Saturday, August 24, 2019

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Thorp T-18, N118RG; accident occurred March 14, 2018 in Cleburne, Johnson County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N118RG



Location: CLEBURNE, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA124
Date & Time: 03/14/2018, 1600 CDT
Registration: N118RG
Aircraft: WHITE THORPE T 18
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 14, 2018, about 1600 central daylight time, a White Thorpe T-18 airplane, N118RG, impacted a tree and terrain during a forced landing following an inflight loss of engine power near Cleburne, Texas. The pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged during the impact. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Blackwood Airpark, near Cleburne, Texas, at 1545.

According to the pilot's accident report, the flight departed to the north from the airport. The engine was running rough while he was flying northbound. The pilot started troubleshooting the roughness and decided to return to return to the airport. He stated, "I mistakenly landed in a pasture, short of the runway, with [the] plane coming to rest after hitting a tree." The pilot reported to the Texas Department of Public Safety Officer at the scene that the fuel line was not feeding through, and later reported to a Federal Aviation Inspector (FAA) that he believed he ran out of fuel. The FAA inspector examined the airplane at the scene. There was no evidence of fuel. The engine had been pulled away from the fuselage. Due to the extent of the damage, the fuel system and engine were not tested.

There was no record that an annual inspection of the airplane was conducted recently. The pilot reported the last annual inspection was on May 17, 2011. The pilot reported that he did not have a current flight review and did not know the date of his last medical certificate.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 79, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Unknown Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  780.9 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5.25 hours (Total, this make and model), 780.9 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 0.25 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0.25 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: WHITE
Registration: N118RG
Model/Series: THORPE T 18
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2008
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 001
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/17/2011, Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 70 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E2D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCPT, 854 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1635 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 214°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  9 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots / 12 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 100°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / -6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: CLEBURNE, TX (TX46)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: CLEBURNE, TX (TX46)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1545 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: BLACKWOOD AIRPARK (TX46)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 835 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  32.415556, -97.384167 (est)

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Cessna 150M, N66786; accident occurred March 07, 2018 near Alfred C. 'Bubba' Thomas Airport (T69), Sinton, San Patricio County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; FAA San Antonio FSDO; Houston, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N66786


Location: SINTON, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA177
Date & Time: 03/07/2018, 1230 CDT
Registration: N66786
Aircraft: CESSNA 150M
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 7, 2018, about 1230 central daylight time, a Cessna 150M airplane, N66786, experienced a partial loss of engine power after takeoff and impacted terrain during a forced landing to a field near the Alfred C 'Bubba' Thomas Airport (T69), Sinton, Texas. The pilot and one passenger were not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the engine mount. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight departed T69 about 1130 on a local flight.

The pilot reported that he conducted a local flight and returned to land at T69 and executed a touch-and-go landing to runway 32. After touching down and taking off again for another touch-and-go, the airplane's engine experienced a partial loss of engine power near the end of the runway. He was unable to gain altitude, so he turned to the right and landed in an open field. During the forced landing the airplane's engine mount was bent; otherwise the airplane appeared to be undamaged.

The pilot reported that he examined the airplane's carburetor and found that was full of carbon, and that the exhaust pipe was pitch black from carbon buildup. He stated that the carburetor was unable to properly regulate the fuel/air mixture due to excessive carbon buildup, corrosion in and on the main nozzle, and basic wear and tear, which caused the engine to flood and experience a partial loss of engine power. He stated that a review of the airplane's maintenance logbook showed that the carburetor had not been rebuilt since it was installed in 1974.

The pilot stated that a new rebuilt carburetor was installed on the engine and it now runs fine. The airplane recently had an annual maintenance inspection and he reported that "everything that may have caused the engine problem checked out okay."

