Thursday, October 16, 2014

Destroying airplane seats of Ebola-infected passengers unnecessary, Centers for Disease Control advises

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for decontaminating an airplane after exposure to the deadly Ebola virus call for the infected passenger's seat and surrounding carpet to be removed and destroyed only if it is "obviously dirty from blood or body fluids."

But "special cleaning" of upholstery, carpets or storage compartments elsewhere in the plane is unnecessary unless they are soiled.

The CDC's "Ebola Guidance for Airlines," posted on the organization's website and updated Wednesday, offer a description of the procedures that likely were used to decontaminate the Frontier Airlines aircraft on which Akron native Amber Vinson traveled a day before she tested positive for Ebola.

The plane in question was to be sent back into service Wednesday afternoon, leaving Cleveland for Atlanta and then on to Denver with travelers on board. But the departure was inexplicably canceled, and later the Airbus A320 flew to Denver without passengers.

Frontier Airlines spokeswoman Tyri Squyres said in an interview Wednesday that the plane was decontaminated three times since Vinson was on board. One of those efforts took place the day before her diagnosis Tuesday. Squyres, however, could not describe exactly how a plane is decontaminated or how the process differs from a typical cleaning.

According to the CDC website, cleaning crews should use disposable protective equipment: waterproof gloves, a surgical mask, goggles or a face shield, a long-sleeved waterproof gown, closed-toe shoes and shoe covers. Rubber boots should be worn if there is an increased risk of splashing or if an area appears highly contaminated with body fluids.

The CDC recommends an EPA-registered disinfectant -- such as bleach or hydrogen peroxide -- to scrub the sick traveler's seat, the seats around it, seat backs, armrests, tray tables, video monitor, light and air controls, and adjacent walls and windows.

Lavatory surfaces, including the door handle, lock, faucet, sink, walls, counter and toilet also must be decontaminated.

The guidelines indicate that special vacuuming equipment or procedures are unnecessary. And it warns against using compressed air, pressurized water or similar procedures, "which might create droplets of infectious materials."

The CDC notes that packages or luggage likely do not pose a risk, though it instructs baggage handlers to avoid touching packages visibly dirty from blood or body fluids and to wash their hands often.

The website states that "the risk of spreading Ebola to passengers or crew on an aircraft is low because Ebola spreads by direct contact with infected body fluids," rather than through the air like the flu.

But the guidelines go on to instruct cabin crews in flight with a sick traveler to keep him or her separated from others as much as possible and to wear full protective gear, including a face shield, gloves and gown when providing direct care.

- Source:  http://www.cleveland.com


 

Ebola Patient Expected to Fly Through Frederick Municipal Airport (KFDK), Maryland

 

FREDERICK, Md. - A woman suffering from the Ebola virus will travel through the four-state area Thursday night on her way to further treatment.

Nina Pham, one of the two nurses who contracted Ebola in Dallas, is expected to fly through Frederick Municipal Airport. Rick Johnson, the airport manager, has confirmed that she will fly in and arrive in Frederick late on Thursday evening.

The nurse will then be transferred to an isolation unit at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.

Frederick mayor Randy McClement said that the State Department is arranging the transport of Pham at the request of the CDC, and is using the same air charter service that they used to fly Americans that were infected with Ebola from Africa.

"This transfer is being handled by experienced professionals who have coordinated the transport of many similar cases without incident," McClement said. "The safety of our community is of the utmost importance to me, and I have been assured that every precaution will be taken to move the patient safely and securely and to provide critical care en route."


Check back for further updates on this story.

Hughes Aero Predator, N912AM: Accident occurred October 16, 2014 in Branson, Taney County, Missouri

BARNES HUGH G: http://registry.faa.gov/N912AM  

BRANSON, Mo.-- Several law enforcement agencies responded to an ultralight crash Thursday night in Branson.

According to Sgt. Jason Pace of the Missouri State Highway Patrol, the crash occurred on Noland Road.

Sgt. Pace said Hubert and Diane Barnes were in the ultralight, and they lost control trying to land.

The husband and wife crashed into the garage of their home.

Emergency workers took both victims to a Springfield hospital in serious condition.

Stay with KOLR10 News for updates to this story.



Plane that crashed enroute to Naples, Florida, had undergone review for special high level flight rules: Socata TBM700N (TBM900), N900KN, fatal accident occurred September 05, 2014 in open water near the coast of northeast Jamaica

NAPLES, Fla. - The private plane that flew off course and crashed north of Jamaica, killing a New York power couple, had just been inspected to see if it qualified for high-level flight rules, records from the Federal Aviation Administration show.

An inspector reviewed the plane records to see if it could be certified to fly as close as 1,000 feet vertically from other planes at altitudes between 29,000 and 41,000 feet.

The review was done on Sept. 3, two days before the crash that killed real estate developer Larry Glazer and his entrepreneur wife, Jane. An FAA inspector checked the altimeter, static system and transponders of the plane, a high performance 2014 Socata TBM700. Those systems deal the plane's altitude and communication.

The parts mentioned in the review aren't directly related to the pressurization system.

Experts believe it may have been a problem with the pressurization system in the aircraft that caused the couple to become hypoxic, or starved for oxygen, and lose consciousness hours before they crashed.

A spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday they cannot fully investigate what caused the accident until the wreckage of the plane is recovered.

The U.S. Coast Guard called off the search of the plane two days after the crash. Maj. Basil Jarrett, spokesman for the Jamaican Defence Force, confirmed on Thursday they are not actively searching for the plane, although he said people who live in the coast near the area where the plane crashed or who navigate in those waters are on the lookout.

The Glazers left Rochester, New York, at 8:26 a.m. Sept. 5, and should have landed in Naples by noon.

But the Glazers radioed air traffic controllers in Atlanta about 10 a.m. Friday to report an unspecified problem with the plane and to request permission to descend from 28,000 feet to 18,000 feet.

The plane was given permission to drop only to 25,000 feet over North Carolina but then did not respond to further instructions to descend to 20,000 feet. Fighter jet pilots escorting the plane reported seeing the pilot passed out but still breathing.

The plane crashed about 2:10 p.m. into the ocean off Jamaica.


- Source:   http://www.naplesnews.com



Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

NEW 51LG LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N900KN

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA424 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, September 05, 2014 in Open Water, Jamaica
Aircraft: SOCATA TBM 700, registration: N900KN
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 5, 2014, about 1410 eastern daylight time (EDT), a Socata TBM700 (marketed as TBM900), N900KN, impacted open water near the coast of northeast Jamaica. The commercial pilot/owner and his passenger were fatally injured. An instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the planned flight that originated from Greater Rochester International Airport (ROC), Rochester, New York at 0826 and destined for Naples Municipal Airport (APF), Naples, Florida. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.


