Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Oakland Aviation Museum to be open to visitors on Thanksgiving

 

OAKLAND -- The Oakland Aviation Museum, at Oakland International Airport, will be open for visitors from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day, museum officials announced. 

The museum features exhibits about Bay Area and naval aviation history. Features include a display of aircraft and information about black Americans and woman in Aviation, Trans Ocean Airlines, and Jimmy Doolittle and 8th Air Force.

A gift shop offers books, T-shirts, caps, coasters and models, and is open to the public.

The Oakland Aviation Museum is located at old North Field at Oakland Airport in the 1939 Boeing School of Aeronautics building at 8252 Earhart Road. It is open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

For more information, visit oaklandaviationmuseum.org or call 510-638-7100.

Texan pleads guilty to shooting crop duster plane

A West Texas man has pleaded guilty to shooting into a crop duster as the plane was spraying a neighbor's fields.
 

Prosecutors say 68-year-old James R. Cate of Talpa pleaded guilty Tuesday to making a threat to an aircraft. Cate, who appeared in federal court in Lubbock, faces up to five years in prison. No sentencing date was immediately set.

Investigators say Cate on Feb. 29 shot three rounds near the chemical-hauling crop duster in an effort to keep the plane away from his fields.

The last round Cate fired hit the propeller, went through the engine cowling and into the chemical hopper. The bullet broke into pieces as it entered the cockpit, going through the leg of the pants the pilot was wearing. The pilot wasn't hurt.


http://www.themonitor.com

Ray Conner, president and CEO of commercial airplanes, Boeing, 
tells Khaleej Times Night Editor Suresh Pattali he is 
overwhelmed by demand

21 November 2012

Ray Conner’s mission is to sell airplanes — that is hundreds of Boeing airplanes of all sizes. He has built airplanes, sold airplanes and serviced airplanes, capping his 34-year career with Boeing by becoming its president and CEO for commercial airplanes in June this year. The man who lives and breathes aircraft talks to Khaleej Times on what Boeing has up its sleeves.

Q: Emirates airline is ready to put money — an estimated $36 billion — on the proposed 777x. President Tim Clark recently went on record saying that the airline would love to replace the entire 777 fleet with a new variant. How far have your talks with prospective buyers for the 777x reached?

A: The talks are very preliminary at this point. But we’re gathering information from airlines today as to exactly what they are looking for in terms of size. Size is really the most important thing for us, so that we can start to focus our energy around the design characteristics of an airplane of a particular size. That’s what we are trying to nail down right now. Once we get that right in terms of the feedback from our customers, then we know what the airplane will look like, and then get down to the nuts and bolts of building the airplane.

The 777 is a proven aircraft. If the proposed 777x incorporates most of the new-gen interior and performance features, don’t you think it might take the sheen out of the Dreamliner?

No, it’s a completely different market. When you look at the seat counts, that’s where you start to see the difference. You have a family of the 787 starting with the 787-8. Then you go to a stretched version, the 787-9, which would be 15 per cent longer. Then we would stretch again with a potentially new airplane, the -10, which would be another 15 per cent on top of that, so [that’s] a 30 per cent longer figure than the 787-8 plane.

Here, the 777x will be much bigger than that. So if the -10 is around 323 seats, the 777x will be much larger than that, more like 300 yards, which is about 365 seats in three class configurations. Maybe, even bigger than that. So you might get closer to the 400-seat range. So we always have customers for different models depending on the seat counts.

Would it be right if I qualify the 787 as the ultimate flying machine?


Yes, the 787 is the ultimate flying machine so far from Boeing. It’s a big technological leap. This is a new-generation plane that benefits both the airline and the passenger. The airplane has unmatched fuel efficiency, burning 20 per cent less fuel than its conventional counterparts. It is also a more productive asset for airlines because it takes less maintenance.

Is the Dreamliner meant for long-haul use like the ones most of your present customers are operating?

 
A good aspect of the 787 is it can do shorter hauls too and still be very efficient. One of the reasons why you have bigger airplanes is that it’s the only way we can make it economical — put lots of seats in them and fly that way. But the operating cost of this airplane is a lot more economical. You can have more seat counts and fly shorter distances, and still be very profitable. And that is one of the great things about the operating cost of this machine.

You have used composite material for fuel efficiency on the 787. Will you consider using similar material in other sought-after models?

It depends on — as we move forward — what exactly we want to do, like things you could do particularly with the wings. Obviously, the composite brings a lot more performance. Composite wings are phenomenal in terms of their characteristics, in terms of performance. And that will be very difficult to move away from; if you’re gonna move away from it, it’ll have to be a move to get something that gives you better performance. The fuselage is also unique. It’s one single-piece round barrel so it takes away lots of the typical joints and panels and those kinds of things. So to what extent we can go in the material use would vary from airplane to airplane.


How many orders are there now for the 787?

At this point, 838 orders. Middle East customers include Etihad Airways, Qatar Airways, Saudia, Gulf Air, Royal Jordanian and Oman. The order book is quite big actually. So, yes, we are very excited about it.
 

There is talk that some Asian carriers are planning to reschedule the delivery program. Will it impact your project in any way?

No, no. We’ll be fine. We have so much demand, to be honest with you. If we have somebody that does want to move or something like that, we have the ability to move other people there.

Some airline chiefs, including Qatar Airways’ Akbar Al Baker, have talked about the flexibility to switch models or variants. Is that true?

We always have that kind of conversation with customers. What he was talking about was a switch within the family. He has a number of airplanes on order, like the 787. So if he has -8, and then -9 and -10 are available, he may want to switch to any of the variants. So if we are given enough time and we have the capability to do that, we always try to accommodate our customers. That’s what we do. Now, if you are talking about switching from one model to another model, that’s a little bit of a different story. Then it becomes a matter of whether or not I can do it or [if the switch] makes sense.

A couple of months ago, Mr Al Baker was talking about some “material defects” on the 787 GE engine. Then the delivery came soon. Has that matter been sorted out?

Yes. It is a well-known situation in the industry. That was just a one-time occurrence. The situation is under control. GE addressed it right away and, yes, it has been taken care of.

Is the 787-9 under active development?

Yes, it is scheduled to enter service in early 2014.


http://www.khaleejtimes.com

Cessna 210D, N3919Y: Accident occurred November 20, 2012 in San Rafael, California

NTSB Identification: WPR13LA047
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 20, 2012 in San Rafael, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/11/2014
Aircraft: CESSNA 210, registration: N3919Y
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Before departure, the pilot confirmed the fuel level by measuring the quantity of each tank, which totaled 6 gallons in the left tank and 23 gallons in the right tank. The fuel selector was placed in the right tank position for takeoff. After taking off to the northeast and when about 500 feet above ground level during the initial climb, the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot switched on both boost pumps, moved the fuel selector back and forth between tanks several times, and attempted to restart the engine; however, the engine did not regain power. The pilot subsequently made a forced landing to a marsh. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the lower right forward area of the fuselage, which resulted in the right fuel reservoir tank being ruptured; neither fuel tank was breached. 

