Friday, September 21, 2018

Cessna 150H, N7152S: Fatal accident occurred September 20, 2018 near Festus Memorial Airport (KFES), Jefferson County, Missouri

Michael Gunnar Metzger

Jacob Alexander Metzger



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Louis; St. Ann, Missouri
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N7152S

Location: Festus, MO
Accident Number: CEN18FA384
Date & Time: 09/20/2018, 2230 CDT
Registration: N7152S
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 20, 2018, about 2230 central daylight time (CDT), a Cessna 150H airplane, N7152S, impacted a tree-covered swamp after executing a go-around in dark, night conditions near the Festus Memorial Airport (FES), Festus, Missouri. The left seat air transport pilot and right seat passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to a private individual and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Greensburg Municipal Airport (I34), Greensburg, Indiana, about 2015 eastern daylight time (EDT).

Family members of the pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was for the pilot to travel to Collins, New York, to retrieve the airplane and bring it to FES. The airplane was going to be used for flight instruction for the pilot's son, who was also traveling with the pilot at the time of the accident. The pilot worked professionally as a commercial airline pilot and previously as a helicopter air ambulance pilot. The airplane was owned by the pilot's father and was stationed at a private residence, with a private airstrip. The pilot's father and the pilot had an "open-ended" agreement that the pilot would eventually travel to Collins, New York, to retrieve the airplane. On September 20, 2018, the pilot traveled from St. Louis, Missouri, to Buffalo, New York, via commercial airline. The pilot and his son were picked up from the airport by a family member and transported to the private airstrip. The pilot departed from the private airstrip about 1400 EDT.

The cross-country flight consisted of travel through Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. Receipts provided by a family member and found in the wreckage showed that the pilot had refueled the airplane three times during the trip. The first refueling stop was at the Chautauqua County/Dunkirk Airport (DKK), Dunkirk, New York, at 1434 EDT for 13.4 gallons of 100LL fuel (commonly referred to as "avgas"). The distance between the private airstrip in Collins, New York, and DKK is about 19 miles. The second refueling stop was at the Knox County Airport (4I3), Mount Vernon, Ohio, at 1753 EDT for 16.56 gallons of 100LL fuel. The distance between DKK and 4I3 is about 226 miles. The third refueling stop was at I34, for 13.62 gallons of 100LL fuel at 2006 EDT. The distance between 4I3 and I34 is about 174 miles. The distance from I34 to FES is about 275 miles.

During the trip, the pilot was communicating with his fiancé via text message from his cellular phone. The pilot communicated to the fiancé that the airplane was experiencing a "small electrical problem" and he reported that his estimated time of arrival (ETA) would be determined "at the next fuel stop… just before dark." The pilot reported to her that the ETA for FES would be about 2215 CDT. He asked the fiancé to be stationed on the north end of runway 10 with a flashlight to help vector the airplane in for landing. The pilot directed the fiancé, "lights on the north end pointing north."

FES has one asphalt runway, 10 and 19, that is 2,202 feet long and 46 feet wide. The airport lighting system at FES consisted of runway edge lights (medium intensity runway lights) along with runway end identifier lights. These types of lighting systems are considered pilot controlled lighting where a pilot can activate the lighting system while airborne by keying the aircraft's microphone a set number of times on the airport's common traffic advisory frequency. The lighting system can also be manually activated by a switch on the outside of the main hangar/office building at FES. A review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Notices to Airmen (commonly referred to as "NOTAMS") data for the day of the accident found no malfunctions or failures of the airport lighting system listed for FES.

The pilot reported to the fiancé that he would attempt to activate the airport lighting system with a handheld very high frequency (VHF) radio, but he was unsure if the radio had enough battery power to perform the task. The fiancé traveled to the requested area at the airport. She reported that the airplane was landing from the north to runway 10. In addition to the lighting provide by the fiancé, the main hangar/office building had one outside light on at the time of the accident. The pilot attempted to land, but she was unsure if the airplane touched down on the runway due to the dark, night conditions present that hampered her visual acquisition of the airplane. She reported that the airplane was "blacked out" and did not have any exterior lights on when it tried to land. The pilot executed a go-around procedure. The last text message from the pilot stated, "keep light on." After several minutes of not seeing or hearing the airplane, the fiancé tried contacting the pilot multiple times with no response. The fiancé contacted law enforcement about 30 minutes after the last text message was received.

