Friday, August 5, 2016

Stinson 108-2 Voyager, N9250K: Accident occurred August 05, 2016 at Sunriver Airport (S21), Deschutes County, Oregon

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9250K

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA424
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 05, 2016 in Sunriver, OR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: STINSON 108, registration: N9250K
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll in gusty wind conditions, the airplane veered off the runway to the right. The pilot further reported that he "applied full brakes" to avoid a bush, subsequently the airplane nosed over. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both left lift struts.

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

A review of recorded data from the automated weather observation station located on the airport, revealed that, about 5 minutes before the accident the wind was 360 degrees true at 7 knots, and wind gusts 13 knots. The airplane landed on runway 36.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll in gusting wind conditions, which resulted in runway excursion and nose-over.



SUNRIVER, Ore. -

A pilot from Washington state landing at Sunriver Airport said an apparent cross-wind caused his nearly 70-year-old plane to veer off the runway Friday afternoon and it overturned in the dirt and rocks, but he walked away unhurt, police said.

Police and fire crews in the resort community responded to the reported crash around 2:20 p.m., said Police Chief Marc Mills.

The arrived to find a 1947 Stinson Voyager 108 aircraft on its top off the east side of the center of the runway, Mills said.

The pilot, Christopher Cole, 45, of Bothell, Washington, was alone in the plane, and already had gotten out and was a safe distance away, he added.

The runway was shut down for about an hour for safety reasons and the National Transportation Safety Board was contacted to investigate the crash.

Mills said Cole was landing in a northerly direction when an apparent cross-wind caused the plane to veer east, off the runway and onto soft dirt and cinder rocks. The plane nosed into the dirt and flipped, coming to rest on its top.

Because the plane came to a rest off the runway, airport operations were only temporarily interrupted.

Cirrus SR22, N908ZU: Incident occurred September 09, 2016 in Monroeville, Monroe County, Alabama

http://registry.faa.gov/N908ZU

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Birmingham FSDO-09

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, STRUCK A DEER, MONROEVILLE, ALABAMA 

Date: 09-SEP-16
Time: 17:50:00Z
Regis#: N908ZU
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MONROEVILLE
State: Alabama

Piper PA-32-301T Saratoga, M and M Aircraft Leasing Inc., N8305W: Incident occurred August 05, 2016 in Miami-Dade County, Florida

M AND M AIRCRAFT LEASING INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8305W 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

Date: 05-AUG-16
Time: 15:55:00Z
Regis#: N8305W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: Unknown
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MIAMI
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A SWAMP, NEAR MIAMI DADE COUNTY, MIAMI, FLORIDA.  

OPA LOCKA (CBSMiami) — A plane went down in Miami-Dade County Friday afternoon.

The Piper PA-32 reportedly went down sometime around noon near Tamiami Trail and Krome Avenue.

The single-engine plane took off from Key West and went down in a swamp, according to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

A helicopter picked up the pilot who was the only person on board and took him to a local hospital. The extent of his injuries are unclear.

The plane was headed to North Perry Airport in Hollywood when it went down.

The FAA is investigating the crash.

Source:  http://miami.cbslocal.com

Piper PA-11, Agri-Flight Inc., N4707M: Fatal accident occurred August 05, 2016 near Laverty Field Airport (IA41), Indianola, Warren County, Iowa

Alex Michael Winter

Neil C. Jackson



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA310 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 05, 2016 in Indianola, IA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/26/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA-11, registration: N4707M
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was using a company airplane to accumulate flight time and experience. Two witnesses reported seeing the airplane climbing after takeoff and noted that the airplane was flying slowly and that it had a “hard time getting any lift.” The airplane finally started to climb; however, the wings started rocking and the airplane subsequently descended into terrain. The witness statements were consistent with the prestall motions of the airplane. 

