Tuesday, October 23, 2018

North American SNJ-5 Texan, registered to Condor Squadron Officers and Airmens Association Inc and operated by the pilot, N7969C: Accidents occurred October 23, 2018 and April 19, 2017

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N7969C

Location:  Agoura Hills, CA
Accident Number: WPR19LA014
Date & Time: 10/23/2018, 1344 PDT
Registration: N7969C
Aircraft: North American SNJ
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 23, 2018, about 1344 Pacific daylight time, a North American SNJ-5 airplane, N7969C, made an emergency landing onto a highway following a total loss of engine power near Agoura Hills, California. The airline transport pilot was not injured. A postimpact fire ensued, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to Condor Squadron Officers and Airmens Association, Inc., and operated by the pilot as a personal flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed about the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight departed Van Nuys Airport (VNY), Van Nuys, California, about 1336.

The pilot reported that, shortly after departure he heard two loud bangs, followed by total loss of engine power. Subsequently the pilot elected to land onto a highway. After touchdown, the airplane swerved to the left and the left wing impacted a concrete center divider and a postimpact fire ensued.

The airplane was recovered to a secure facility for further investigation. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: North American
Registration: N7969C
Model/Series: SNJ 5
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Condor Squadron Officers & Airmens Assoc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KVNY, 770 ft msl
Observation Time: 2051 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 130°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.84 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Van Nuys, CA (VNY)
Destination: Van Nuys, CA (VNY)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 34.138056, -118.724444 (est)


Tuesday was an absolute nightmare for motorists up and down the Conejo and Simi Valley regions, but for Rob Sandberg, the 42-year-old pilot who put his airplane down safely in the middle of a busy 101 Freeway in Agoura Hills, it might have just been the luckiest day of his life.

Sandberg, a Camarillo resident and longtime pilot, landed his small training aircraft on the northbound lane of the 101 Freeway at Liberty Canyon Road at about 1:45 p.m. Tuesday after encountering engine trouble

A large plume of black smoke rose quickly from the crash site.

Sandberg, a professional commercial pilot, survived the ordeal with only singed hair. He was in the aircraft by himself.

With German war insignia on both wings, the plane appeared to be a vintage World War II aircraft, but it was a T-6 Texan, a single-engine airplane used to train pilots in the U.S. Air Force from the 1940s to the 1970s.

It’s part of the Condor Squadron, a nonprofit organization based out of Van Nuys Airport that flies over parades and memorial services,

Capt. Johnny Starling of the California Highway Patrol said the aircraft flew out of the Van Nuys Airport and suffered mechanical trouble shortly after taking off.

“The plan was to do a circle around the Warner Center and then touch down again at Van Nuys (Airport). About eight or nine minutes into the flight he heard two loud bangs, the engine went dead and he lost power,” Starling said.

“(The pilot) was able to maintain control of the aircraft and landed on the freeway. As he landed, there was one car in front of him, and to avoid it he swerved to the left, hit the center divider and (the plane) burst into flames.”

Starling praised the pilot for avoiding any injury to himself or motorists cruising by as rush-hour traffic began to build.

“When I first walked up to the scene, knowing he just climbed out of a burning aircraft, I was surprised to see him just calmly standing on the side of the road going through his phone,” Starling said. “He said he was fine. It was as if he’d had a flat tire on his car and was waiting for AAA to show up.”

Agoura Hills resident Jennifer Buzza was driving southbound on the 101 Freeway and was one of the first people on the scene of the crash.

“All I really comprehended was the (plane’s) last bounce and then it hitting the middle divider. I pulled over and started running to the plane,” Buzza said. “The pilot was out of the plane and a truck driver on the northbound side was getting out of his truck with a fire extinguisher. (When we learned) there was nobody else on the plane, we backed off and said, ‘OK, let’s keep cars away.’”

Buzza is a member of the Agoura Hills Community Emergency Response Team, and said her training helped her keep calm and respond to the situation.

“It was unbelievable. First, it’s an old warplane, so you’re already confused. Next, there’s an airplane on the freeway crashing and burning in front of you. It doesn’t compute in your head,” Buzza said. “My first response was, ‘You need to get out of here.’ Then I went, ‘Nope, calm down, get over there, make sure people are (safe), because somebody could be in there right now.’”