The Jefferson County (Missouri) Sheriff's Office initiated a search for the missing airplane working with multiple ground and air assets. Data acquired from the cellular phones in the wreckage were used to help determine the search area. The wreckage was located by air assets in a tree-covered swamp, near the Plattin Creek, on September 21 about 0740 CDT. The wreckage was situated about one quarter of a mile south east of the departure end of runway 19 and about 440 feet above mean sea level. The airplane was equipped with a Pointer 3000 emergency locator transmitter (ELT), Technical Standard Order 91 (operating on 121.5/243.0 megahertz). The U.S. Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, reported no ELT signals were received by their monitoring systems from the accident airplane.

On September 22, the National Transportation Safety Board investigation-in-charge, two aviation safety inspectors from the FAA St. Louis Flight Standards District Office, and air safety investigators from Continental Motors and Textron Aviation traveled to the accident site. The investigative team hiked to the accident site and an examination was conducted on the airframe and engine. During the examination, no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane were noted. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the fuselage, and the empennage. All structural components of the airplane were located at the accident site.

Photograph 1 - Aerial view of the wreckage
 (courtesy of KSDK.com).

No evidence of breaching was observed with the wings that held the fuel tanks. A total of about 2.25 gallons of fuel were extracted from both fuel tanks. The Cessna 150H pilot's operating handbook (POH) states that the maximum capacity for both fuel tanks is 26 gallons total (13 gallons in each tank). The POH further states that the usable fuel amount for all flight conditions is 22.5 gallons total and the unusable fuel amount is 3.5 gallons total.

The alternator and voltage regulator were removed from the wreckage and were retained for future examination and testing. An examination of the maintenance records revealed no evidence of uncorrected mechanical discrepancies with the airplane. Two working handheld flashlights were found in the cockpit. The handheld VHF radio, two cellular phones, and an electronic tablet were recovered from the wreckage and secured.

The U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington, District of Columbia, provided various sun and moon data for the day of the accident for FES. Sunset was 1902, and the end of civil twilight was 1928. Moonrise was 1656, and the moon transit was 2206. The phase of the moon was listed as, "Waxing Gibbous with 83% of the moon's civil disk illuminated."

The two-seat capacity airplane, serial number 15067852, was manufactured in 1967. The airplane was equipped with a 100 horsepower Continental Motors O-200-A carbureted engine, serial number 67630-7-A. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N7152S
Model/Series: 150 H
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCPS, 413 ft msl
Observation Time: 0353 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 180°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Greensburg, IN (I34)
Destination: Festus, MO (FES)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  38.190000, -90.384444 (est)


Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Obituary of Michael Metzger

Michael Gunnar Metzger, age 56, died in the early morning of Friday, September 21st, 2018 when the Cessna 150 he was piloting with his son, Jacob Metzger, crashed while trying to land in Festus, Missouri.

Michael was born on June 13, 1962 in Topeka, Kansas. He grew up around planes. Mike started flying when he was just 13 years old. From there, he joined the US Army. He later transferred to the US Air Force and finally to the Iowa National Guard. During this time, he also flew Medevac helicopters, most notably for the University of Iowa hospital. Once retired from the military, he began flying commercially for American Airlines. He was very active in the local aviation community where he lived, in Hillsboro, Missouri, and was a CO in the Missouri Commemorative Air Force.

In his free time, he was absolutely devoted to his children. He would carry their pictures with him and talk about them to anyone who would listen. He was a true nature lover, and was always excited to talk about his hummingbirds and the waterfall he always wanted in his backyard.

Michael is survived by three children, Aly, JC, and Shane Metzger, and his fiancée, Margo Smith.