The pilot and passenger were employed as company ground personnel. According to company policy, the pilot was not allowed to fly with passengers, and the passenger was only allowed to fly with a company flight instructor. The pilot was not a flight instructor. Examination of the airplane revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. A postaccident estimation of the airplane's weight and balance showed that the airplane exceeded its maximum gross weight at the time of the takeoff. It is likely that the pilot’s inadequate preflight planning led to the airplane being operated above its maximum gross weight and degraded its climb performance and led to an aerodynamic stall.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inadequate preflight planning, which resulted in the airplane being operated above its maximum gross weight, degraded its climb performance, and led to an aerodynamic stall during the initial climb.

On August 5, 2016, about 1113 central daylight time, a Piper PA-11; N4707M, impacted a field while maneuvering near Indianola, Iowa. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The commercial pilot and a student pilot rated passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Agri-Flite Inc under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 for the personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Laverty Field Airport, Indianola, Iowa at 1045.

According to the president of Agri-Flight Inc, the pilot and the passenger were employed by Agri-Flite Inc as ground crew personnel and not as a pilots. The pilot was not a company flight instructor, was not allowed to fly with passengers, and was only allowed to fly with company flight instructors. The passenger was only allowed to fly with company flight instructors and not with any other pilots. The president said that ground personnel were allowed to fly company airplanes in order to accumulate flight time, but it was not a method in which ground personnel would transition from their ground personnel positions to pilot positions within the company. The president said there were no upcoming company pilot positions available for the pilot or passenger and that ground personnel are allowed to fly company airplane as a benefit.

On the day of the accident, the president saw the pilot perform at least two stop and go's in N4707M. The president said that the passenger was sitting outside of the company office using his phone and later speculated that the passenger was communicating with the pilot. The president said the pilot landed N4707M, and the student pilot got on board without the airplane being shut down. According to the company security video, they both departed in the N4707M toward the west.

According to local law enforcement, two witnesses stated that they saw the airplane takeoff toward the east, and it appeared to be moving "very sluggishly." The said that appeared as if there was something wrong with the airplane because it was it was having difficulty in attaining enough speed to takeoff and "more trouble" climbing after it lifted off the runway. The airplane flew to the east, then circled to the west, continued to be flying "very slowly," and "a hard time getting any lift." The airplane finally started to climb but then the left wing "dipped down" toward the ground. The airplane seemed to wobble back and forth three or four times, first the left wing followed by the right wing dipping down toward the ground. The airplane then "dropped out of the air."

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. He held a second class medical certificate dated November 6, 2015. The medical certificate was issued without any limitations. According to the operator's accident report, the pilot had accumulated about 260 hours of total flight time of which about 2.5 hours was in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Principal Airworthiness Inspector from the Des Moines Flight Standards District Office stated that the wreckage was oriented facing east on a 090-degree heading The airplane's left wing rested flat on the ground. The right wing root was up off the ground slightly due to how the fuselage was twisted and laying on its left side. The post-crash fire consumed all fabric from the left and right wings and fuselage. Small pieces of fabric were still attached to parts of the fuselage frame tubing. Flight control continuity was confirmed. The Continental A-65-8, serial number 33822-5-8, engine magnetos were broken out of the back of the engine but were on the accessory case. The propeller was still bolted to the flange. The left blade was splintered several inches from the hub. The separated portion was located on the ground, under the engine. Approximately 30 percent of the right blade was missing. The instrument panel and all instruments were badly damaged by the fire. The only recognizable instrument was the turn and slip indicator. The positions of the throttle, carburetor heat, and fuel selector could not be determined due to the condition of the wreckage.

The FAA final Forensic Toxicology Fatal Accident Report for the pilot stated: no carbon monoxide detected in blood, cyanide testing not performed, no ethanol detected in urine, and no listed drugs detected in urine.

The president of Agri-Flite Inc.said that based on a pilot's weight of approximately 225 pounds and a passenger's weight of approximately 285 pounds, N4707M had a weight above the maximum certified weight of the airplane. The calculated takeoff weight of the airplane for the accident flight was about 1,338 lbs and the maximum certified weight was 1,220 lbs.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA310
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 05, 2016 in Indianola, IA
Aircraft: PIPER PA-11, registration: N4707M
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On August 5, 2016, about 1113 central daylight time, a Piper PA-11; N4707M, impacted a field while maneuvering near Indianola, Iowa. The airplane was destroyed. The commercial pilot and a passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Agri-Flite Inc under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 for the flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Laverty Field Airport, Indianola, Iowa.


