Thursday, April 21, 2016

Town removes plane from resident’s Oceanside, New York, driveway


Hal Guretzky stands in front of the Cessna he keeps at his home in Oceanside, New York.




Hempstead Town crews on Thursday removed a single-engine private airplane parked in front of an Oceanside home after the owner was cited for repeated violations of town codes.

The wings of the plane in Harold Guretzky’s Yale Street driveway were removed and its body taken to the town’s storage facility after the Hempstead building department earlier this month cited “the potential danger presented by the storage of a plane in a residential neighborhood.”

Town officials have been seeking to remove the plane since July, after neighbors’ complaints about the 24-foot-long Cessna and radio towers he attached atop the home. The town’s building department reported the violation “deems the storage of a plane unsafe.” The radio towers also were said to be unsafe.

Guretzky, 70, was told to remove the plane by April 19 or face seizure by the town and removal of a radio tower. Town officials said Guretzky was served with several notices of violation, which were posted on his home and sent by certified mail, warning of the possible removals.

The town’s commissioner of engineering’s office cited high winds earlier this month that the report said lifted the plane 3 feet off the ground while it was tied down. The storm also toppled one of the radio towers.

Guretzky, reached Thursday by phone, said he was driving in Wyoming on his way back to New York from California and was unaware of the plan to remove the plane. He said he had asked his lawyer to seek a stay of the order until he returned.

Guretzky said his plane was protected by the Federal Aviation Administration. He also said he was prepared to sue the town over the seizure of the plane.

“I wish I was there,” an irate Guretzky said. “Why should they bother my poor little airplane? Don’t mess with this old fart. If I have to protect my property, I’ll do what has to be done.”

Guretzky’s Garden City-based attorney Marc Ialenti said he was unaware the plane was being taken apart and argued the town needed a judge’s order.

The town filed a complaint April 5 in Nassau County District Court to remove the plane, citing violations for unlawful storage of an airplane without a permit and having an unauthorized radio tower. A hearing was adjourned Tuesday and rescheduled for May 12.

But town officials said the hearing will continue. They said they were able to seize the plane without a court order because it posed an immediate danger of “uplifting, falling, collapsing or causing damage and injury to the occupants and/or adjacent property,” as stated in the engineering report.

Story and video:  http://www.newsday.com

Mooney M20K 231, registered to MC AIR Inc and operated by the pilot, N97119: Fatal accident occurred April 21, 2016 at Woodland State Airport (W27), Woodland, Washington

Marc Sebastian Messina 
 1960 - 2016


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama 
Mooney International Corporation; Kerrville, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N97119


Table 1: Ground Roll and Takeoff Distance Chart



Location: Woodland, WA
Accident Number: WPR16FA095
Date & Time: 04/21/2016, 1445 PDT
Registration: N97119
Aircraft: MOONEY AIRCRAFT CORP. M20K
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 21, 2016, about 1445 Pacific daylight time, a Mooney M20K, N97119, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during an aborted takeoff from Woodland State Airport (W27), Woodland, Washington. The rear seat passenger was fatally injured, and the commercial pilot and the front seat passenger received serious injuries. The airplane was registered to MC AIR, Inc., and was being operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight, which was destined for Renton Municipal Airport (RNT), Renton, Washington. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot flew from RNT to W27 with the front seat passenger the day before the accident to meet the rear seat passenger and other friends for a fishing trip. The fishing trip concluded about 1400 on the day of the accident, and the pilot and his passengers were dropped off at W27 by a friend.

The pilot reported that he occupied the left front seat; the passengers occupied the right front seat and the left rear seat. Before departing from the 1,953-ft-long runway, the pilot computed a takeoff ground roll of about 1,250 ft and a distance to clear a 50-ft-obstacle of about 2,200 ft. He gave a preflight briefing to the passengers that included instructions on operation of the seat belts; the engine start and run-up were "normal". Before takeoff, the pilot set the flaps to 10°, called out "seat belts," and advanced the throttle to 2,700 rpm and a manifold pressure of 39 inches while holding the brakes. He released the brakes and started the takeoff roll. The airplane lifted off after a ground roll of about 1,250 ft and climbed to about 35 ft above ground level but "then no longer seemed to accelerate as expected." The pilot lowered the nose and found that the airplane was "just above the ground." He retarded the throttle and flared the airplane into a nose-high attitude to avoid a "head on" impact with a berm, which was located about 415 ft beyond the departure end of the runway.