The crash shut down the 101 Freeway for several hours while emergency responders dealt with the situation.

Fire crews extinguished the flaming aircraft, but the road remained blocked through the evening as investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration gathered all the evidence they needed from the scene. 


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.simivalleyacorn.com





A World War II-style plane crash-landed on the northbound 101 Freeway in Agoura Hills on Tuesday afternoon, with no one getting injured on the ground or in the aircraft.

The pilot was out of the plane as it burned near the center divider of the freeway, said Vanessa Lozano of  the Los Angeles County Fire Department.

It is unclear if the pilot left the plane on his own, or with the assistance of an agency.

The crash was reported about 1:45 p.m. near Liberty Canyon Road, with no vehicles involved, Lozano said.

Fire officials extinguished the burning plane and the fire was declared knocked down at 2:14 p.m.

The cause of the plane’s crash-landing was not immediately known.

After both the north and south bound lanes of the 101 were closed for several hours, the number three and four lanes — the main portion of the freeway — on the southbound side were opened to drivers at about 4:30 p.m., said Alex Rubio, a spokesman for the California Highway Patrol. The northbound 101 number four lane and the Lost Hills Road on ramp were also opened.

During the closures, the drivers from the northbound side were being diverted to Lost Hills Road, while southbound traffic was exiting at Liberty Canyon Road, said Elizabeth Kravig, a CHP spokeswoman.

Though it is still unknown where the plane took off from, it was based at the Van Nuys Airport, said Diana Sanchez, spokeswoman with the Van Nuys Airport.

Allen Kenitzer, with the investigating Federal Aviation Administration, said the plane, a North American SNJ-5 airplane, also known as an AT-6, crashed “under unknown circumstances.”

“The aircraft sustained substantial damage,” Kenitzer said.

The plane belongs to the Condor Squadron Officers and Airmen’s Association, Sanchez said. The nonprofit was founded in 1965 by former WWII pilots to preserve aircraft from the war, the group’s website said.

Sanchez said the squadron planes, which are based at the airport, are often used for flyovers at memorials and parades. She said there was no known previous accidents relating to the squadron’s planes.

It is unclear if the plane in the accident was vintage or a model of one.

Terry Williams, a spokesman with the the National Transportation Safety Board, said his agency is also investigating the incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.dailybulletin.com







A plane crashed and burst into flames in the middle of the busy 101 Freeway in Southern California on Tuesday, bringing traffic to a standstill. The accident was reported about 1:50 p.m. near the Liberty Canyon Road exit of the northbound side of the freeway in Agoura Hills, according to the Los Angeles Fire Department. 

The cause of the accident wasn't immediately clear. The LAFD rescued the pilot, who was trapped, and said there were no other injuries. CBS Los Angeles reports fire crews extinguished the flames and officials stopped traffic in both directions.

The California Highway Patrol urged motorists to avoid the area. They say some lanes have since reopened to traffic. "Please keep the [freeway] shoulders clear for emergency vehicles," they added.

The Van Nuys Airport said the plane involved in Tuesday's crash is from the Condor Squadron Officers and Airmans Assoc Inc.

Officials said the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.cbsnews.com






CALABASAS (CBSLA) – A small vintage plane caught fire after crashing on the 101 Freeway in Agoura Hills Tuesday afternoon.

The plane landed sometime before 2 p.m. near the center divider on northbound Liberty Canyon Road, according to the Los Angeles County Fire Department. Video from the scene showed smoke and flames billowing hundreds of feet into the air.

The pilot – who was the sole occupant – escaped the plane unhurt, the fire department said.

He’s in his 40s and is an experienced pilot for Alaska Airlines, according to CBS2’s Randy Paige.

Responding firefighters quickly extinguished a blaze sparked by the crash.

There was no report of any injuries, but the North American SNJ-5 Texan sustained substantial damage, the Federal Aviation Administration reported.