A gathering for family and friends to celebrate Mike’s life will be from 4 to 7 pm Tuesday, September 25, 2018, at Gay & Ciha Funeral and Cremation Service in Iowa City. His remains will be buried in his hometown of Collins, NY, along with those of his son, Jacob. A private family service will be held in New York this weekend. To share a thought, memory or condolence please visit the funeral home website @ www.gayandciha.com.

https://gayandciha.com

Obituary of Jacob Metzger

Jacob Alexander Metzger, age 20, died in the early hours of the morning on Friday, September 21, 2018 when the Cessna 150 he and his father, Michael Metzger, were flying crashed while trying to land in Festus, Missouri.

Jacob was born on June 20th, 1998 in Seattle, Washington. From an early age, two things were clear: he loved his friends and family, and he was going to be a pilot. He always knew how to light up a room, and could tell when you needed a hug or a shoulder to cry on. He was always a hardworking kid, whether it was with Maxwell Construction, Texas Roadhouse, or at home fixing his trucks. Jake and his dad would spend entire days with each other, repairing and refurbishing cars, boats, and planes. He always said he was learning to become a pilot, just like his dad. Jacob had been preparing for flight school. The day before the accident, Jacob had piloted the plane himself for two hours, and said that it was the best two hours of his life. Thus it can only be said that Jacob died doing what he loved.

He leaves behind a mother, Jane Taylor, and three siblings, Aly, JC, and Shane Metzger.

A gathering for family and friends to celebrate Jacob’s life will be from 4 to 7 pm Tuesday, September 25, 2018, at Gay & Ciha Funeral and Cremation Service in Iowa City. Per his expressed wishes, his remains will be buried with his father’s in Buffalo, NY. To share a thought, memory or condolence please visit the funeral home website @ www.gayandciha.com.

Jacob was posthumously granted admission to the American Airlines Cadet Academy. He has finally earned his wings.

https://gayandciha.com

JEFFERSON COUNTY • Police have identified a father and son who were killed in a plane crash Friday near Festus after electrical problems made it hard for them to see the runway. 

The sheriff's office identified them as Michael G. Metzger, 56, of Hillsboro and his son, Jacob A. Metzger, 20, through dental records. Jacob Metzger lived in Iowa.

Michael Metzger, a pilot for American Airlines, had been flying the small plane back from New York to refurbish in Festus, where they had a hangar, when the plane crashed about 2 a.m. Friday about 200 to 300 yards from the runway. 

Before trying to land, Metzger texted his fiancée and asked her to stand with flashlights on the runway so he could see where he was going, according to police. The two were texting back and forth, police said.

Police said lights at the airport are not on throughout the evening, but pilots can activate something on their radios to turn the lights on once they get close. Without electrical power, the pilot could not activate the lights.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

https://www.stltoday.com

   

FESTUS, Mo. (KMOV.com) -- An airline pilot and his son were killed Thursday night when their small plane crashed near the Festus Memorial Airport after a mechanical failure.

Authorities haven’t released the names of the father, who was in his mid-50s, and his son, who was in his early 20s.

Festus Memorial Airport Vice President Mike Bippen told News 4 the pilot was very experienced.

"With him being an American Airlines pilot, I mean he's probably got more hours than all of us put together," said Bippen.

According to the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department, the father and son were returning with a Cessna 150 they had purchased in New York which the son planned to use as he pursued a pilot’s license. At some point in the flight, the plane lost all electrical power.

"If he had lost his whole electrical system he wouldn't be able to see inside the cockpit at night. He wouldn't be able to see what his airspeed is, his elevation, you know the heading,” said Bippen.

Like most small airports, Festus Memorial Airport isn’t staffed 24 hours a day and the lights are turned off at night. Pilots can remotely turn them on by clicking the microphone of their radio six times. But the pilot of the Cessna couldn’t do that because of the mechanical problems.

"He texted his fiancée to respond out here to assist in either getting the lights on for the runway or to use a flashlight to indicate the end of the runway,” said Corporal John Kozel with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department.

Kozel said the fiancé went to the airport but couldn’t get the lights on, so she stood at the end of the runway with a flashlight. He said the plane attempted to land but was offline, then crashed as it tried to circle back around for a second attempt.

