Sunday, June 24, 2018

Cessna A185E Skywagon 185, N2231T: Incident occurred June 23, 2018 in Jefferson, Lincoln County, Maine

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland

Aircraft crashed into a swamp.


http://registry.faa.gov/N2231T


Date: 23-JUN-18
Time: 22:30:00Z
Regis#: N2231T
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: A185E
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: JEFFERSON
State: MAINE

A federal look into Saturday's crash of a seaplane into a Jefferson swamp may be over in days and may or may not yield a report, a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board said Monday.

In other developments Monday, Wiscasset Municipal Airport Manager Rick Tetrev confirmed the plane is based at the town-owned facility on Chewonki Neck Road.

And Lincoln County Sheriff's Lt. Brendan Kane said the owner and others worked Sunday to remove the plane. Traffic was down to one lane at one point, due to the use of a crane, Kane said. He believed the owner planned to return it to the airport, he said.

Authorities have said the pilot and his passenger, both of Newcastle but not further identified, got out of the upside down plane unaided and unhurt.

Because no one died or was seriously injured, the plane's removal before the federal examination was OK and is not unusual, NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway said in a phone interview from Washington, D.C.

Jefferson Fire Chief Walter Morris said representatives of both the Federal Aviation Administration and NTSB told him via phone Sunday, the plane was not to be disturbed. He said he contacted Lincoln County Communications to tell the sheriff's office what he was told. Kane said the FAA told the sheriff's office it was fine with the plane being removed.

Holloway said the FAA would be looking into the crash, including interviewing the pilot, and would relay its information to the NTSB. A preliminary report would follow within about 10 days, if there is one, Holloway said.


That may depend on the damage, if any, to the plane, he said. "Until we have further information, it's up in the air," he said about the likelihood of a report or any further investigation.




JEFFERSON — A group of about a dozen people worked for hours Sunday to pull a small plane out of a bog a few hundred yards south of the Augusta Road where it had crashed Saturday afternoon.

Jefferson Fire Chief Walter Morris said Sunday that an eyewitness saw the plane, a Cessna 185, flying low over the trees just before 5:30 p.m.

“He thought it would not end well,” Morris said.

The plane, equipped with pontoons, came down in the bog, eventually striking an obstacle, causing it to flip over its nose and land on its roof.

When the Jefferson Fire Department arrived on the scene with 19 firefighters and emergency medical technicians, Morris said, two people had gotten out of the plane and were not injured. They were checked out at the scene.

Because firefighters smelled fuel, the crash was reported to the state Department of Environmental Protection.

The bog is adjacent to Dyer River, which flows into Dyer Long Pond, just west of the north end of Damariscotta Lake, Morris said.

Morris said he did not have the names of the two men in the plane.

A call to the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office was not returned Sunday.

The Federal Aviation Administration’s registry shows the plane belongs to David Hewitt of Newcastle. Attempts to reach Hewitt Sunday were unsuccessful.

Joe Holland captured the aftermath of the crash on video using his drone.

Holland is the owner of the Jefferson Scoop, an ice cream shop about 3 miles away from the crash site. He was hosting a fundraiser for the Jefferson Fire Department on Saturday when the call of the crash came in.

Holland said he followed the department down the road, and at the request of Morris and with the approval of the Lincoln County Sheriff’s deputy on scene, he put his drone in the air to survey the crash site.

Normally, deploying a drone over the scene of an emergency is illegal, he said.

“The chief asked me to send it up to see if anyone was hurt,” Holland said.

The drone also looked for the presence of leaking fuel and debris, and to help find an optimal route for the first responders to the crash to get back out of the bog; it was not how they went in.

“That’s a bog with no bottom,” Holland said. “Any misstep could get you up to your waist (in the bog).”

Holland said people who live on North Mountain Road reported hearing the plane stall and restart three times before the plane went down.

“It looks like he was heading for Dyer Long Pond,” he said.

On Sunday, Holland said about 15 people were gathered at the bog to pull the plane out, first working to flip the plane right-side up, then pulling the plane across the bog with the help of trucks from Jordan Lumber in Kingfield to draw it close to the road embankment.

Holland has posted the video to YouTube and plans to post a second video of the recovery.