The 101 Freeway was shut down in both directions before reopening just before 5 p.m.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://losangeles.cbslocal.com

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Aviation Accident Final Report
- National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Location: Van Nuys, CA
Accident Number: GAA17CA242
Date & Time: 04/19/2017, 1745 PDT
Registration: N7969C
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN SNJ
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot reported that, as the tailwheel was contacting the ground, a "sudden gust of wind" lifted the right wing and that the airplane weather-vaned to the right. Subsequently, the airplane ground looped and exited the right side of the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and aileron.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system on the accident airport, about the time of the accident, reported that the wind was from 270° at 9 knots. The pilot landed on runway 16. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control of the airplane during the landing roll with a quartering tailwind.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Tailwind - Effect on operation
Crosswind - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)

Landing
Runway excursion
Dragged wing/rotor/float/other 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 39, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/17/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/02/2015
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 900 hours (Total, all aircraft), 270 hours (Total, this make and model), 720 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: NORTH AMERICAN
Registration: N7969C
Model/Series: SNJ 5
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: 43974
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/10/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4982 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6783 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: R1340 AN1
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 600 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KVNY, 770 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0051 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 159°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 270°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Van Nuys, CA (VNY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Van Nuys, CA (VNY)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1700 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: VAN NUYS (VNY)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 802 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8001 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  34.213333, -118.490556 (est)

Mooney M20C, privately owned and operated, N9667M: Fatal accident occurred October 23, 2018 at Woodbine Municipal Airport (KOBI), Cape May County, New Jersey

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N9667M

Location: Woodbine, NJ
Accident Number: ERA19FA023
Date & Time: 10/23/2018, 1400 EDT
Registration: N9667M
Aircraft: Mooney M20C
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 23, 2018, about 1400 eastern daylight time, a privately owned and operated Mooney M20C, N9667M, impacted the ground during the initial climb after takeoff from the Woodbine Municipal Airport (OBI), Woodbine, New Jersey. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was being operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

A witness who was located at the airport's fuel terminal reported that the airplane taxied from the fueling location towards the approach end of runway 31; then he heard the engine rev-up to a high rpm and observed the airplane begin to takeoff. He watched the airplane become airborne and begin to climb until it reached an estimated 100 feet above runway 31. He noted the airplane was in a slight climb attitude and the landing gear retract when the airplane was between taxiways C and D, then diverted his attention. He then heard the sound of an impact by the windsock and called 911 to report the accident. He further reported that the engine sounded steady and constant with no abnormal sounds from the time when he first heard it until the impact.

A mechanic who maintained the airplane reported that he was inside a hangar at OBI when he heard the application of full takeoff power, followed by the sound of the impact. He indicated that the engine sound was steady prior to the impact. He subsequently responded to the accident site and he noted a small amount of smoke on the right side of the airplane's instrument panel. He also noted puddles of fuel on the ground with a "major puddle under the left wing."

Airport security video that captured the airplane just before the impact depicted the airplane in a nearly vertical nose-low, slight left wing low attitude with all landing gears extended. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Mooney
Registration: N9667M
Model/Series: M20C NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Rumble, Wayne E
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OBI, 41 ft msl
Observation Time: 1354 EDT
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots / , 250°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Woodbine, NJ (OBI)
Destination: Woodbine, NJ (OBI) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  39.220556, -74.795833

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Wayne Rumble
~
Wayne Rumble
~

RUMBLE, WAYNE E., - 85, of Palermo, NJ, on Tuesday Oct 23, 2018 passed away unexpectedly at Woodbine Airport doing what he loved best, flying is own airplane. Born in Ringtown, PA, Wayne was a proud veteran of the US Air Force & retired from IBM as a senior engineer, designing Air Traffic Control Systems. His love of flying continued for 71 years, with an impressive list of accomplishments. He was also currently employed by Woodbine Airport as the maintenance mgr & was 3 days from retirement.

Wayne’s passions were many, Round Dancing, gardening, his pets, his lunch dates with his pilot buddies, but most of all, his family. He will be so incredibly missed. Wayne was predeceased by his beloved wife of 48 years, Ruth & son Gary & parents Guy & Mellie Rumbel. He is survived by his beloved wife of 18 years, Eileen Krog Rumble, brother Kenneth (Carol), son Ron Rumble, 2 daughters Kathy (Joe) Ruffenach & Lori Kellenberger. Also, 9 grandchildren-Brian (Whitney) Rumble, Scott (Rachel) Rumble, David Ruffenach, Mark (Ashley) Ruffenach, Amy (fiancĂ©e Demetri) Ruffenach, Matthew & Alexander Rumble, Kristine Kellenberger & Melissa (David) Hanlon. He so loved his 5 great grandbabies Owen, Emily, Alexandra, Brooke, & Jacob, with the expected arrival of child #6 in Feb. 


