Sunday, May 21, 2017

Restaurants and a warehouse proposed for Braden Airpark (N43), Forks Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania



The proposed development of three restaurants and a warehouse at Braden Airpark could give the small-plane airfield a long, prosperous future, but is it right for Forks Township's future?

That's a decision township officials face after J.G. Petrucci Co. laid out development plans that could bring enough money to rebuild the outdated airport that's been home to small-plane pilots since the Great Depression. But it would also bring cars and potentially tractor-trailers into a part of the township already struggling with traffic, said Eric Chuss, a township supervisor and small plane pilot.

"I can't speak for the entire board, but a plan that includes a large warehouse at Braden isn't something we'd generally be interested in moving forward with," Chuss said. "I think there are some things that would be appropriate there, but we have some concerns about this."

For now, the plan is little more than a trial balloon floated by New Jersey-based Petrucci, which was the only developer to respond to a request by the Lehigh-Northampton Airport Authority for proposals to redevelop Braden. Three years ago the authority considered closing the airport and selling it for development, causing a backlash from pilots and officials from Forks Township and Northampton County. With help from a $250,000 county grant, the authority has since decided to keep it open and perform roughly $500,000 of overdue improvements. 

But a $2.7 million plan to rebuild the 1,956 foot long runway, construct a new terminal and add several hangars to attract more pilots to base their planes there can't happen unless the authority can raise money by leasing unused parts of the airport to business tenants.

That's where the Petrucci plan comes in. It would cover roughly half of the 72-acre airport, building a cafe at the corner of Sullivan Trail and Uhler Road, along with two other restaurants just north of the Braden runway. South of the runway, on 31 acres, would be a 350,000 square-foot warehouse that would allow truck access from Bushkill Drive.

But to do all that, Forks Township would have to change the zoning on the property from recreation, education and and municipal to employment center district, which allows light industrial manufacturing and retail.

It would also need the approval of the airport authority. It's unclear who the tenants would be, or even how much traffic it would create.

"These are the uses we believe would generate interest," said Martin Till, Petrucci's regional president. "This is all very preliminary. Until we know what the township will approve, there's no point developing a business model."

After a meeting with Petrucci officials two weeks ago, township officials drafted a list of concerns that would likely need to be addressed before the land could be considered for rezoning, Chuss said.

"I think we'd like assurances that the airfield would remain open and I think we'd like to see businesses that relate to the airport, such as a restaurant connected to the terminal, an aircraft maintenance business and maybe a flight school," Chuss said. "I know a lot of people will have concerns about the traffic. Whatever goes there, we'd have to have a discussion about how the traffic would impact the area."

For some pilots, seeing their beloved airfield chopped in half would be a bitter pill. Opened in 1938 as Easton Airport by packaged-meat seller Edwin Braden, the airport was a place where thousands of pilots learned to fly. In 1999 — by then it was renamed Braden Airpark — the authority took over operations. But when it considered selling Braden in 2014, the uncertainty caused the flight school to leave, and more than half of its 70 pilots took their planes to other airports.

Redevelopment is seen as key to bringing back that heyday. The man who shares a name with the airport endorses development there, even if it means shrinking the airpark. Paul Braden, a retired Lutheran minister from Easton, remembers how pilots used to flock to his family's airport and how many friends taught their children to fly there. Still, the idea of people ordering hamburgers at a drive-through or truckers loading goods on land where people use to park their planes doesn't bother him.

"There was a time decades ago when people would land their Piper Cubs on that grassy area where they would build the warehouse, but today you can only use the runway. That part of the airport hasn't really been in use for years," said Braden, who still bases the Piper Cherokee he leases with four other pilots at the airfield. "It's up to the township to decide whether they want a warehouse, but for me, I see nothing there that gets in the way of flight activities."

For Braden, the debate is a good thing because it means the airpark has a future.

"Not long ago, it seemed like it didn't have a future," he said. "But now there's a lot of reason to be hopeful. All I can do is root for it to happen."

Original article can be found here:  http://www.mcall.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N740SP, Jet Air Inc: Accident occurred June 10, 2015 in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Illinois

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Jet Air Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N740SP

NTSB Identification: GAA15CA161
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 10, 2015 in Galesburg, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/12/2015
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N740SP
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During a 50 hour maintenance inspection, an airframe and powerplant mechanic discovered that the airplane's firewall was substantially damaged. The operator was not able to determine when the accident flight occurred or the pilot responsible.

The airplane's last maintenance inspection occurred about three months prior to the discovery. Numerous pilots flew the airplane during that period, none of which reported an event that would result in damage to the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
Firewall damage reported by maintenance personnel that occurred during an unknown phase of flight, because the accident flight and pilot could not be determined.

JetBlue momentum losing steam - Tallahassee, Florida

Efforts to snag JetBlue aren't taking off at the speed local officials hoped.

The campaign seems to have lost momentum, despite glossy "GetBlue" campaigns, the Legislature's $1-million funding offer and promises to use services through written commitments from local universities and businesses.

City officials all but rolled out the red carpet to coax the New York-based carrier to provide direct flights from Tallahassee to Fort Lauderdale. So far, JetBlue is a no show. City Commissioner Scott Maddox, who's spearheading airport improvement efforts, said JetBlue was impressed with Tallahassee's community effort. The capital city made a case for service, he said, but JetBlue wants to serve secondary routes, too.

"We won’t see any movement in 2017, but we’re hopeful for 2018," Maddox said, adding he knows what's at stake. "If we are going to have meaningful economic development in Tallahassee, we have to have more flights out of our airport and that’s why I have been working so hard at this."

