilot advanced the mixture control to full rich, applied carburetor heat, and began to retard the throttle when the engine suddenly experienced a total loss of power. The pilot completed the restart procedures and the engine started again. When the pilot advanced the throttle and the engine reached 1,700 rpm, the engine lost power again. After a second restart, the engine reached 1,350 rpm and lost power a final time. The pilot declared an emergency and descended toward a road. During the landing, a car pulled out onto the road so the pilot ascended to avoid the car, then quickly descended to avoid power lines. The airplane's left wing impacted a road sign; the airplane spun and came to rest on the road. 

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that although the airplanes wings had been removed and the fuel tanks drained prior to his arrival, there was "enough fuel" available. The airplane sustained damage to the fuselage and both wings. 

The airplane has been retained for further examination.




BIXBY — No injuries were reported after a small plane landed on South Memorial Drive near East 121st Street in Bixby Thursday afternoon.

The plane had to make an emergency landing for an unknown reason. It landed in the northbound lane of Memorial and did not crash into any cars, a Bixby police dispatcher said.

One person was inside the plane and was not hurt. Authorities have pushed the plane out of the roadway.

Story and video:  http://www.tulsaworld.com















BIXBY, Okla. – A single-engine plane landed in the middle of Memorial Drive Thursday afternoon.

Bixby police confirmed that a Cessna single-engine plane landed on Memorial Drive near S. 120th Street in Bixby.

They went on to say that just one person was on board and was not injured nor were any cars or people hit or damaged.

Story and video:  http://www.kjrh.com

Cessna 152, N5355Q, Gorge Winds Aviation Inc: Incident occurred April 20, 2016 in Troutdale, Multnomah County, Oregon

GORGE WINDS AVIATION INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N5355Q

Date: 20-APR-16
Time: 18:18:00Z
Regis#: N5355Q
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09
City: TROUTDALE
State: Oregon

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI STRUCK THE TAXIWAY LIGHT, TROUTDALE, OR

Air Tractor AT-301, N23811: Incident occurred April 20, 2016 in Nyssa, Malheur County, Oregon

http://registry.faa.gov/N23811

Date: 20-APR-16
Time: 17:30:00Z
Regis#: N23811
Aircraft Make: AIR TRACTOR
Aircraft Model: AT301
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Boise FSDO-11
City: NYSSA
State: Oregon

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A ROAD, NEAR NYSSA, OR

Cessna 162 Skycatcher, N5217S, Eagle Flyers I LLC: Accident occurred April 21, 2016 near Indianapolis Executive Airport, Indiana (KTYQ), Zionsville, Boone County, Indiana

EAGLE FLYERS I LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5217S

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Indianapolis FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA163
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Zionsville, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/16/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA Aircraft 162, registration: N5217S
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that, due to known thunderstorms northwest of the airport, he planned to remain in the traffic pattern during the instructional flight. Automated weather equipment located at the airport also reported lightning in the vicinity of the airport immediately before the flight departed with the student pilot flying the airplane. 

While on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, the flight instructor realized that the storm, including heavy rain and possible windshear, had approached the airport more quickly than expected. He noted that the airplane was 300 ft above the pattern altitude, and he told the student to reduce power to descend. The throttle was already at idle power, but the airplane was not descending. As the student turned the airplane onto the base leg, the flight instructor observed a corporate jet execute a go-around before reaching the end of the runway. He then noted that the airplane’s primary flight display indicated that was it descending at 1,500 ft per minute. He then took control of the airplane, added full power, and set a climb attitude. Realizing that they would not be able to land on the runway before the heavy rain and possible windshear conditions arrived, the flight instructor chose to conduct a go-around and turned away from the storm and flew to the southeast at full power with the carburetor heat on. He estimated that the airplane was about 200 ft above ground level when it encountered heavy rain, which reduced the visibility to “virtually 0.” His priority was to keep the wings level with a slight nose high attitude to gain altitude. He heard the student pilot say “pull up” about the time that the airplane impacted a plowed field. The flight instructor also stated that there was hail at the time of the accident. The flight instructor reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The flight instructor’s improper decision to depart on a local instructional flight in rapidly deteriorating weather conditions, including thunderstorms and hail, which resulted in subsequent impact with terrain during a go-around. 