According to preliminary air traffic control (ATC) data received from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), after departing ROC the pilot climbed to FL280 and leveled off. About 1000 the pilot contacted ATC to report an "indication that is not correct in the plane" and to request a descent to FL180. The controller issued instructions to the pilot to descend to FL250 and subsequently, due to traffic, instructed him to turn 30 degrees to the left and then descend to FL200. During this sequence the pilot became unresponsive. An Air National Guard intercept that consisted of two fighter jets was dispatched from McEntire Joint National Guard Base, Eastover, South Carolina and intercepted the airplane at FL250 about 40 miles northwest of Charleston, South Carolina. The fighters were relieved by two fighter jets from Homestead Air Force Base, Homestead, Florida that followed the airplane to Andros Island, Bahamas, and disengaged prior to entering Cuban airspace. The airplane flew through Cuban airspace, eventually began a descent from FL250 and impacted open water northeast of Port Antonio, Jamaica.

According to a review of preliminary radar data received from the FAA, the airplane entered a high rate of descent from FL250 prior to impacting the water. The last radar target was recorded over open water about 10,000 feet at 18.3547N, -76.44049W.

The Jamaican Defense Authority and United States Coast Guard conducted a search and rescue operation. Search aircraft observed an oil slick and small pieces of debris scattered over one-quarter mile that were located near the last radar target. Both entities concluded their search on September 7, 2014.

Rep. Shuster Wants Flight Restrictions


ALTOONA - Lawmakers in Washington are asking President Obama to place a restriction on flights from West Africa. 

Representative Bill Shuster along with Senator John Thune from South Dakota asked for that temporary travel ban to be placed in effect immediately.

Other nations such as France and Great Britain have already enacted such travel bans to help fight the spread of Ebola. Representative Shuster believes a ban on individuals that have lived in or traveled to the affected nations is vital to stopping the spread of the virus.

Representative Shuster said Thursday, "I think one of the prudent things to do would be to restrict flights from Western Africa from those 5 nations where 95% of the Ebola outbreaks have come from that are coming to the United States and other places."

Shuster went on to say that President Obama has the power to begin restricting those flights immediately.


- Source:  http://www.wearecentralpa.com

Captain Doron: Yalla, Yallah, Yala - C172/G1000 - Takeoffs & Landings - Bayport Aerodrome (23N), New York

 


Published on October 16, 2014
 http://youtu.be/JWV6aaTGi44

Airbus Gets Order for Weather Satellites Worth EUR1.3 Billion: European Space Agency Places Order for Six Weather Satellites

The Wall Street Journal

By  Friedrich Geiger


Updated Oct. 16, 2014 12:47 p.m. ET

BERLIN—The European Space Agency has ordered weather satellites worth 1.3 billion euros ($1.7 billion) from Airbus Group NV, the plane maker said Thursday.

Airbus has signed contracts with the ESA to design and build six satellites meant to continue and improve weather forecasts. The satellites have a mass of about four metric tons each. Three of the satellites focus on optical instruments and atmospheric sounders, and the other three on microwave instruments.

Airbus’ defense and space unit will lead an industrial consortium comprising more than 100 companies in 16 European countries, to supply more than 150 different pieces of equipment and services for the spacecraft platforms and instruments.

The launch of the first satellite is scheduled for 2021. The satellites are expected to enhance meteorological data with improved spectral and spatial resolution.


- Source:  http://online.wsj.com

Aeronca 7AC Champion, N946DR: Accident occurred October 16, 2014 in Cordele, Georgia

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA017 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 16, 2014 in Cordele, GA
Aircraft: AERONCA 7AC, registration: N946DR
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 16, 2014, about 1230 eastern daylight time, an Aeronca 7AC airplane, N946DR, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Crisp County Cordele Airport (CKF), Cordele, Georgia. The private pilot was fatally injured and the passenger received serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The planned cross-country flight departed from CKF at 1230 and was destined for Peach State Airport (GA2), Williamson, Georgia. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to witnesses, the accident airplane was the first of four airplanes to depart in sequence from runway 28, a 5,001-foot-long, 150-foot-wide, asphalt runway. The airplane lifted off from the runway about midfield and started a climb. After reaching about 150 feet above ground level, the airplane entered a gradual left turn that progressed into a steep turn and slight descent. The airplane then entered a nose down attitude before it impacted the ground, spun around and came to rest.

The airplane came to rest in a grass area in a flat attitude, on a southerly heading about 350 feet from the runway. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. The wings remained attached to the fuselage; the right wing displayed both outboard and inboard leading edge crush damage and the inboard wood spar was broken at the fuselage. The inboard section of the left wing exhibited vertical crush damage. No damage was noted on the elevator and rudder control surfaces and the elevator trim tab was observed in the slight nose up position. Both propeller blades remained attached to the propeller hub. Blade A exhibited some chordwise scratches and curling at the blade tip. Blade B also displayed chordwise scratches and a slight bend at the blade tip. Examination of the accident site and wreckage revealed that the airplane right wing made contact with the ground before the airplane spun and came to rest.

Further postaccident examination of the airframe was conducted at a secure facility and fuel system continuity was confirmed from the wing tanks, through the fuel gascolater, to the engine. Flight control continuity was established from the control stick in the cockpit to the ailerons and elevator, and from the rudder pedals to the rudder.

Examination of the seat belt restraints revealed that the pilot's lab belt and shoulder harness had been cut by the first responder team.

The pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on December 11, 2013. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 3,098 hours; of which, 88 hours were flown during the previous 6 months.

A handheld Garmin 396 global positioning system receiver was recovered from the cockpit and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, DC, for download.

The engine was retained for further examination.


AIRCRAFT CRASHED ON TAKEOFF, THERE WERE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD, 1 WAS FATALLY INJURED, 1 SUSTAINED SERIOUS INJURIES, CORDELE, GA

  
Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Atlanta FSDO-11


ST JULIEN JANICE C: http://registry.faa.gov/N946DR 

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov





 

CORDELE — A pilot is dead and his wife, who was his passenger, in critically injured after a small airplane crashed shortly after takeoff from a refueling stop Thursday at the Crisp County-Cordele Airport.

According to Crisp County Sheriff Billy Hancock, the
Aeronca 7AC Champion aircraft, owned and piloted by Rene St. Julien, 61, of Port St. Lucie, Fla., was part of a four-plane group on its way to the Wings Over North Georgia air show in Rome. Hancock said the planes had stopped to refuel on their way from the Port St. Lucie area.

Around 12:35 p.m., all four planes took off. When the
Aeronca 7AC Champion reached an altitude of 250-300 feet, it suddenly nosedived to the runway, killing St. Julien and injuring his wife and passenger, Jan St. Julien, Hancock said.

Responders from the Cordele and Crisp County fire departments and EMS worked to extricate Jan St. Julien from the wreckage, Hancock said, who was then airlifted to the Macon Medical Center for treatment. Officials said on Thursday her condition was critical.