During an interview, the front seat passenger stated that the pilot watched him fasten his seat belt but did not provide a safety briefing to the passengers. He reported that the rear seat occupant was on his cellphone during the takeoff, but could not recall if the pilot announced "seat belts" before the takeoff roll. When the airplane was about 350 ft from the berm, the pilot announced that they were not going to make it. The airplane's nose rose before the airplane impacted the berm.

The pilot's friend, who witnessed and recorded a video of the accident, was located at the north end of the airport near the berm that the airplane impacted. The video showed that as the airplane approached the departure end of runway 32, it entered a slight nose-high attitude, and the left main landing gear lifted from the runway surface when the airplane was about 20 ft from the end of the runway. The video showed that the airplane reached an estimated maximum altitude of about 4 ft above the ground during the takeoff. In the video, after the airplane departed the asphalt runway, it maintained a nose-high attitude and then touched down in grass about 75 ft before it reached the airport perimeter fence, which was located about 375 ft beyond the runway end. During the time that the airplane was airborne, its estimated average groundspeed was about 65 knots. Sound spectrum analysis of the video indicated that the engine speed was constant about 2,430 rpm until the airplane impacted the fence and subsequently collided with the rising face of the berm.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 52, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane single-engine sea, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with a single-engine airplane rating. The pilot's most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate was issued on June 22, 2015 and included the restriction "must wear corrective lenses." According to the pilot's logbook, he had accumulated 2,915 hours of flight experience at the time of the accident, of which 46 hours were flown in the preceding 6 months. The pilot reported that he had accumulated about 100 hours of flight experience in the accident airplane make and model.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1981 and registered to MC AIR on May 10, 2007. The airplane was powered by a turbocharged, direct-drive, air-cooled, 210-horsepower Continental TSIO-360-LB7 engine. A review of maintenance records revealed that the most recent 100 hour inspection was completed on September 30, 2015, at a hobbs time of 1,916 flight hours. At the time of the inspection, the engine had accrued 671 flight hours since major overhaul. The airplane had amassed 1,926 total flight hours at the time of the accident.

Takeoff Performance Information


The excerpts below from the airplane flight manual (AFM) show the procedures for a normal takeoff and an obstacle takeoff.

TAKEOFF (NORMAL)

Fuel boost pump – OFF
Alternate air – Push Closed
Parking brake – Push OFF
Engine oil temperature - 100° F minimum
Power – 40" MP and 2,700 rpm
Engine instruments – Check proper indications
Aircraft attitude – Lift nose wheel at 67 KIAS
Landing gear – Retract prior to 107 KIAS
Flaps – Retract in climb

TAKEOFF (OBSTACLE)

Fuel boost pumps – OFF
Alternate air – Push Closed
Parking brake – Push OFF
Engine oil temperature - 100° F minimum
Power – 40" MP and 2,700 rpm
Engine instruments – Check proper indications
Aircraft attitude – Lift nose wheel at 67 KIAS
Climb speed – 74 KIAS until clear of obstacle, then accelerate to 95 KIAS.
Landing gear – Retract in climb after clearing obstacle
Flaps – Retract after clearing obstacle

The AFM takeoff performance section includes charts for both ground roll and takeoff distance over a 50-ft obstacle. Both charts assume conditions that include 10° flaps, 40 inches manifold pressure, mixture full rich, and a paved level runway surface. These performance charts do not account for weights above the airplane's maximum gross weight of 2,900 pounds (lbs). Using the charts, the airplane's ground roll and takeoff distance over a 50-ft obstacle were calculated assuming an outside air temperature of 23°C and a gross weight of 2,900 lbs. As shown in Table 1, the airplane's zero-wind ground roll and takeoff distance over a 50-ft obstacle were about 1,350 ft and 2,300 ft, respectively. With a 4-knot headwind, the airplane's ground roll and takeoff distance over a 50-ft obstacle were about 1,200 ft and 2,200 ft, respectively. With a 6-knot tailwind, the airplane's ground roll and takeoff distance over a 50-ft obstacle were about 1,550 ft and 2,600 ft, respectively.