Morris said the crash was reported to the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Kathleen Bergen, a spokeswoman with the FAA, said Sunday that the aircraft owner needs approval from the FAA or the NTSB to move the aircraft. The aircraft has to be removed from the water and transported to a hangar at a local airport for the investigation and aircraft owners are responsible for having the aircraft moved.

Story and video ➤ https://www.centralmaine.com









Jefferson Fire and Rescue was having a fundraiser at Jefferson Scoop when Lincoln County Communications called the agency out to a plane crash near Augusta Road about 5 p.m. Saturday, Fire Chief Walter Morris said. The seaplane's pilot and lone passenger, both men, got themselves out of the upside down plane, got checked at the scene by Waldoboro Ambulance paramedics and did not need to go to a hospital, Morris said in a phone interview Saturday evening.

Morris said he had called for equipment to carry the occupants out of the swampy area Dyer Stream runs through, but they were able to walk out.

Names were not available. The two are both from Newcastle, Lincoln County Sheriff's Sgt. Aaron Beck said by phone later.

An Augusta Road motorist reported the crash via cell phone after seeing the plane flying very low then appearing to nose-dive into the swamp, Morris said.

Jefferson Scoop owner Joe Holland aided the effort with his drone that provided an aerial view of the scene; it was the first time the department involved a drone in an emergency, Morris said.

"It was extremely beneficial." Morris has been learning about the help drones can be, including hearing about it at a York County fire chiefs' meeting where it was discussed in connection with the recent 300-acre fire in the Wells-Kennebunk area, he said.

Morris said he may compile a resource list of drone owners willing to help in a response as Holland did Saturday.

"That is a great idea," Holland said in a separate phone interview Saturday night. He has had the drone about a year and has found the technology helpful when he fished professionally across the nation, he said. Holland estimated he had the drone about 400 feet above the crash scene.

He said he'd held the event at the business to raise funds and awareness about the department and all it does. "I feel they're the heroes in town."

Asked what he was feeling that night about having the fundraiser and then using his drone to aid in the effort at the crash scene, Holland said: "It felt awesome to be able to help them in more than one way."

After the crash, the business’s Facebook page had a post reading: “Please pray for all those involved as our first responders make their way out into the swamp.”

Lincoln County Sheriff's Office also responded and was going to take care of notifying the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board, Morris said.

He could not see the extent of any damage to the plane, which he believed was still sitting in the swamp that night, he said.

Morris said Maine Department of Environmental Protection was notified of the possibility fuel may have leaked into Dyer Stream. Three firefighters who trudged about half a mile to the crash smelled fuel, but saw no sheen, he said

Story and video ➤ http://www.penbaypilot.com

Cessna 172L Skyhawk, N7239Q: Fatal accident occurred June 22, 2018 near Diamondhead Airport (66Y), Hancock County, Mississippi

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N7239Q
Location: Diamondhead, MS
Accident Number: ERA18FA174
Date & Time: 06/22/2018, 0700 CDT
Registration: N7239Q
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 22, 2018, at 0700 central daylight time, a Cessna 172L, N7239Q, was destroyed during a collision with trees, powerlines, and terrain during the initial climb after takeoff from Diamondhead Airport (66Y), Diamondhead, Mississippi. The student pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the solo instructional flight which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the student pilot's flight instructor, who was also the owner/operator of the airplane, the purpose of the flight was to conduct solo traffic pattern work at 66Y. The student pilot was to conduct full-stop landings and taxi back to the approach end of the runway before initiating the next takeoff.

A police detective witnessed the airplane while he was traveling westbound on the interstate near the departure end of runway 36. He said that the airplane appeared over the interstate traveling "slowly" northbound, just above treetop height.

With a model of an airplane in his hand, the witness displayed the airplane crossing the roadway as the nose pitched up from a level pitch attitude. Once the airplane was across the interstate and above the trees on the north side, the nose gradually pitched down as the airplane rolled and turned to the left until it was out of view below the trees. The witness stated his car was directly abeam the airplane at that time, and he had traveled about 1/2 -mile past the accident site when he saw smoke above the trees.