“The Sheriff’s office took some of the other pilots to Macon so they could be close to her,” Hancock said. “Others are spending the night in Cordele.”

Hancock said representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration were at the crash scene Thursday afternoon and plan to meet with members of National Transportation Safety Board on Friday to begin an investigation of the crash.

- Source:   http://www.albanyherald.com


http://www.antiqueairfield.com

http://www.americanwacoclub.com


Rockwell International 112A, N1148J: Accident occurred October 16, 2014 in Gainesville, Georgia

Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA016
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 16, 2014 in Gainesville, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/23/2016
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL 112, registration: N1148J
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor and private pilot were conducting an instructional flight. A witness reported that, when the airplane about 400 ft above the ground, he heard a “surging” sound coming from the engine and observed pitch and roll oscillations occurring; he then lost sight of the airplane. A video provided by the fixed-based operator showed the airplane take off and begin to climb. Shortly after, it recorded a radio call on the common traffic advisory frequency indicating that an emergency existed and that the airplane was returning to the airport. Another witness reported seeing the airplane’s landing gear barely clear a building as it flew toward the airport. He added that, as the airplane neared power lines, the airplane pitched up, likely in an attempt to avoid them. The airplane then collided with a telephone pole and unmarked transmission lines, which ruptured the fuel tank, and then struck the ground. A postcrash fire ensued that nearly consumed the cockpit, cabin, and both wings. Examination of the flight controls and heat-damaged engine revealed no evidence of preimpact failures or malfunctions. Examination of the manifold valve revealed that the inlet and outlet ports were blocked to varying degrees. Analysis of the blockage material determined that it was an organic polymer material consistent with polyester; however, the source of the contamination could not be determined. Although the blockages of the inlet and outlet ports precluded postaccident flow testing of the manifold valve, it is likely that the blockages resulted in the surging reported by the witness and the subsequent loss of engine power. The blockages likely would not have created a condition that would have been detectable to the pilots during the pretakeoff engine run-up. 

Although the fuel vent lines of both wings were found blocked with organic material consistent with insect nest material, the accident flight was very short and, therefore, it is unlikely that these blockages affected the engine operation. The blockages of the fuel vents were located in an area that would not have been visible to the pilots during the preflight inspection of the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The partial loss of engine power due to the undetected blockage of the inlet and outlet ports of the manifold valve by an organic compound of an unknown source.


HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 16, 2014, about 1129 eastern daylight time, a Rockwell International 112A, N1148J, registered to and operated by a private individual, collided with a powerline pole, unmarked transmission lines, then the ground during a forced landing in Gainesville, Georgia. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 instructional, local flight from Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport (GVL), Gainesville, Georgia. The airplane was destroyed by a postcrash fire and the flight instructor and private pilot were fatally injured during the flight that originated about 1 minute earlier.

According to the airplane owner's next door neighbor, about 1 week before the accident the owner told him he would be flying from the right seat with a flight instructor on-board.

A witness who was outside his hangar which is located south of runway 29 near the departure end of runway 29, reported that he observed the airplane flying at an estimated altitude of 400 feet, He heard a surging sound from the engine, and noticed oscillations of pitch and roll. The witness saw the airplane for about 3 to 4 seconds and then lost sight due to obstructions. He then heard a loud sound from the powerlines and heard the sound of impact followed by seeing smoke. He then ran to the sight, called 911 to report the accident, and when he arrived there were already 8 to 9 people on-scene. When he arrived the flight instructor was out of the airplane and on grass located north of the location of the wreckage.

Another witness who was in a building located immediately west of the accident site reported to FAA seeing the airplane's landing gear barely clear the building as it flew in an easterly direction towards the airport. The witness heard a sputtering or popping sound from the engine but did not see any smoke trailing the airplane. The witness reported that as the airplane flew towards powerlines that were located east of the building, he observed the airplane pitch up, as if in an attempt to avoid them. A portion of a wing contacted a powerline pole, and then the airplane rolled and impacted the ground coming to rest inverted. The witness ran to the accident site and assisted the flight instructor from the airplane, and also attempted to rescue the other occupant but was unable. He then rendered assistance to the flight instructor until first responders arrived.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The left seat occupant, age 50, held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single and multi-engine land, instrument airplane ratings. A review of his Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman file revealed that on August 5, 2006, he received a FAA Form 8060-5, titled Notice of Disapproval of Application for the private pilot certificate. He subsequently passed on August 18, 2006. He also held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single engine, and instrument airplane ratings. He was issued a second class medical certificate with no limitations on September 10, 2014. On the application for the medical certificate he listed a total time of 4,100 hours, and 500 hours in the previous 6 months. His last flight review in accordance with 61.56 occurred on January 14, 2014.

According to personnel of a fixed base operator, the left seat occupant began flying with them as a student pilot in 2005, and has been a flight instructor with them since 2008 or 2009. He was reported to be in good health, and the accident flight was his 3rd flight with the airplane owner flying from the right seat.

A review of copies of the left seat occupant's pilot logbook that contained entries from June 28, 2014, to the last entry dated October 15, 2014, revealed that he logged flying with the owner in the accident airplane on October 1st and 6th, 2014. Both flight durations were recorded to be 1.2 hours and the remarks section of the first flight indicated, "Larry right seat", while the remarks section of the second flight indicated, "Larry Right Seat Landing." Excluding the accident flight, he logged a total time of 4,171 hours.

The right seat occupant, age 74, held a private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land rating, issued December 13, 2005. A review of his FAA airman file revealed that 3 days earlier, or on December 10, 2005, he received a FAA Form 8060-5, titled Notice of Disapproval of Application for the private pilot certificate. The areas on the disapproval notice included takeoff's, landings, go-arounds, and ground reference maneuvers. On August 22, 2014, he was issued a third class medical certificate with a limitation that he, "Must wear corrective lenses for near and distant vision." On the application for the medical certificate he listed a total time of 711 hours, and 37 hours in the previous 6 months. A review of his 2nd pilot logbook that was found in the wreckage revealed his last flight review in accordance with 61.56 occurred on February 15, 2014; the flight review consisted of 2 hours of ground instruction and 1.1 hours of flight instruction.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was manufactured in 1975, by Rockwell International as model 112, and was designated serial number 428. It was powered by a 200 horsepower Lycoming IO-360-C1D6 engine and equipped with a Hartzell constant speed HC-E2YR-1BF propeller with F766A blades propeller.

Review of the maintenance records revealed the airplane was last inspected in accordance with an annual inspection on September 1, 2014. The airplane total time at the time of the inspection was 3,656.6 hours. Further review of the maintenance records revealed the fuel tanks were sealed last on March 17, 2006; at airplane total time of about 3,196.7 hours.