Authorities have identified the second man killed in a plane crash north of Indianola last week.

Neil C. Jackson, 23, of Jerome, Idaho, was killed when the small airplane he was in crashed Aug. 5, according to a Warren County Sheriff's Office news release on Wednesday.

Alex Michael Winter, 22, of Indianola also died in the crash.

The small aircraft crashed about 11:15 a.m. Aug. 5 in the 12300 block of Geneva Street, near Laverty Field Airport, just north of Indianola.

The crash is under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

According to an FAA report, the aircraft crashed into a field and burned. Jackson and Winter were the only people in the plane.

Authorities have not released further details about how the plane crashed.

According to FAA records, Jackson is a licensed commercial pilot for single-engine airplanes, and Winter is a student pilot.

The two were flying for flight instruction when the plane crashed, according to the FAA report.



INDIANOLA, Iowa —Two people were killed in a small-plane crash Friday in Warren County, Sheriff Brian Vos said.

A Piper PA-11 small aircraft crashed around 11:40 a.m. under what the Federal Aviation Administration called "unknown circumstances," in a field outside the airport, north of Indianola near 12341 Geneva St., just west of Highway 69.

Names of the victims are being withheld pending family notification.

The FAA is investigating the crash and will pass information to the National Transportation Safety Board, which will lead the investigation.

Source:  http://www.kcci.com





WARREN COUNTY, Iowa — Two people are dead following a plane crash in Warren County Friday morning.

The happened near 12341 Geneva, just west of Highway 65/69, at about 11 a.m. Friday.

Law enforcement officials said the plane was practicing landing maneuvers at a nearby landing strip when the crash happened.

The NTSB is investigating the crash.

Beech F33A Bonanza, We Fly 2 LLC, N47TJ: Incident occurred August 04, 2016 at East Hampton Airport (KHTO), Suffolk County, New York

WE FLY 2 LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N47TJ

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Farmingdale FSDO-11

Date: 04-AUG-16
Time: 14:10:00Z
Regis#: N47TJ
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 33
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: EAST HAMPTON
State: New York

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, EAST HAMPTON, NEW YORK.

PA14 EXP, N18PG: Accident occurred August 04, 2016 in Sparta, Kent County, Michigan

Aviation Accident Final Report / National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -    National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Factual Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Grand Rapids, Michigan

http://registry.faa.gov/N18PG

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA305
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 04, 2016 in Sparta, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/06/2017
Aircraft: GILCHRIST PA14EXP, registration: N18PG
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Shortly after takeoff, the experimental amateur-built airplane experienced a total loss of engine power, and the private pilot conducted a forced landing to a field. During the landing, the airplane’s landing gear impacted a fence, resulting in substantial damage. A postaccident examination and test run of the engine revealed no malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.  Although the atmospheric conditions present at the time of the accident were conducive to the formation of moderate carburetor icing at cruise power settings and serious carburetor icing at descent power settings, the airplane was operating at takeoff power; therefore, the investigation could not conclude that the loss of power was the result of carburetor ice accumulation. Based on the available evidence, the reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined, since postaccident examination revealed no malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

On August 4, 2016, about 2030 eastern daylight time, an amateur-built PA14EXP airplane, N18PG, sustained substantial damage when it struck a fence and nosed over during a forced landing following a loss of engine power during initial climb after takeoff. The pilot and passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight was originating the Paul C Miller-Sparta Airport, near Sparta, Michigan, at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that he performed a pre-flight inspection of the airplane and a run-up prior to takeoff. All checks were normal. He stated that the takeoff was normal until reaching about 300 feet above ground level when the engine lost all power. He stated that the engine was still rotating. He checked the fuel selector, which was on "both", and attempted to pump the throttle which had no effect. He then executed a forced landing to an adjacent field, but stuck a fence with the landing gear. The airplane came to a rest on the ground past the fence.