Diamondhead Airport was at 14 ft elevation and positioned between Interstate 10 and Cutoff Bayou. Runway 36/18 was 3,800 ft long and 75 ft wide. Runway 36 ended immediately prior to Interstate 10, which was a four-lane divided highway oriented east-west.

Preliminary radar data obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) depicted four left-hand traffic patterns were completed prior to the accident flight. The airplane was first acquired on radar at 0628:28. At 0658:24, near the conclusion of the fourth approach, the airplane was at 225 ft mean sea level (msl), and 1,100 ft prior to the approach end of the runway. There were no further radar targets identified as the accident airplane. The witness statement and the proximity of the accident site to the runway placed the airplane in an area consistently below radar coverage.

The wreckage was examined at the site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was oriented about 210° and was about 75 ft in length. The airplane came to rest upright and was oriented 098°. Several pieces of angularly cut wood, some greater than 8-inches in diameter, were scattered around the airplane.

The cockpit, cabin area, right wing, and the empennage were consumed by a postcrash fire. The left wing displayed uniform crushing along the leading edge. Striation marks and tearing along the leading edge consistent with a wire contact were visible. The tail section showed thermal damage but remained mostly intact.

The engine was exposed, the propeller remained attached, and each displayed significant thermal damage. The right magneto and oil filter were separated from the engine, and the left magneto remained secure in its mounts.

The engine was rotated by hand through the vacuum pump pad. Continuity was confirmed through the accessory section to the valvetrain and power train. Thumb suction and compression were observed at all cylinders except for the No. 2 cylinder.

The No. 2 cylinder intake valve appeared not fully seated. The cylinder was removed and leak-checked with water. Water drained from the intake port with only valve-spring tension applied to the valve stem. The valve was "staked" using a mallet and when water was again poured into the interior of the cylinder, no liquid was observed draining out of the intake port. Coking on the intake valve stem was consistent with the valve in an open position while exposed to the postimpact fire.

Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit area to the flight control surfaces or their associated hardware and attachment points. The flap actuator jackscrew was intact, and measured in its as-found condition. Measurement of the exposed threads corresponded with a full-flap, 40-degree-extention setting.

The student pilot was issued an FAA third-class medical and student pilot certificate in September 2017. A review of his logbook revealed he had accrued 169.1 total hours of flight experience. His first solo endorsement was dated June 12, 2018 after he had accrued 164.9 total hours of flight experience.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1972. Its most recent annual inspection was completed October 1, 2017 at 4,898.4 total aircraft hours.

At 0650, the weather recorded at Stennis International Airport (HSA), 3 miles west of the accident site included clear skies and calm winds. The temperature was 24°C, and the dew point was 24°C. The altimeter setting was 29.93 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N7239Q
Model/Series: 172 L
Aircraft Category:Airplane 
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHSA, 23 ft msl
Observation Time: 1150 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 24°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Diamondhead, MS (66Y)
Destination: Diamondhead, MS (66Y)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 30.369167, -89.390556

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Hancock County Coroner Jim Faulk, center, watches as firefighters put out a fire at the scene of a small plane crash in Diamondhead on Friday, June 22, 2018.



A student pilot who died in a fiery plane crash near Diamondhead has been identified as 69-year-old Premnathan "Prem" Naidoo, according to his family.

Everyone involved in the investigation of the Friday morning crash in woods just north of Interstate 10 believes the victim was Naidoo, Hancock County Coroner Jim Faulk said. But officials are still working on a positive ID via autopsy and dental records.

Before the crash, Prem Naidoo sent a text message to his instructor saying he planned to fly out, his son Terry Naidoo said.

The small plane took off about 6:30 a.m. to fly around the area, officials have said, and it crashed less than a mile from the airport.

It was on fire and entangled in a power line when first responders reached the wooded area.

The crash

Diamondhead Fire Chief Jerry Dubuisson has told the Sun Herald there was no radio traffic of a problem with the plane before it crashed.

The student pilot was flying alone, officials said. A student pilot may fly solo after passing tests given by a flight instructor, according to the Federal Aviation Administration website.

The Cessna 172 crashed shortly after it left the Diamondhead Airport, said Keith Holloway with the National Transportation Safety Board.

"At this point, no conclusions or determination has been made," he said, but the NTSB may release a preliminary report late next week.