The airplane's fuel system consists of an integral 25.0 gallon fuel tank in each wing, which routes fuel to the five-position fuel selector valve, fuel strainer or gascolator, electric (auxiliary) fuel pump, mechanical fuel pump, servo fuel injector, flow divider, to each fuel injector nozzle installed in each cylinder. Each wing contains a fuel vent scoop assembly part number (P/N) 48550-1) installed on the lower wing skin outboard of the integral fuel tank. The fuel vent scoop contains two openings; the first faces forward, while the second is parallel to the lower wing skin. Both openings at the fuel vent scoop have fittings that protrude inside the wing, and those fittings are connected to the fuel tank via flexible rubber hoses, aluminum lines, and fittings. Each fuel tank is also vented from a fitting on the fuselage that is connected by aluminum lines and fittings.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A surface observation weather report taken at GVL at 1153, or approximately 24 minutes after the accident indicates the wind was from 280 degrees at 9 knots, the visibility was 10 statute miles, scattered clouds existed at 2,200 and 3,300 feet, and overcast clouds existed at 4,200 feet. The temperature and dew point were 14 and 09 degrees Celsius, respectively, and the altimeter setting was 29.92 inches of Mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The GVL Airport is equipped in part with runway 29, which is 4,001 feet in length and 100 feet wide. While the airport common traffic advisory frequency is not officially recorded, a fixed base operator on the field has security cameras that contain a portion of runway 29, and also record audio transmission from radio calls on the CTAF.

A review of the provided video recording revealed that a portion of the takeoff was recorded, as well as a radio call from an occupant of the airplane. The video depicted the airplane when it was about 1/2 way down the runway in a normal climb attitude. The airplane went out of view of the camera, and a short time later, a radio call on the CTAF frequency was recorded by the FBO security system. The radio call indicated an emergency existed and advised the flight was returning runway 05. Approximately 2 seconds later, power to the video camera was shut off, which was attributed to impact to the power lines.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane crashed off airport; the main wreckage was located at 34 degrees 16.201 minutes North latitude and 083 degrees 50.226 minutes West longitude, or 0.28 nautical mile and 211 degrees from the departure end of runway 29.

Examination of the accident site revealed the crash site was southwest of the intersection of Scott Street and Palmour Drive. Two powerline poles were broken; 1 pole immediately adjacent to the accident site and 1 pole near the intersection of Scott Street and Palmour Drive. The powerline pole immediately adjacent to the accident site was broken in three pieces (including a piece that was underground). Additionally, damage to unmarked 7200KV three phase electrical wires oriented on a magnetic heading of 035 degrees was noted; the pole and wires were repaired before NTSB arrival, but the damaged components were retained at the accident site. Examination of the broken powerline that was immediately adjacent to the accident site revealed it was approximately 40 feet long, and was set approximately 6 feet below the ground. The pole was fractured at ground level and also about 25 feet above ground level. Pieces of white paint with green color on the opposite side and gouges were noted on the upper 40 inches of the pole, consistent with contact by a portion of the airplane. Wiring from the left Aeroflash Signal Box was found hanging on a telephone wire to the northeast of the broken powerline pole immediately adjacent to the accident site.

Nearby businesses were contacted to determine if either contained security video that captured the accident sequence; no video depicting the accident sequence was recorded.

Further examination of the accident site revealed ground scars on the road 53 feet 6 inches from the pole contact location. With an estimated pole contact located 31 feet 8 inches above ground level, the descent path to the ground was calculated to be approximately 59 degrees. The ground scar was oriented on a magnetic heading of 068 degrees.

Examination of the wreckage revealed the engine, cockpit, and wing carry-thru were inverted. A postcrash fire nearly consumed the cockpit, cabin, and both wings. The outer 4 feet of the left wing was initially found on the sidewalk in the area of the powerline pole, but subsequently moved closer to the main wreckage before NTSB arrival.

Examination of the left wing revealed the outer 4 feet was separated; the upper and lower wing skins exhibited sawtooth type fractured oriented in a spanwise direction. The separated section contained the outer portion of the integral fuel tank, and fuel vent lines. The full span of the aileron remained connected, and the aileron counterweight was in-place. The main landing gear was fractured, and the wheel assembly was damaged. The aileron control cables were connected the aileron bellcrank adjacent to the control surface and the pushrod was connected to the bellcrank and the remaining portion of the aileron. Examination of the separated outer section of left wing revealed the fuel tank vent lines were detached at both fittings of the fuel vent scoop assembly; both openings of the fuel vent scoop assembly were free of obstructions. Examination of the ends of the flexible hoses attached to each of the vent lines revealed both were free of obstructions at the opening. When air was blown into the separated forward oriented vent tube, a solid particle of debris exited the tube at the tank connection with force; the debris was collected. Additional air was applied and small particles of dust/dirt exited. Further examination of the forward oriented fuel vent line revealed tan colored debris adhering to the wall approximately 1.25 inches from the end, which obstructed part of the tube opening. Evidence of tan colored material adhering to the entire inner circumference was noted; the material was consistent with insect nest material. The lines were removed from the "T" fitting, and the 90 degree portion was inspected and found to be completely blocked by tan colored material.

Examination of the right wing which was upright revealed it was fractured at the wing root, and bent up at about a 45 degree angle about 7 feet outboard of the wing root. The main landing gear was extended. The flap was attached at the inboard and outboard hinges, and the aileron was connected at the inboard hinge. A portion of aileron counterweight was found adjacent to the right wing. The aileron control cable was connected at the aileron bellcrank near the control surface. The fuel vent lines were found loose among the wreckage. The line that attaches to the tank fitting was fractured, but the fractured portion of line was recovered. The line and wing section exhibited extensive fire damage. Examination of the fuel vent lines associated with the right fuel vent scoop assembly revealed evidence of soot adhering to the exterior surfaces. The end openings of all three lines were free of obstructions. The aluminum line that connects to the forward fitting of the scoop assembly was disconnected from the "T" fitting, and black colored loose material including a round shaped object measuring 11/32 inch in diameter came from the line. The other fuel vent line at the "B-nut" at the "T" reduction fitting well downstream of the end of the hose was completed blocked by debris. The remaining identified portions of fuel vent lines were free of obstructions.

Examination of the empennage revealed it was heat damaged. The right horizontal was bent up about 90 degrees approximately 2 feet outboard of the root, and also bent inboard 90 degrees. The left elevator remained connected at the inboard 2 hinges, and also the spar was attached at the outboard hinge, while the right elevator with trim tab connected remained attached at the inboard 2 hinges; the full span was accounted for. Both the left and right elevator trim tab actuators were connected by chains, and were symmetrically extended 2.125 inches, which equates to trim tab deflection of 6 degrees nose-up.

Examination of the aileron, elevator, and rudder flight controls revealed control cable continuity was confirmed from each control surface to the respective cockpit control. The flap torque tube assembly with attached right arm assembly and portion of actuator screw was found loose in the wreckage. Examination of the actuator screw revealed it was extended 12 threads, which equates to flap extension of 8 degrees.