. Tallahassee's economy, long dominated by public sector jobs, has shown growth. Unemployment continues to decline and other economic indicators, including consumer spending, have improved compared to recent years. The population in Tallahassee's Metropolitan Service Area is 378,593 residents and shows a steady increase.

The airport often features in talks about Tallahassee's economy. Even during last week's Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce trip to Nashville, Tennessee, gripes surfaced over the high cost of airfare and the limited flight options. Some said the lack of options is a deterrent to new businesses, who then turn to other communities to open plants or to expand existing facilities. The airport issue, they said, must be a priority.

"It's a work in progress," City Aviation Director Chris Curry said, regarding JetBlue. "As long as they continue to meet with us, the conversation isn’t dead. They have a timetable and sometimes what they have going, it may affect something else ... It’s only dead with airlines when you stop meeting with them to get new service.”

Dual city-community campaigns have taken place to lure JetBlue. Sachs Media Group, a Tallahassee public relations firm, orchestrated the campaign pro bono. The GetBlue campaign drew more than $2 million in local pledges and more than $1 million in Broward pledges to book JetBlue flights.

Curry and Maddox have met with JetBlue officials on several occasions in an effort to close a deal. Curry, who meets with various airlines about four times a year, said he plans to have another meeting next month.

"I’ll continue to do that in the hopes that Tallahassee is a place they want to be,” he said.

Tallahassee has a checkered history when it comes to improving the city's limited flight options. Citing a lack of profitability, AirTran Airways ended its flights from Tallahassee to Atlanta and Tampa in 2004. A few years ago, Tallahassee landed direct service to Washington D.C. through US Airways. When the airline consolidated with United Airlines, the route was axed.

In the case of JetBlue, the city is offering more than $1 million in incentives during the carrier's first year. The package includes covering JetBlue's landing and fuel fees and start-up expenses. The incentives would be paid for using a $1-million grant awarded by the Legislature this year, plus $25,000 in in-kind donations from the chamber, $40,000 from the Tourist Development Council and about $270,000 from airport funds, which Curry hopes will be covered by revenues.

Maddox, mayor from 1997 to 2003, said Tallahassee's airport is in better shape than other similar Florida cities, including Gainesville and Melbourne. He's gone to great lengths to snare meetings with airport presidents and CEOs. When he learned former Southwest Airlines CEO Herb Kelleher was in Jefferson County, Maddox did some research and found out Kelleher's interests.

Maddox has told the story often. He made sure Kelleher had a box of cigars and a bottle of Booker's Bourbon, along with a note to consider Tallahassee for airfare service. That got the city in the door for a meeting. But no service.

Maddox heard then what he's heard before: Tallahassee's proximity to several hubs, such as Jacksonville and Atlanta, hurts the airport's chances of adding more flights to the lineup.

“I think the airport is a tremendous asset," said Tallahassee City Manager Rick Fernandez, adding a JetBlue deal isn't "imminent" but conversations will continue. "The number of flights and the economics of it is a whole different deal. As an airport operator, the city has very little control over that. It’s a matter of the market. The airlines will price the commodity as they see fit.”

Built in 1989, Tallahassee's airport added "international" to its name status in 2015. At this time, that allows the airport to be a stopping point for international cargo — not travelers. While city officials say the international designation is a leap toward bringing more offerings to the airport, some Nashville trip-goers noted comments from the community where people are "laughing at us."

The terminal has undergone a $12-million makeover and renovations to refresh the outdated interior with new terrazzo tiles throughout that showcase branches of state and local government, Florida State and Florida A&M universities and Tallahassee Community College.

Top-down changes were made to the airline ticket and rental counters, the flooring, ceiling tiles, lighting and in-line baggage handling system. The airport gallery is now larger and stretches across the wall facing the ticket counters. A new visitor counter, manned by volunteers, offers information for not only the airport but the region.

Officials tout the improvements as being part of the grand plan to attract more carriers and services.

Time will tell.

Original article can be found here: http://www.tallahassee.com

Sea & Sky Cygnet, N59AT: Accident occurred June 01, 2015 in Panama City, Bay County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA230
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 01, 2015 in Panama City Beach, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/20/2017
Aircraft: SEA & SKY INC DBA KRUCKER ACFT CYGNET, registration: N59AT
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial airplane pilot reported that, during his first solo flight in his new weight-shift-controlled aircraft, he experienced an unstable feeling when he started a right turn. While attempting to roll the aircraft straight and level, it rolled into an uncontrollable, "steep" left turn and entered an aerodynamic stall before crashing into the water below. It is likely that when the pilot attempted to correct the initial roll to the right, the aircraft rolled past 90° of bank, to a condition where the pendulum stability, which kept the fuselage below the wing, ceased to act, resulting in the loss of control. Postaccident examination of the aircraft revealed that several of the hardware components attaching the wing to the trike had fractured; however, examination of the fractures revealed that they all exhibited features consistent with overstress due to impact, and no evidence of preexisting damage was observed.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's loss of aircraft control, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N59AT

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA230
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 01, 2015 in Panama City Beach, FL
Aircraft: SEA & SKY INC DBA KRUCKER ACFT CYGNET, registration: N59AT
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 1, 2015, about 1905 central daylight time, a Sea & Sky INC Cygnet weight-shift-control aircraft, N59AT, was substantially damaged when it impacted the water near Panama City, Florida. The commercial pilot was seriously injured. The aircraft was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the personal flight, which departed Panama City Beach, Florida at 1905.