Weight and Balance


The AFM recovered from the airplane contained a weight and balance record dated May 23, 1994, that was marked as superseded on March 26, 2008, when avionics components were replaced. No weight and balance records with a more recent date than May 23, 1994, were found in the AFM. The airplane empty weight (EW) recorded on the May 23, 1994, weight and balance record was 1,945 lbs. Using the EW of 1,945 lbs, the pilot's weight of 206 lbs, the front seat passenger's weight of 284 lbs, the rear seat passenger's weight of 251 lbs, a fuel weight of 210 lbs, and a baggage weight of 83 lbs, the computed total weight was 2,978 lbs, which exceeded the maximum gross weight by 78 lbs. The occupant weights were derived from a combination of hospital reports and personal statements; the fuel weight was derived from the approximate fuel quantity drained from the airplane's wing tanks; and the baggage was weighed.

The pilot provided a weight and balance estimate for the flight, which he computed using a loading application on a portable electronic device. The pilot's inputs included an EW of 1,804 lbs, a combined weight of 530 lbs for the pilot and front seat passenger, a rear seat passenger weight of 200 lbs, a fuel weight of 210 lbs, and a baggage weight of 120 lbs. The pilot's computed total weight was 2,864 lbs. When asked where he obtained the EW of 1,804 lbs, the pilot replied that he retrieved this EW from the internet.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1440 recorded weather at Paradise Point State Park, Ridgefield, Washington, located about 2.5 nautical miles (nm) southeast of W27, included wind from 290° at 2 to 4 knots, temperature 23°C, dewpoint 7°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.67 inches of mercury.

The 1459 recorded weather at St. Helens, Oregon, located about 4 nm southwest of W27 included wind from 131° at 1 to 6 knots, temperature 24°C, dewpoint 12°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.65 inches of mercury.

The 1453 recorded weather observation at Scappoose Industrial Airpark (SPB), Scappoose, Oregon, located about 9 nm southwest of W27, included wind from 070° at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 22°C, dew point 08°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.71 inches of mercury.

The resolution of the video frames from the recording made by the friend was sufficiently high for making wind-related observations. A windsock was located about 330 ft left of and before the end of the paved runway; it was about 730 ft from the camera. In addition to the windsock, the video also recorded trees and bushes on both sides of the runway. The video showed that the shape of the windsock corresponded to low wind speed, and did not show any visible motion of branches and leaves consistent with calm wind at the time of takeoff.

AIRPORT INFORMATION


W27 was located at an elevation of 29 ft above mean sea level and had one asphalt runway in a 14/32 configuration. The north end of the airport was bordered by a perimeter fence that was situated about 375 ft beyond the departure end of runway 32. A 9-ft-tall berm adjacent to a wastewater treatment facility was perpendicular to and about 415 ft beyond the departure end of runway 32.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest upright and relatively intact on the rising face of the berm on a magnetic heading of 320°. The initial impact point was indicated by a crater on the berm that measured about 8 ft long and contained both main landing gear. The airplane was located about 5 ft beyond the crater. Several plexiglass window fragments were scattered about 20 ft beyond the airplane. Both propeller blades displayed chordwise striations that originated at the leading edges. One propeller blade exhibited a slight aft bend and was tangled in a portion of the airport perimeter fence. The other propeller blade did not display any bending.

All major structures of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. The nose landing gear was located in the debris path about 8 ft beyond the main wreckage. Both wings remained attached to the fuselage and displayed depressions in the leadings edges about midspan along with wingtip damage.

The wing tanks were not breached. More than 20 total gallons of fuel were drained from the wing tanks and a fuel line. The fuel selector moved normally between each detent, and no obstructions were noted in the valve. Some residual fuel was found in the lines of the gascolator. A SAR-GEL water finding paste test confirmed that the fuel was not contaminated by water. The gascolator screen displayed some debris, but it was not obstructed. The electric fuel boost pump functioned normally when tested using an external 12-volt battery.

The rudder, elevator, and aileron control tubes and links were continuous from their respective control surfaces to the cockpit. The stabilizer jackscrew displayed 6 threads, consistent with a takeoff position. The flap jackscrew remained attached and measured 1.75 inches, consistent with a 10° normal takeoff flap setting. The flap indicator in the cockpit showed the flaps were in a takeoff position.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Cowlitz County Coroner's Office, Longview, Washington, performed an autopsy on the rear seat passenger. The cause of death was listed as "blunt head and neck injuries." The rear seat passenger's injuries included a laceration to the left posterior scalp with multiple intersecting linear lacerations associated with a hemorrhage into the scalp. He sustained further injuries including fractures of cervical vertebrae C1, C2, C4, and C5, hemorrhage of the cervical paraspinal muscles, and facial contusions of the left cheek and right medial eyebrow.