Recovery personnel reported that they drained 1 gallon of aviation fuel from the left fuel tank and that the fuel selector switch was in the right tank position. Postaccident examination did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. A postaccident test run of the engine was accomplished with no anomalies noted. After the engine run was completed, the airplane’s left and left fuel supply systems were examined. The examination revealed that there were no blockages or ruptures to the left fuel supply system and that the right fuel reservoir tank rupture permitted whatever fuel was present in the right fuel tank to drain from the system after the accident. The reason for the reported total loss of engine power could not be determined. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The loss of engine power during initial climb for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

On November 20, 2012, about 1120 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 210D, N3919Y, sustained substantial damage as a result of a forced landing following a loss of engine power during initial climb near San Rafael, California. The certified commercial pilot, the sole occupant of the airplane, sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the proposed cross-country flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight was originating from the Martin Ranch Airport (CA35), San Rafael, California, at the time of the accident, with an intended destination of Chico, California.

In a written statement submitted to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the pilot reported that prior to take off the fuel selector was in the right tank position. Additionally, he confirmed by "sticking" (measuring) the fuel levels, that he had a total of 29 gallons on board; 6 gallons in the left tank and 23 gallons in the right tank. The pilot stated that after taking off and during the initial climb, the engine was delivering full power. About 500 feet above ground level (agl) the pilot reported that the engine experienced a total loss of engine power, at which time he turned on both fuel pumps and switched the fuel selector from the right tank to the left tank; this action did not restore power to the engine. The pilot subsequently switched the fuel selector back and forth several times, but with no success of restoring engine power. The pilot revealed that at this time he set up for a forced landing to a marsh. After landing, the airplane slid about 100 feet before coming to rest upright. The airplane had sustained substantial damage to the lower right forward area of the fuselage, which resulted in the right fuel reservoir tank being ruptured. The pilot opined that after exiting the airplane, he observed fuel draining out of the lower right cowling at about one-half gallon per minute.

In a telephone conversation with the NTSB IIC, a first responder reported that while walking toward the accident site and when he was about 75 yards from the wreckage, he detected a very strong odor of fuel. He further reported that when he was about 30 to 40 yards from the airplane he observed a distinct sheen on the surface of the water, which he thought was fuel leaking from the airplane, although he did not visually observe fuel escaping from the airplane. 

In a telephone conversation with the NTSB IIC, the owner of the salvage company that recovered the airplane reported that only about 1 gallon of fuel was recovered from the left fuel tank, and that the tank had not been breached. Additionally, he reported that while the right fuel tank had not been breached, the associated fuel lines had been compromised, which he said explained the fuel odor and the fuel in the water outside and around the airplane. The salvage owner also reported that the fuel selector was in the RIGHT TANK position at the accident site.

Subsequent to the airplane being recovered to a secured storage facility, and at the request of the NTSB IIC, the engine was examined and a test run was performed by a Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) air safety investigator under the supervision of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector. 

Prior to the test run, maintenance records were reviewed. The engine was a Continental IO-520-A (32), serial number 112876-R, with a build date of October 19, 1999. The engine's most recent annual inspection was performed on May 1, 2012, at a tachometer time of 571.3 hours, which corresponded to the time since the last major overhaul. At the time of the examination, the tachometer read 592.2 hours. Maintenance records did not indicate the actual total time of the engine.

An external examination of the engine revealed no impact damage. The top sparkplugs were removed and displayed a lean operation with little-to-no deposits or soot. A borescope inspection of all six cylinders revealed no signs of operational distress to any of the cylinders, pistons, or valves. A thumb compression test resulted in suction and compression being obtained on all six cylinders. Additionally, during crankshaft rotation a spark was obtained on all six top ignition leads. 

In preparation for the test run the three-bladed, variable-pitch McCauley propeller was removed due to the damage sustained by all three blades and was replaced with a two-bladed, fixed-pitch propeller for the test run. Additionally, as the right fuel reservoir tank had been ruptured, the fuel hose between the auxiliary electric boost pump and the engine-driven fuel pump inlet was removed from the boost pump end, and an alternate electric fuel boost pump and alternate fuel tank were attached to the engine-driven fuel pump's inlet line.

Electric power was supplied to the alternate electric boost pump and the engine was started using the accident aircraft's ignition/starting system. The engine ran through various power settings with no anomalies noted. The engine revolutions per minute (RPM) was limited to 2,500 during the engine run for safety reasons. The engine's mixture control was adjusted throughout the engine run and the fuel flow and RPM instrument readings represented what was to be expected for a given adjustment. The engine ran for 0.2 hours on the tachometer (592.2 to 592.4); about 15 minutes. The examination and test run of the engine did not reveal any abnormalities that would have prevented normal operation and production of rated horsepower.

Following the engine run the fuel supply system was examined. The alternate electric boost pump was removed from the fuel supply system and the fuel line between the auxiliary boost pump and the engine-driven fuel pump remained disconnected. The left fuel return line was plugged at the left wing root and compressed air was provided to the left fuel tank supply tube with the right fuel tank selected [this fuel selector position would block fuel from getting to the fuel strainer and electric boost pump from the left fuel tank]. With the compressed air supplied to the left pickup tube, compressed air could be heard entering and filling the left fuel reservoir; however, compressed air did not exit the fuel selector. The same test was then conducted with the fuel selector positioned to the left fuel tank, which is a position that would permit fuel to flow from the left fuel tank, through the left fuel reservoir, to the fuel strainer and auxiliary/engine-driven fuel pumps. When compressed air was supplied to the left pickup tube, it could be observed exiting the line that would normally supply the engine-driven fuel pump. No blockage or ruptures were noted on the left side fuel supply system.

http://registry.faa.gov/N3919Y

NTSB Identification: WPR13LA047
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 20, 2012 in San Rafael, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 210, registration: N3919Y
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 20, 2012, about 1200 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 210D, N3919Y, sustained substantial damage as a result of a forced landing following a loss of engine power during initial climb near San R
afael, California. The certified commercial pilot, the sole occupant of the airplane, sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the proposed cross-country flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight, and a flight plan was not filed. The flight was originating from the Martin Ranch Airport (CA35), San Rafael at the time of the accident. It was destined for Chico, California.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) about an hour after the accident, the pilot reported that after taking off and climbing to an altitude of about 400 to 600 feet above ground level, and without warning, the engine quit. The pilot stated that because of the low altitude he only had time to set up for a forced landing, which he performed to an open marsh area with the landing gear retracted. The pilot estimated that he had about 32 gallons of fuel on board at the time of the takeoff.

Postaccident examination by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that as a result of the forced landing the airplane had sustained substantial damage to the right forward area of the fuselage.

In a telephone conversation with the NTSB IIC, a first responder reported that while walking toward the accident site and when he was about 75 yards from the wreckage, he detected a very strong odor of fuel. He further reported that when he was about 30 yards from the airplane he observed a distinct sheen on the surface of the water that surrounded the airplane.

The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.



 A 37-year-old Sausalito man suffered cuts and bruises when he landed his Cessna 210 plane in a marsh near the San Rafael Airport on Smith Ranch Road Tuesday morning, a Marin County sheriff's lieutenant said.

The pilot was able to walk away from the plane and was treated by paramedics at the scene for a cut on his forehead, Lt. Jamie Scardina said.

Scardina said he is not authorized to release the pilot's name, but San Rafael Fire Department Battalion Chief Jeff Buscher identified him as Zack Kinsey.

Scardina said the pilot took off from San Rafael Airport and was at 700 feet when the single-engine plane experienced an unknown mechanical failure.

The pilot tried to land at San Rafael Airport but the plane lost power and crashed belly down about a quarter-mile from the runway, Scardina said.