One fuel vent check valve with attached fitting and section of hard aluminum line was found in the wreckage debris by the FAA-IIC. The check valve was inspected and photographed. No determination was made as to what tank the check valve was for. Disassembly examination of the fuel selector valve revealed it was positioned to both; no obstructions were noted internally of the ports.

Examination of the engine was performed by a representative of the engine manufacturer with NTSB oversight. The engine, which sustained heat damaged associated with the postcrash fire remained partially attached to the aircraft firewall via the tubular engine mount, was removed for examination. Following removal of the cylinders, continuity of the crankshaft to the accessory case and valve train was confirmed. The engine-driven fuel pump, which remained attached to the engine was heavily fire damaged. It was removed and disassembled which revealed the diaphragms were destroyed. Both magnetos and ignition harness sustained fire damage that precluded operational testing. Examination of the lubrication system revealed the oil suction screen was absent of ferrous debris, and the oil filer paper media was charred, but was absent ferrous debris between the media pleats. Examination of the fuel injector nozzles revealed no blockage. Following examination of the engine, the servo fuel injector and manifold valve were retained for further examination.

Examination of the propeller revealed the propeller spinner exhibited minimal damage. One propeller blade was loose in the hub, and 1 blade was bent aft with very course chordwise scratches on the blade face.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The flight instructor seated in the left seat was transported to a hospital for treatment of his injuries, but died while hospitalized on November 10, 2014. Because of the length of hospital stay, a postmortem examination and toxicology testing by FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory was not performed.

A postmortem examination of the right seat occupant was performed by Forensic Medicine Associates, Inc., at the DeKalb County Forensic Science Center. The cause of death was listed as "Blunt Force Head Trauma."

Forensic toxicology testing on specimens of the right seat occupant was performed by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The toxicology report stated the results were negative for carbon monoxide, volatiles, and tested drugs, while testing for cyanide was not performed.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Examination of the servo fuel injector revealed extensive heat damage which precluded operational testing. The fuel regulator plug which was safety wired was removed and the fuel diaphragm stem nut was observed to be in-place. Disassembly examination revealed the air diaphragm was heat damaged and the fuel diaphragm was destroyed. The plastic portion of the seat was destroyed, while the metal portion of the seat was in-place. Removal of the mixture control and fuel control section revealed ghost mark indicating the mixture was just off the full rich position. The clevis was broken to facilitate removal of the idle valve. Based on internal components of the servo, the throttle was in the wide open position. A detailed report concerning the servo fuel injector examination is contained in the NTSB public docket.

Examination of the manifold valve revealed that the inlet fitting, inlet port and the ports of the valve body for each cylinder were obstructed to varying degrees by an unknown substance. Because of the obstructions, flow testing was not performed. Following removal of the cover from the bottom of the manifold valve, brown colored material was noted. The top cover of the manifold was removed and the fuel side of the diaphragm and housing were clean. The manifold valve was sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for analysis of the obstruction material. A detailed report concerning the manifold valve examination is contained in the NTSB public docket.

According to the NTSB Materials Laboratory Report concerning the examination of the manifold valve, most of the portals had substance build-up that limited the openings to approximately half of the portal diameter or more. The blockages of each portal were estimated as follows: 45 percent and 75 percent for the inlet fitting and valve body opening, respectively; 60 percent for both the portal 'A' fitting and valve body opening; 70 percent for the portal 'B' valve body opening; 45 percent for the portal 'C' valve body opening; and 60 percent for the portal 'D' valve body opening. Samples of substances were taken from each port, along with the larger central opening of the back cover for testing by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with a diamond attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory. Multiple FTIR analyses were performed on each portal sample, including the hard and soft areas of each sample, as well as areas of different colors for each sample. A spectral library search found the unknown material spectrum to be a very strong spectral match to several types of polyester-a type of organic polymer. Because the sample was degraded and the spectra for polyesters are so similar, it was difficult to differentiate between different types of polyesters. A copy of the NTSB Materials Laboratory Factual Report is contained in the public docket.

LAWRENCE YOUHANAIAN: http://registry.faa.gov/N1148J 

NTSB Identification: ERA15FA016
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 16, 2014 in Gainesville, GA
Aircraft: ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL 112A, registration: N1148J
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 16, 2014, about 1129 eastern daylight time, a Rockwell International 112A, N1148J, registered to and operated by a private individual, collided with a powerline pole, unmarked transmission lines, then the ground during a forced landing in Gainesville, Georgia. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 instructional, local flight from Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport (GVL), Gainesville, Georgia. The airplane was destroyed by a postcrash fire. The certified flight instructor (CFI) sustained serious injuries, while the private-rated pilot was fatally injured. The flight originated about 1 minute earlier from GVL.

A witness who was outside his hangar which is located south of runway 29 near the departure end of runway 29, reported that he observed the airplane flying at an estimated altitude of 400 feet, He heard a surging sound from the engine, and noticed oscillations of pitch and roll. The witness saw the airplane for about 3 to 4 seconds and then lost sight due to obstructions. He then heard a loud sound from the powerlines and heard the sound of impact followed by seeing smoke. He then ran to the sight, called 911 to report the accident, and when he arrived there were already 8 to 9 people on-scene. When he arrived the CFI was out of the airplane and on grass located north of the location of the wreckage.

Another witness who was in a building located immediately west of the accident site reported seeing the airplane's landing gear barely clear the building as it flew in an easterly direction towards the airport. The witness heard a sputtering or popping sound from the engine but did not see any smoke trailing the airplane. The witness reported that as the airplane flew towards powerlines that were located east of the building, he observed the airplane pitch up, as if in an attempt to avoid them. A portion of a wing contacted a powerline pole, and then the airplane rolled and impacted the ground coming to rest inverted. The witness ran to the accident site and assisted the CFI from the airplane, and also attempted to rescue the other occupant but was unable. He then rendered assistance to the CFI until first responders arrived.

Examination of the accident site revealed the airplane crashed off airport property west of runway 5/23, near the approach end of runway 5. The engine assembly, cockpit, cabin, and empennage came to rest inverted; the cockpit, cabin, and both wings were nearly consumed by the postcrash fire.


AIRCRAFT STRUCK A POWERLINE AND CRASHED ONTO A ROAD NEAR THE AIRPORT, THERE WERE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD, 1 WAS FATALLY INJURED, 1 SUSTAINED SERIOUS INJURIES, GAINESVILLE, GA

Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11


Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


 A Gainesville man has been identified as the person killed in a single-engine plane crash Thursday near Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport.

Lawrence Youhanaian, 74, was flying the 1976 Rockwell Commander 112 Thursday morning when the plane crashed on Palmour Drive, said Cpl. Kevin Holbrook, Gainesville police spokesman.

Passenger Kelly Chandler, 50, a Gainesville resident and flight instructor at Lanier Flight Center, was seriously injured in the crash, Holbrook said.