On April 21, 2016, about 1645 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 162, N5217S, sustained substantial damage when it impacted a field about 1/4 mile east of the Indianapolis Executive Airport (TYQ), Zionsville, Indiana. The flight instructor and student pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to Eagle Flyers I LLC and operated by Montgomery Aviation, Inc., under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed when the airplane departed TYQ on a local flight about 1640. No flight plan was filed.

The flight instructor reported that he checked the weather during the flight briefing and the cloud ceilings were about 3,000 ft above ground level (agl) with a southerly wind at 10 kts and rain showers in the area. After the preflight and engine run-up, the pilot checked the weather radar and it indicated a green radar return 3-5 miles to the west with some yellow radar returns about 5 miles west. A small area of red returns was noted further out to the northwest. The radar indicated that the movement of the storm was to the northeast. The Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS) broadcast obtained immediately before departure indicated that lightning was in the airport vicinity. 

The flight instructor reported he planned to stay in the traffic pattern due to the observed weather to the northwest. The student pilot was flying when they departed on the first takeoff. The flight instructor reported as they were flying on the downwind, the weather, including heavy rain, had moved in much quicker than expected. About midfield on the downwind leg, he noted that the airplane's altitude was 300 ft above the pattern altitude and he told the student pilot to reduce power to descend. The student pilot told him that the throttle was already at idle power, yet the airplane was not descending. The flight instructor stated that he realized that they might be encountering a wind shear situation. As they turned onto the base leg, a Global Express Jet was executing a go-around before reaching the end of runway 18. The flight instructor noted that the primary flight display (PFD) in the Cessna 162 was indicating the airplane was in a 1,500 fpm rate of descent. He took control of the airplane and added full power and set a climb attitude. Realizing that they would not be able to land on runway 18 before the heavy rain and possible wind shear conditions arrived, he elected to turn away from the storm and fly to the southeast at full power with carburetor heat on. He estimated that their altitude was 200 ft agl when they encountered heavy rain which reduced the visibility to "virtually 0." His priority was to keep the wings level with a slight nose high attitude to gain altitude. He heard the student pilot say "Pull up" about the time that the airplane impacted the plowed field. The flight instructor reported that there was heavy rain and hail at the time of the accident. 

The examination of the wreckage indicated that the airplane impacted the field on an east heading. The nose gear and propeller separated from the airplane at the initial point of impact. The airplane traveled about 310 ft before coming to rest with the nose of the airplane facing west. The forward fuselage and engine compartment were substantially damaged, and both wings received substantial damage outboard of the struts. The empennage sustained minor damage. The flight instructor reported that there was no mechanical malfunction or failure of the airplane during the accident flight. 

At 1635, the surface weather observation at TYQ was: wind 150 degrees at 10 kts; visibility 10 miles; thunderstorms in the vicinity; clouds scattered at 3,000 ft, broken at 3,700 ft, broken at 6,500 ft; temperature 20 degrees C; dew point 14 degrees C; altimeter 29.83 inches of mercury. Lightning in the distance, west and north. 

At 1655, the surface weather observation at TYQ was: wind 260 degrees at 18 kts gusting to 35 kts; visibility 3/4 mile; heavy thunderstorms and rain; clouds scattered at 500 ft, broken at 3,000 ft, overcast at 6,500 ft; temperature 16 degrees C; dew point 12 degrees C; altimeter 29.86 inches of mercury.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA163
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Zionsville, IN
Aircraft: CESSNA Aircraft 162, registration: N5217S
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 21, 2016, about 1445 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 162, N5217S, sustained substantial damage during a go-around when it impacted a field about 1/4 mile east of the Indianapolis Executive Airport (TYQ), Zionsville, Indiana. The flight instructor and student pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to Eagle Flyers I LLC and operated by Montgomery Aviation, Inc., under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed TYQ on a local flight about 1440. 

At 1435, the surface weather observation at TYQ was: wind 150 degrees at 10 kts; visibility 10 miles; thunderstorms in the vicinity; clouds scattered at 3,000 ft, broken at 3,700 ft, broken at 6,500 ft; temperature 20 degrees C; dew point 14 degrees C; altimeter 29.83 inches of mercury. Lightning in the distance west and north. 