According to the pilot, this was his first solo flight in his new aircraft after a sign off by his instructor. He stated that after takeoff, he climbed the to approximately 300 feet and leveled off. He began a turn to the right and noted an "unstable" feeling in the flight controls. He attempted to roll the aircraft to straight and level, it continued to the left and rolled into an uncommanded "steep" left banking turn. The pilot was unable to maintain control of the aircraft; subsequently it entered an aerodynamic stall and impacted the water.

According to the pilot's son he watched as the aircraft departed St. Andrews Bay. He said that as the aircraft began a slight right turn, it began to oscillate from left to right while descending. At about 50 feet above the bay the aircraft turned to the right in a 90° bank before "crashing" into bay. A review of a video recording revealed that the pilot was in stable flight prior to the accident. In a statement made to the NTSB; the pilot's son assisted with the postaccident recovery of the aircraft and noted the wing assembly was separated from its fuselage attachment point, and was being held on by cables before the aircraft was recovered.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector examined the airplane after the accident. According to the inspector, the wing and fuselage (trike) were buckled, and the aluminum hang block attachment and three attachment bolts had fractured. The hang block assembly was forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for further examination.

The hang block assembly consisted of a strap and saddle. The saddle was attached to the strap by three flush-head bolts on each side of the strap. The strap for the saddle was fractured on both sides through the three saddle attachment holes on the right side and the forward saddle attachment hole on the left side. Bolts for attaching the right side of the saddle to the strap were sheared. The lower fracture surfaces through the strap at the left and right had an overall twisting deformation, and both fracture surfaces had a uniform rough matte gray appearance consistent with ductile overstress fracture. The saddle attachment bolts on the right side of the saddle were fractured. The fracture features and associated deformation and contact damage were consistent with shear fracture.

The United Kingdom's Air Accidents Investigations Branch (AAIB) commissioned a safety study of the tumble mode, a peculiarity of weight-shift-control aircraft. This safety study described the inherent spiral instability of the aircraft type. According to the report, "Many weightshift microlight aircraft are spirally unstable (particularly at higher power settings); thus, an initial small bank angle is likely to increase without (unless horizon reference is available) the pilot's ability to control it. The aircraft would roll, potentially past 90° of bank to a condition where the pendulum stability which keeps the trike below the wing ceases to act – inevitably causing some loss of control."

Cessna 182S, N378ES: Accident occurred May 21, 2017 in West Chester, Chester County, Pennsylvania

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N378ES 


NTSB Identification: ERA17LA185
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, May 21, 2017 in West Chester, PA
Aircraft: CESSNA 180S, registration: N378ES
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 21, 2017, about 1355 eastern daylight time, a privately owned and operated Cessna 182S, N378ES, was substantially damaged when it impacted a utility pole and terrain during a forced landing near West Chester, Pennsylvania. The private pilot was not injured. The flight departed Trenton Mercer Airport (TTN), Trenton, New Jersey at about 1330, and was destined for Montgomery County Airpark (GAI), Gaithersburg, Maryland. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, about 20 minutes into the flight at an altitude of about 5,000 ft mean sea level, he noticed a loss of oil pressure, and the oil pressure warning light illuminated about 1 minute later. The cylinder head temperature and oil temperature indications were normal. He declared an emergency with air traffic control, and received vectors to the Brandywine Airport (OQN), West Chester, Pennsylvania. A few minutes later the engine began to "shudder" making it difficult to control the airplane. At that time, the oil temperature was "high up on the gauge" and he decided to shut down the engine. About 3 miles from OQN, he determined the airplane would likely not reach the airport, and he prepared for an off-airport landing in a nearby field. During the approach to the field he noticed powerlines obstructing his path. Unable to climb above them, he descended and attempted to fly underneath the wires; however, the left wing struck a utility pole. The airplane impacted the ground and came to rest about 200 ft beyond the pole.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the left wing was separated from the fuselage, the elevator and rudder were damaged. Oil streaks were observed along the fuselage belly. An initial examination of the engine revealed that metal fragments were trapped in the oil suction screen. About 1/4 quart of oil was found in the sump. The No. 6 piston did not move when the engine was rotated by hand.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, helicopter, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued April 6, 2016. The pilot reported 2,100 hours of total flight experience of which 1,200 were in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

The pilot reported that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on September 9, 2016, about 25 flight hours prior to the accident. The engine had accrued 2,250 hours since new, and about 860 hours since overhaul.

The engine was retained for further examination.


E. BRADFORD TOWNSHIP, Pennsylvania -   Authorities with the Federal Aviation Administration report, “A Cessna 182S aircraft made an emergency landing in a field in West Chester, PA at about 2:55pm today.”

The pilot was the only person on board. His condition has not been released but earlier reports said there were no injuries.

The plane took off from Trenton Mercer Airport in N.J. and was headed to Gaithersburg, Md.

It landed near Route 322 (Downingtown Pike) and Frank Road, which is just to the north.

The FAA will investigate what went wrong.

Story and video:  http://www.fox29.com








A small plane made an emergency landing in Chester County Sunday afternoon. 

The plane landed near Rt. 322 and Frank Road in West Chester, Pennsylvania around 2 p.m. 

Pat Poole told NBC10 she was at her granddaughter’s softball game at Copeland School Park nearby when she saw the plane coming down low. She then heard a crashing noise, walked up over a hill where she was sitting and found the plane on the ground in a grassy area. The pilot was out of the aircraft, uninjured, according to Poole.

Poole told NBC10 the left wing of the plane clipped a telephone pole, bringing down wires. There was also gas leaking from the plane. No one was hurt during the incident however. Police and firefighters responded to the scene.