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 57, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/07/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  1100 hours (Total, all aircraft), 250 hours (Total, this make and model), 1100 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 98 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 23 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N66786
Model/Series: 150M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 15076279
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1601 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3727.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-200-A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CRP, 46 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1151 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 180°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 12000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 50°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.37 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Sinton, TX (T69)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Sinton, TX (T69)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1130 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Alfred C Thomas Airport (T68)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 48 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 32
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4323 ft / 55 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 28.038611, -97.542500

Loss of Control in Flight: Beech 77 Skipper, N6699B; accident occurred February 28, 2018 at Odessa Airport-Schlemeyer Field (KODO), Ector County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Dockets: - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N6699B

Location: Odessa, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA114
Date & Time: 02/28/2018, 1815 CST
Registration: N6699B
Aircraft: BEECH 77
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 28, 2018, at 1815 central standard time, a Beech 77, N6699B, impacted terrain during initial climb at Odessa Airport-Schlemeyer Field (ODO), Odessa, Texas. The airplane sustained substantial damage, and the private pilot received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to an individual and operated by another individual under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flight was to remain in the ODO traffic pattern and was originating at the time of the accident.

According the Federal Aviation Administration inspector from the Lubbock Flight Standards District Office, the airplane owner was not the registered owner of the airplane. The airplane owner allowed the pilot to fly the airplane hoping that the pilot would buy the airplane. The last annual inspection of the airplane was in 2016.

A National Transportation Safety Board Pilot/Operator Accident/Incident Report Form 6120 was not received from the airplane owner. A completed Form 6120 was received from the pilot.

The pilot stated that he and the airplane owner performed a preflight inspection of the airplane, which included checking the fuel and oil. The pilot said that once fuel was added, the airplane "checked out good." The pilot stated they "looked over" the Pilot's Operating Handbook (POH) for the airplane to "familiarize" himself with the airplane. He then started the airplane, and it ran "nice and smooth no issues on startup." He taxied the airplane to the fuel pumps to obtain fuel and then taxied to runway 29 (6,200 feet by 100 feet, asphalt) where he performed a run-up, and there were "no problems." He planned on departing from runway 29 and remain in the airport traffic pattern for touch-and-go landings. He said during the takeoff roll, the airplane accelerated to 49 knots about ½ down the runway. He rotated the nose of the airplane and lifted the airplane "gradually." He noticed that upon lift-off, the airplane's "acceleration and power started to disappear." He lowered the airplane nose to increase airspeed as the airplane approached the departure end of the runway and then raised the nose gradually, but the stall warning horn would sound; he aborted the climb. There was no useable runway remaining, and the airplane was approaching a densely populated area, so he executed a slight right bank turn to remain over the airport. The stall warning horn sounded, and the airplane "dropped from the sky."

The pilot stated that he was not sure of how the accident could have been prevented other than not flying at night or having aborted the takeoff earlier in the takeoff phase.

The pilot stated his total flight experience in the accident make and model of airplane was 0 hours.

Post-accident examination of the airplane revealed that the airplane wing flaps were in the fully retracted position. One of the two propeller blades had leading edge gouges and S-shaped bending. The second propeller blade had chordwise scratching/polishing, and the blade tip was curled inboard about 180° in the spanwise direction. The reduction of any engine power could not be determined.

According to the Beech 77 POH, the bottom of the airspeed indicator was 54 knots indicated airspeed (KIAS). The POH Takeoff checklist stated the takeoff rotation speed was 56 knots.

With an approximate airport elevation of 3,004 feet, an altimeter setting of 29.81 inches of mercury, an outside air temperature of 19°Celsius, the pressure altitude was 3,107 feet. ODO recorded wind about the time of the accident as 320°at 14 knots. The approximate headwind component with a departure from runway 29 was 12 knots. Under these conditions and with a maximum takeoff weight of 1,675 lbs., the POH TAKEOFF DISTANCE – HARD SURFACE chart showed an approximate takeoff distance ground roll and takeoff distance over a 50-foot obstacle as 900 feet and 1,350 feet, respectively.

The Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3), Chapter 5, Takeoffs and Departure Climbs, Rejected Takeoff/Engine Failure, stated:

Prior to takeoff, the pilot should identify a point along the runway at which the airplane should be airborne. If that point is reached and the airplane is not airborne, immediate action should be taken to discontinue the takeoff. Properly planned and executed, the airplane can be stopped on the remaining runway without using extraordinary measures, such as excessive braking that may result in loss of directional control, airplane damage, and/or personal injury. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 25, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s):  None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/04/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/29/2016
Flight Time:  348 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0.1 hours (Total, this make and model), 308 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N6699B
Model/Series: 77
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: WA-40
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/01/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1680 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-235
Registered Owner: Stephen Warren
Rated Power:
Operator: Russ Padgett
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ODO, 3004 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1753 CST
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 10000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 14 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 320°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.81 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 0°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Odessa, TX (ODO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Odessa, TX (ODO)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1815 CST
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Odessa Airport-Schlemeyer Fld (ODO)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 3004 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 29
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6200 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Precautionary Landing; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 31.920000, -102.390000 (est)

Fire (Post-Impact): Beechcraft 200 Super King Air, N241CK; fatal accident occurred September 25, 2018 near Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport (KOSC), Michigan



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan
Textron Aviation (Beech Aircraft); Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N241CK  



Location: Oscoda, MI
Accident Number: CEN18FA387
Date & Time: 09/25/2018, 0613 EDT
Registration: N241CK
Aircraft: Beech 200
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Fire/smoke (post-impact)
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 25, 2018, at 0613 eastern daylight time, a Beech 200, N241CK, collided with trees and terrain while on an instrument approach to Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport (OSC), Oscoda, Michigan. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post-impact fire. The airplane was registered to Kalitta Equipment LLC, and was operated by Kalitta Charters as a Title14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 positioning flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight which originated from Willow Run Airport (YIP), Ypsilanti, Michigan, about 0513.

According to Kalitta personnel, the pilot was flying to OSC to pick up passengers and subsequently fly them to Memphis, Tennessee. The airplane departed YIP about 0513 and climbed to a cruise altitude of about 13,500 ft. The airplane en route airspeed was about 250 knots. At 0537, when the airplane was about 85 miles south of OSC, it began its initial descent. At 0548, the airplane was vectored to the right to intercept the final approach course and was cleared for the VOR runway 6 approach at OSC. The last radar return was at 0550 and indicated that the airplane was at an altitude of 2,200 ft and 8.1 miles from the runway threshold. It impacted terrain 4.6 miles past this point, about 3.5 miles from the runway threshold. According to the VOR runway 6 approach procedure, an altitude of 2,500 ft (or higher) is flown during the procedure turn. If the OSC altimeter setting is used, descent is made to 1,660 feet to Dogsy intersection, and then to 1,100 feet, the minimum descent altitude (MDA) to Au Sable (ASP) intersection.

When the airplane failed to arrive at the airport as scheduled, Kalitta officials notified the Federal Aviation Administration. The wreckage was subsequently located about 1030.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 33-year-old pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane multiengine land rating, type ratings in the Learjet, Dassault DA-20 Falcon, and Canadair 601 Challenger, and commercial privileges with an airplane single-engine land rating. He also held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine, multiengine, and instrument ratings, and a ground instructor certificate with an instrument rating. His first-class FAA airman medical certificate, dated March 9, 2018, contained no restrictions or limitations. According to the operator, the pilot had logged 3,806 total hours of flight experience, of which 201 hours were in the Beech 200.

The pilot's most recent Part 135 proficiency check was satisfactorily completed on August 31, 2018, in the Dassault DA-20.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane, serial number BB272, was manufactured in 1977. It was powered by two Pratt and Whitney PT6A-41 turboprop engines (serial numbers PCE80581 left, and PCE80282 right), each rated at 850 shaft horsepower, driving two Hartzell 3-blade, all-metal, full feathering, constant speed propellers (model HC-B3TN-3G).