The plane went down around 10:30 p.m. in a heavily wooded area. During the night, a search was suspended because of the weather but the plane was discovered Friday morning around 7:40 a.m. by a helicopter from Mercy Hospital, which was aiding in the search.

"It's just sad, tragic deal for a nice person and his son to pass this way," said Bippen.

Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration arrived Friday morning and an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board was expected to arrive Friday night or Saturday morning.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kmov.com







JEFFERSON COUNTY • A father and his adult son were killed in a plane crash near Festus after electrical problems made it hard for him to see the runway, authorities said Friday morning.

Before trying to land, the pilot even texted his fiancée and asked her to stand with flashlights on the runway so he could see where he was going, police say.

The single-engine Cessna 150 crashed about 200 to 300 yards from the runway, said Mike Bippen, vice president of CAEE, which runs the airport.

There were no survivors, he said.

The names of the dead haven’t been released. The father was in his 50s and an American Airlines pilot from the Jefferson County area. His son was in his 20s, Bippen said.

The father and son were bringing a plane back from New York. They planned to refurbish it in Festus, where they had a hangar.

Jefferson County Sheriff Dave Marshak said the pilot had reported electrical issues Thursday night. Authorities had been searching for the plane for several hours when they found the wreckage before 8 a.m. Friday.

Marshak said the pilot’s fiancée called police at 2 a.m. Friday. The pilot had contacted her from the plane when he was having electrical problems. Marshak said lights at the airport are not on throughout the evening, but pilots can activate something on their radios to turn the lights on once they get close. Without power, the pilot could not activate the lights.

He asked the woman to stand at the end of the runway with a flashlight so he could try to see where to go, the sheriff said. The man and woman were texting back and forth, Marshak said.

Police tried to get a helicopter in the air for a search but rain hampered that effort. They began a ground search Friday morning. On the south end of the airport, they found the plane in woods near Joachim Creek.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

Bippen, the airport executive, said the father was an experienced pilot for American Airlines. “So he had plenty of hours of flying,” Bippen said.

Bippen said most small airports like the one in Festus have a system where the pilots activate the runway lights by clicking their mic six times. “His plane was having electrical issues, which would mean he probably had no lights on his plane and couldn’t see his instruments,” Bippen said. “We don’t know if he tried to land.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.stltoday.com

Avid Flyer Mk IV, EC-YFP: Fatal accident occurred May 26, 2018 in Loja, Granada, Spain



NTSB Identification: CEN18WA196
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 26, 2018 in Granada, Spain
Aircraft: AVID AVID FLYER, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On May 26, 2018, at 1030 UTC, an Avid Flyer Stol, EC-YFP, encountered a loss of climb during initial climb out and subsequent impact with terrain near Loja Aerodrome, Granada, Spain. The experimental airplane was destroyed; the pilot suffered serious injuries and the passenger was fatally injured. The Avid Flyer had departed on a local flight.

This investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Comisión de Investigación de Accidentes e Incidentes de Aviación Civil (CIAIAC) Spain. Under the provisions of Annex 13 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation as a State of Design, the United States has designated an accredited representative to participate in the investigation. Any further information may be obtained from:

CIAIAC Spain: 
c/ Fruela, 6 
28011 Madrid
Telephone: +34 91 597 8960-63
E-mail: caiiac@fomento.es
Investigator-in-Charge: Mr. Juan A Plaza
Telephone: +34 91 597 8964 
E-mail: japlaza@fomento.es 

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the CIAIAC Spain.








Aviación Civil investiga las causas por las que una aeronave se ha estrellado este mediodía en una zona de olivar de Loja (Granada), accidente en el que ha fallecido un hombre de 55 años y ha resultado herido muy grave un joven de 25, ambos vecinos de la provincia de Málaga.

Según han informado a Efe fuentes de la Guardia Civil, que inicialmente se hizo cargo del suceso, será personal especializado de Aviación Civil el que investigue las causas del accidente mortal registrado sobre las 12.30 horas en una zona de olivar ubicada en Loja (Granada).