Rt. 322 is currently closed between Copeland School Road and Frank Road as officials investigate.

Original article can be found here: http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com

Eurocopter AS-350 BA, N504WD, Hat Creek Helicopters LLC: Accident occurred May 04, 2015 at Ravalli County Airport (6S5), Hamilton, Montana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana
Bureau d'Enquetes et d'Analyses; Paris

Investigation Docket- National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Hat Creek Helicopters LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N504WD

NTSB Identification: GAA15LA083
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 04, 2015 in Hamilton, MT
Aircraft: AIRBUS AS-350, registration: N504WD
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 4, 2015 about 1045 mountain daylight time, an Airbus AS-350 BA helicopter, N504WD, had a hard landing during a practice hovering autorotation at the Ravalli County Airport (6S5) in Hamilton, Montana. The flight instructor and the pilot receiving instruction were not injured. The helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to Hat Creek Helicopters LLC, Hamilton, Montana, and operated by the flight instructor as a day, visual flight rules instruction flight under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Ravalli County Airport (6S5), Hamilton, Montana.

The flight instructor reported that during hovering autorotation training, the pilot receiving instruction pulled in too much collective pitch, the helicopter ballooned, and subsequently landed hard. The flight instructor reported that they performed several additional training maneuvers and then landed without further incident. A postflight inspection revealed substantial damage to the tailboom. 

The flight instructor reported that it was difficult to control the throttle (fuel flow control lever - FFCL) due to its location, mounted on the pedestal between the front seats, necessitating the release of either the cyclic or collective control to manipulate the FFCL. Further, not having an idle detent, made the pilot/instructor vulnerable to inadvertently shutting down the engine while trying to manipulate the throttle for training or emergency purposes. He reported that the accident could have been prevented had the throttle been co-located on the collective as in other helicopter designs he'd flown, allowing the pilot/instructor to manipulate the throttle without relinquishing control of the collective or cyclic controls. 

He further explained that seated in the left seat, he had to lean over the center console to the right, to control the FFCL. While in this position, he was unable to prevent the pilot on the controls from pulling too much collective, resulting in a drop in main rotor RPM as the helicopter ballooned. He added that he felt that if there was a governor or tail rotor problem, he would not be in position to handle the emergency while trying to manipulate three controls with two hands. 

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector stated in the FAA Form 8020-23 Accident/Incident Report, (June 2015), "Due to the location of the throttle on the AS-350 BA and no idle detent, it is difficult for a flight instructor sitting in the left seat to manipulate the throttle."

The flight instructor verified that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Fuel Flow Control Lever Design

The accident helicopter had a control quadrant located on the floor between the pilot's seat (right) and left front seat. The quadrant was comprised of a rotor brake lever, a fuel flow control lever, and a fuel shut-off lever. The fuel flow control lever is the center lever. The lever's track is designed with three positions and two detents that require the pilot to pull the lever to the right to move out of the detent and move the lever forward or back. The lever is made of thin spring steel and is easily flexed to the right. The upper detent serves as the stop (fuel cut-off) and start position. The second detent serves as the flight position. This position automatically meters fuel to the engine based on power demands. When moved out of flight position detent and forward, the emergency range is entered. 

Cockpit Restraint System Testing 

During November 2015, the cockpit restraint system with a floor mounted FFCL was tested for compliance with 14 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 27 Airworthiness Standards: Normal Category Rotorcraft and FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 27-1B Certification of Normal Category Rotorcraft. 

§27.777 Cockpit controls

Cockpit controls must be—

(a) Located to provide convenient operation and to prevent confusion and inadvertent operation; and 

(b) Located and arranged with respect to the pilots' seats so that there is full and unrestricted movement of each control without interference from the cockpit structure or the pilot's clothing when pilots from 5'2" to 6'0" in height are seated. 

Essential controls should be evaluated with the shoulder harness locked in the retracted position.

The following are examples of cockpit control issues which should be avoided:

(iv) Control/seat relationship which requires unusual pilot contortions at extreme control displacements.

(viii) Controls for accessories or equipment which require a two-handed operation.

(x) Essential controls which cannot be actuated during emergency conditions with the shoulder harness locked.

(xi) Throttle controls which can be inadvertently moved through idle to the cutoff position.

(xii) Switches, buttons, or other controls which can be inadvertently activated during routine cockpit activity including cockpit entry.

The tests were conducted by an FAA airworthiness inspector at the request of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator in charge (IIC). 

The inspector tested the cockpit restraint system with personnel of varying heights. The four-point cockpit restraint system had an inertia reel with a manual lock. He reported that the test subjects reached the floor mounted control quadrant, but none were able to grab the controls with a full or partially closed hand. With the FFCL in the "flight" gate, the test subjects were able to reach it with the first segments of their fingers and fingertips. The same minimal accessibility was reported for the fuel shutoff lever. He also surmised that during a violent oscillation of a helicopter during a crash, it would be impossible to control the FFCL.

An example of a violent oscillation in a helicopter accident sequence can be viewed in the video footage of WPR16FA029 (Airbus AS-350 B3 accident).

NTSB report MIA07TA017 (AS-350 BA) reported that the pilot removed his hand from the collective to manipulate the FFCL during an emergency. The pilot had slowly advanced the FFCL to the flight gate detent, when he observed a sudden spike in torque and then heard the engine begin to rev rapidly. The helicopter started to shake violently and bounce on the ground. He attempted to close the fuel shutoff valve; however, the collective control rose each time he released it, when attempting to close the FFCL, lifting the helicopter off the ground.