The plane is owned by Diamondhead Aerolease LLC, the FAA Registry shows.

'He loved his work'

Naidoo was the owner of Asphalt & Wax Innovations in Pass Christian. The business works with contractors who need to manufacture asphalt for paving.

His father traveled around the world for business and was working toward getting his pilot's license, Terry Naidoo said.

Prem Naidoo was born in South Africa and moved to America in 2001 with his family, Terry Naidoo said. The family settled in Diamondhead and Prem Naidoo started the business.

Prem Naidoo, his wife and son became naturalized citizens in 2010. Another son's citizenship is pending.

"He was very excited to become an American citizen," Terry Naidoo said of his father. "We all were."

Prem Naidoo had several patents on asphalt compositions and had co-authored abstracts on processes such as rubber binders and mixes, according to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office website.

Terry Naidoo described his father as a hard worker and go-getter who couldn't sit still.

"He loved his work," Terry Naidoo said. "He loved to stay busy so he had to have a hobby or work."

Terry and his brother both worked with their father.

"It's been tough, but we're fighting through it," Terry Naidoo said.

The crash remains under investigation.


Story and video ➤ http://www.sunherald.com




The family of a business owner has tentatively identified him as the pilot who died in a plane crash near the Diamondhead Aiport on Friday.

The man has been identified as Premnathan "Prem" Naidoo, 69, a business owner and research & development chemist, who was a student pilot.

"The plane left the Diamondhead airport and came to the north side of I-10 and crashed in the wooded area," Diamondhead Fire Chief Jerry Dubuisson said Friday. "The plane apparently flipped one of the power lines and it wrapped around the airplane."

Senior Air Safety Investigator Brian Raynor with the National Transportation Safety Board said in a press conference on Saturday that the NTSB had launched a probe into the crash.

“Our understanding, in preliminary radar data, indicates that the gentlemen flying the airplane was doing practice traffic patterns at the Diamondhead airport,” Raynor said. “On what appears to be the fifth takeoff, the airplane crashed in the woods on the north side of the interstate just beyond the departure of the runway at Diamondhead. The airplane was destroyed and the student pilot was fatally injured.”

Hancock County Coroner Jim Faulk said Monday that investigators cannot legally identify the pilot of the crashed Cessna 172 until an odontologist finishes his work.

Faulk said authorities were "99.9 percent sure" of the man's identity, but said authorities cannot yet publicize his name until the dental records are thoroughly examined.

Naidoo was the founder of Asphalt & Wax Innovation, LLC. According to the company's website, it "commenced operations in April 2006 under the ownership of Prem Naidoo who retired from 30 years service with Shell International and 10 years service with Sasol International as Research & Development Chemist. AWI performs research and development, quality control, and consultation for all aspects of the roofing and paving industries.

"Green Asphalt Technologies, LLC (GAT) was registered and started operations in September 2008 and is operated by (Prem's son) Terry Naidoo. GAT has a mission to develop eco-friendly solutions to enhance and benefit the asphalt industry as a whole. Specifically, GAT focus is on the responsible usage of recycled asphalt pavements and shingles going into the asphalt pavements of today."

Both companies operate primarily in the research and technology development field, forging relationships with other suitable companies for sales, marketing, and commercialization, according to the website.

Faulk said that authorities should be able to officially release the name of the victim by some time on Tuesday.


https://www.seacoastecho.com





DIAMONDHEAD, MS (WLOX) - An investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board met in Diamondhead Saturday afternoon to hold a briefing regarding the single-engine plane crash that happened Friday.

The Hancock County pilot, whose identity has not yet been released, died in the crash.

The investigator said a report with factual discoveries should be released within the next 5-7 business days. However, a complete and verified report may take up to a year. 

"The plane wreckage should be completely removed by the end of the day today and should be taken to a site in Jacksonville," the investigator said. 

After questions from the media were taken, the investigator met with the Diamondhead mayor, the Hancock County coroner. and other city officials privately. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.wlox.com



DIAMONDHEAD, MS (WLOX) - The scene was horrific: A Cessna 172 plane torn apart, pieces melted. Trees smashed from the impact.  And in the middle of it all was the body of the male pilot burned beyond recognition.