The plane sustained moderate damage and the National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the incident, Scardina said.

The crash was reported around 11 a.m. about a mile southeast of the airport located at 400 Smith Ranch Road, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.

Buscher said the plane slid underneath high-tension electrical power lines and came to rest near a wooden walkway that is about three feet above the marsh.

One of the plane's wing tips was damaged when it hit the walkway, Buscher said.

The plane was still in the marsh this morning, Buscher said.

SAN RAFAEL, Calif. — A plane made an emergency landing into a marsh this morning after its pilot had trouble taking off from nearby San Rafael Airport, San Rafael fire officials said.

The pilot, the lone occupant of the plane, crashed just after 11 a.m. after taking off from the airport located at 400 Smith Ranch Road, San Rafael Fire Chief Chris Gray said.

The pilot walked away from the crash with only minor injuries and the plane sustained minor damage, Gray said.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said he did not immediately have information that afternoon on the identity of the pilot or the type of aircraft that crashed.

Authorities do not yet know what caused the plane to crash.

San Rafael fire Battalion Chief Jeff Buscher said the pilot maneuvered a controlled crash that landed the plane belly down into a marsh.

The aircraft then hit a ditch and spun around.

The damaged plane was resting under power lines near the airport Tuesday afternoon and fire crews were monitoring it for possible fuel spills, Buscher said.


 The pilot of a small plane suffered only minor injuries after his aircraft apparently lost power after takeoff at the San Rafael Airport on Tuesday morning, landing in an isolated, marshy area, authorities said.

The man was walking to McInnis Parkway to meet police and firefighters, a police spokeswoman said.

"He (the pilot) may have minor injuries, but he was talking" to responders, said San Rafael police spokeswoman Margo Rohrbacher.

Rohrbacher said the plane was "way out in the marshland. The pilot got out on his own and is walking to McInnis Parkway to meet the responding unit."

The Marin County Sheriff's Office was handling the case, Rohrbacher said.



Cessna 182D Skylane, N61LN: Accident occurred November 17, 2012 in Bondurant, Wyoming

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA053 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 17, 2012 in Bondurant, WY
Aircraft: CESSNA 182D, registration: N61LN
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 17, 2012, about 1345 mountain standard time, a Cessna 182D, N61LN, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain south of Bondurant, Wyoming. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. The private pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, was fatally injured. Visual and instrument meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the route of flight and a flight plan was not filed. The cross-country flight originated from Stevensville, Montana, about 1130 with an intended destination of Pinedale, Wyoming.

Information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the family of the pilot contacted the FAA on the evening of November 17, 2012, after they became concerned when the pilot had not arrived at his intended destination. The FAA subsequently issued an Alert Notification (ALNOT). The Civil Air Patrol, United States Air Force, and local law enforcement, commenced search and rescue operations throughout the area of the pilot's intended flight path. The wreckage was located by aerial units on the afternoon of November 24, 2012.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted mountainous terrain approximately 35 miles west of the flights intended destination. The wreckage debris path was about 133 feet in length and oriented on a magnetic heading of about 200 degrees at an elevation of about 10,150 feet. All major structural components of the airplane were located within the debris path.

The wreckage will be recovered to a secure location for further examination.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 61LN        Make/Model: C182      Description: 182, Skylane
  Date: 11/17/2012     Time: 0000

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: BONDURANT   State: WY   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS 
  FATALLY INJURED, SUBJECT OF AN ALERT NOTICE ISSUED 11/17/12, WRECKAGE 
  LOCATED 15 MILES FROM BONDURANT, WY

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: CASPER, WY  (NM04)                    Entry date: 11/26/2012 
 
Courtesy photo

 Search crews looking for a missing plane in Wyoming are coping with deep snow and low clouds. The plane departed from the Stevensville Airport on Saturday.

 JACKSON, Wyo. – Crews searching for a small plane missing for a week in the rugged terrain of the Upper Hoback found wreckage of the aircraft and the body of its pilot, Sublette County sheriff’s officials said Saturday.

The sheriff’s office said the only person on board, 63-year-old Miles McGinnis, died in the plane crash near the Lincoln and Sublette County line. He and his single-engine Cessna 182 were reported missing a week ago when it failed to arrive in Pinedale on the afternoon of Nov. 17.

McGinnis was flying to Wyoming from Stevensville, the Jackson Hole News and Guide reported.

An air crew from Teton County found the wreckage more than a mile from the location of the last radar contact with the plane, in the Wyoming Range, and a ground crew hiked to the crash site. The sheriff’s office said search crews had been in that area of the Upper Hoback earlier in the week but the debris field had been covered by snow, which melted during recent warmer temperatures.

Search and rescue teams from both counties had spent the past week searching the area for the La Barge pilot and his single-engine Cessna. The Sublette County Sheriff’s Office began distributing fliers Wednesday for help from hunters and hikers.

Authorities plan to recover the body Sunday. Federal transportation and aviation officials will investigate the crash.

http://missoulian.com


PINEDALE, Wyo. — Officials have identified the pilot of a small plane that went missing Saturday over rugged terrain in western Wyoming.

The Sublette County Sheriff's Office says 63-year-old Myles McGinnis of LaBarge, Wyoming, was the only occupant of the Cessna 182 that left Stevensville, Montana, on Saturday. The plane was bound for Pinedale but disappeared from radar between Jackson and Bondurant.

Public Information Officer Steve Smith of the sheriff's office says two search planes and a helicopter were searching for the McGinnis plane on Tuesday. Temporary flight restrictions are in place over the search area.

More searchers on the ground are traveling by foot and by snow machine. Nearly two feet of new snow has fallen in the search area since Saturday afternoon.


http://missoulian.com

Cessna 150F, N8000S: Accident occurred November 20, 2012 in Red Oak, Iowa

http://registry.faa.gov/N8000S

NTSB Identification: CEN13CA087 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 20, 2012 in Red Oak, IA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/29/2013
Aircraft: CESSNA 150F, registration: N8000S
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot was on the third leg of a VFR solo cross country flight. His intent was to do a touch-and-go landing and then return to his initial departure airport. During his first and second approaches, he executed go-around maneuvers due to what he described as turbulence when the airplane came into ground effect. During the third approach, he landed to the left of centerline and the airplane began to skid to the left. The student pilot stated that he applied the wrong rudder correction and the airplane went off the runway. He added power to try to pull up and the right wing stalled. The left wing hit the ground and the airplane came to rest nose down in a bean field adjacent to the runway. Both wings sustained substantial damage. The student pilot had a total of 25 flight hours in the airplane, with 4.2 hours as pilot-in-command (solo). The wind was calm at the time of the accident. Postaccident examination of the airplane did not reveal any evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction or abnormalities.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The loss of control while landing due to the solo student pilot's delay to execute a go-around and his improper control inputs during a bounced landing.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 8000S        Make/Model: C150      Description: 150, A150, Commuter, Aerobat
  Date: 11/20/2012     Time: 1420

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: RED OAK   State: IA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, WENT OFF THE RUNWAY INTO A FIELD, RED OAK, IA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: DES MOINES, IA  (CE01)                Entry date: 11/21/2012 
 

http://registry.faa.gov/N8000S


 
Photo courtesy Montgomery County Emergency Management Director Brian Hamman.