NTSB report CEN11FA599 (AS-350 B2) reported in the Party Submission on the design of the FFCL that, "Because of this design, the pilot must remove his hand from the collective flight control to alter the engine RPM. Additionally, the floor mounted fuel flow lever does not have an "idle detent" that would normally provide a pilot with a tactile indication or a physical stop at the engine idle point. Without the tactile feedback or physical "stop" it is possible to inadvertently reduce engine RPM below idle and potentially cause the engine to shut down. Due to the design limitation, the aircraft manufacturer has a restriction when conducting engine failure training. 

A08A0007 (AS-350 BA, Canada) discussed the FFCL having no idle detent position, "Because there is no physical stop between the flight detent and the stop detent, it is possible that the FFCL was inadvertently set at or accidently moved to a position that caused the engine to spool down."

SL 2013/11 (AS-350 BA, Norway) reported that the FFCL having no idle detent position, "Thus there is a risk of an inadvertent shut-down of the engine while reducing the FFCL to set the engine at idle."

The FAA published Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 16006 in June 2016. This SAFO discusses the location of the hydraulic switch for the Bell UH-1 series helicopter and showed that in a recent accident, due to the aircraft configuration, the pilot was forced to remove his hand from the collective, place it on the cyclic so he could reach across with his right hand to shut off the hydraulic switch. This action of removing the pilot's hand from the collective control, might have created a situation where control of the helicopter was compromised.

Governor Failure Procedure – Excessive Fuel Flow Rate

An internal FAA memorandum (April 2010) from the Systems Safety and Analysis Branch (AAL-240) to the Recommendations and Analysis Division (AAI-200) discusses the emergency procedures for a governor failure (excessive fuel flow rate) and states in part:

The emergency procedure requires the pilot to release the collective control while flying to modulate fuel flow with the fuel flow control lever. When a collective input is made the fuel lever would have to be readjusted. Modulating fuel in the manual governor mode while flying without collective input at low level and maneuvering would be nearly impossible. 

14 CFR Part 27 Airworthiness Standards: Normal Category Rotorcraft prescribes airworthiness standards for the issue of type certificates, and changes to those certificates, for normal category rotorcraft with maximum weights of 7,000 pounds or less and nine or less passenger seats. Additional information on the human factors aspect of cockpit control design can be found in the FAA Human Factors Division report DOT/FAA/TC-13/44 Human Factors Considerations in the Design and Evaluation of Flight Deck Displays and Controls (2013).

§27.771 Pilot compartment

For each pilot compartment—

(b) If there is provision for a second pilot, the rotorcraft must be controllable with equal safety from either pilot seat; and 

§27.777 Cockpit controls

Cockpit controls must be—

(a) Located to provide convenient operation and to prevent confusion and inadvertent operation; and 

(b) Located and arranged with respect to the pilots' seats so that there is full and unrestricted movement of each control without interference from the cockpit structure or the pilot's clothing when pilots from 5'2" to 6'0" in height are seated. 

Essential controls should be evaluated with the shoulder harness locked in the retracted position.

As background, the following are examples of cockpit control issues which should be avoided:

(iv) Control/seat relationship which requires unusual pilot contortions at extreme control displacements.

(viii) Controls for accessories or equipment which require a two-handed operation.

(x) Essential controls which cannot be actuated during emergency conditions with the shoulder harness locked.

(xi) Throttle controls which can be inadvertently moved through idle to the cutoff position.

(xii) Switches, buttons, or other controls which can be inadvertently activated during routine cockpit activity including cockpit entry.

§27.1143 Engine controls

(d) If a power control incorporates a fuel shutoff feature, the control must have a means to prevent the inadvertent movement of the control into the shutoff position. The means must— 

(1) Have a positive lock or stop at the idle position; and 

(2) Require a separate and distinct operation to place the control in the shutoff position. 

(4) If throttle controls incorporate a fuel shut-off feature, a means should be provided to prevent inadvertent movement to the shut-off position. This means should--

(i) Provide a positive lock or stop at the idle position. An idle detent (mechanical or electrical/mechanical such as solenoid) is an accepted arrangement. 

(ii) Require a separate and distinct operation to place the control in the shut-off position. Separate action (switch or button) to displace the idle stop or distinct offsets in throttle motion to allow movement from the idle stop to shutoff are accepted arrangements. 

In its 2006 study of the aircraft certification process, the NTSB made two recommendations to the FAA concerning human/aircraft interaction issues in the certification of aircraft. Safety Recommendation A-06-37 asked the FAA to — amend the advisory materials associated with 14…[CFR] 25.1309 to include consideration of structural failures and human/airplane system interaction failures in the assessment of safety-critical systems. 

Safety Recommendation A-06-38 asked the FAA to… require a program for the monitoring and ongoing assessment of safety-critical systems throughout the life cycle of the airplane… Once in place, use this program to validate that the underlying assumptions made during design and type certification about safety-critical systems are consistent with operational experience, lessons learned, and new knowledge.

Jetstar plane that took off after curfew at Queenstown Airport to be investigated

A breach of regulations by Queenstown Airport has been described as disappointing and concerning.

A Jetstar flight left the resort on Saturday at 10.14pm - 14 minutes after the airport's approved operating hours ceased.

Queenstown Lakes Mayor Jim Boult said the incident would be investigated.

"We are very disappointed this has occurred because it is clearly a breach of the agreement and also a breach of trust with residents at Frankton.

"It is something we are concerned about."

Airport management made him aware of the breach yesterday morning.

Airways New Zealand and Jetstar will also be involved in the investigation.