"We know it's a local pilot who was just doing some flying here locally," said Diamondhead Fire Chief Jerry Dubuisson. "He wasn’t headed out of town."


The plane went down a little after 7 a.m. Friday after taking off from the Diamondhead Airport.


"The owner of the plane told me that before the pilot took off, he'd indicated to him - as they all have to do for him - that he was going to be flying today. And that was just a typical, 'I'll be flying today, and I'll be in the Diamondhead area.'" 


There was no record of a mayday call. As it went down, the plane clipped a power line. First responders were delayed until Coast Electric Power crews could shut the power off and ground the wire.


By noon, Federal Aviation Authority officials had begun their investigation.


It's the first plane crash Jerry Dubuisson has had to work as fire chief.


"The experiences we've had with planes typically in Diamondhead have been a mechanical malfunction while it's in the air and the pilot's been able to work that through or get the plane safely on the ground with minor damage," Dubuisson said. 


Coroner Jim Faulk couldn't believe the call. It's the second fatal accident in as many days in the same place.


"I said, 'You've got to be kidding me.' I didn’t believe dispatch," Faulk said. "The thing that gets my eyes kind of teary is to have to notify the family members. That's the worst thing that you could be asked to do, but you have to do it."


Faulk said the official identification of the pilot will have to be done using dental records, and the process could take a while. 


Chief Dubuisson said the National Transportation Safety Board will be on scene Saturday conducting its investigation.


Story and video ➤ http://www.wlox.com












HANCOCK COUNTY, MS (WVUE) - The coroner of Hancock County, MS, said it could take several days before they know the identity of a man killed in a plane crash near Diamondhead.

The crash happened Friday around 7 a.m. with the plane going down just north of I-10. The plane flew for about 2,000 feet before it went down in the woods just north of the Diamondhead airport.

Responding Diamondhead firefighters didn't know whether it would be a private plane or a military plane at first since the crash site was between the Stennis military airport and the small Diamondhead air strip.

"Found a single-engine aircraft down and on fire," said Jerry Dubuisson with the Diamondhead Fire Department.

The plane, a Cessna 172, appeared to be carrying a lot of fuel. It burned for two-and-a-half hours before the coroner was able to remove the body of the victim inside. But the recovery efforts were also delayed by other factors.

"Initial efforts hampered because the plane clipped a power line and recovery crews were fearful of that," said Dubuisson.

The pilot is believed to be from the Diamondhead area, but authorities have not been able to make a positive identification due  to the condition of the body.

Investigators don't yet know what caused the plane to go down. They said there were no reports of distress calls before the crash.

"I can confirm there were no maydays at either Gulfport or Stennis towers," said Dubuisson.

Authorities say that could be an indication that there were no engine problems, but the plane went down so close to the runway there may not have been enough time for the pilot to call for help.

Mississippi Emergency Management and the  National Transportation Safety Board are heading up the investigation. 

The Hancock County coroner said it could take several days for dental records to provide a positive identity of the victim.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wmcactionnews5.com

Ercoupe 415-D, N94070: Fatal accident occurred June 24, 2018 near Monmouth Municipal Airport (C66), Warren County, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Illinois

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N94070

Location: Monmouth, IL
Accident Number: CEN18FA235
Date & Time: 06/24/2018, 1115 CDT
Registration: N94070
Aircraft: ERCOUPE 415 D
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 24, 2018, about 1115 central daylight time, an Ercoupe 415-D airplane, N94070, impacted terrain near Monmouth Municipal Airport (C66), Monmouth, Illinois. The two private rated pilots were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under to provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed during the flight and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight departed Galesburg Municipal Airport (GBG) Galesburg, Illinois, at 1049.

Airport surveillance video from GBG revealed that the airplane taxied from the hangar area toward the end of runway 21 at 1044. The airplane then taxied along the parallel taxiway to the first intersection where it made a left 180° turn and continued to taxi back to the end of runway 21. The airplane departed runway 21 at 1049.

A preliminary review of the radar data revealed that the airplane traveled west after departure from GBG. The radar track showed the airplane made several turns and continued west. The final radar target was recorded 2.17 miles south-southwest of the accident site (figure 1).