Photo courtesy Montgomery County Emergency Management Director Brian Hamman.


Photo courtesy Montgomery County Emergency Management Director Brian Hamman.

Emergency crews from the Red Oak Fire Department this (Tuesday) morning responded to a reported airplane crash at the Red Oak Airport. Emergency Manager Brian Hamman reports the fire department was dispatched at around 8:30-a.m.
 
Crews arriving on scene found a single engine aircraft that appeared to have gone off the runway during landing and entered a bean field in the middle of the airport complex. The pilot and single occupant of the aircraft was outside the aircraft walking around. The unidentified pilot was uninjured in the crash that involved a 1965 Fixed Wing Single-Engine Cessna Model 150F registered to Call One Incorporated, out of Clarinda.

Hamman says the airport was closed for a short period of time while emergency crews were on the runway. At this time the scene has been turned over to the FAA for investigation. The Red Oak Fire Dept was assisted on scene by the Red Oak Police Dept, Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, Montgomery County Emergency Management Agency, City of Red Oak officials and airport authorities.

Around 8:30 Tuesday morning, the Red Oak Fire Department responded to the Red Oak Airport for a reported plane crash.


Crews arrived on the scene and found a single engine aircraft which appeared to have gone off the runway during landing, and stopped in a bean field in the middle of the airport complex. The pilot was the only person on board, and was outside the aircraft walking around with no injuries.

The aircraft involved is a 1965 Cessna 150F, registered in Clarinda, Iowa.

The airport closed for a short time while emergency crews were on the runway. The scene was handed off to the FAA for investigation.

The Red Oak Fire Dept was assisted on scene by the Red Oak Police Dept, Montgomery County Sheriff's Office, Montgomery County Emergency Management Agency, City of Red Oak officials and airport authorities. 


(Red Oak) -- The pilot of an airplane escaped injury after a plane crash in Red Oak. 

 According to Montgomery County Emergency Management Coordinator Brian Hamman, the Red Oak Fire Department was dispatched to the scene of the crash at around 8:30 Tuesday morning. A single-engine aircraft had gone off the runway during landing at the Red Oak Airport, coming to rest in the middle of a beanfield in the middle of the airport complex. The pilot, who was the plane's sole occupant, has not been identified.

 The airport was closed for a brief period while emergency crews were on the runway. The FAA is currently handling the investigation. Fire officials were assisted at the scene by Red Oak Police, the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office, the Montgomery County Emergency Management Agency, officials with the city of Red Oak, and airport authorities.

Learners boost Robinson R22 crash rate: Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand

 

Despite the prominence of Robinson R22 helicopters in crash statistics - further highlighted by the recent death of a Queenstown pilot near Wanaka - the Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand (CAA) has no specific safety concerns about the make of helicopter, providing it is used within its parameters.

Figures released by the CAA show the accident rate in R22 helicopters - about 20 accidents per 100,000 flying hours - is almost double the overall New Zealand-registered helicopter accident rate, estimated at just over 10 accidents per 100,000 flying hours.

CAA corporate communications manager Mike Richards said the higher-than-average accident rate for the R22 could be mostly accounted for by the large amount of training carried out in the machines, which meant they were often flown by inexperienced pilots or students.

"They have a higher proportion of learner drivers than bigger, more expensive, machines," Mr Richards said. "There are also occasions where they are used at, and in some instances beyond, their design limits."

CAA had "no particular safety concerns about this helicopter type when it is operated as intended by the manufacturer and within its design, maintenance and flight parameters".

There were 62 R22 accidents in New Zealand in the past 10 years.

The total number of accidents for all other helicopter makes over the same period was 122.

Fatalities occurred in nine of the 62 R22 accidents, five of which were in the Otago-Southland region (see fact box).

The most recent was on November 8, when Queenstown pilot Julian Kramer (52), also known as Julianne, died while flying a friend's R22 during a private flight over the Criffel Range.

Wanaka Helicopters owner Simon Spencer-Bower, regarded as the world's most experienced R22 pilot, shared the CAA's view.

He said because R22s were the lowest-cost helicopter to rent and fly, there were plenty in use, particularly by "low-houred" pilots.

"Most of the people who learn to fly around the world, probably 70% to 80%, are training in the Robinson helicopter," he said.

"They're not always crashing; it's just that there's a lot being used. I think now they're ... one of the most prolific helicopters in the world."

While the R22 had a big safety margin between its normal operations and its limits, he agreed that was sometimes compromised.

"Someone might exceed the limitations of the helicopter for whatever reason, but that's not unique to a Robbie."

Mr Spencer-Bower rated the R22 one of the most reliable makes of helicopter in the world in terms of its mechanics.

"I sit in them all day and I have over 40,000 hours in them and they've never let me down.

"They are a wonderfully reliable aircraft."

There are 154 R22s on the New Zealand register, making it the second-most-popular helicopter in the country behind its big brother, the R44, of which there are 170 registered.

Mr Richards said it could be a year before the final CAA report into the crash that killed Mr Kramer was complete.


 Mounting toll
 
Fatal Robinson R22 accidents in Otago-Southland:
 
March 5, 2006: Wanaka pilot Keith McKenzie (29), of Canada, and passenger American tourist Jonathan Stein (61), killed in crash on Homestead Peak, near Wanaka. 

November 1, 2008: Haast pilot Morgan Saxton (31) killed during routine flight between Haast and Wanaka. 

October 14, 2010: Bluff pilot and instructor Jason Wright (29) and trainee pilot Avondale farmer Allan Munro (67) killed in crash in Bluff Harbour. 

April 27, 2011: Wanaka pilot and instructor Graham Stott (31) and trainee pilot Marcus Hoogvliet (21), of Queenstown, killed in crash at head of Arawhata River. 

November 8, 2012: Queenstown pilot Julian Kramer (52) killed in crash on Criffel Range, near Wanaka.

Story and photo:   http://www.odt.co.nz

Beechcraft C90A King Air, Cheyenne Ventures LLC, N702DK: Accident occurred November 20, 2012 in Roanoke, Virginia

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA065 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 20, 2012 in Roanoke, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/30/2014
Aircraft: BEECH C90A, registration: N702DK
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During the downwind leg of the traffic pattern at the destination airport, the pilots lowered the landing gear. The pilot then noticed that the right main landing gear (MLG) was not down and locked in position for landing. The flight crew made multiple attempts to get a down-and-locked indication without success, so the pilot decided to abort the landing and divert to another airport with longer runways. After executing the manual gear extension checklist, the flight crew made a low pass at the diversion airport, and the air traffic controller in the control tower advised that the landing gear appeared to be in the down position. During the landing, the touchdown was normal, and the airplane slowed normally; however, as the airplane exited the runway, the right MLG collapsed. Examination of the wreckage revealed that the right wing, right nacelle, and right wheel well had received substantial damage and that the right MLG, after collapsing, had punctured the right nacelle fuel tank.

The right MLG bearing actuator support bracket was made of aluminum. Examination of the right MLG revealed that the right MLG bearing actuator support bracket was broken and had separated from its mounting position. Multiple cracks in the bracket were visible, and, at the microscopic level, the cracks had shiny surfaces indicative of abrasion, and overload regions with a cloudy appearance. Essentially, with each cycle, whether it was with extension of the landing gear, retraction of the landing gear, or landing itself, the cracks were subjected to loading which caused them to continue to propagate until the entire assembly reached a point at which structural integrity was no longer present to hold the landing gear actuator. 