According to the pilot's medical records, his injuries included a burst fracture of lumbar vertebra L3 with 50% loss of height, a displaced fracture of the right radial styloid, a laceration of his right hand, and abrasions to his left shoulder and right chest. His injuries were classified as serious due to the lumbar fracture. According to the front seat passenger's medical records, his injuries included a compression fracture of lumbar vertebra L1 with 20% loss of height, a puncture laceration of his right forearm, and abrasions to both knees. His injuries were also classified as serious due to the lumbar fracture.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Engine Examination


The engine was shipped to the manufacturer's facility in Mobile, Alabama, for an examination and test run under the supervision of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC). The engine was mounted in a test cell; various thermocouples, pressure lines, and test pads were installed on the engine; and a test club propeller for the engine model was fitted to the propeller flange. According to the manufacturer, the design maximum-rated-power parameters included 2,700 rpm, 40 inches manifold pressure, and unmetered fuel pressure between 34 and 38 pounds per square inch (psi).

During initial tests, the engine was sluggish to start and ran slightly rough at idle. The engine subsequently reached 2,640 rpm, 39 inches manifold pressure, and an unmetered fuel pressure of 27 psi when tested without any adjustments. The magnetos were then re-timed from 12.5° before top dead center (BTDC) and 11.5° BTDC for the left and right magnetos, respectively, to 20° BTDC, in accordance with the engine manufacturer's specification. After this adjustment, the engine reached 2,765 rpm, 40 inches manifold pressure, and an unmetered fuel pressure of 26 psi. Further tests were completed by enrichening the fuel/air mixture through a manual adjustment of the aneroid at the fuel pump until the unmetered fuel flow reached 34 psi, consistent with the manufacturer's prescribed range. The engine ran more smoothly as the fuel/air mixture was adjusted, and the roughness ceased after the final adjustment was made.

Propeller Examination

A propeller examination was performed at the propeller manufacturer's facility with oversight from the NTSB IIC. The propeller exhibited damage consistent with sudden stoppage associated with impact forces. Both propeller blades displayed leading edge impact damage, leading edge polishing, and chordwise gouges and paint scratches. Continuity of the pitch change system was confirmed from the piston to both blade shanks. The assembly contained two actuating links that are loaded in compression during normal operation and connect the hydraulic piston and yoke assembly to the pin on the base of each propeller blade. A single actuating link had failed in tensile overload related to gross deflection of the blade and pitch change mechanism during the accident sequence.

Propeller Governor Examination

The propeller governor was examined at the governor manufacturer's facility with oversight from an FAA inspector. The unit did not display any abnormalities or visual damage when it was removed from the shipping container, and manual rotation of the drive gear was smooth with no binding. Internal examination of the unit, by removing the top cover and head assembly, did not reveal any indications of noticeable wear. A functional test of the unit recorded the following parameters: pressure relief, pump capacity, internal leakage, maximum rpm, control arm setting, minimum rpm, and control arm travel. The unit met the required test value for each parameter, except for maximum rpm. According to the manufacturer, the propeller governor's maximum governed speed should be 2,700 rpm. When the unit was placed on a test bench, it governed to a maximum speed of 2,590 rpm.

SURVIVAL FACTORS

The airplane had four seating positions: two front seats and an aft seat cushion (placed directly on the airplane structure) with two seat positions. The head rests had been removed from all seats. A representative of Mooney Corporation reported that the accident airplane would have been produced with head rests. All four seat positions were equipped with three-point restraint systems consisting of a lift latch buckle lap belt and a single fixed length (adjustable) shoulder harness affixed to the airplane's sidewall outboard of each seat position. The shoulder harness terminated with a metal fitting that was to be hooked to a standoff button on the insert tab portion of the lap belt during use. The pilot and the front seat passenger reported that they were wearing their lap belts and shoulder harnesses. The witness who recorded the accident reported that when he responded to the airplane immediately after the impact, the rear seat occupant's lap belt was fastened, but not his shoulder harness. An investigator from the Cowlitz County Coroner's Office responded to the scene about 1 hour after the accident and reported seeing the rear passenger in the same orientation as shown in the photograph; the passenger's upper torso was bent at the waist with his head contacting the pilot's seatback. The investigator noted that the "decedent was unrestrained at the time of… initial observation" and that he was "advised by first responders, that the decedent's seatbelt had been unsecured by medics for emergency medical assessment."