Chandler was flown to Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. Grady doesn’t disclose patient conditions, spokeswoman Denise Simpson said.

“He’s still in intensive care on the respirator,” said Troy Wheeler, Lanier Flight Center president.

Chandler has served as an instructor at the center since 2007.

“More people have learned to fly with Kelly than anybody on my staff,” Wheeler said. “He’s highly experienced.”

Chandler says on the center’s website that “working and flying here at Lanier Flight Center has been an awesome life-changing experience which I will cherish and continue for years to come.”

Wheeler also knew Youhanaian, who has family in California.

“Larry was one of our first customers when we opened in 2003,” he said. “He learned to fly, then went on to buy his own airplane in 2006.”

Youhanaian’s plane was at Lee Gilmer, Wheeler said.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the cause of the crash. A preliminary report is pending.

Keith Smith, spokesman for the Gainesville Fire Department, said the plane left the airport on Runway 29.

“As they started to (fly off), they had engine trouble and tried to turn around and come back,” he said.

Board spokesman Nicholas Worrell told The Times Friday an investigator was working on recovery efforts Friday, gathering eyewitness statements, reviewing any available video and photographic evidence and analyzing maintenance and pilot records to determine the cause of the crash.

“Anything that can help gather as much factual information as possible to help determine what caused the accident,” Worrell said.

Worrell said the investigator would likely conclude the on-scene portion of the investigation this past weekend, then move the wreckage to a private location for more analysis.

Authorities first learned about the Gainesville incident about 11:30 a.m. after hearing reports that a small plane had struck some power lines and crashed onto Palmour, which encircles much of the airport.

Upon arrival, emergency found one person was dead and the other had been pulled from the craft by a bystander, Flair Lee, whose workplace is near the crash site.


http://www.gainesvilletimes.com


Federal officials are investigating a plane crash that killed one person and seriously injured another Thursday morning near Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport in Gainesville.

The National Transportation Safety Board is in the early stages of the investigation, spokesman Keith Holloway said.

Names of the victims weren’t immediately available.

Authorities first learned about the incident about 11:30 a.m. after hearing reports that a small plane had struck some power lines and crashed onto Palmour Drive, which encircles much of the airport.

Upon arrival, emergency responders found wreckage of a single-engine Aero Commander 114 occupied by two people. Authorities said they didn’t have the tail number for the plane, which crashed just short of the airport.

One person was dead and the other had been pulled from the craft by a bystander, Flair Lee, a diesel mechanic with Red Oak Sanitation, which is near the crash site.

The person pulled from the plane was flown to Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta.

Lee, who was working on a truck at the time, said he first knew something was wrong when he heard overhead the plane’s engine “sputtering like it was losing power.”

“When I saw him (fly) over the top of the building, I just watched … as he clipped a (power) pole and knocked the lights off the top of it with his wing. And the plane just flipped upside down and straight into the ground.”

Lee said he first ran to the office and told workers to call 911, then ran to the plane with a co-worker. Lee was able to pull one of the occupants out and place him on grass nearby.

“By the time I got back (to the plane), the flames were so high, I couldn’t get the seat belt or anything off the other guy,” he said.

Flames were shooting 15-20 feet in the sky, he said.

“The guy I got out was responsive and everything,” Lee said. “He could talk, and all that he kept telling me was, ‘It burns. It hurts.’”

Lee said that he and his co-worker “went through 15 fire extinguishers” in the shop at Red Oak to try to put out the flames.

He said he couldn’t tell whether the person he rescued was a passenger or the pilot in the four-seat craft. Authorities also said they couldn’t distinguish the two.

As for his role in the rescue, Lee shrugged off any hero status, saying, “I just feel like I did what I had to do.”

Keith Smith, spokesman for the Gainesville Fire Department, said the plane left the airport on runway 29.

“As they started to (fly off), they had engine trouble and tried to turn around and come back,” he said.

Smith confirmed Lee’s account about the plane clipping the power pole and hitting the ground.

Flames from the wreckage charred part of a fence that lines the airport side of Palmour Drive.

Because of the crash, authorities closed Palmour Drive between Aviation Boulevard and ZF Industries at 1261 Palmour Drive.

Georgia Power also responded to the scene, as the crash caused a power outage at the airport.


- Source:  http://www.gainesvilletimes.com









Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N612SP, Sohail Air Ventures LLC: Accident occurred October 16, 2014 in Big Bear, California

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board  -   Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA014
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 16, 2014 in Big Bear, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N612SP
Injuries: 3 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 16, 2014, about 1400 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N612SP, was substantially damaged when it collided with terrain near Big Bear City Airport (L35), Big Bear, California. Sohail Air Ventures LLC was operating the rental airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot and two passengers sustained serious injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight departed Corona, California, at an undetermined time with an intended destination of L35.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the pilot reported that he intended on flying to L35 for lunch prior to returning to Corona. Prior to the flight, he verified the fuel level of each fuel tank at 11 to 12 gallons of fuel and noted that the airplanes log sheet indicated 13 gallons of fuel should have been in each wing's fuel tank. The pilot further reported to the inspector that he anticipated getting fuel at Big Bear and that he planned to fly directly above the box canyons of the mountainous terrain west of the airport.

The pilot stated that thirty minutes into the flight, he noticed that he could not maintain altitude above the canyons and the engine was losing power. Once inside a box canyon, he maintained a position on the left side of the canyon with the intent to execute a right turn out of the canyon toward lower terrain. As the airplane continued to sink, he noticed that he did not have enough engine power to maintain a close proximity to the face of the mountain. The pilot further stated that when he heard the stall warning horn, he decided to initiate a landing on top of the trees instead of stalling [the airplane]. The pilot added that he had adjusted the mixture early in the flight, but the events of the flight happened too fast to attempt corrective adjustments immediately prior to the accident.

First responders confirmed that the wing fuel tanks were breached, and fuel had drained out through holes in the wings.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

An aviation routine weather report (METAR) for L35, elevation 6,756 feet msl, located about 8 miles northeast of the accident site was issued at 1415. It indicated wind from 260 degrees at 10 knots, 10 miles or greater visibility, sky clear, temperature at 20 degrees C, dew point -17 degrees C, and an altimeter setting at 30.15 inches of mercury. The relative humidity was 7%.

A METAR for San Bernardino International Airport (SBD), elevation 1,159 feet msl, located about 15 miles southwest of the accident site, was issued at 1350. It indicated wind calm, 10 miles or greater visibility, sky few at 5,000 feet, temperature at 24 degrees C, dew point 8 degrees C, and an altimeter setting at 29.96 inches of mercury.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Examination of the recovered wreckage was conducted on October 28, 2014, by representatives of the FAA, Cessna, and Lycoming Engines under the supervision of the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge.