In December 2003, the airplane manufacturer issued a mandatory service bulletin to replace the right and left aluminum MLG bearing actuator support brackets with steel brackets and specified that the replacement of the brackets be accomplished "as soon as possible," but "no later than the next scheduled inspection, the next 200 flight hours or 24 months." The airplane manufacturer also requested that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issue an Airworthiness Directive (AD) based on the service bulletin. However, the FAA did not find an "unsafe condition" and did not issue an AD, which would have made compliance with the service bulleting mandatory.

Review of the airplane's maintenance records confirmed that the airplane owner and the operator had not had the new steel brackets installed. Further, the FAA has not issued an AD for the MLG bearing actuator support brackets.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the right main landing gear bearing actuator support brackets. Contributing to the accident was the owner's and operator's failure to comply with the airplane manufacturer's mandatory service bulletin and the Federal Aviation Administration's failure to issue an airworthiness directive.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On November 20, 2013, at 1030 eastern standard time, a Beech C90A, N702DK, operated by Dominion Aviation Services Incorporated, was substantially damaged during a landing gear collapse, after a precautionary landing, at Roanoke Regional Airport (ROA), Roanoke, Virginia. The pilot, copilot, and the two passengers were uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the air taxi flight conducted under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 which departed Chesterfield County Airport (FCI), Richmond, Virginia, originally destined for Montgomery Executive Airport (BCB), Blacksburg, Virginia.

According to the pilot, after departing FCI for BCB, the flight was uneventful until the landing gear was lowered while on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern for runway 12 at BCB, when the pilot realized that the right main landing gear was not down and locked in position for landing. The landing gear annunciator panel indicated that both the nose landing gear and left main landing gear were in the proper position but, the right main landing gear "green light" was not illuminated. 

The pilot and copilot then tested the light to ensure that it was operating properly and it illuminated when pressed. The landing gear "handle" was then moved to the up position with no change in the landing gear position indication. It was then was placed back into the "down" position with no change in indication. At this point the pilot decided to abort the landing. 

Further attempts to extend the right main landing gear were unsuccessful and the pilot made a decision to divert to ROA since the runways were longer than the ones at FCI or BCB. After executing the manual gear extension checklist the flight crew made a low pass down runway 24 at ROA and the air traffic controller who was in the control tower advised that from his vantage point it appeared the landing gear appeared to be in the down position. The pilot then made a decision to land without flaps and to shutdown the right engine and feather the propeller to minimize damage should the right main landing collapse. 

During the landing, the touchdown was normal and no "abnormal feelings" were observed. After applying the brakes and adding reverse thrust on the operating engine the airplane slowed normally, however as the airplane exited the runway, the right main landing gear collapsed.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and pilot records, the pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multi-engine land, commercial privileges for airplane single-engine land, and type ratings for the CA-212, and DHC-6. He also held a flight instructor rating for airplane single engine, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued on January 16, 2012. He reported that he had accrued 2,520 total hours of flight experience, 210 of which, was in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA and pilot records, the copilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multi-engine land, commercial privileges for airplane single-engine land, and a type rating for the RA-390S. He also held a flight instructor rating for airplane single engine, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued on August 20, 2012. He reported that he had accrued 4,783 total hours of flight experience, 2,664 of which, was in the accident airplane make and model.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a 6-seat, low wing, pressurized, twin engine airplane of conventional metal construction. It was equipped with retractable landing gear and was powered by two Pratt & Whitney PT6-21 reverse flow turboprop engines each capable of producing 550 shaft horsepower. It could fly 1,277 nautical miles with reserve fuel, at cruise speeds up to 247 knots true airspeed, and climb to altitudes in excess of 32,000 feet. 

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1990.

According to the operator, the airplane was added to their 14 CFR Part 135 operating certificate on April 30, 2007.

According to airplane maintenance records, the airplane's most recent Approved Aircraft Inspection Program inspection was completed on March 29, 2012. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accrued approximately 5,086 total hours of operation, and the engines had accrued approximately 1,490 total hours of operation since major overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The recorded weather at ROA at 1054 included: winds calm, 10 miles visibility, few clouds at 11,000 feet, temperature 8 degrees C, dew point 3 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.17 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Roanoke Regional Airport was a tower controlled public use airport. It had two runways configured in a 16/34 and 06/24 configuration. Runway 24 was asphalt, grooved, and in good condition. The total length was 6,800 feet long and 150 feet wide. It was equipped with runway end identifier lights, and was marked with non-precision markings that were in good condition.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the wreckage revealed that the Right Main Landing Gear (MLG) after collapsing had punctured the right nacelle tank, and the right wing, right nacelle, and right wheel well had received substantial damage. 

Examination of the Right MLG revealed that the Right MLG Bearing Actuator Support Bracket was broken, and had separated from its mounting position. Multiple cracks in the bracket were visible including a saw-tooth like crack along the fasteners. Discoloration also existed on the mounting surfaces around the fasteners on the outboard side of the bracket which attached it to the airplane's structure. Further examination of the Right MLG Bearing Actuator Support Bracket also revealed that it was made of aluminum, and examination of the cracks using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope revealed shiny surfaces indicative of abrasion, and an overload region with a cloudy appearance. 

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Mandatory Service Bulletin

According to FAA records, on September 18, 2003, while on approach to Piedmont triad International Airport (GSO), Greensboro, North Carolina, the pilot of a Beech C90A; N200TR lowered the landing gear for landing but could not get a right main landing gear down and locked indication. Several attempts were made by the pilot to get the landing gear down and locked indication, but they were unsuccessful. The pilot then performed a low pass for a visual inspection from the tower to help ascertain if the landing gear was in the down position. The pilot was advised by the tower and aircraft on the taxiway that it appeared to be so. The airplane landed without incident but, during the turnoff from the runway onto the taxiway, the right main landing gear collapsed. Examination of the airplane revealed that a MLG Bearing Actuator Support Bracket was found, "broken from its mounts."

Subsequent to this incident, the airplane manufacturer received reports of cracks in the MLG Bearing Actuator Support Brackets on two airplanes. Investigation of the cracks by the airplane manufacturer discovered that the cracks could cause the main landing gear to bind, preventing normal extension and retraction of the main landing gear which could lead to an inability to fully extend and lock the main landing gear.

As a result, in December of 2003, the airplane manufacturer issued Mandatory Service Bulletin (MSB) 32-3345 to replace the aluminum, MLG Bearing Actuator Support Brackets with steel brackets, for both the left and right main landing gears, to improve bracket support and service life of the assembly. This was distributed to authorized service centers, owners of record on the FAA Aircraft Registration Branch List, and individuals and organizations who had a publications subscription with the manufacturer. Furthermore, they specified in the MSB that the replacement of the brackets be accomplished "as soon as possible" but, "no later than the next scheduled inspection, the next 200 flight hours or 24 months" from the last day of the month that the service bulletin was issued, whichever occurred first. 

Review of Maintenance Records

Review of maintenance records revealed that on the day before the accident, the right main landing gear actuator was removed as it was leaking. It was replaced with an overhauled unit. Rigging procedures were performed, an operational and leak check was performed, the hydraulic reservoir was serviced, and the landing gear system was "exercised" to purge air from the system. No leaks were detected by maintenance personnel, and the airplane was returned to service.