Postaccident photographs showed that the rear left seat shoulder harness was attached to the airframe, undamaged, and not attached to the lap belt insert tab standoff button. A postaccident photograph showed that the outboard insert tab portion of the left rear seat's lap belt was affixed to its floor attachment point and was undamaged. None of the webbings showed any noticeable damage, fraying or warping in the photographs.

Seat belt testing was performed by representatives of the FAA. Both rear lap belt buckles were affixed to a central floor attachment fitting and functioned normally when insert tabs were fastened. Both buckles released the insert tabs when the lift latches were lifted.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION


The "Rejected Takeoff" section of the FAA Airplane Flying Handbook states:


Prior to takeoff, the pilot should have in mind a point along the runway at which the airplane should be airborne. If that point is reached and the airplane is not airborne, immediate action should be taken to discontinue the takeoff. Properly planned and executed, chances are excellent the airplane can be stopped on the remaining runway without using extraordinary measures, such as excessive braking that may result in loss of directional control, airplane damage, and/or personal injury. In the event a takeoff is rejected, the power should be reduced to idle and maximum braking applied while maintaining directional control.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 52, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/22/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   2915 hours (Total, all aircraft), 100 hours (Total, this make and model), 23 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MOONEY AIRCRAFT CORP.
Registration: N97119
Model/Series: M20K NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1981
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 25-0503
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/30/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2900 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 11 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1926 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors, Inc.
ELT: C91  installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-360-LB
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 210 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: , 200 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1440 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 160°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.67 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: WOODLAND, WA (W27)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: RENTON, WA (RNT)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1445 PDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: WOODLAND STATE (W27)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 29 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 32
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1953 ft / 25 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  45.901667, -122.737222

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA095
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Woodland, WA
Aircraft: MOONEY AIRCRAFT CORP. M20K, registration: N97119
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 21, 2016, about 1445 Pacific daylight time, a Mooney M20K, N97119, was substantially damaged during its departure from Woodland State Airport (W27), Woodland, Washington. The rear seat passenger was fatally injured; the commercial pilot and front seat passenger received serious injuries. The airplane was registered to MC AIR Inc., and was operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight. Although visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, an instrument flight plan was filed for the cross country flight, which was destined for Renton Municipal Airport (RNT), Renton, Washington. The personal flight was originating at the time of the accident. 

According to a video of the accident flight, the airplane began a takeoff roll from runway 32. The airplane approached the departure end of the runway and entered a nose high attitude as the left main landing gear lifted from the runway surface. After the airplane departed the asphalt runway, it maintained a steep angle of attack and then settled into grass about 75 feet from the airport perimeter fence. At this time the engine harmonics changed, consistent with a decrease in engine power. The airplane subsequently collided with the fence and then impacted the rising face of a berm. According to a witness, the airplane reached an altitude of approximately 4 feet during the attempted departure.

The airplane came to rest on top of a berm about 500 feet from the departure end of runway 32 at W27. An initial impact point (IIP) was identified by a crater that measured about 8 feet long. Both main landing gear, were located on the rising face of the berm about 37 feet beyond the airport perimeter fence. The main wreckage, comprised of all four corners of the airplane, was about 5 feet beyond the IIP and remained intact and was oriented on a heading of 320 degrees magnetic. Both propeller blades displayed chordwise striations along their respective leading edges. Propeller Blade A exhibited a slight aft bend and was tangled in a portion of the airport perimeter fence. Propeller Blade B did not display any bending. 

The rudder, elevator and aileron control tubes were traced from their respective control surfaces to the cockpit. The elevator jackscrew displayed 6 threads, consistent with a takeoff position. 

The 1453 recorded weather observation at Scappoose Industrial Airpark (SPB), Scappoose, Oregon included wind 070 degrees true at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 22 degrees C, dew point 08 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.71 inches of mercury.




Two Washington residents injured in Thursday's plane crash at Woodland Airport have been identified and released from the hospital, and authorities have changed their description of the fatal accident.

The pilot of the single-engine aircraft, Angus Walker, 52, of Woodinville and front-seat passenger, Jacob Kuper, 36, of Enumclaw were found outside the aircraft and both suffered serious injuries, according to a Monday press release from the Woodland Police Department. 