Mr. Boult welcomed the airport's proactive approach.

"It is very clear from its actions, and the airline's actions, they are also taking it seriously. They have undertaken to investigate the matter fully and we expect to be informed of the outcome of that.

"We also expect to hear how they plan to ensure this doesn't happen again."

Frankton resident Barbara Williams said the breach should not have occurred.

"There is absolutely no reason why the aircraft should have been let go after 10 o'clock. The curfew is set - we only get eight hours in a 24-hour day where we have silence ... that is the only thing it has to do."

The airport issued an apology to residents, but Ms. Williams said that was not enough.

"It really upsets me that it cannot stick to a ruling. It breached its own curfew ... it was its [the airport's] promise. It is taking the absolute mickey out of its own word. It is not good enough."

The airport's general manager of operations and safety, Mike Clay, agreed.

He supported the concerns raised by the mayor and residents.

"The outcome of this investigation will ensure we have processes in place to make sure this doesn't happen again.

"At the end of the day, a curfew is a curfew and it is not a flexible thing. We don't expect it to be breached."

He confirmed the aircraft should have departed earlier but was delayed because of snow.

Mr. Clay said he would talk to Airways, Jetstar and airport staff today about the situation.

Jetstar put the delay down to weather conditions.

The JQ 220 flight was scheduled to depart for Australia at 8.45pm.

An emailed media statement said: "The freezing snow conditions in Queenstown on Saturday caused delays to our international services as de-icing of the aircraft was required prior to departure.

"Our pilots received permission to depart Queenstown after the 10pm curfew and the flight to Melbourne was airborne at 10.14pm. We apologize for any inconvenience caused to local residents by the later departure time."

Original article can be found here: http://www.nzherald.co.nz

Cessna 140, N2514N: Accident occurred April 30, 2015 near Crescent Lake State Airport (5S2), Klamath County, Oregon

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hillsboro, Oregon

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N2514N 

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA155
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 30, 2015 in Crescent Lake, OR
Aircraft: CESSNA 140, registration: N2514N
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 30, 2015, about 1947 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 140, N2514N, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a loss of engine power, near the Crescent Lake State Airport (5S2) Crescent Lake, Oregon. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The airline transport pilot was not injured and the passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight originated from Rogue Valley International - Medford Airport, Medford, Oregon, about 1830, with a destination of Sisters Eagle Air Airport, Sisters, Oregon.

The pilot reported that during cruise flight, about 7,500 feet mean sea level (msl), the engine lost power after the selected fuel tank was run empty. He switched fuel tanks, and made several attempts to restart the engine but was unsuccessful. Subsequently, the pilot realized that he would not be able to make the nearest airport, and initiated a forced landing on a nearby road, about two miles south of 5S2. During the approach and landing roll, the airplane struck several trees but remained upright.

A postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the right wing sustained substantial damage. The airplane was recovered and further examination of the airplane by a FAA inspector revealed the continuity of the fuel from the wing tanks to the engine. The left fuel tank was observed to be empty and the right fuel tank was nearly full. When the right fuel tank was selected, the engine ran normally. No anomalies in the fuel system or fuel selector were noted during the examination.

Despite numerous requests to the pilot, he did not provide a completed NTSB Form 6120.1 to the investigator-in-charge.

AeroBridge: Lake City Municipal Airport (51J) is new emergency relief landing site



LAKE CITY, S.C. — The Lake City Municipal Airport is now a landing site for emergency relief planes and housing location for nonperishable supplies to be used during extreme weather events.

AeroBridge, a first-response emergency management nonprofit organization, will house supplies at the airport in Lake City to be used for disaster relief in several coastal cities in South Carolina and North Carolina.

AeroBridge is activated by FEMA, according to Lake City Administrator Shawn Bell. The nonprofit organization helps to get emergency supplies to hard-hit areas during extreme weather events in a timely manner.

“Aero Bridge has access to all of these private small airplanes and pilots,” Bell said. “They can be in a lot of these areas in a couple hours.”

Experienced pilots work with Aero Bridge and can land planes in small spaces such as golf cart paths and grass runways.

“When communities need water, food anything like that, they (Aero Bridge) can be activated, dispatched and go out to these communities that are hit by hurricanes, earthquakes, whatever, and start immediately sending out aid,” Bell said.

One reason the Lake City Municipal Airport was selected as a landing site is its location. Bell said Lake City is on the coast, but inland enough that if a hurricane comes, the city won’t be completely devastated.

“But we’re also strategically located. We’re about halfway between Hilton Head and a lot of the Carolina communities up in North Carolina as well, the Carolina beaches,” Bell said. “So this is a really good kind of logistics point for them.”

Dennis Bassin, Aero Bridge field director of emergency services for South Carolina, said he is responsible for any coastal location from Hilton Head to Elizabeth City, N.C.

“We’re a branch of the national organization, and we’re Aero Bridge for the two Carolinas,” Bassin said. “We also have a logistics base out in Bamberg County.”

The Bamberg and Lake City sites are the only two in the Carolinas. Aero Bridge of the Carolinas is activated when needed by FEMA. Most recently, Aero Bridge assisted with relief efforts during the 2015 flood.

“Like the flood that hit Clarendon, Williamsburg and Georgetown counties, our first planes were dispatched to those areas two hours after the call,” Bassin said. “So that may seem like a long time, too, but you have to make sure the weather is right and pilots check their planes carefully and load them very carefully.”

With the 2017 hurricane season beginning June 1, Aero Bridge is already gearing up. A simulated supply load-up was scheduled at the Lake City Municipal Airport on Saturday morning, but had to be postponed because of weather conditions.