Postaccident testing and teardown of the overhauled actuator revealed, that it performed per the manufacturer's specifications. No evidence of any binding or of any preimpact failure or malfunction of the actuator was discovered. Further review of the maintenance records did reveal however, that the airplane had not received the new steel bracket installation as required under the MSB. 

ORGANIZATIONAL AND MANAGEMENT INFORMATION

In 1983, Dominion Aviation was founded as Old Dominion Air Charter, initially providing aircraft management and charter. 

In 1991, Dominion Aviation was awarded the contract to operate the fixed base operation (FBO) at the airport when Chesterfield County, Virginia privatized operations at FCI, 

At the time of this report, in addition to charter, Dominion Aviation was providing a range of FBO services including refueling, maintenance, aircraft management, flight training, aircraft rental, and hangar leasing. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Request for Airworthiness directive 

On December 3, 2003, the airplane manufacturer requested that the FAA issue an Airworthiness Directive (AD) based on the MSB. Review of FAA records revealed, that even though the FAA agreed with the issuance of the MSB by the airplane manufacturer, the FAA did not find an "unsafe condition as required by Title 14 of the CFR, Federal Aviation Regulations, Part 39" and did not issue an AD. 

FAA Order 8620.2A

On November 5, 2007, the FAA issued Order 8620.2A which established a national policy for applicability and enforcement of manufacturer's data, and provided information and guidance to aviation safety inspectors (ASI) regarding the applicability and enforcement of Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) data listed on FAA type certificate data sheets (TCDS) and information and guidance regarding OEM maintenance manual material, Service Letters (SL), Service Bulletins (SB), and other maintenance or flight operations information including any material that has been identified or labeled by an OEM as "Mandatory."

According to the Order, 14 CFR Part 43.13(a) stated, in part, "Each person performing maintenance, alteration, or preventive maintenance on an aircraft, engine, propeller, or appliance shall use the methods, techniques, and practices prescribed in: 

1) The current manufacturer's maintenance manual or; 
2) Instructions for Continued Airworthiness prepared by its manufacturer, or; 
3) Other methods, techniques, and practices acceptable to the Administrator." 

According to the FAA, the language of section 43.13(a) clearly provides a person with three permissible options when performing maintenance, alterations, or preventive maintenance on a product. Section 43.13(a) does not provide an order of precedence for these three options. Further, although section 43.13(a) does not specifically address SB's or SL's, an OEM may legitimately incorporate an SB or SL into one of its maintenance manuals by reference. If it does so, the data specified, and the method, technique, or practice contained therein, may be acceptable to the Administrator. However, unless any method, technique, or practice prescribed by an OEM in any of its documents is specifically mandated by a regulatory document, such as Airworthiness Directive (AD), or specific regulatory language such as that in section 43.15(b); those methods, techniques, or practices are not mandatory. 

Safety Actions

At the time of this report, of the 393 C90As that were affected by the MSB, 305 airplanes had the aluminum MLG actuator support brackets replaced with steel brackets, 48 had not. As a result, in order to improve safety, in July, 2014, Textron Aviation released Beechcraft King Air Series Communique 2014-01 to remind owners and operators of the importance of complying with the MSB to replace the Aluminum MLG actuator support brackets with ones made of steel. 

On August 7, 2014, Dominion Aviation Services advised the NTSB that in order to improve safety they had reviewed all MSBs on all of their airplanes that were on their certificate after the accident, and aircraft that had been added to their certificate afterwards, had also been reviewed. They also advised though not required by the FAA, they would continue to review and analyze the pertinence of complying with MSBs and would include in their next revision of their Operations Manual this policy and procedure.


http://registry.faa.gov/N702DK 

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA065 
 Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 20, 2012 in Roanoke, VA
Aircraft: BEECH C90A, registration: N702DK
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 20, 2013, at 1030 eastern standard time, a Beech C90A, N702DK, was substantially damaged during a landing gear collapse after a precautionary landing at Roanoke Regional Airport (ROA), Roanoke, Virginia. The pilot, copilot, and the two passengers were uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the air taxi flight conducted under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 which departed Chesterfield County Airport (FCI), Richmond, Virginia, originally destined for Montgomery Executive Airport (BCB), Blacksburg, Virginia.

According to the pilot, after departing FCI for BCB, the flight was uneventful until the landing gear was lowered while on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern for runway 12 at BCB, when the pilot realized that the right main landing gear was not down and locked in position for landing. The landing gear annunciator panel indicated that both the nose landing gear and left main landing gear were in the proper position but, the right main landing gear "green light" was not illuminated.

The pilot and copilot then tested the light to ensure that it was operating properly and it illuminated when pressed. The landing gear "handle" was then moved to the up position with no change in the landing gear position indication. It was then was placed back into the "down" position with no change in indication. At this point the pilot decided to abort the landing.

Further attempts to extend the right main landing gear were unsuccessful and the pilot made a decision to divert to ROA since the runways were longer than the ones at FCI or BCB. After executing the manual gear extension checklist the flight crew made a low pass down runway 24 at ROA and the air traffic controller who was in the control tower advised that from his vantage point it appeared the landing gear appeared to be in the down position. The pilot then made a decision to land without flaps and to shutdown the right engine and feather the propeller to minimize damage should the right main landing collapse.

During the landing the touchdown was normal and no "abnormal feelings" were observed. After applying the brakes and adding reverse thrust on the operating engine the airplane slowed normally however as the airplane exited the runway the right main landing gear collapsed.

Post accident examination of the airplane revealed that the right main landing gear actuator support bracket was broken and had separated from its mounting position. Further examination revealed the presence of discoloration on its mounting surfaces around the fasteners on the outboard side of the support bracket which attached it to the airplane's structure.

The right main landing gear actuator support bracket, and portions of the right main landing gear assembly were retained by the NTSB for further examination.





ROANOKE, Va.— The Roanoke Regional Airport is playing catch up after an emergency landing forced the airport to close its runways today. A small plane's landing gear collapsed around 10:30 this morning. 

 Because of this malfunction, no planes left or landed at the airport for 3-hours leaving passengers and their families playing the waiting game; on this a very busy travel holiday.

Chad Anderson, a pilot who witnessed the landing said "It looked sluggish. That's when I heard emergency equipment and it was very evident something was wrong."

The private plane came from outside of Richmond, heading to Blacksburg.  But, instead the pilot had to detour to Roanoke after learning there was trouble with his plane's landing gear.

Anderson says the pilot tried to turn and the gear snapped and the propeller hit the ground.

Initially, it looked like a quick clean up but it took longer than expected.  A big crane and tow truck were called in to help remove the disabled plane and spilled fuel that closed the runways.

While crews worked outside, inside people waited.  Roanoker James Gerstenmaier said he'd been waiting for over 2-hours for his son to arrive.

Trish Woodie from Lynchburg had been at the airport for a couple of hours leaving Lynchburg early in the morning to pick up family.

Jennifer Busch of Salem was hoping to make a connecting flight in Atlanta. Busch said "For someone who doesn't like to fly that much anyway, it makes extra anxiety."

________________________

A private King Air plane with four people on board crashed at the Roanoke Regional Airport Tuesday morning when its landing gear collapsed on touch down.    No one on board was injured and there was no fire.   The pilot had some warning before he landed that the landing gear might malfunction and radioed ahead to the tower.  Emergency crews were standing by when the plane touched down.