Del suceso alertó un conductor que ha visto cómo la avionetas se estrellaba en un paraje agrícola a la altura del kilómetro 178 de la A-92, sentido Sevilla, punto hasta el que se han desplazado agentes de la Guardia Civil y el helicóptero de este cuerpo armado, la Policía Local y los Bomberos de Loja y Protección Civil.

La Guardia Civil también ha precisado que la aeronave había salido de un aeródromo ubicado en Campillos (Málaga) y no de las instalaciones civiles de Cuesta de la Palma de Loja, con una ruta programada que incluía dar una vuelta por la comarca de Granada en la que se ha estrellado y regresar al punto de salida, según comunicó al aeropuerto de Granada.

El accidente se ha saldado con la muerte de un hombre de 55 años y vecino de Málaga que volaba acompañado de un joven de 25 años de Vélez Málaga, que ha sufrido múltiples fracturas y ha sido evacuado en helicóptero hasta el hospital malagueño Carlos Haya, centro en el que ha ingresado en estado muy grave.

De momento no ha trascendido quién pilotaba la aeronave y se investigan las causas del accidente, que se ha producido con buena climatología y sin niebla.

https://www.diariosur.es

de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver, N121AK: Accident occurred September 20, 2018 in Igiugig, Alaska

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N121AK

Location: Igiugig, AK
Accident Number: GAA18CA565
Date & Time: 09/20/2018, 1530 AKD
Registration: N121AK
Aircraft: De Havilland DHC 2
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 1 Minor, 6 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

The pilot of the float-equipped airplane reported that, during the initial climb after a water takeoff, about 200 ft, he turned right, and the engine lost power. He immediately switched fuel tanks and attempted to restart the engine to no avail. The airplane descended and struck trees, the right wing impacted terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector that, during the initial climb, after the engine lost power, he noticed that the center tank, which was selected for takeoff, was empty. He added that passengers stated that the engine did regain power after switching tanks, but the airplane had already struck trees.

The pilot reported as a recommendation to more closely follow checklists. 

Pilot Information


Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 59, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/10/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/01/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 12496 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5000 hours (Total, this make and model), 10632 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 198 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 60 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: De Havilland
Registration: N121AK
Model/Series: DHC 2 I
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1951
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 121
Landing Gear Type: Float
Seats: 8
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: P&W
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: R-985
Registered Owner: Rainbow River Lodge Llc
Rated Power: 450 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAIG, 90 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2328 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 211°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 5 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 800 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:220° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Rain; Moderate - Mist
Departure Point: Igiugig, AK
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1530 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries:1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor, 5 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 6 None
Latitude, Longitude: 59.325000, -155.900833 (est)


Multiple people suffered "minor non-life threatening injuries" as the result of a plane crash near the Bristol Bay village of Igiugig, according to Alaska State Troopers.

AST said the Dehavilland DHC-2 float plane operated by a lodge in the area was carrying seven people when it crashed shortly after taking off Thursday afternoon.

The plane was operated by Rainbow River Lodge, AST spokesperson Megan Peters later confirmed. 

One person was transported to a local clinic for their injuries. 

The National Transportation Safety Board has been notified. No further information is available at this time. 

Igiugig is a remote village of about 50 people, situated at the mouth of the Kvichak River on Lake Iliamna and is part of the Lake and Peninsula Borough. 


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.ktva.com

A plane crashed Thursday afternoon near the village of Igiugig. Alaska State Troopers say seven people were onboard the Dehavilland DHC-2, which was operated by local lodge. All survived. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, two onboard suffered minor injuries, and there was substantial damage to the aircraft. 

The National Transportation Safety Board has been notified, and troopers will continue to investigate. The cause of the crash has not been confirmed.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kdlg.org

Piper PA-28-180, N703TK: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 in Agua Caliente Springs, San Diego County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Made emergency landing on a dirt road.

Lorimar Group Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N703TK

Date: 20-SEP-18
Time: 22:12:00Z
Regis#: N703TK
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28 180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS
State: CALIFORNIA

Mooney M20J, N66201: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 at Kalaeloa Airport (PHJR), Hawaii

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Landed gear up.