All are welcome to attend Wayne’s visitation on Sunday evening Oct 28th from 6-8:30PM at GODFREY FUNERAL HOME OF PALERMO, 644 S Shore Rd, Palermo. Visitation will also be held on Monday morning Oct 29th from 9:30-11AM at GRACE LUTHERAN CHURCH, 11 E Dawes Ave, Somers Pt, NJ 08244 followed by his funeral service at 11AM. Interment will be at SEASIDE CEMETERY in Palermo. In lieu of flowers, donations will be gratefully accepted by GRACE LUTHERN CHURCH (see above address) c/o Wayne E Rumble Memorial Fund or BEACON ANIMAL RESCUE, 701 Butter Rd, Ocean View, NJ 08230. Condolences may be left for the family at www.godfreyfuneralhome.com.



WOODBINE — An 85-year-old man with decades of pilot experience died in a plane crash Tuesday afternoon at the Woodbine Airport, State Police said.

State Police identified the man Tuesday night as Wayne Rumble, of the Marmora section of Upper Township.

Previous Press stories identify Rumble as the maintenance manager at the airport, a positioned he’d held since 1998. He had been a pilot since 1950 and was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force.

The small, general aviation airport owned by the borough is used mainly for instructional purposes, Mayor Bill Pikolycky said. It houses 60 to 80 single-engine planes year-round.

The plane was a single-engine Mooney M20C fixed wing, State Police said. The wreckage will stay in place overnight.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

The airport remains closed.

Marcello Mirabelli, of Ocean View, a pilot who has kept his plane at the Woodbine Airport for three years, said he arrived at the airport Tuesday with the intention to fly to Connecticut.

“I got here and I saw all the commotion, so I drove down there and I knew exactly who it was when I saw the plane,” Mirabelli said. “It’s just awful that this happened.”

In 2009, a 53-year-old father and his 12-year-old son were killed in a plane crash at the airport. The plane crashed 10 minutes after takeoff.

Original article ➤  https://www.pressofatlanticcity.com



An 85-year-old man died when his small plane crashed near a runway at Woodbine Municipal Airport in Cape May County, State Police said. 

The Mooney M20C, which was piloted by Wayne Rumble of Marmora crashed during takeoff just after 2 p.m. Tuesday, officials said. Rumble was the only person on board.

The plane was registered to Rumble, who was a certified commercial pilot and instructor, records show.

Police and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating what caused the aircraft to crash at the small airport. 

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.nj.com



WOODBINE, New Jersey (WPVI) -- A pilot was killed when a small plane crashed on Tuesday afternoon in Cape May County, New Jersey.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the Mooney M20C aircraft stalled during takeoff and crashed at the Woodbine Municipal Airport just after 2 p.m.

That pilot was the only person on board.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://6abc.com





An investigation is underway after a pilot was killed in a small plane crash in Woodbine, New Jersey. 

The Mooney M20C crashed on the runway at the Woodbine Municipal Airport at 2:03 p.m. Tuesday. 

The pilot, a man in his 80s, died in the crash. He was the only person on board. 

"It's very tragic," Marcello Mirabelli, another pilot, told NBC10. "We all knew him pretty well and it's always sad to see a fellow pilot go down." 

The plane that crashed is registered to a man from Upper Township, New Jersey. 

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are handling the investigation and working to determine what caused the crash. 

Original article ➤  https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com

Van's RV-6A, N122EA: Incident occurred October 22, 2018 in San Jose, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California

Veered off the taxiway and hit airport sign.

https://registry.faa.gov/N122EA

Date: 22-OCT-18
Time: 17:58:00Z
Regis#: N122EA
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: RV6A
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: SAN JOSE
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N109TJ: Incident occurred October 22, 2018 at DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK), DeKalb County, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Landed short of runway.

Lanier Equipment Leasing LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N109TJ

Date: 22-OCT-18
Time: 19:28:00Z
Regis#: N109TJ
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Robinson R44, N4132H: Accident occurred October 22, 2018 in Kaneohe, Hawaii

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Rotorcraft crashed on a sandbar due to unknown circumstances.