The airplane was maintained under an Approved Airworthiness Inspection Program (AAIP). The most recent inspection was performed on March 28, 2018, at an airframe time of 13,933.6 hours. At that time, the left engine had accrued 13,912.7 total hours and 7,742.2 hours since overhaul, and the right engine had accrued 12,802.5 total hours and 6,747.3 hours since overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The following weather observations were recorded by the Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS):

0555: Wind from 180° at 7 knots; 5 miles visibility in light rain; 400 ft overcast ceiling; temperature, 18°C; dew point, 18°C; altimeter setting of 29.91 inches of mercury.

0615: Wind from 200° at 6 knots; 4 miles visibility in drizzle; 400 ft overcast ceiling; temperature, 19°C; dew point, 19°C; altimeter setting of 29.91 inches of mercury.

0635: Wind from 200° at 7 knots; 4 miles visibility in heavy drizzle; ceiling, 400 ft overcast ceiling; temperature, 19°C; dew point, 19°C; altimeter setting of 29.92 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INORMATION

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane had impacted the tops of trees, then descended at a 45° angle to the ground. A postimpact fire consumed the cockpit and cabin area. There were numerous propeller contact marks in the trees. Examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or anomalies. Actuator positions indicated that the landing gear was extended, and approach flaps had been set. Fire and impact damage precluded examination of the cockpit instruments.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Due to the condition of the remains, autopsy and toxicology protocols were not performed. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 33, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/09/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/31/2018
Flight Time:   3806 hours (Total, all aircraft), 201 hours (Total, this make and model), 2687 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 72 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 64 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N241CK
Model/Series: 200 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1977
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: BB272
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 9
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/28/2018, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 12500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 13933.5 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney Canada
ELT: C91A installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-41
Registered Owner: Kalitta Equipment LLC
Rated Power: 850 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: KC8A

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: OSC, 633 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0635 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 245°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  4 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 400 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None /
Wind Direction: 200°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Ypsilanti, MI (YIP)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Oscoda, MI (OSC)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0513 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport (KOSC)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 633 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Wet
Runway Used: 06
IFR Approach: RNAV; VOR/DME
Runway Length/Width: 11600 ft / 200 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 44.416667, -83.485833

Controlled Flight into Terrain: Cessna U206G Stationair 6, N1738R; fatal accident occurred September 24, 2018 in Rainy Pass, Alaska

Dave Oberg has worked for Regal Air since 2002. 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska
Regal Air; Anchorage, Alaska
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 


https://registry.faa.gov/N1738R


Location: Rainy Pass, AK 
Accident Number: CEN18FA386
Date & Time: 09/24/2018, 1032 AKD
Registration: N1738R
Aircraft: CESSNA U206
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled 

On September 24, 2018, at 1032 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna U206G airplane, N1738R, impacted mountainous terrain about 13 miles west of Rainy Pass Lodge Airport (6AK), Rainy Pass, Alaska. The pilot was fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to Laughlin Acquisitions LLC and was being operated by Regal Air as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 on-demand cargo flight. Marginal visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Lake Hood Seaplane Base (LHD), Anchorage, Alaska, at 0930 and was en route to a private airstrip on the southwest side of the Alaska Range about 30 miles west of the accident site.

The operator reported that the purpose of the flight was to deliver about 400 lbs of lumber to the private airstrip, pick up two passengers, and return to LHD. The Regal Air chief pilot was flying the same flight path in another company Cessna 206 and departed 16 minutes after the accident pilot. He was in radio contact with the pilot throughout the flight and most of the communications were related to the weather conditions and cloud coverage along the route of flight, including that the weather conditions could change rapidly. The chief pilot also heard the accident pilot in radio communication with the owner of Rainy Pass Lodge, but he could only hear the pilot's side of the conversation. The chief pilot lost radio contact with the accident pilot about 1030 and assumed that he had proceeded into Rainy Pass and no longer had line of sight for radio contact.