Figure 1 – Radar Track

Two witnesses, who were 0.5 miles northeast of C66, stated that the airplane was traveling east to west and flew very low over their house. They added that since they live near this airport they are very used to hearing normal engine sounds and this engine did not sound normal since the engine was sputtering and backfiring. They stated that the airplane flew about 30 ft above them, made a steep left bank toward south, then impacted the ground in a wooded area (figure 2). After impact the airplane burst into flames. They both ran to the accident site to provide assistance but were unable to help due to the fire an extreme heat.

Another witness, who was on a golf course about 0.3 miles south of the accident site, described the airplane and stated that he observed it flying south to north about 1100. He stated that "the engine sounded like it was missing and not flying smoothly." He added that the airplane continued north behind trees which obstructed his view, but he listened to the engine sound for another 15 to 30 seconds, when he "heard the engine rev higher."

Figure 2 – Accident Site

A postaccident examination of the airframe revealed that the fuselage was consumed by fire. The empennage remained intact with minor impact damage and fire damage at the rear fuselage area. The metal structure of both wings remained mostly intact and the fabric covering was consumed by fire. The two wing fuel tanks and the header fuel tank were consumed by fire. The header tank fuel quantity gauge was found in the debris path and the metal rod was bent near the cork end. The elevator and rudder control cables remained intact and were continuous from the cockpit to the control surfaces. The aileron control tubes and associated hardware were intact from the ailerons, through the wing, to the fuselage; both aileron control tubes were fractured and bent near the fuselage.

The engine came to rest inverted and remained attached to the engine mounts and the firewall. The two-blade, fixed-pitch propeller was attached to the crankshaft; one blade was bent aft about mid-span and the other blade was straight with minimal damage. Neither propeller blade exhibited leading edge damage or chordwise scratches. The propeller was rotated by hand and engine continuity was confirmed through the valve train and rear accessory section; the cylinders exhibited suction and compression with the top spark plugs removed. The carburetor was found resting on the engine and sustained fire and impact damage. The throttle cable remained attached to the throttle control arm. The mixture control cable was loose from mixture control arm and was found immediately next to the carburetor. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ERCOUPE
Registration: N94070
Model/Series: 415 D
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: GBG, 804 ft msl
Observation Time: 1115 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2800 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Monmouth, IL (C66)
Destination: Monmouth, IL (C66)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  40.938611, -90.623056 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Robert V. Burkhart

Roger D. Lundeen

Roger D. Lundeen, 72, of Galesburg, died Sunday, June 24, 2018 in Monmouth.


He was born September 15, 1945, in Galesburg, the son of Clifford A. and Doris L. (Painter) Lundeen.  He married Beverly J. Cavett April 17, 1982, in Macomb.


He is survived by his wife of 36 years, Beverly; a daughter, Traci Lundeen of Macomb; a son, Justin Lundeen of Galesburg; a granddaughter, Shannon Lundeen; a great-granddaughter, Chade; a brother, Larry (Jackie) Lundeen of West Columbia, South Carolina; and two nephews, Jeff and Kevin Lundeen.  His parents preceded him in death.


Roger worked in the carpenter shop at Butler Manufacturing Company from 1965 to 2005.  After being retired for five years, he started working for Coach House Garages as their district salesman, in 2010, a position that he still held.  He graduated from Abingdon High School in 1964.


Roger enjoyed planes and had his pilot’s license.  He also enjoyed radio-controlled models, collecting and working on clocks, and photography.


Visitation will be noon to 1:30 p.m. Monday, July 2, 2018 at Hinchliff-Pearson-West Funeral Directors and Cremation Services Galesburg Chapel.  Funeral service will follow at 1:30 p.m. with Rev. Jim Ecklund officiating.  Burial will be in East Linwood Cemetery.  Memorial contributions may be made to the Knox County Humane Society.  Online condolences may be made at www.h-p-w.com.


Robert "Bob" V. Burkhart


Robert V. “Bob” Burkhart, 65, of Peoria, IL passed away on Sunday, June 24, 2018 due to an airplane crash in Monmouth, IL.  He was born on November 4, 1952 in Barnesville, OH to Francis and Doris Lou (Martin) Burkhart.  He married Judith Ann Hoag Fritz on December 9, 2006 in Peoria, IL.