Pilot Wouter Sijtsma is one of the participating Aero Bridge pilots. Sijtsma has participated with the organization for two years and helped with flood relief in Georgetown.

“You do a lot of flying, and you might as well do something useful with it, and you might as well help some people because after those rains, all those people didn’t have food, water, etcetera, so why not help out and still get your proficiency in,” Sijtsma said.

To be able to participate in emergency relief efforts is impressive, he said. Pilots get to see the weather circumstances and devastation from a different viewpoint.

“You land in and you know you’re doing something right,” Sijtsma said. “It does feel great.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.scnow.com




LAKE CITY, SC (WPDE) —  Lake City municipal airport will potentially play a helpful role in future disaster relief efforts.

The airport will house emergency non-perishables, water and other supplies for AeroBridge.

AeroBridge is a non profit organization that responds to disaster areas with aid as soon as the storm passes and it's safe.

The non profit has access to small private planes and volunteer pilots which make it easy for them to fill up with supplies at small airports and take off to where help is needed within 30 minutes.

During an emergency, about 30 planes will land and fill up in Lake City to help towns from Hilton Head to Elizabeth City, NC.

Lake City is in the middle of those cities which makes it a prime location.

Dennis Bassin with AeroBridge says because the planes are small they can respond faster than some disaster response entities.

"Our commitment is to have the first plane in the air full of emergency supplies two hours after we get the call from FEMA and then our longer-range commitment is for the first three or four days after things become safe," Bassin said.

AeroBridge responded with supplies in Georgetown after the 2015 flood and brought in supplies for weeks after.

They say they will be recruiting ground volunteers in Lake City.

Original article can be found here:   http://wpde.com

Editorial: Pilot shortage threatens smaller airports

Things seem to be looking up, up and away for the Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport (KROA). American Airlines recently added a second weekday flight to New York’s LaGuardia Airport, plus a Saturday flight where previously there wasn’t one.

In all, the number of American Airlines flights between Roanoke and New York has doubled, from six a week to 12 a week.

That’s a good thing, right? (Hint: The correct answer is “yes.”) One of the most frequent complaints about the region is its lack of air service, which is a function of that pesky thing called the free market. Airlines are not municipal utilities. They’re for-profit companies. They’ll send planes where they think they can make the most money and cut flights where they can’t.

If you want more flights out of Roanoke, the best thing you can do is . . . fly out of Roanoke, to show market demand. That’s an easy argument to make in theory; somewhat harder to carry out in practice if the immediate effect is paying more than you would if you drove to Greensboro, North Carolina.

That’s a topic for another day, though. Instead, today we look at a looming problem that could bring flights to Roanoke down to earth: The nation — indeed, the world — is facing a shortage of pilots.

We’ll get to the reasons why shortly, but here’s why this is an issue that should concern not just the Roanoke Valley, but smaller communities around the country: If airlines have to cut routes because they don’t have enough pilots, they’ll staff the routes that make the most money and cut the ones that don’t. That’s good news for the New York-to-Los Angeles route, not so good for Roanoke-to-anywhere.

This isn’t an imaginary issue: Last year, 24 flights scheduled to fly out of Roanoke were cancelled because weren’t crews available, up from 13 the year before, according to data supplied by the airport. It’s harder to tell how many flights into Roanoke were cancelled for the same reason, but there were at least 14 — and possibly more.

Now, for the bigger picture: Why is there a pilot shortage? Keep in mind there’s a shortage coming for lots of professions — a consequence of the baby boomers moving into retirement, and a smaller generation coming along behind them. Some businesses are warning we need more welders; the aviation industry is warning we need more pilots.

“The major airlines are retiring pilots at a rate of 18,000 over the next few years,” says Travis Williams, the chief flight instructor at Averett University in Danville (hold your question on why Averett has such a position; we’ll come back to it). “That’s approximately how many pilots there are at the regional levels. All those pilots in the regionals, they’re going to move up to the majors and that’s going to leave a lot of empty seats at the regionals.”

There are lots of other reasons driving this pilot shortage besides sheer demography:

• It’s harder nowadays to get a pilot’s license. The Federal Aviation Administration has raised the requirements for first officers on commercial flights to have logged 1,500 hours of flying time. Previously, the FAA required only 250 hours of flight time. The FAA made the change following the investigation into the 2009 crash of Colgan Air Flight 3407 in Buffalo that killed all 49 people on board and one person on the ground; some argue that the 1,500-hour was an overreaction. In any case, it’s slowed the creation of new pilots.

• There’s more competition for existing pilots. The growth of Asian economies has spurred a big demand for pilots there, too. That Boeing projection of a demand for 617,000 new pilots? It predicts that 40 percent of those will be needed in Asia. Finally . . .

• The recession cut the number of people entering aviation for one simple reason: It’s expensive to learn how to fly. Some flight schools simply closed — that whole free market thing again.

All that goes under the heading of “bad news.” Now comes the good news. Something’s being done to address the pilot shortage — and some of that is happening not far from us.

There are three colleges in Virginia that now have aviation programs: Averett College, Hampton University and Liberty University.

Averett and Hampton are the oldest, both dating to 1985. Liberty’s is, not surprisingly, the biggest. They all have one thing in common: They’re growing.

Averett averaged about 40 students for most of its history; in the last three years it’s grown to more than 70 students. “Now younger people are starting to realize there is a high demand for pilots and what better time to get into aviation,” Williams says.