Higgins Leasing Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N4132H

Date: 23-OCT-18
Time: 03:26:00Z
Regis#: N4132H
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R44
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: SIGHTSEEING
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: KANEOHE
State: HAWAII


From a thousand feet in the air, the Hawaiian islands were breathtaking.

Carli McConaughy and Adam Barnett of Joliet took a helicopter tour on Monday while on vacation in Honolulu, two days after getting engaged while hiking the Manoa Falls Trail.

At the pilot’s suggestion, both glanced to their left to get a glimpse of the site where the classic television show Gilligan’s Island was filmed decades ago, off the coast of Oahu.

“It was the most beautiful thing we’ve ever seen,” said McConaughy, 35.

Suddenly the pilot’s head began bobbing and his body slumped over next to McConaughy, who was in the passenger seat. Barnett, 31, began shaking him from the the back seat, yelling at his fiance to “pull it up,” frantically motioning to the cyclic control in the center of the two front seats.

The chopper rapidly nosedived. While McConaughy had no prior flight training, she said she grabbed the control and pulled, likely slowing the decent and crash into the ocean.

“We hit the water hard,” she said. “I just think it was the best way we could have crashed. We all survived."

She said her fiance was able to pull her and the pilot out of the helicopter, and emergency responders brought them to shore of Kaneohe Bay on jet skis.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman confirmed that a Robinson R44 helicopter with three people on board crashed under unknown circumstances in Kaneohe on the island of Oahu, but had no other information. The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are still investigating the crash.

The Honolulu Star Advertiser reported a Monday helicopter crash in Kaneohe Bay with a 35-year-old female passenger and 31-year-old male passenger. The owner of the helicopter tour company said the 57-year-old pilot had suffered a medical condition, according to the newspaper.

The helicopter wreckage was airlifted from waist-deep waters on Tuesday, according to the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources. The crash site was on the ocean side of the Ahu O Laka sandbar, a popular spot for boat tours, the department said in a news release.

“The pilot and two passengers were seriously hurt but it’s reported none of their injuries are considered life-threatening,” the news release said.

Barnett and McConaughy are now back home in Joliet and healing from their injuries. McConaughy said she suffered a broken bone and toe in one foot, a gash in the other foot and a compression fracture in her back; she said Barnett’s injuries include a broken arm and he’ll likely need surgery on the area of his wrist. Both are also scratched and bruised.

“We’re just happy to be alive,” she said.


https://www.chicagotribune.com

Military and Honolulu fire helicopters converged on the Kaneohe Bay sandbar, Monday afternoon, following the report of a downed helicopter. A 57-year-old helicopter pilot suffered an undisclosed medical condition at the time of the accident, according to a tour company the pilot works for.


HONOLULU (KHON2) - UPDATE: The helicopter is part of the Novictor Oahu Helicopter Tours.

A representative with the company said the pilot suffered an apparent medical condition during the flight, and added the pilot and two passengers suffered no life-threatening injuries. 

Emergency personnel rushed to Windward Oahu Monday afternoon after a helicopter went down near the Kaneohe sandbar.

It happened at around 5:15 p.m.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a Robinson R44 helicopter crashed under unknown circumstances.

Emergency Medical Services treated three patients, two men and a woman.

A 57-year-old man, reportedly the pilot, suffered apparent injuries to his back, head and chest; a 31-year-old male suffered apparent injuries to his head, chest, back and right arm; and a 35-year-old female suffered apparent injuries to her chest, back and left leg.

All patients also appeared to have suffered multiple lacerations to their bodies, according to EMS. They were all taken to a trauma center in serious condition.

Fire officials say Good Samaritans were able to assist them shortly after the crash.

"While en route, we were informed that there were three occupants. All were conscious and alert. As we got closer, more information came in telling us there was a Good Samaritan out there that had the three occupants on board so we just deployed our assets out there to assess, stabilize, and transport the three occupants," said Battalion Chief Mark Nakagawa, Honolulu Fire Department. "I'm not sure if they self-extricated or guys from the boat got off to assist them, but by the time we got out there, they were already on the boat. There were also two kayakers out there assisting.