They were treated and released from PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center late last week. 

Rear-seat passenger Marc Messina, 56, of Renton was found dead inside the cabin of the plane, a Mooney 20K that was owned by McAir Inc. of Woodinville. 

According to the press release, the aircraft attempted to take off in a northbound direction. However, it failed to gain adequate lift and crashed into an eight-foot chain link fence and striking a berm at the Woodland Waste Water Treatment Plant off the north end of the runway. The cause of the crash is unknown.

Officials initially speculated that the plane crashed during an emergency landing.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the incident. 


Original article can be found here: http://tdn.com


Marc Messina (left). 

WOODLAND, Wash. — There is a story behind the picture (above), now stored on Jim Linkous' cellphone. He and longtime friend, Marc Messina, along with a couple other people had spent the day fishing for salmon. Instead, as the picture shows, they ended up catching a clam.

It's now one of the last pictures he has of 56-year-old Messina.

"I never, ever thought that we would have this happen an hour after we were off the water," Linkous told KATU News.

The next cellphone image Linkous would capture would be the moments before the deadly plane crash Thursday afternoon at Woodland Airport -- killing Messina and injuring both the pilot and another passenger. Linkous has since handed over the video to crash investigators.

According to Linkous, he had dropped Messina, the pilot and another passenger off at the airport after a day on the water and decided to run and get them water. By the time he got back, they were already taxiing.

"The aircraft just could not get off enough lift. It got maybe 5-6 feet in the air and the pilot, really did it heroically, he took the aircraft back down, hit a fence to try and slow them and hit the berm and they came to rest, but it was horrific impact," Linkous said.

Calling 911 on the way, Linkous quickly ran over only to eventually pull the pilot from the plane. He sat with Messina, who he says was already gone.

In the day since the crash, Linkous finds himself thinking back to that wonderful day on the water, just hours before the crash and remembering his friend of 15-years, "I sort of think (of him) like an Italian family should be -- just this wholesome and connected -- and you know, full of love and joy and generosity and that was Marc."

"Marc is probably honestly one of the best guys that I have ever met in my life,"

Messina, who lived in Seattle, but was raised in Portland, was married with three daughters. He was in town after visiting his daughter in southern California.

Linkous says both the pilot and the other passenger are still recovering.


Story and video:  http://katu.com




The person who died in a plane crash at Woodland State Airport Thursday afternoon was identified as a Renton man.

The Cowlitz County Coroner ‘s Office identified Marc Sebastian Messina, 56, as the man who died after the plane he was in, a Mooney M20K, went off the runway, through a fence and up an embankment.

The crash, reported at about 3 p.m., injured two other passengers aboard the plane, but their identity and conditions have not been released.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer said that the plane crashed under unknown circumstances and that both the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Messina co-founded CTS and leads the business team. His prior experience includes having been a General Manager for both Airborne Express and Expanets. With an Executive MBA from the University of Washington, Messina is a Marketing and Business Process expert leading strategic thinking in understanding and implementing technologies for a specific business need.

Original article can be found here: http://www.columbian.com


Marc Messina (left) with longtime friend, Jim Linkous. (Photo courtesy: Jim Linkous)



Marc Messina, 56, of Renton. (Photo courtesy of a friend)

WOODLAND, Wash. (AP) — The man who died in a small plane crash north of Portland, Oregon, Thursday has been identified.

The Cowlitz County Coroner’s Office identified 56-year-old Marc Sebastian Messina, of Renton, as the man who died. The medical examiner said Messina was the rear-seat passenger and died upon impact.

Officials say two others were injured in the crash in which the single-engine Mooney M20K drove off the end of the runway, through a fence and up an embankment. Officials haven’t released the names or conditions of those injured.

The Columbian reports (http://goo.gl/f8V4fE ) the plane is registered to a Woodinville corporation and was bound for Renton.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer says the plane crashed under unknown circumstances. The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.


Woodland is about 30 miles north of Portland, Oregon.






One person was killed and two others were injured after a small aircraft ran off the runway at the Woodland State Airport, Woodland Mayor Will Finn said.

Emergency personnel were called to the scene about 3 p.m., with firefighters arriving to find that a single-engine plane had gone off the end of the runway, through a fence and up an embankment, Clark County Fire & Rescue Spokesman Tim Dawdy said.