At 1455, the surface weather observation at TYQ was: wind 260 degrees at 18 kts gusting to 35 kts; visibility 3/4 mile; heavy thunderstorms and rain; clouds scattered at 500 ft, broken at 3,000 ft, overcast at 6,500 ft; temperature 16 degrees C; dew point 12 degrees C; altimeter 29.86 inches of mercury.



A flight instructor and his teenage student are recovering from non-life threatening injuries after being involved in a plane crash in Boone County.

Ronald W. McCormick, 70, and a 17-year-old male flagged down help from a passerby in the 600 block of S County Road 1200 E in Zionsville shortly before 5 p.m. April 21. They were transported to St. Vincent Hospital and are both expected to make a full recovery.

Authorities said the aircraft was based out of Indianapolis Executive Airport, which is about a mile from the crash site.

Responding agencies include the Zionsville Police Dept., Zionsville Fire Dept. and the Boone County Sheriff’s Office. Boone Co. Sheriff Mike Nielsen interviewed McCormack as part of the investigation, which also included notifying the FAA and NTSB.

Original article can be found here: http://www.currentzionsville.com




A single-engine aircraft crashed into a field about a half-mile east of Indianapolis Executive Airport in far eastern Boone County about 5:15 p.m. Thursday.

Both the pilot and a passenger were taken to St. Vincent Hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

The plane crashed across County Road 1200 East near the Palomino Ballroom, about sixth-tenths of a mile south of state Route 32. Boone County Sheriff Mike Nielsen said the crash was called in by a passerby who said they were stopped by someone saying they had just been in a plane crash.

Nielsen said the passengers were identified the flight instructor as Ronald W. McCormick, 70, and student pilot was a 17 year old juvenile male, both were transported to St. Vincent Hospital with non-life threatening injuries. The plane, a 2011 single engine Cessna, was based at the airport and registered to Eagle Flyers, an aircraft rental service.

Nielsen said the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration will complete the investigation and determine the cause. But based on an initial interview with the pilot and witnesses driving by at the time of the wreck, the cause appears to be weather related as a storm was passing through the area at the time.

"These are two very lucky people," Nielsen said.

A fuel leak from the plane was contained by booms placed by Zionsville Fire Department firefighters.

The airport is owned by the Hamilton County Airport Authority. Its main runway is 5,500 feet long and runs north-south. About 95 aircraft use the airport each day, according to information from the Federal Aviation Administration. About 65 aircraft, including seven multi-engine and 12 jet craft, are based at the airport.

Zionsville Fire Department, Boone County Sheriff's Department, Zionsville Police Department responded to the scene.


Original article can be found here:   http://www.reporter.net


A small plane carrying two passengers crashed Thursday near the Indianapolis Executive Airport, police said.

Boone County Sheriff's Office deputies and emergency medical crews were sent shortly before 5 p.m. to the 600 block of South County Road 1200 East, near the airport and 3½ miles northeast of Zionsville. A woman had called 911 and said she'd just been stopped by a person who said they were involved in a plane crash.

The aircraft, police said, was based out of the airport and was carrying a 70-year-old flight instructor and his teenage student pilot. Both passengers were taken to a St. Vincent hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Police said representatives with the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are responding to the scene to handle the investigation.

County Road 1200 East will remain closed from Ind. 32 to 166th Street, police said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.theindychannel.com




A small plane crash has been reported in Zionsville, near the Indianapolis Executive Airport, according to the Town of Zionsville's official Twitter account.

The crash apparently happened shortly before 5 p.m. Thursday, near State Road 32 and County Road 1200 E., a post from the account said.

Police and fire crews are currently on the scene and with the passengers of the plane. It's unclear if anyone suffered injuries.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.indystar.com

ZIONSVILLE, Ind. (WISH) — A plane has crashed near Indianapolis Executive Airport, according to the Town of Zionsville’s Twitter page.

The town said that the Zionsville Police Department and other law enforcement agencies are en route to the location near 1200 East and 100 South.

Dispatchers said two people were injured and taken to St. Vincent Indianapolis Health.


Original article can be found here:   http://wishtv.com 


 ZIONSVILLE, Ind. (April 21, 2016) – Police say a small plane has crashed one mile east of the Indianapolis Executive Airport.

Police say two people were in the plane. Both were able to get out of the plane and were taken to the hospital. Both were awake and conscious.

It happened at 606 South 1200 East, near the Palomino Ballroom, around 5 p.m.

Original article can be found here: http://fox59.com