Liberty had a minor in aviation going back to the ‘70s, says James Malloy, dean of Liberty’s School of Aeronautics. The school was on the verge of shutting down the program in 2002 for lack of interest when then-chancellor Jerry Falwell Sr. decided to go in the opposite direction: Make it bigger. The school started with four students and a rented airplane in 2002. Now, it has 456 students on campus and a fleet of 28 aircraft that Liberty owns outright. Liberty’s even bought an airport — the New London Airport in Bedford County.

Liberty also has an online program that connects out-of-town students with flight schools in different parts of the country. Regional airlines typically don’t require a college degree, but the majors do, so Liberty sees a lot of regional pilots taking its online program to get their degree so they can move up.

It’s somewhat hard to compare numbers: Hampton averages 50-60 aviation students but only about 12 are in the pilot training program. Those 70 Averett students are all potential pilots; Liberty’s 456 on-campus students include 337 on a pilot track, with others training for drones or aviation maintenance or other aviation fields.

They all have one thing in common, though: Airlines now show up on campus to recruit their students. “We literally have recruiters all the time,” Malloy says. Students typically have jobs waiting before they graduate. And that’s not all: “Now airlines are coming with signing bonuses,” Malloy says. “They’re giving them all kinds of incentives. That’s all a result of the demand.”

So maybe that whole free market thing will work things out, after all. In the meantime, if you know someone interested in being a pilot, feel free to give them some career advice. You’d be doing all of us a favor.

Original article can be found here: http://www.roanoke.com/opinion/editorial

Robinson R22 Beta, N2322Z, HeliFlights LLC: Accident occurred May 20, 2017 at Linden Airport (KLDJ), Union County, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: ERA17CA187 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 20, 2017 in Linden, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/05/2017
Aircraft: ROBINSON R22, registration: N2322Z
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The helicopter flight instructor stated that he was providing the student pilot with his first introductory flight in a helicopter. The flight instructor was holding the dual controls lightly while the student pilot practiced hovering. The helicopter was hovering over a concrete area on the airport and had drifted over grass. The flight instructor then told the student pilot to hover back over the concrete. As the helicopter was proceeding back to the concrete, the student pilot made an abrupt movement on the cyclic to the right, and the right skid contacted an unknown object, which caused a dynamic roll-over. The student pilot's written account was similar, except he stated that the flight instructor had taken control of the helicopter and was hovering toward the concrete when a sudden downward push of wind caused a forceful movement to the right. Examination of the wreckage revealed that the right skid had contacted the ground, which resulted in a dynamic rollover and substantial damage to the main rotor blades and fuselage. No preimpact mechanical malfunctions were noted nor did the pilots report any. The wind at the airport was recorded as calm about the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The flight instructor's failure to maintain helicopter control while hovering, which resulted in skid contact with the ground and a dynamic roll-over.

The helicopter flight instructor stated that he was providing the student pilot with his first introductory flight in a helicopter. The flight instructor was holding the dual controls lightly while the student pilot practiced hovering. The helicopter was hovering over a concrete area on the airport and had drifted over grass. The flight instructor then told the student pilot to hover back over the concrete. As the helicopter was proceeding back to the concrete, the student pilot made an abrupt movement on the cyclic to the right and the right skid contacted an unknown object, causing a dynamic rollover. The student pilot's written account was similar, except he stated that the flight instructor had taken control of the helicopter and was hovering toward the concrete when a sudden downward push of wind caused a forceful movement to the right. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the right skid had contacted the ground, resulting in a dynamic rollover and substantial damage to the main rotor blades and fuselage. The inspector did not observe any preimpact mechanical malfunctions, nor did the pilots report any. The wind at the airport was recorded as calm about the time of the accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Saddle Brook, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

HeliFlights LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2322Z


NTSB Identification: ERA17CA187
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 20, 2017 in Linden, NJ
Aircraft: ROBINSON R22, registration: N2322Z
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The helicopter flight instructor stated that he was providing the student pilot with his first introductory flight in a helicopter. The flight instructor was holding the dual controls lightly while the student pilot practiced hovering. The helicopter was hovering over a concrete area on the airport and had drifted over grass. The flight instructor then told the student pilot to hover back over the concrete. As the helicopter was proceeding back to the concrete, the student pilot made an abrupt movement on the cyclic to the right and the right skid contacted an unknown object, causing a dynamic rollover. The student pilot's written account was similar, except he stated that the flight instructor had taken control of the helicopter and was hovering toward the concrete when a sudden downward push of wind caused a forceful movement to the right. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the right skid had contacted the ground, resulting in a dynamic rollover and substantial damage to the main rotor blades and fuselage. The inspector did not observe any preimpact mechanical malfunctions, nor did the pilots report any. The wind at the airport was recorded as calm about the time of the accident.



A helicopter that was hovering a few feet over the ground at an airport crashed Saturday and rolled onto its side, police said. 

Neither of the two men inside were injured, police said. Linden Airport Director Paul Dudley said the victims were an flight instructor and student pilot.  

Linden police said only minor damage was reported. 

The helicopter was a Robinson R22 Beta, the Federal Aviation Administration said. 

The Federal Aviation Administration said it will investigate. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.nbcnewyork.com

LINDEN - Police and fire department units responded to Linden airport at 4:45 p.m. Saturday, May 20,  for a reported helicopter crash, according to police department spokesman Lt. Christopher Guenther.

The helicopter was reportedly hovering a few feet off the ground when it crashed and fell to its side, he said. 

The helicopter was occupied by two men at the time, both of whom were not injured.

There was no fire associated with the crash and only minor damage reported.

The investigation has been turned over to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Original article can be found here: http://www.mycentraljersey.com