The airplane was an amateur-built version of a Piper PA-14 airplane. It was powered by a reciprocating carburetor equipped Aerosport O-375 engine bearing serial number 1547-SPE. The engine was rated to produce 205 horsepower. According to the pilot report the engine had accumulated 45.5 hours total time in service at the time of the accident.

The engine was examined by Federal Aviation Administration inspectors while still mounted in the airframe. All engine controls were still attached and functioning normally. The carburetor was broken at the flange mount. All fuel hoses were intact and unrestricted. The fuel strainers and screens were clean. The engine was rotated and compression was noted on all cylinders. Six quarts of oil was present in the engine. The battery was connected and ignition spark was checked. Spark was observed, but the inspector noted that the spark "seemed weak". No anomalies were noted.

Subsequently, the airplane owner had the engine removed and sent to an engine rebuilder where it was placed in an engine test cell and was run for about 5-6 hours. During the testing the engine was run with the electronic magnetos that were installed at the time of the accident, but a surrogate carburetor was used since the one that was installed at the time of the accident had broken during the accident sequence. No anomalies were noted during the engine test run.


At 2053. the weather conditions reported at the Grand Rapids International Airport included a temperature of 28 degrees Celsius and a dew point of 18 degrees Celsius. According to a carburetor icing probability chart, the reported temperature and dew point were in a range for moderate carburetor icing at cruise power settings and serious carburetor icing at descent power settings.

HPL-1 High Wing-Para, N9095U: Accident occurred August 04, 2016 in Owensville, Brown County, Ohio

http://registry.faa.gov/N9095U

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cincinnati FSDO-05

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA313
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 04, 2016 in Owensville, OH
Aircraft: LIMING LOUIS L HPL 1 HIGH WING PARA, registration: N9095U
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 5, 2016, about 0745 eastern daylight time, an Liming Louis L HPL-1 experimental airplane, N9095U, registered to the pilot/owner, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a partial loss of engine power near Owensville, Ohio. The private pilot, who was the sole occupant, was not injured. The personal local flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated at 0730 from the Brown County Airport (GEO), Georgetown, Ohio.

Prior to departure from GEO, the pilot reported that he fueled the aircraft with M94 fuel. After takeoff, the pilot flew to the north for about 9 miles and began circling a private residence at 1,500 feet AGL. Suddenly, the engine power went to idle. The pilot checked to make sure that he had not bumped the idle control with his left knee and attempted to increase the engine RPM. The engine RPM did not increase and the pilot chose a grassy field to land while the engine remained at idle. Upon initial touchdown in the rough vegetated field, the airplane's speed was relatively high. The airplane became airborne and the the left wing struck a small stand of trees, spun around about 360 degrees, and struck the ground before coming to a stop. Substantial damage was incurred to the left wing and right wing strut and the pilot exited without injury.

Fuel samples were taken from the GEO source and no contaminates were found.



BROWN COUNTY, OH (FOX19) -

Federal and state authorities are investigating two separate small plane crashes in Brown County Thursday night.

Both aircraft went down at scenes about 20 miles apart just minutes apart starting at 8:04 p.m., according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol's Georgetown post.

The first plane crash occurred in the area of Fryer Road, near Russellville.

A 1973 Cessna piloted by Timothy Howser, 46, of Batavia, crashed into a field after reportedly having engine trouble, the patrol said in a prepared statement. 

Howser suffered non-life threatening injuries and was taken to Clermont Mercy Hospital by Russellville Emergency Medical Services.

Timothy Howser’s passenger, Tony Howser, 44, of Highland Heights was not injured,according to the patrol.

The second plane crash was reported about 8:07 p.m. in the area of Carpenter Road, near Mount Orab. 

The experimental aircraft, piloted by Kristopher Cooper, 42, of Hamersville also crashed into a field after reportedly having engine trouble, patrol officials said.