Perly Aviation Inc Trustee

https://registry.faa.gov/N66201

Date: 20-SEP-18
Time: 02:20:00Z
Regis#: N66201
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: KAPOLEI
State: HAWAII

Boeing PT-17 Kaydet, N34KS: Accident occurred September 15, 2018 at Morris Municipal Airport (C09), Grundy County, Illinois

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; DuPage, Illinois

While on landing roll, aircraft suffered damaged to upper and lower wing tip due to drifting into Bellanca 7ECA, N8503.

https://registry.faa.gov/N34KS

Date: 15-SEP-18
Time: 15:15:00Z
Regis#: N34KS
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: PT 17
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MORRIS
State: ILLINOIS

Hiller UH-12E, N1349A: Accident occurred September 20, 2018 in Frankfort, Marshall County, Kansas

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

https://registry.faa.gov/N1349A

Location: Frankfort, KS
Accident Number: GAA18CA573
Date & Time: 09/20/2018, 0730 CDT
Registration: N1349A
Aircraft: Hiller UH 12E
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Unknown or undetermined
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 133: Rotorcraft Ext. Load 

The pilot in the skid-equipped helicopter reported that he established a hover over a seeding bucket, so that the bucket could be attached to the helicopter's cargo hook by the ground crew. One of the ground crewmembers grabbed the skid while trying to connect the bucket, and the helicopter descended. The main rotor blades struck the auger on the seed tender. The helicopter came to rest upright, on top of a grass bale in front of the seed tender.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the main rotor and the tail rotor drive systems.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Center
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/02/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 11030 hours (Total, all aircraft), 6980 hours (Total, this make and model), 10925 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 59 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 54 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Hiller
Registration: N1349A
Model/Series: UH 12E Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1960
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 2035
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 3
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/02/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4654.1 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: VO-540-C2A
Registered Owner: Sky Copters Inc.
Rated Power: 340 hp
Operator: Sky Copters Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137); Rotorcraft External Load (133)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBIE, 1324 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 39 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1215 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 337°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 13 knots / 16 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.79 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 20°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Frankfort, KS
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Frankfort, KS
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0730 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.705556, -96.416944 (est)

Piper PA-22-135 Tri-Pacer, N3544A: Accident occurred September 17, 2018 at Hillsdale Municipal Airport (KJYM), Michigan

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; East Michigan, Michigan

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N3544A

Location: Hillsdale, MI
Accident Number: GAA18CA560
Date & Time: 09/17/2018, 1800 EDT
Registration: N3544A
Aircraft: Piper PA22
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

The pilot reported that, during landing, he flared too high and the airplane aerodynamically stalled. He added that the airplane landed hard, the nose landing gear collapsed, the airplane veered to the right off the runway into the dirt and nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, fuselage, and empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N3544A
Model/Series: PA22 135
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1954
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 22-1818
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1951 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O-290-D2
Registered Owner: Jason Ingalls
Rated Power: 135 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KJYM, 1182 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2215 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 117°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 10000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 350°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.9 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hillsdale, MI (JYM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hillsdale, MI (JYM)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1800 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: HILLSDALE MUNI (JYM)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1184 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 10
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  41.921667, -84.587778 (est)

Schleicher ASK 13, N545TT: Incident occurred September 13, 2018 at Richmond Field Airport (69G), Gregory, Livingston County, Michigan

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Michigan

Hard landing.

Sandhill Soaring Club

https://registry.faa.gov/N545TT

Date: 13-SEP-18
Time: 21:40:00Z
Regis#: N545TT
Aircraft Make: SCHLEICHER
Aircraft Model: AS K13
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: GREGORY
State: MICHIGAN

Beech V35B Bonanza, N1120M: Incident occurred September 20, 2018 at Minden-Tahoe Airport (KMEV), Douglas County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Gear up landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N1120M

Date: 20-SEP-18
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N1120M
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: V35B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MINDEN
State: NEVADA