Surviving are his wife Judy of Peoria; sons Benjamin Burkhart of Chicago, Timothy (Nicole) Burkhart of Germantown Hills, and Daniel Burkhart of Normal, IL; daughters Hilary (Ricardo Loera) Fritz of Zellwood, FL and Jessica Fritz of Wataga, IL; grandchildren Easton, Jake, and Chandler Burkhart; brother Max (Kathy) Burkhart of Barnesville, OH; and one niece and one nephew.  He was preceded in death by his parents and step-son Benjamin Fritz.

Bob graduated from the first Physician Assistant program from Yale. He was a Physician Assistant at CT Assist in Decatur, IL where he specialized in cardiothoraic surgery. Bob was a gentle, kind-hearted soul with an open heart. He was always there as a husband, father, Papa, colleague, and friend. But his favorite title was being a Papa to his three grandkids. He was an avid pilot, flying for over 30 years. He enjoyed going to fly in breakfasts and air shows.  Bob loved metal detecting and all things academia and was a passionate lifelong learner. He loved to grill and was always ready with a homemade dessert. He will be missed by the many lives he touched. 


Cremation rites have been accorded.  A Memorial Visitation will be held from 4:00 pm until 7:00 pm on Thursday, June 28, 2018 at Mason Funeral Home Germantown Hills.  In lieu of flowers memorials may be given to an Educational Fund for his grandchildren through CEFCU.  Online condolences at www.masonfuneralhomes.com.



PEORIA — Two pilots, one from Peoria and the other from Galesburg, were killed Sunday morning in a plane crash near the Monmouth Municipal Airport, Warren County Coroner Al McGuire said Monday.


Robert V. Burkhart, 65, of Peoria and Roger D. Lundeen, 72, of Galesburg were pronounced dead at the scene at 11:35 a.m., McGuire said. Autopsy results indicated both died from injuries in the crash.


The plane crashed about 11:10 a.m. in a wooded area just north of Monmouth and about half a mile north of the Monmouth Municipal Airport, McGuire said.


“Both of them were pilots, and we’re not sure who was flying the plane,” McGuire said.


According to the Warren County Sheriff’s Office, eyewitnesses described hearing a plane engine sputtering late Sunday morning. The plane was coming in low before it banked hard and crashed, and witnesses heard an explosion. Witnesses directed first responders to a brush area where a fire crew extinguished the burning aircraft.


Burkhart was the registered owner of the fixed wing, single-engine plane, a model 415-D manufactured in 1946, according to the Federal Aviation Administration registry.


“Mr. Burkhart lived in Peoria, but his plane was hangared in Galesburg,” McGuire said.


McGuire said he did not know where the plane had taken off from or where it was headed, but he thought the men might have attended a fly-in/drive-in pancake breakfast and open house Sunday morning at the Macomb Municipal Airport.


Macomb airport manager Lee Cobb said he could not confirm they had come to the fly-in.


“When pilots fly in they are told to go to the registration desk and register. Then they get a free breakfast. We have no record of them doing that,” he said.


In addition to McGuire’s office, agencies investigating the crash are the Warren County Sheriff’s Office, Illinois State Police, Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.pjstar.com









MONMOUTH — The two people killed Sunday morning in a plane crash near the Monmouth Municipal Airport were men from Peoria and Galesburg, Warren County Coroner Al McGuire said Monday.

Robert V. Burkhart, 65, of Peoria and Roger D. Lundeen, 72, of Galesburg were pronounced dead at the scene of the crash, McGuire said. Authorities said Sunday the crash was reported about 11:10 a.m. about half a mile northeast of the airport.

Burkhart was the registered owner of the fixed-wing, single-engine plane, a model 415-D manufactured in 1946, according to the Federal Aviation Administration registry.

McGuire said he believed the men had attended a fly-in/drive-in breakfast and open house Sunday at the Macomb Municipal Airport.

“My understanding is that they were in Macomb that morning,” McGuire said. “Mr. Burkhart lived in Peoria but his plane was hangared in Galesburg.”