Airframe

The electrical master switch was in the ON position. The ignition switch was in the BOTH position with the key in the switch. The auxiliary fuel pump switch was in the ON position. Investigators determined that the fuel selector valve was in the BOTH position. The gascolator contained a clear blue fluid that smelled like aviation gasoline; a water finding paste test had no response indicating that there was no water contamination. The screen was clean.

Engine

Investigators manually rotated the crankshaft with a tool in the vacuum pump drive pad. The crankshaft rotated freely, and the valves moved approximately the same amount of lift in firing order. The accessory gears turned freely. Investigators obtained thumb compression on all cylinders in firing order. A borescope inspection revealed no mechanical deformation on the valves, cylinder walls, or internal cylinder head. When each magneto drive shaft was rotated by hand, both magnetos produced spark at all posts.

The fuel pump's rubber diaphragm was intact and the pump contained a fluid consistent with the appearance and odor of aviation fuel.

Propeller

The two blades were bent and twisted. Both blades exhibited leading edge gouges and chordwise striations.

No evidence of any preexisting mechanical anomalies with the airframe or engine was found that would have precluded normal operation. For further information, see the NTSB Airframe and Engine Examination Notes within the public docket for this accident.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Neither the pilot nor the operator submitted an NTSB form 6120.1, Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report.

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA014
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 16, 2014 in Big Bear, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N612SP
Injuries: 3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 16, 2014, about 1400 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N612SP, collided with terrain near Big Bear, California. Sohail Air Ventrues LLC was operating the rental airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot and two passengers sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. The cross-country personal flight departed Corona, California, at an undetermined time with a planned destination of Big Bear. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The airplane collided with terrain while maneuvering in a mountainous area.



 BIG BEAR LAKE (CBSLA.com/AP) — Authorities say a plane that crashed has left three people injured near Big Bear Lake. 

The California Highway Patrol reported the plane crash just before 2 p.m. Thursday in an area described as rugged, rocky and forested, San Bernardino County sheriff’s spokeswoman Cindy Bachman told KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO.

Wreckage of the light aircraft was seen near Highway 18 west of Glory Ridge about 12 miles west of Big Bear Airport, according to San Bernardino County Fire officials.

It was unclear whether the plane was taking off or landing, however, the pilot was able to call 911 when the plane crashed, Bachman said.

A man and two women were hoisted from the wreckage and airlifted out of the forest.

KCAL9’s Laurie Perez spoke with James Ponder of Loma Linda University Medical Center about the conditions of the victims.

The three people on board had moderate injuries, including bumps and bruises and perhaps some broken bones, according to Bachman. No fatalities were reported.

“I’m told they are in fair condition right now,” said Ponder. “Their vital signs are stable and within normal limits. The outcome is likely going to be favorable. The patients are conscious and may or may not be comfortable.”



http://losangeles.cbslocal.com

Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office: FAA Riverside FSDO-21
 
SOHAIL AIR VENTURES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N612SP

Los Angeles News | FOX 11 LA KTTV  


Big Bear Lake, CA - 

Multiple people were injured Thursday afternoon in a plane crash reported near Big Bear Lake, according to the San Bernardino County Fire Department.

It happened around 2 p.m. about 12 miles west of Big Bear City Airport  near State Route 15 and Glory Ridge. The San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department referred to the plane as a "light aircraft" and stated there were a total of three injuries.

The victims were hoisted onto responding medical helicopters.

Both the fire and sheriff's departments responded to the scene and were posting updates on Twitter.

Coincidentally, a second plane was located near Thursday's scene from an accident that happened 8 to 10 years ago, according to emergency responders.























NTSB Identification: WPR13LA346 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 28, 2013 in Lone Pine, CA
Aircraft: BEECH 35-B33, registration: N82182
Injuries: 4 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 28, 2013, about 1516 Pacific daylight time, a Beech 35-B33, N82182, experienced a loss of engine power immediately after departing Lone Pine Airport, Lone Pine, California. The pilot executed a forced landing into desert terrain. All four occupants egressed the airplane with minor injuries, and a post accident fire ensued causing substantial damage. The airplane was registered to Sohail Air Ventures LLC, and operated by the private pilot, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Aviation, Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and a visual flight plan had not been filed. The flight originated at 1515 from Lone Pine Airport, and was destined for Corona, California.

The pilot stated that he diverted to Lone Pine Airport to wait out a weather system that was on their route of flight. About 1.5 hours after landing he decided to proceed on the planned route. He performed a full preflight and engine run up prior to departure. After takeoff he retracted the landing gear, and he noticed that the airplane was not climbing normally, and in fact, was in a slight descent. The engine started to sputter. The pilot performed a gear up forced landing. After the airplane stopped, he noticed a fire emanating from the left wing. His three passengers egressed through the right cabin door, and he followed. The fire spread and soon engulfed most of the airplane's cabin before firefighters arrived to put out the flames.


Beech 35-B33 Bonanza, SOHAIL AIR VENTURES LLC, N82282

US donates flight simulator to Costa Rica's Public Security Ministry

Public Security Minister Celso Gamboa, left, takes a test flight in Costa Rica’s new flight simulator. 
(Courtesy of U.S. Embassy)



Officers of the U.S. Southern Command on Wednesday delivered a flight simulator to the Public Security Ministry’s Air Surveillance Service (SVA) to help train pilots.

The simulator, the first of its kind in Costa Rica, copies the cockpit of a Piper Seneca III aircraft and runs training programs in great detail. It cost $305,000 and was delivered to Public Security Minister Celso Gamboa, who thanked the U.S. government for the donation.

The gift will help supplement SVA training and lower operational costs. Previously, SVA pilots were trained in actual planes on actual flights. But budget restrictions meant the SVA could send only two pilots per year to other countries at an average cost of $30,000 each. Those trips also were funded by the U.S. government.

Pilots now will become better prepared in responding to emergencies without the risks associated with live training.

- Source:  http://www.ticotimes.net

Friends of the Airport have big ideas for facility

South Bruce Peninsula Mayor John Close, Georgian Bluffs Mayor Alan Barfoot, and Georgian Bluffs Deputy Mayor Dwight Burley at the Wiarton-Keppel Airport.
 James Masters photo. 



Brian Reis, Secretary for the Friends of the Airport (FOTA) says that the group wants to investigate the possibility of taking over management of the Wiarton-Keppel airport in a strictly volunteer capacity.

The airport has taken a lot of heat in recent months, due to mismanagement, misinformation, and differing agendas from South Bruce Peninsula and Georgian Bluffs, says Reis. He feels that the airport is a “tremendous asset to the community,” and should be treated as such.

“We know that it does, and can, bring more money into the community,” said Reis during an interview in Wiarton. “It’s very difficult for an airport to produce a profit, just because of the business model that they operate under. They don’t make anything, they don’t sell food, they don’t rent rooms that sort of thing. A study from the American Owners and Pilots Association... shows that small regional airports brought in 42 billion into the US economy. Scale that down for Canada, and that’s still a big amount of money.”