Both runways at the Roanoke Regional Airport were closed for about three hours.   The crash delayed two inbound flights and five outbound flights.




UPDATE: Roanoke Regional Airport says one runway should open within half an hour.

 Roanoke Regional Airport's Sherry Wallace now says the Roanoke Regional Airport runways could be closed for another two hours because of a plane crash there this morning.  A crane is on its way to remove a twin-engine King Air from the tarmac.

A private King Air plane with four people on board crashed at the Roanoke Regional Airport this morning when its landing gear collapsed on touch down.    No one one on board was injured and there was no fire.   The pilot had some warning before he landed and radioed ahead to the tower.  All the runways at the Roanoke Regional Airport are temporarily closed.

The landing gear appears to have collapsed when a twin engine plane landed at Roanoke Regional Airport this morning.  Emergency crews have responded.  There are no details yet on injuries.

Emergency crews are responding to the Roanoke Regional Airport where a small plane may have had a problem with landing gear as it landed. The plane and emergency crews are on the runway right now.

Editorial: Frontier Airlines' expanded flight offerings shows promise of Trenton Mercer Airport (KTTN), New Jersey

By Times of Trenton Editorial Board
on November 20, 2012 at 7:56 AM, updated November 20, 2012 at 7:57 AM 

No sooner had Frontier Airlines established operations at Trenton-Mercer Airport, airline officials announced an expansion of its twice a week service to Orlando.

The airline, which launched its inaugural flight late last week from the Ewing facility, also will add nonstop flights to Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers and Tampa, Fla., as well as New Orleans. 

The welcome news eases the sting of Streamline Airlines’ decision to quit the airport and its service to Boston. 

While Streamline catered primarily to business travelers and offered just the one destination, Frontier’s focus is trained on leisure travelers eager for a vacation or weekend of balmy weather away from the cold clench of winter. It may prove to be the airline -– and airport — of choice for families making a long-anticipated trip to one of the Orlando-area theme parks as it draws some passengers from Atlantic City or Lehigh Valley international airports.

And why not?

A Frontier Airlines official sees the airport as an undiscovered gem, valuable by virtue of its accessibility from New York and Philadelphia and spacious parking.

Passengers also will find value with low introductory fares until Nov. 29 made possible partially by a lack of the traffic that’s often apparent at other airports. Here, they won’t face the headaches of parking congestion, long lines at check-in or often tardy takeoffs.

“When you spend 30 minutes on a plane waiting to take off in Philadelphia, the pilots and flight attendants are being paid and the airplane is burning fuel,” Daniel Shurz, Frontier’s senior vice president for commercial, said in an interview with Times staffer Mike Davis. “All that unproductive time frustrates customers and makes flying out of those airports more expensive.”

Frontier’s new service also will open up the Mercer area to travelers from Florida and Louisiana. The region has a lot to offer; according to the state’s Division of Tourism and Travel, the county attracted more than $1 billion in tourism dollars and travel spending in 2010.

The airline’s investment and quick service additions could be a catalyst for other carriers. In the meantime, it certainly demonstrates recognition of the region’s potential.

“The expansion of Frontier is one more step in a series of steps we will take to develop this airport and the area as a whole,” Mercer County Executive Brian Hughes said last week.

Operating for almost a century, Trenton-Mercer Airport continues to act as an economic engine for the area with tax revenue and jobs it provides.

We’re glad to see an expanded flight plan taking hold.

http://www.nj.com/times-opinion

http://www.airnav.com/airport/KTTN

http://www.state.nj.us

GE Aviation acquires 2 manufacturing firms

GE Aviation has acquired locally based Morris Technologies and Rapid Quality Manufacturing, precision manufacturing companies that make everything from parts for unmanned military vehicles to hip replacement prototypes.

Terms were not disclosed.

The two privately held companies employ about 130 people locally in additive manufacturing, an automated process for creating rapid prototypes and end-use production components.

Evendale-based GE Aviation says the acquisition allows the jet engine maker to expand its engineering and manufacturing capabilities to meet growing demand over the next five years.

“Morris Technologies and Rapid Quality Manufacturing are parts of our investment in emerging manufacturing technologies,” Colleen Athans, vice president and general manager of the Supply Chain Division at GE Aviation, said in a statement.

“Our ability to develop state of the art manufacturing processes for emerging materials and complex design geometry is critical to our future. We are so fortunate to have Morris Technologies and Rapid Quality Manufacturing just minutes from our headquarters. We know them well.”

Founded by Cincinnati natives Greg Morris, Wendell Morris and Bill Noack in 1994, Morris Technologies in Sharonville and Rapid Quality Manufacturing in West Chester have supplied parts to GE Aviation for several years. The companies have made everything from lightweight parts for unmanned aerial vehicles for the U.S. military to hip replacement prototypes for the medical field.

The Sharonville and West Chester facilities will become part of GE Aviation’s global network of manufacturing operations.

In a statement, GE Aviation said it already has contracted with the companies to produce components for the best-selling LEAP jet engine being developed by CFM International, a 50/50 joint company of GE and Snecma (SAFRAN) of France. The LEAP engine, which is scheduled to enter service in the middle of this decade on three different narrow-body aircraft, has received more than 4,000 engine orders before the first full engine has even gone to test.

Morris Technologies and Rapid Quality Manufacturing focus on the aerospace, energy, oil & gas, and medical industries.


http://news.cincinnati.com

Beechcraft 35-B33 Debonair, Westchester Flying Club, N8519M: Accident occurred November 17, 2012 in White Plains, New York

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board -  Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N8519M
 
NTSB Identification: ERA13LA060  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 17, 2012 in White Plains, NY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/23/2013
Aircraft: BEECH 35B33, registration: N8519M
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On final approach for landing, the pilot observed that the airplane was high, and he performed a slip in order to lose altitude. During the maneuver, the engine lost power, and the pilot performed a forced landing to a parking lot. Postaccident examination revealed the fuel selector switch was in the off position; however, the pilot said that, after the accident, he turned the fuel selector from an unknown position to OFF and that he could not recall the prior position. The examination also found that the right wing fuel tank contained about 14 gallons of fuel, and the left tank was empty. Although the left wing tank was ruptured during impact, no evidence of fuel leakage or odor was found at the site. The airplane was equipped with a non-standard engine and propeller and did not have a Supplemental Type Certificate for the installation. Further, the pilot did not have fuel consumption information for the current engine-propeller installation; thus, the pilot likely misjudged the fuel consumption for the flight. It is likely that the fuel selector was positioned to the left tank, which had become very low on fuel. The slip maneuver aggravated the low fuel condition of the left wing fuel tank, and the airplane was starved of fuel, which resulted in the loss of engine power. Additionally, the pilot's failure to utilize the auxiliary fuel pump per the pilot operating handbook during air start most likely prevented the engine from restarting. Postaccident examination revealed no anomalies that would have precluded the normal operation of the airplane or engine components.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper fuel management and his excessive slip maneuver, which led to fuel starvation and a total loss of engine power, and his failure to activate the electric boost pump during the attempted engine restart.

On November 17, 2012, about 0005 eastern standard time, a Beechcraft B33, N8519M, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power while on approach to Westchester County Airport (HPN), White Plains, New York. The private pilot incurred minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Rock Airport (9G1), Tarentum, Pennsylvania at about 2150. The business flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot conducted a flight from HPN to 9G1 prior to the accident flight, after which he did not refuel the airplane. The pilot stated that he departed 9G1 for HPN with approximately 47 gallons of fuel.