The owner of Rainy Pass Lodge stated that he saw the accident airplane fly over his lodge and that he made radio contact with the pilot. He stated that he could see Long Lake Hills, which is about 8 miles southeast, and that the cloud coverage to the southeast was more significant than it was to the northwest near Rainy Pass, and it appeared to be dissipating. When the chief pilot reached Long Lake Hills, he did not feel comfortable continuing the flight due to the low clouds so he turned around and returned to LHD.

The operator was tracking the airplane's flight path using Spidertracks (figure 1) and noticed that the track stopped at 1031. A review of the Spidertracks flight data revealed that the airplane changed altitude multiple times, descending as low at 450 ft above ground level (agl) at some points. During the final 7 minutes of the flight the airplane's altitude was between 1,400 ft and 1,900 ft agl, with the final recorded point at 1,000 ft agl and descending. About 30 minutes after the track stopped and the operator was unable to contact the pilot, an Alert Notice was issued for the missing airplane, and the Alaska Air National Guard conducted an aerial search mission to locate the airplane. The wreckage was discovered near the end of a mountain valley on a steep mountain side about 3.5 miles southwest of the mouth of Goodman Pass and next to a box canyon.

Figure 1 – Flight track from Spidertracks 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 66, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane; Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/20/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 25000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 291 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 150.1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued the pilot a second class special issuance medical certificate on October 20, 2017, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses. The special issuance was for obstructive sleep apnea and was first granted in 2014.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N1738R
Model/Series: U206 G
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:1978 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: U20604588
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-F
Registered Owner: LAUGHLIN ACQUISITIONS LLC
Rated Power: 300
Operator: Regal Air
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPTI, 1858 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1858 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 85°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1200 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2700 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts:  10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 140°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.53 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C / 5°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Anchorage, AK (LHD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  AKD
Type of Airspace: Class E; Class G

The closest weather observation station to the accident site was located at 6AK. The human weather observer for 6AK reported the following observations. At 0848, wind from 160° at 12 knots gusting to 18 knots, visibility 7 miles, scattered clouds at 1,500 ft, overcast cloud layer at 4,000 ft, temperature 5°C, dewpoint 4°C, and barometric pressure of 29.56 inches of mercury. At 1058, wind from 140° at 10 knots, visibility 7 miles, scattered clouds at 1,200 ft, broken clouds at 2,700 ft, temperature 6°C, dewpoint 5°C, and barometric pressure of 29.53 inches of mercury.

The Alaska Aviation Weather Unit issued AIRMETs Sierra, Tango, and Zulu at 0724 for instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions and mountain obscuration in clouds and precipitation, for moderate turbulence below 12,000 ft and isolated severe turbulence within 8,000 ft agl, and for moderate icing conditions between 8,000 ft and flight level (FL) 180 with the freezing level between 4,000 and 5,000 ft. The accident site was located on the border of the forecast areas, which were valid at the time of the accident.

An area forecast indicated that, after 0700, scattered clouds at 500 ft msl, broken ceiling at 1,500 ft msl, and overcast skies at 3,500 ft msl with cloud tops to FL180 were expected with visibilities of 3 miles in light rain and mist. East of Sparrevohn, Alaska, (including the accident area) isolated ceilings of 3,500 ft msl were expected, and east of a line from Sparrevohn to Nikolai, Alaska, (including the accident area) surface winds from the east to southeast at 30 knots with gusts to 45 knots were forecast.

The flying weather chart indicated IFR conditions forecast for the accident site with areas of wind greater than 30 knots. Occasional to continuous moderate turbulence was forecast for the accident site between the surface and 12,000 ft msl.