Injured patients inside the plane were taken to area medical centers, Dawdy said. Three people were in the plane, but he couldn’t comment on their conditions.

Authorities on scene said that the plane, a Mooney M20K registered to a corporation in Woodinville, was bound for Renton.

Federal Aviation Administration Spokesman Allen Kenitzer said that the plane crashed under unknown circumstances. Both the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Finn said services from the wastewater treatment plant, just north of the airport, will not be disrupted for citizens of Woodland.

Washington State Patrol said the plane remained in the landing strip area and did not impact Interstate 5 but that looky-loos caused a traffic hazard by slowing their speeds in the area.

Woodland State Airport, owned by the Washington State Department of Transportation, is east of Interstate 5 on the north side of the North Fork Lewis River. It has one paved runway, 1,953 feet long and 25 feet wide, but no hangars or structures. It averages 69 takeoffs or landings per week, according to airnav.com, a website for private pilots.

A handful of incidents have been reported at the Woodland airport over the last 20 years, according to Columbian files. In June 1996, a Kalama man piloting an ultralight aircraft was killed during a failed takeoff. In June 2003, a plane taking off in gusty wind veered off course and slammed into the runway, but no one was killed. In September 2007, a plane that had taken off from Pearson Field in Vancouver attempted to make an emergency landing at Woodland after the engine quit, but landed short in a raspberry field. No one was injured.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.columbian.com











WOODLAND, Wash. – One person died and two people were injured after a small plane went off a runway and crashed at the Woodland State Airport Thursday afternoon, according to Clark County fire officials.

Woodland Mayor Will Finn said one person was killed in the crash. The extent of the other passengers' injuries was not immediately released.

The plane crashed through a fence and was resting against a small hillside when authorities arrived. At least two of the wheels were broken from the fuselage.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the Mooney M20K crashed under "unknown circumstances." 

Original article can be found here:   http://www.kgw.com











WOODLAND, Wash. — One person died and two others are injured after a small plane ran off the Woodland State Airport runway Thursday afternoon.

Fire officials say a Mooney M-20 single-engine plane went off the runway just before 3 p.m., crashed into a fence and went up an embankment.

The extent of the two individuals' injuries is unknown. The victim, who was a passenger in the plane, has not yet been identified.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer says the plane crashed under unknown circumstances. Both the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

According to online records, the plane wasn't supposed to take off until 4:45 p.m.

It's owned by McAir Inc. based in Woodinville, Wash.

The airport is about 30 miles north of Portland.

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://katu.com

Bell 47G-2A, N64702: Accident occurred April 21, 2016 in Los Fresnos, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Additional Participating Entity:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Hendrickson Flying Service Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N64702

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA161 
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Los Fresnos, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: BELL 47G-2A, registration: N64702
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the operator, the commercial pilot of the helicopter was performing an aerial application flight when the helicopter struck a set of power lines that ran perpendicular to the field being sprayed. The operator stated that the lines were obscured due to trees.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inability to see and avoid the power lines because of trees obscuring his view.

On April 21, 2016, about 1112 central daylight time, a Bell 47G-2A, N64702, collided with power lines, impacted terrain, and caught fire near Los Fresnos, Texas. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, was seriously injured. The helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Hendrickson Flying Service, Inc, Rochelle, Illinois, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from Weslaco, Texas, at an undetermined time.

The following account of the accident is based up a report submitted by the operator because the pilot was seriously injured and was in the hospital: The pilot was spraying a cotton field between two sets of power lines that ran parallel to his flight path. The helicopter struck a third set of power lines that ran perpendicular to the field being sprayed. The power lines were obscured by trees. A ground fire erupted after the accident, resulting in the helicopter being destroyed.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA161
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Los Fresnos, TX
Aircraft: BELL 47G-2A, registration: N64702
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 21, 2016, about 1112 central daylight time, a Bell 47G-2A, N64702, collided with power lines, impacted terrain, and caught fire near Los Fresnos, Texas. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, was seriously injured. The helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Hendrickson Flying Service, Inc, Rochelle, Illinois, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from Weslaco, Texas, at an undetermined time.

The following account of the accident is based up a report submitted by the operator because the pilot was seriously injured and was in the hospital: The pilot was spraying a cotton field between two sets of power lines that ran parallel to his flight path. The helicopter struck a third set of power lines that ran perpendicular to the field being sprayed. The power lines were obscured by trees. A ground fire erupted after the accident, resulting in the helicopter being destroyed.