As the airplane was on final approach to runway 34 at HPN, at an altitude of 1,000-1,500 feet mean sea level, the pilot noticed that he was above the glide path for a normal landing and "performed a brief slip to lose altitude quicker" During the slip, the pilot decreased propeller pitch, and the engine made an unusual "roaring" sound. The pilot declared an emergency on the airport’s common traffic advisory frequency, switched the fuel selector from the left fuel tank to the right fuel tank, and performed the emergency checklist for an engine failure by memory before attempting to restart the engine. The pilot maneuvered the airplane towards a lighted parking lot and executed a forced landing about one-half of a nautical mile short of runway 34. After egress from the airplane, the pilot stated that he returned back inside the cockpit to turn the fuel selector off. During postaccident interviews, the pilot could not remember from what position he turned the fuel selector to the off position. The pilot did not report any preflight mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.

Examination of the airplane revealed damage to the firewall, left wing root and wing spar. Flight control cable continuity was established from the cockpit controls to all the control surfaces. Although the left fuel tank was ruptured during impact with a tree, no fuel pooling, leakage, or odor were present at the accident site. Examination of the cockpit indicators, controls, and switches revealed the fuel selector switch was in the off position, the throttle was in the full power position, the fuel mixture control lever was in the full rich position, and the propeller control lever was in the full out position. The auxiliary fuel boost pump switch was in the off position.


The 2256 recorded weather at HPN included wind from 360 degrees at 8 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 3 degrees C, dew point 5 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.41 inches of mercury.

The low-wing, retractable-gear airplane was powered by a Continental IO-520-BB, 285- horsepower engine, which was equipped with a 3-bladed McCauley propeller. Review of maintenance records revealed that an annual inspection was completed on June 6, 2012, at a total time of 11,298.5 hours. At the time of the accident, the engine total time was 2865.3 hours, with 809.8 hours since last major overhaul.

Examination of the fuel system was performed by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors. The main fuel screen was removed, and residual fuel was found in the screen. The fuel line from the firewall to the engine-driven fuel pump was removed, and no residual fuel was found in the line. The engine-driven fuel pump was removed, and the drive coupler was inspected and found intact. The fuel control unit, fuel flow transducer, fuel manifold valve, and all associated fuel lines were removed and exhibited no residual fuel. Approximately 14 gallons of fuel was drained from the right wing.

Data extracted from the airplane’s fuel totalizer by the NTSB vehicle recorder laboratory indicated that the airplane consumed 54.2 gallons of fuel during the accident flight and the flight prior, and had 19.8 gallons of total fuel remaining on board at the time of the accident, three gallons of which was unusable.

According to FAA records, the engine-propeller combination installed on the accident airplane was not authorized in the type certificate data sheet for a Beechcraft B-33, and the airplane did not have a Supplemental Type Certificate or Flight Manual Supplement for the installation. The pilots operating handbook (POH) for the accident airplane did not include any information, including fuel consumption, for this engine and propeller combination. According to the POH, the maximum duration for a slip maneuver is 20 seconds for an airplane with unbaffled main fuel cells, with which the accident airplane was equipped. The POH also stated that, during an air start procedure, the auxiliary fuel pump must be turned to the on position until power is regained.


 NTSB Identification: ERA13LA060 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 17, 2012 in White Plains, NY
Aircraft: BEECH 35-B33, registration: N8519M
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 17, 2012, about 0005 eastern standard time, a Beechcraft B33, N8519M, operated by a private individual, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following loss of engine power while on approach to Westchester County Airport (HPN), White Plains, New York. The private pilot incurred minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Rock Airport (9G1), Tarentum, Pennsylvania.

The pilot stated that while turning on to final for the instrument landing system approach to runway 34 at HPN, and while at 1000-1500 feet mean sea level, he noticed that he was above the glide path for a normal landing. The pilot said that he "performed a brief slip to lose altitude quicker." It was then that he pushed the propeller control forward and the engine made an unusual noise; a "roaring", as he described. The pilot declared an emergency on the common traffic advisory frequency. The pilot switched from the left fuel tank feed to the right fuel tank feed and deduced that he was not going to be able make a safe landing on the runway and performed the emergency checklist for an engine failure by memory; as he stated. The pilot lined up on a lighted parking lot and executed an emergency landing about one half of a nautical mile short of runway 34.

Examination of the airplane by Federal Aviation Administration inspectors revealed damage to the firewall, left wing root and wing spar. Although the left wing tank was punctured, no fuel pooling, and no leakage or fumes were present at the accident site. FAA inspectors were also able to drain 14 gallons of fuel from the right wing tank.

The airplane is equipped with a J. P. Instruments Fuel Scan 450, designed to record various parameters with the fuel system onboard the airplane. The FAA inspectors recovered the instrument from the airplane and forwarded it to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, DC, for data download.



 


Beechcraft 35-B33 Debonair (N8519M) in a parking lot off King Street in Rye Brook around midnight Friday.


Judah Holstein did not see his life flash before his eyes late Friday when he realized his plane couldn’t make it to the Westchester County Airport

 Rather, the 43-year-old father of three, vice president of the Westchester Flying Club in Purchase, said his sole focus was landing his single-engine aircraft without taking out himself or any people or property on the ground.

“Once I recognized I was not going to be able to land safely at the airport, the parking lot was the safest option I found at the time,” Holstein said Monday. “That’s where I attempted to land. If not for that tree, it would have turned out a little better.”

Holstein, who has hundreds of hours of flight experience, radioed ahead to declare an emergency in the air.

After clipping a tree, the Beechcraft landed hard on its belly — with one wheel lying on the hardtop near the nose — in a corporate park’s lot on King Street, less than a mile south of the airport.

“The tree wasn’t real tall, probably 15 to 20 feet tall,” Holstein said Monday. “I didn’t see it until there wasn’t much I could do about it.”

He cut his eyebrow on the airplane’s sun visor and also suffered a minor back injury.

He was treated at Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla. Monday, he returned to work as president of Miracom Computer Corp. in Eastchester.

His employees showered him with attention, amazed he escaped without much more than a scratch.

Holstein, who was interviewed by representatives for the Federal Aviation Administration, said he couldn’t share more specifics of the crash because the investigation is open.

The pilot was returning from a round-trip flight between Westchester County Airport and Rock Airport in Pittsburgh, a 560-nautical-mile trip.

He arrived at Rock at 6:22 p.m. and took off on the return flight at 9:53 p.m., according to FlightAware, a plane-tracking website.

He said he’d taken the route before, and had flown twice before that in the past week, to Washington, D.C. and Norwood, Mass.

“I just followed my training,” he said of the emergency landing. “My number one priority was making sure no one got hurt, or too hurt. A little cut in the eyebrow isn’t too bad, all things considered.”

Brian McCloskey, president of the Westchester Flying Club, said Holstein left a voice mail message with him immediately after landing.

“He was still in the parking lot and he sounded a little shaken up,” McCloskey said. “He said he had a cut on his forehead and that his back was a little sore.”

Holstein said he feels lucky. He expects he’ll fly again.

“I’m pretty pragmatic generally,” he said. “I’ve dealt with plenty of things in my life, so I’ll deal with this too.“