"Nothing is ever straightforward but it was fortunate for us that the Good Samaritans were out there that quick, and were able to secure the three occupants, and then pass on information to our fire dispatch on their condition," Nakagawa added.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.khon2.com


A 57-year-old tour helicopter pilot suffered an undisclosed medical condition at the time of Monday afternoon’s accident at the Kaneohe Bay sandbar, the tour company said.

“We have confirmed that the pilot suffered a medical condition in flight,” said Nicole Vandelaar, owner and chief pilot of Novictor Helicopters.

The male pilot and two passengers, who are visitors to Hawaii, were taken to the Queen’s Medical Center in serious condition, but have been upgraded to stable condition.

Vandelaar declined to elaborate on the pilot’s medical condition out of respect for his privacy. She noted that the pilot’s injuries, as well as the passengers’ injuries, are non-life-threatening. “I’m just grateful that everybody is OK.”

Allen Kenitzer, spokesman of the Federal Aviation Administration, said the agency and the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the accident which happened at about 5:12 p.m.

Crews from the Honolulu Fire Department, Coast Guard, Federal Fire Department and Waterfront Operations of Marine Corps Base Hawaii responded to the downed Robinson R44 helicopter.

HFD spokesman Capt. Scot Seguirant said good Samaritans, including fishermen and two kayakers, assisted the pilot and two passengers who were conscious and alert.

HFD coordinated with federal firefighters and the Marines to transport the three people to Heeia Kea Pier where Emergency Medical Services personnel were waiting.

Paramedics treated the pilot who sustained injuries to his back, head and chest and two visitors — a 35-year-old woman who sustained injuries to her chest, back and left leg and a 31-year-old man who sustained injuries to his head, chest, back and right arm.

Dustin Malama, spokesman of the Honolulu Emergency Services Department, said the pilot and passengers also suffered multiple lacerations to their bodies.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.staradvertiser.com

Three people were in serious condition today after a private helicopter landed on a sandbar in Kaneohe Bay.

A 35-year-old woman sustained leg injuries and a 31-year-old man had a right-arm injury. The 57-year-old male pilot had a head laceration and a right-arm injury. All three had spinal injuries and were transported to a trauma center.

The Honolulu Fire Department received a call at 5:12 p.m.

HFD Capt. Scot Seguirant said that the helicopter was on the sandbar in Kaneohe Bay in an upright position. There was no fire.

Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Wyrick said a non-military helicopter landed on the sandbar.

“I don’t know why they landed there,” she said. “I don’t know that it was an emergency landing.”

A 17-foot fishing boat in the area was the first to respond to the helicopter.

The first person rescue personnel brought back to shore from the helicopter was able to walk up the boat ramp, but the other two were each carried from the water, a witness said.

The three occupants were recovered by Ocean Safety and Honolulu firefighters, were brought to shore, and were transported to the Queen’s Medical Center, the Coast Guard said. The Department of Land and Natural Resources was on scene, and officials were assessing for pollution from the landing.

A Coast Guard HH-65 Dolphin helicopter also responded as well as a C-130 airplane that was already flying when the incident happened.

Marine Corps Base Hawaii said it had at least one big CH-53E Super Stallion in the air assisting.

About seven years ago, a Marine died after a military helicopter crashed in Kaneohe Bay.

In March 29, 2011, an aging Marine Corps CH-53D Sea Stallion helicopter crashed on the Kaneohe Bay sandbar, killing 22-year-old Cpl. Jonathan D. Faircloth. Three other crew members also were injured when the big helicopter made a “hard impact” landing from an altitude of about 300 feet while on a night training flight. The chopper ended up on its side.

The crash was caused by a “catastrophic mechanical failure” as pilots struggled to maintain control, an investigation concluded. The Sea Stallions were retired and replaced by newer CH-53E Super Stallions.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.staradvertiser.com

Robinson R22 BETA, N8350M: Incident occurred October 22, 2018 in River Forest, Cook County, Illinois

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; DuPage, Illinois

Rotorcraft force landed in a field due to bird strike.

Vortex Leasing LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N8350M

Date: 22-OCT-18
Time: 19:20:00Z
Regis#: N8350M
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: RIVER FOREST
State: ILLINOIS