Cooper was not hurt. He was the only one in the aircraft. 

Both pilots had reported refueling their planes before they departed the Brown County Airport, according to the patrol.

The highway patrol was assisted at the scene of both crashes by Russellville Police and Fire Departments, Mount Orab Police and Fire Departments and the Brown County Emergency Management Agency.

The Federal Aviation was notified of both crashes, which remain under investigation.

Source:  http://www.fox19.com

Aero AT-4 LSA, Flowmeter Services LLC, N703GB: Incident occurred August 04, 2016 Northampton, Hampshire County, Massachusetts

FLOWMETER SERVICES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/aN703GB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Windsor Locks FSDO-63

Date: 04-AUG-16
Time: 16:00:00Z
Regis#: N703GB
Aircraft Make: AERO
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Damage: Minor
LOCATION
City: NORTHAMPTON
State: Massachusetts

AIRCRAFT, AERO SP Z O O AT-4 LSA, ON LANDING SUSTAINED DAMAGE TO NOSE WHEEL AND PROPELLER, NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

Cessna 150L, N10770: Accident occurred August 04, 2016 near Brown County Airport (KGEO), Georgetown, Brown County, Ohio

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cincinnati FSDO-05

http://registry.faa.gov/N10770


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA306
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 04, 2016 in Russellville, OH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/20/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N10770
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

As the private pilot was descending the airplane for landing, he heard a loud "bang," and the engine subsequently began running rough. Unable to maintain altitude, the pilot conducted a forced landing to a soybean field, during which the airplane impacted a ditch and nosed over. Examination of the engine revealed that the No. 2 cylinder was completely separated between the flange and the head. Examination of the cylinder revealed a fatigue crack that initiated at a cooling fin valley on the exterior surface. The fatigue crack grew around 40% of the circumference of the cylinder, and overstress led to the eventual cylinder fracture. A metallographic cross-section of the cylinder revealed corrosion pits under the paint and primer. The alloy is not necessarily susceptible to pitting, but crevice corrosion near an unpainted area or exposure to salt environments can lead to similar corrosion features.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power due to a fatigue crack of the No. 2 cylinder cooling fin, which resulted in failure of the No. 2 cylinder. 

On August 4, 2016, at 2004 eastern daylight time, the pilot of a Cessna 150L, N10770, impacted terrain in a soybean field near Russellville, Ohio, after a loss of engine power. The private pilot on board sustained a minor injury and the pilot-rated passenger was not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from Brown County Airport (KGEO), Georgetown, Ohio, about 1945.

The pilots told an FAA inspector that while they were descending for landing, they heard a loud "bang" and the engine began running rough. Unable to maintain altitude, they made a forced landing in a soybean field. The airplane struck a ditch and nosed over. Examination of the engine revealed the number 2 cylinder had completely separated between the flange and the head.

The pilot was instructed to ship the cylinder halves to the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for examination. According to the Materials Laboratory's Factual Report (16-110), the cylinder had fractured about the circumference of the seventh cooling fin valley through approximately 40% of the cross section. The fracture was relatively flat, exhibited a reflective luster, and was oriented in the direction of piston movement. The fracture surface revealed the presence of crack arrest marks, which were consistent with progressive cracking due to fatigue. Additionally, several cooling fin flange surfaces exhibited small circular features consistent with pitting. An initial thumbnail crack was present adjacent to the crack initiation site, with radial marks and crack arrest marks propagating outward. Fatigue striations were present, consistent with fatigue crack propagation. The crack initiation site on the head side of the fracture surface consisted of three stepped features containing ratchet marks between the steps, consistent with multiple crack initiation sites that had coalesced as the fatigue cracks grew and propagated inward. The mating (open piston side) fracture surface exhibited three ridge shapes, consistent with the previously observed ratchet marks on the head side fracture surface.