NEAR SAN BENITO — The pilot of a crop dusting helicopter remains in a San Antonio hospital. He received serious injuries after crashing in a Cameron County field.

Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration will be at the crash site on Friday. Their job will be to figure out how and why the helicopter crashed.

Thursday’s crash was an event unexpected by all involved.

“I heard this boom. I turned around and I saw the helicopter go down,” Jeannie Guajardo said. Her husband, James Guajardo, described the moment the helicopter crashed in their field near FM 803 and Ebony Road.

“I saw a gentleman kind of stumbling out. I ran to him, I get him by the arms. He was all burned up. I walked him to my truck and tell him to go ahead and lay down in my backseat,” James Guajardo said. Jeannie called 911, as her husband helped the pilot.

The pilot works for the Hendrickson Flying Service. The company was hired by the Texas Boll Weevil Eradication Foundation to spray cotton fields around the Valley.

Lindy Patton is president and CEO of the foundation. He said he’s glad the pilot survived the crash.

“We're very relieved that he was at least able to walk away,” Patton said. “I know he had some injuries, and I think he's been sent to San Antonio, I've heard. But our thoughts and prayers are with him and his family. I don't know the pilot myself. I did look at some of his information when we certified the contractor and his aircraft and his pilots, and he had extensive flying time. I think it was over 5,000 hours of flying time.”

Patton said they don’t decided how much experience a helicopter pilot should have.

“It’s up to the independent contractor; it's his business, his private business,” Patton said. “As long as they have the flying time and can do a good job for us, and to my knowledge, they've done a really good job. We've never had any issues.”

Patton said despite Thursday’s crash, their work in the Valley is not over,

Currently, the full identity of the pilot is unknown. It is known that he is from Alabama and working for the Illinois-based aviation company.

It was last known that the pilot was in critical condition at a San Antonio hospital.

Story and video:  http://www.krgv.com




Authorities are at the scene of a helicopter crash that happened late this morning outside Los Fresnos.

The accident occurred at about 11:30 a.m. on FM 803 and Ebony Road, said Cameron County Sheriff Omar Lucio.

Lucio said the helicopter pilot was able to get out of the aircraft before it burst in to flames. 

The unidentified pilot has been transported to Valley Baptist Medical Center in Harlingen. He is in critical condition. He is expected to be flown to a San Antonio hospital for further treatment, said Los Fresnos Fire Chief Gene Daniels.

Authorities said the helicopter clipped the power lines in the area and crashed. 

A man in a nearby home heard the impact and called 9-1-1.

Cameron County sheriff’s deputies, Texas Department of Public Safety troopers, local firefighters and Magic Valley Electric Company are at the scene.

Original article can be found here: http://www.brownsvilleherald.com





NEAR SAN BENITO – A 61-year-old helicopter pilot from Alabama is in San Antonio after crashing Thursday morning.

The crash happened between Los Fresnos and San Benito city limits on FM 803 and Ebony Road.

The remains of the crop duster helicopter are still on the private property. The Federal Aviation Administration will visit the scene on Friday.

Los Fresnos Fire Chief Gene Daniels said they received the call at around 11:30 a.m.

“EMS and fire department both responded when we got here. We had the helicopter on fire; the male subject that had been burned has been moved away from the fire. He actually walked away from the helicopter. We had a grass fire where the power lines went down, and the helicopter was on fire. So we had one truck working on the grass fire, the other truck was on the helicopter itself,” Daniels said.

The Los Fresnos Fire Department was able to completely put out both fires. Authorities inform the helicopter hit some power lines before hitting the ground.

DPS Sgt. Johnny Hernandez said the pilot remains in critical condition. He suffered severe burns on 75 percent of his body.

The helicopter was operating under the Texas Boll Weevil Eradication Foundation. It’s a foundation dedicated to remove the insect from cotton fields.

Daniels said the department had to be cautious when putting out the fire due to the chemical the chopper was carrying.

“You have to be conscious of what chemicals are carrying, identify them quickly in case they’re a hazard,” Daniels said. “There was less than 10 gallons of chemical in the helicopter.”

The scene is clear of any hazard. The fire department will continue to monitor the scene all throughout the day and night.

Story and video:  http://www.krgv.com