The chief pilot stated that, on the day of the accident, he and the accident pilot had reviewed weather information beginning at 0800 until just before their departures. The weather information reviewed included the area forecasts and imagery from FAA's aviation weather cameras. In addition, they received text messages regarding the weather conditions at their intended destination. A pilot report relayed to them about 0815 reported 30 to 40 knot winds and low visibility. The accident pilot received an updated report about 0915 that the wind had decreased to 20 knots for the area near his destination, and he departed shortly after receiving this phone call. About 0940, while en route, the accident pilot radioed to the company for someone to review the weather cameras and provide an update on the weather along his route of flight. The chief pilot stated that he elected to takeoff with the expectation that both pilots would return if the weather was unsuitable.

Figures 2 and 3 are images from the cameras near 6AK that depict low layers of stratocumulus clouds surrounding 6AK around the accident time.


Figure 2 – Facing north at 1017 AKDT

Figure 3 – Facing northwest at 1022 AKDT 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 62.072778, -153.184722

On September 26, the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, an FAA inspector, and the Regal Air chief pilot traveled to the accident site via helicopter and documented the accident site and wreckage. The main wreckage was located about 4,400 ft mean sea level (msl) on the east side of a steep, loose rock-covered mountainside and was partially covered in snow. The initial impact point, identified by the propeller assembly and cockpit debris, was located about 4,700 ft msl. Figure 4 shows a photo from about the same altitude and heading as the accident airplane's final Spidertracks point, which faces south into the box canyon. The figure shows the initial impact area circled in red. The mountain tops at the back of the box canyon were about 5,000 ft mean sea level.


Figure 4 – Accident location facing south, impact area circled in red

The first responders reported that the rescue helicopter's rotor wash blew the wreckage off its perch and it slid down the face of the slope to its final resting point. A debris path of airplane wreckage was found along the slope leading to the main wreckage.

A postaccident examination of the engine and airframe revealed significant impact damage signatures to the leading edges of the wings and the lower fuselage. The propeller assembly had separated from the crankshaft flange and the blades exhibited significant leading-edge gouges, chordwise scratches, and curled blade tips. The engine oil pan was evenly crushed upward into the bottom of the engine. The examination did not reveal any mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The airplane was equipped with an engine data monitor (EDM) that recorded basic engine parameters, which included cylinder head temperatures, exhaust gas temperatures and fuel flow. A review of the EDM data did not reveal any anomalies.


Medical And Pathological Information

The pilot's sleep apnea report 1 month before his most recent medical exam (about 1 year before the accident), showed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) usage of 92% for greater than 6 hours, with a apnea-hypopnea index of 4.6, which denotes no sleep apnea. The pilot also reported chronic headaches, high blood pressure, and arthritis in the right knee. He reported the headaches had improved with CPAP usage.

The Alaska State Medical Examiner's Office, Anchorage, Alaska, conducted an autopsy of the pilot. The autopsy report concluded that the cause of death was multiple blunt-force injuries. The autopsy was unremarkable with no signs of natural disease.

Toxicological testing of urine and liver specimens by the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory detected an unquantified amount of diphenhydramine. Diphenhydramine is a sedating antihistamine available over the counter in many products used to treat colds, allergies, and insomnia. It's often marketed under the names Benadryl and Unisom. Diphenhydramine undergoes postmortem distribution and central levels may be three times higher than peripheral levels. Additionally, the non-sedating high blood pressure and migraine headache medication, propranolol, was detected in liver tissue, and acetaminophen and salicylate (found in aspirin) were detected in urine. Blood was not available for testing.

Additional Information

Emergency Locator Transmitter

The Alaska Air National Guard, who conducted the search and rescue mission to locate the airplane, did not receive a signal from the airplane's emergency locator transmitter (ELT). During the wreckage examination, the ELT did not exhibit any significant damage and the antenna was still connected. The investigation was unable to determine why the ELT did not transmit after the accident.

Rockwell 690A Turbo Commander, N52PY: Accident occurred August 14, 2019 at Stockton Metropolitan Airport (KSCK), San Joaquin County, California

JK Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N52PY

NTSB Identification: GAA19CA494
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 14, 2019 in Stockton, CA
Aircraft: Rockwell 690, registration: N52PY

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.