According to the engine maintenance records, cylinder number 2 (serial number 0049), manufactured by Superior Air Parts, Coppell, Texas, was overhauled on April 14, 2000. The overhaul included grounding the intake and exhaust valve seats, grounding the intake valve, replacing the intake and exhaust guides, and replacing the exhaust valve. The cylinder was then pressure checked and returned to service.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA306
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 04, 2016 in Russellville, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N10770
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 4, 2016, at 2009 eastern daylight time, the pilot of a Cessna 150L, N10770, made a forced landing in a soybean field 4 miles easts-southeast of Russellville, Ohio, after the engine lost power. Of the two pilots on board, one sustained a minor injury and the other was not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from Brown County Airport (KGEO) , Georgetown, Ohio, about 1930.

The pilots told an FAA inspector as they were descending for landing, they heard a loud "bang" and the engine began running rough. Unable to maintain altitude, they made a forced landing in a soybean field, struck a ditch, and nosed over.

Examination of the engine revealed the number 2 cylinder had separated between the flange and the head.


Update, Friday, 6:30 a.m. : Two pilots whose planes crashed minutes apart Thursday night in Brown County reported engine problems prior to crashing, officials said in a news release.

A Cessna 150L  piloted by Timothy Howser, 46, of Batavia crashed into a field at 8:04 p.m. Howser was treated for non-life threatening injuries while passenger Tony Howser, 44, of Highland Heights, wasn't injured. The crash occurred near Fryer Road in Russellville, Ohio.

Kristopher Cooper, 42, of Harnersville, Ohio, wasn't injured when his experimental aircraft crashed about three minutes later near Carpenter Road in Mount Orab, Ohio.

Both planes refueled prior to their departure from the Brown County Airport, authorities said.

The Federal Aviation Administration was notified of the crashes, which are still being investigated.

Previous report: Two single-engine planes crashed in Brown County Thursday evening within 3 minutes of each other, according to Brown County Ohio State Highway Patrol.

The two incidents appear to be completely separate from one another, a dispatcher there said. One plane fell near Fryer Road and Clifton Avenue, and the other went down near Carpenter and Boyd roads at 8:04 p.m. and 8:07 p.m., respectively.

Perhaps even more surprising, there were no injuries.

Both planes landed in soybean fields and caused no damage – except for the planes. The crash sites are about a 25-minute drive apart from each other.

Officials are looking into the causes of both crashes, which are unknown at this time.

Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-300, N368SW: Accident occurred August 04, 2016 at Baltimore/Washington International Airport (KBWI), Baltimore, Maryland

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

SOUTHWEST AIRLINES CO: http://registry.faa.gov/N368SW 

NTSB Identification: DCA16CA207 

Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of Southwest Airlines
Accident occurred Thursday, August 04, 2016 in Baltimore, MD
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/23/2017
Aircraft: BOEING 737 3H4, registration: N368SW
Injuries: 134 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On August 4, 2016 at 9:02pm eastern daylight time, Southwest Airlines flight 149, a Boeing 737, N368SW, experienced a failure of the nose landing gear during pushback from the gate at the Baltimore/Washington Thurgood Marshall International Airport (BWI), Baltimore, Maryland. The aircraft was substantially damaged and there were no injuries to the 6 crewmembers or 129 passengers but the airplane was substantially damaged. The flight was being operated under 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 121 as a regularly scheduled passenger flight to Atlanta-Hartsfield International Airport (ATL), Atlanta, Georgia.


According to the flight crew, as the pushback tug was maneuvering the aircraft off the gate, the flight crew felt the front of the airplane bounce up and down, and then came to rest on the nose. The passengers were deplaned via air stairs.


The nose gear collapsed in a forward direction, resulting in substantial damage to the gear structure, the nose gear well, and crushing the forward bulkhead. An airport surveillance camera video was obtained, which showed the tug pushing the aircraft at approximately 6 knots. The tug specifications indicate that speed could be achieved only in second gear or higher. The airline general operating manual specifies that pushback must be conducted in low or first gear, and at a walking speed.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

the tug operators excessive speed during pushback.