When first responders arrived at the scene Sunday, witnesses directed them to a brush area where a fire crew extinguished the burning aircraft.

Burkhart and Lundeen were located on board the plane and were declared dead at the scene by McGuire. No one on the ground was injured. The matter was referred to the Federal Aviation Administration for investigation.

Eyewitnesses near the scene described hearing a plane engine sputtering late that morning. The plane was coming in low before it banked hard and crashed, and witnesses heard an explosion.

Personnel responding to the incident included the Alexis Fire Department, Alexis Ambulance, Gerlaw Fire Department, Warren Central Fire District, Monmouth Fire Department, Monmouth Police Department, the Warren County Sheriff’s Office and the Illinois State Police.

The FAA began investigating the incident Monday morning.

(The Lundeen who died in the plane crash is not the same Roger Lundeen who is general manager of WGIL Radio.)

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.galesburg.com

Van's RV-7A, N19MM: Accident occurred June 24, 2018 in Alexander City, Tallapoosa County, Alabama

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Vestavia, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N19MM

Location: Alexander City, AL
Accident Number: ERA18LA177
Date & Time: 06/24/2018, 0920 CDT
Registration: N19MM
Aircraft: CRAWFORD RV-7
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 24, 2018, about 0920 central daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built RV-7A, N19MM, was destroyed after it impacted trees and power lines during a forced landing in Alexander City, Alabama. The airline transport pilot and passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Atlanta Regional Airport-Falcon Field (FFC), Atlanta, Georgia, destined for Thomas C Russell Field (ALX), Alexander City, Alabama. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, the accident flight was the first flight since the airplane's condition inspection. He flew for about 45 minutes and everything was working correctly. The airplane was at 2,000 ft above ground level when the pilot reduced the throttle and the engine "popped" twice and then experienced a total loss of engine power. He noted the fuel gauges indicated 21 gallons of fuel remaining, switched the fuel selector valve position and turned towards ALX. At that time, the airplane was about 4 miles from runway 18. The pilot did not think the airplane would glide to the runway, so he turned to the right and tried to land in a field. During the approach, the airplane contacted tree tops and power lines that the pilot did not see. The airplane then impacted terrain and the occupants egressed through the tip-up canopy. The pilot further stated that the power lines started a fire which consumed the airplane. Additionally, the maintenance logbooks were destroyed in the fire.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the fire consumed a majority of the center of the airplane. The propeller blades showed fire damage and there was no evidence of impact damage. The electrical cable that the airplane impacted was draped over the spinner and there were no signs that the propeller was rotating upon impact with the wires or trees. There was evidence of a small quantity of unburned fuel on the ground.

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate and a flight instructor certificate, each with ratings for airplane single-engine land and multi-engine land. His FAA first class medical certificate was issued on April 18, 2018. He reported 13,465 total hours of flight experience of which 75 hours were in the RV-7A.

At 0815, the weather recorded at ALX included broken clouds at 1,100 ft, wind from 240° at 3 knots. The temperature was 26°C, the dew point was 26°C, and the altimeter setting was 30.06 inches of mercury.

The engine and airframe were retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CRAWFORD
Registration: N19MM
Model/Series: RV-7 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KALX, 686 ft msl
Observation Time: 1315 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 26°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 240°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1100 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Atlanta, GA (FFC)
Destination: ALEXANDER CITY, AL (ALX)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.928889, -85.969444 (est)








ALEXANDER CITY, AL (WSFA) - A plane crashed in Alex City Sunday morning, according to the Alex City Fire Department. 

According to a Facebook post by the fire department, a crew was at the scene of the crash behind Taco Bell. The Taco Bell is located off of Highway 280. 

Photos from the scene show the plane on fire, but the fire department's post says the two occupants of the plane managed to escape unharmed before the fire started. 

Power crews were at the scene repairing lines that came down during the crash. The power lines are back up, and Alexander City Lights and Power officials say the only places without power were the Taco Bell and a nearby swimming pool.  

WSFA reporter Jordyn Elston reported that the occupants of the plane were a grandfather and grandson. 

Video from an Alex City resident shows huge plumes of smoke and flames coming from the scene after the crash. 

Story and video:  http://www.wsfa.com