Reis admits that the recent submission of an incomplete business plan to South Bruce Peninsula “fell short,” but maintains that an economic study should be commissioned and completed by the joint councils of Georgian Bluffs and South Bruce Peninsula to assess the feasibility of the airport and how it could be better utilized to produce tourism, travel and boost the local economy of both municipalities.

“Fiddling around with business plans is only useful if you know what you’re shooting for. If you don’t have figures to back up what you’re putting in your plan, it just doesn’t work.”

Reis said that part of existing confusion and misinformation he has heard regarding the airport, is that they’re reserved for the wealthy elite, and serve no real purpose for the average citizen.

“A lot of people think that airports like ours are for rich people - and they’re not. Most of the aircraft that are registered in Canada are not commercially built Sesna’s or Learjets, they’re ordinary, amateur, home-built aircraft. Made from scraps, or from kits by everyday Joe’s like you and I. It’s a hobby. It’s a love. You don’t have to be a millionaire to do it, it’s the same as any other hobby, you invest money in it.”

Reis says that the airport has had, in the past, very successful management running the facility that substantially built the business up. But he says the two municipalities owning the airport together can pose a big problem, as differing agendas can get in the way, and even stop the facilities’ progression.

“You need [successful management]. Of course traffic drops in the winter, we’ve got weather to deal with - but in the summer, we get loads of people heading up to Manitoulin, northern Ontario. They stop in, fuel up, have a bite if the restaurant was open. There’s a courtesy car up there that brings people into town to use some of Wiarton’s downtown businesses, etc.”

Township of Georgian Bluffs Deputy Mayor, Dwight Burley, noted during a phone conversation that open invitations extended to FOTA to attend airport board meetings have never yielded the groups’ participation, but responded to Reis’ volunteer management idea by saying: “yes, by all means. No question about it, we would be happy to talk. It would be good for the whole region.”

Burley said he would gladly sit down with FOTA following some initial conversations with South Bruce Peninsula, and noted that he sees public meetings as imperative to the success of the airport. He added that there’s “a little more to it than that, pro’s and con’s” referencing the joint municipal ownership of the airport working with FOTA. 

Burley said he was presently happy with appointing Dan Vachon as interim airport manager, saying that there have been ongoing “great conversations” with management, as well as a number of good ideas circulating about the airport.

“This area won’t see passenger aircraft,” said Burley. “Owen Sound airport and Wiarton need to compliment each other. Maybe combining flight schools and fuel costs, for example.”

Burley also noted that the airports’ relationship with Transport Canada has always been a positive one. 

Township of Georgian Bluffs Mayor, Alan Barfoot, said that the idea was a “really good suggestion,” during a phone interview. He added that one of the first things on the agenda of the new council should be to “invite South Bruce Peninsula to our municipality” to weigh out some issues pertaining to the airport.

“We would need to work out some boundary issues, and of course the airport is a really hot topic right now,” said Barfoot. “Of course, someone would have to come up with costs up front. The idea has some merit, and we will certainly take a look at it.”

Barfoot concluded by saying it was “pretty much pointless” to get involved with discussions until a new council has been elected following the October 27th municipal election.

South Bruce Peninsula Mayor, John Close, agreed by saying that utilizing FOTA’s experience in a managerial capacity was “probably the next step” for the airport. Close served as Chair of the airport board back in 2001 before the township amalgamation.

“I would certainly hope that the next council would want to chat,” said Close. “Not only have the Friends [of the airport] contributed thousands of volunteer hours, but also, some good ideas involving sustainability... this is a good opportunity for the airport to step away from the politics associated with it. I’d like to see FOTA conduct a report so both councils could see their recommendations over the airport keeping its certification, or dropping down to a registered airport.”

Close called the airport “a blank slate [that is] nowhere near its potential,” and added that infrastructure is still one of the biggest obstacles that the airport faces. Close referenced the cost of paving runways and paths to existing and potential new hangars that could be used for winter storage, as a big cost facing the facility. This monetary issue is also one of the larger issues that South Bruce Peninsula and the Township of Georgian Bluffs run into when conducting airport business together. 

“It all boils down to dollars. We have a great working relationship with Georgian Bluffs. We have to work out how to manage the airport more effectively, and if we can’t - what do we do? Sell, consider other paths?,” said Close.

Close said another topic he would like to see FOTA weigh in on, would be the existing dump sites located on the airport property. The sites consist of buried barrels, and was “done appropriately,” said Close. Close would like to see FOTA present recommendations to both councils on a direction regarding the dump sites.

Reis says that small aircraft are only a small part of breaking into a larger profit margin. ‘Jet A fuel’ could be a huge revenue generator. Jet A, which is a unique specification of jet fuel that has been used in the United States since the 1950’s and is usually not available outside the United States and a select few Canadian airports. Wiarton’s close proximity to Michigan and New York means that some American planes and the Canadian military could use the Wiarton airport as a reliable fuel up station in the future. 

Reis recalls a day when he was on volunteer duty in the weather station, when a Canadian military Hercules cargo plane came in to fuel up, and purchased an approximate 2,000 liters of Jet A fuel, while the crew dined in Wiarton. If the Wiarton airport was prepared to accept that kind of business on a regular basis, he added, the municipality would be much better off economically. 

“Jet A fuel goes for a lot of money,” said Reis.

A certified mechanic and additional winter storage facilities could also help the airport turn a profit, noted Reis. 

Reis adds that the number of American visitors that fly up to search for quarry stone from any number of the Bruce’s quarries is considerably large. Reis says that commissioning an economic study would show how much money really does come in to the community in a year directly because of the airport. But numbers have dropped off drastically, with some estimates from FOTA claiming that traffic has dipped down as much as 80% in the last two years. Reis blames the drop in usage on poor management, and indecision because of the joint-municipal ownership model.

Reis says that the Friends of the Airport would happily voluntarily manage the airport to assist the joint municipal ownership board in lowering their capital costs, if it would help the airport return to its former glory.   

“If we took over management, it would be on a strictly volunteer basis... and we’ve got the expertise. We’ve got former airline pilots, military pilots, weather specialists, flight information specialists, we’ve got an aerospace engineer - all locally in Wiarton. One of them worked with NASA and worked on a program to do research on disorientation space, caused by weightlessness,” said Reis.

Reis says the mentality of the present airport board needs to change to help inspire some positive progression.

“If you’re going to manage an airport, at least be in favour of what you’re managing and be willing to support it and do whatever possible to get the thing moving. [They] should take advantage of the assets that are there, and the potential that is there. If a manager can’t get past the management board, he’s just at their beck and call,” said Reis. 

Reis says that FOTA will consider presenting a delegation to local council introducing the idea in more detail. 


- Source:  http://www.wiartonecho.com