Bell 412EP, Aero Tech LLC, N412AT: Incident occurred August 03, 2016 in Speedwell, Wythe County, Virginia

AERO TECH LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N412AT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Richmond FSDO-21

Date: 03-AUG-16
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N412AT
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: 412
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SPEEDWELL
State: Virginia

N412AT BELL 412EP ROTORCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD NEAR SPEEDWELL, VIRGINIA.

Robinson R44 II, Ace Flyers Inc., N719TF: Accident occurred August 04, 2016 in Homer, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary   -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

ACE FLYERS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N719TF

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03

NTSB Identification: ANC16CA051 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 04, 2016 in Homer, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N719TF
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that while en route, about 1,000 feet above ground level (agl), a loud sound was heard in conjunction with feeling a "bump." At this point, a vibration was felt in the control pedals and a precautionary landing was executed. Upon inspection, an estimated 3-inch area of the tail rotor blade exhibited signs consistent with buckling. 

Witnesses on the ground reported seeing an object consistent with a bird fall from the sky after contact with the helicopter. No panels or other equipment was missing from the helicopter during an inspection following the landing. The pilot reported no pre-impact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
An in-flight collision with a bird resulting in damage to a tail rotor blade, which required replacement.

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, Boeing Employees Flying Association Inc., N4801D: Accident occurred August 04, 2016 in Everett, Snohomish County, Washington

BOEING EMPLOYEES FLYING ASSOCIATION INC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N4801D

FAA Flight Standards District Office:FAA Seattle FSDO-01

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA417
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 03, 2016 in Everett, WA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N4801D
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After a local flight, the pilot reported that while taxing in the non-movement area at night he made a left turn and impacted a building door with the left wing.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from the building door, which resulted in substantial damage to the left wing.

Beech F33A Bonanza, N6728X: Accident occurred August 01, 2016 in Blythe, Riverside County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N6728X


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA411 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 01, 2016 in Blythe, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: BEECH F33, registration: N6728X
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was conducting a night, visual meteorological conditions flight from a rural desert airport, and reported that prior to the flight, she did a weight and balance, checked the temperature, and did performance calculations.

The pilot reported that after rotation, the airplane was not producing "sufficient power and not climbing as anticipated" and the stall warning horn was audible. She lowered the airplane's nose, and the stall warning horn silenced. The pilot further reported that she heard "scraping" [ground impact] against the airplane, but she could not see the terrain due to the night conditions. Subsequently, the airplane impacted the ground off of the airport, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage.

In a follow up email conversation with the pilot's attorney, the attorney said that the pilot reported that the engine was producing power at the time that the aerodynamic stall warning horn was audible and just before impact, but noted that the power was not sufficient. 

A photograph of the accident airplane provided by the FAA inspector that responded to the accident, showed all three blades exhibited tip curl, torsional twisting and S-bending, consistent with the engine producing power at the time of impact.

The airplane performance and weight and balance calculations that the pilot performed prior to the accident flight were requested by the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC), but were not provided. 

The pilot stated she was unaware of any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

It is likely that the pilot exceeded the critical angle of attack during takeoff at night resulting in an aerodynamic stall. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has published the Airplane Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-3A (2004). This handbook discusses aerodynamic stalls and states in part:

The key to stall awareness is the pilot's ability to visualize the wing's angle of attack in any particular circumstance, and thereby be able to estimate his/her margin of safety above stall. This is a learned skill that must be acquired early in flight training and carried through the pilot's entire flying career. The pilot must understand and appreciate factors such as airspeed, pitch attitude, load factor, relative wind, power setting, and aircraft configuration in order to develop a reasonably accurate mental picture of the wing's angle of attack at any particular time. It is essential to flight safety that a pilot takes into consideration this visualization of the wing's angle of attack prior to entering any flight maneuver.

Stall accidents usually result from an inadvertent stall at a low altitude in which a recovery was not accomplished prior to contact with the surface.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to attain adequate airspeed to climb and her exceedance of the airplane's critical angle-of-attack during takeoff initial climb at night, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall at low altitude.