Sunday, March 12, 2017

Rick and Hayden Mercil: Dad and co-pilot son share ride through life

Hayden Mercil, 8, at the controls of the Cessna 180 his dad, Rick Mercil, piloted during a recent day trip for a burger to Sunset Lodge on Oak Island of Lake of the Woods.




By Rick Mercil 


LAKE OF THE WOODS, Minn. — Eight years ago in January, my life changed forever when Rosa and I adopted our son, Hayden. Our adult girls had left the nest, and this little guy came into our lives out of our desire to provide him a home.

Fast forward eight years, and I not only have a son, but I have a co-pilot, too. This was never more evident than on Monday, Jan. 16.

Hayden and I both had the day of for the Martin Luther King Day holiday. We decided to take advantage of the beautiful bluebird day to fly my 1957 Cessna 180 from Crookston up to the Northwest Angle of Lake of the Woods for a burger at Sunset Lodge on Oak Island.

During the flight, Hayden got 50 cents if he pointed out any towers along the route and $1 if he spotted an airport. We made funny noises in the microphone through the headsets and told silly jokes to each other, just the two of us.

It was a perfect father-son day. You can imagine the fun we had!

The flight to the Angle took about an hour, and we landed on the ice road near Oak Island. We taxied up to Sunset Lodge and went in and had the best hamburger this side of U.S. Highway 2.

Before we left, Hayden had the biggest bowl of ice cream he had ever seen.

When we departed, the moan of the old Continental engine tired the little guy out. He put his head on my lap and fell right to sleep. It was only when I radioed the Crookston airport to announce my flight intentions that he awakened. The day ended perfectly, and I couldn't have been happier.

It was one of the best flying experiences I ever had—and I've had a few.

Source:  http://www.wdaz.com

Cessna 177RG Cardinal, Arte Original LLC, N7571V: Incident occurred March 12, 2017 at Centennial Airport (KAPA), Denver, Colorado

Arte Original LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N7571V 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Denver, Colorado 

Aircraft landed gear up.  

Date: 12-MAR-17
Time: 17:23:00Z
Regis#: N7571V
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C177
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO


CENTENNIAL, Colo. — A small plane landed on its belly at the Centennial Airport Sunday morning after the landing gear didn’t come down.

There was one person on board the single-engine Cessna Cardinal, airport officials said on Twitter.

No one was hurt in the “gear-up landing,” officials said.

There was no word on why the landing gear didn’t come down.

South Metro Fire Rescue was responding to the airport.

Runway 10/28 was closed while they worked to remove the aircraft, officials said.

Story and photo:  http://kdvr.com

Progressive Aerodyne Searey, N9888D: Winds from Hurricane Matthew on October 07, 2016 pulled aircraft off the tie-down and pushed it into a fence
































AIRCRAFT:  2004 DEWHURST SEBASTIAN SEAREY N9888D, serial number: 1MK339C
ENGINE:   Rotax 912S, s/n: 4429381.  

The engine was reportedly run without oil and is completely disassembled. 

The intent of the following list is only to verify that these major Components are present, with no guarantee of condition:

2- Case halves
1- Accessory case
1- Crankshaft
1- Camshaft
4- Connecting rods
4- Cylinders
4- Pistons  
4- Heads
4- Wrist pins
8- Lifters
8- Pushrods
2- Carburetors

PROPELLER:  Ivoprop ground-adjustable three blade. 

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:  Unknown

PROPELLER:    Unknown

AIRFRAME:  673.8 in July 2016 according to logbook entry

OTHER EQUIPMENT:  KY 97A, KT 76A

Garmin was reported stolen and is NOT included with the salvage.

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Winds from Hurricane Matthew on 10/07/16 pulled N9888D off the tie-down and pushed it into a fence.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:  Inspection is highly recommended.  Damage includes but may not be limited to the following:
The leading edge of the left wing appears to be dented.
The left wing tip and the left position light mounting are damaged
The left elevator is scraped
There is a hole in rudder
The right elevator and right wing tip are damaged 
The tail appears twisted/bent
The right wing tip is damaged
The right navigation light is off the mounting
The right aileron skin is damaged.
The pylon attaching the wing to the fuselage has twisted and caused damage at the pylon base. (There were popped mounting rivets around the pylon which indicates the main fuselage had been twisted)
The engine was reportedly run without oil and it is currently completely disassemble
The canopy does not shut tight
The cockpit was found with an inch or more of water in the floor

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N9888D.htm

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N8447R; accident occurred March 12, 2017 near Peter O. Knight Airport (KTPF), Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida

Main Wreckage

Induction duct

View down collapsed duct

Side view of collapsed duct-removed

Accident Duct and Exemplar (Approved) Duct 

Accident Duct and Exemplar (Approved) Duct 



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N8447R




Location: Tampa, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA128
Date & Time: 03/12/2017, 1335 EDT
Registration: N8447R
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The private pilot stated that he rented the airplane 2 days before the accident flight to fly across the state for several days. On the day of the accident, the pilot performed a preflight inspection of the airplane with no anomalies noted. After takeoff and during the initial climb, the pilot noticed a loss of engine power, and the rpm started to drop. He attempted to return to the departure airport and land on an intersecting runway, but during the turn, he realized he would not make it back to the airport; he ditched the airplane into the surrounding water. The airplane was substantially damaged during the ditching.

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the induction duct from the air filter to the carburetor had collapsed, which likely restricted air flow to the engine and ultimately resulted in the loss of engine power. Further examination revealed that the induction duct on the accident airplane was not approved for installation on the engine. About 3 years before the accident, the Federal Aviation Administration had issued a special airworthiness information bulletin recommending operators inspect airplanes of this model to ensure that the correct induction duct was installed; that there was no loose or displaced supporting wire or signs of wear, perforation, or deterioration; and that the part had not collapsed. However, the operator was unaware of the bulletin and had not performed the inspection. After the accident, the operator inspected the fleet and installed the approved part on all affected airplanes. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A collapsed engine induction duct, which resulted in restricted air flow to the engine and a subsequent loss of engine power. Contributing to the accident was the operator's failure to ensure that the correct induction duct was installed.

Findings

Aircraft
Scheduled maint checks - Incorrect service/maintenance (Cause)
Air intake - Failure (Cause)

Environmental issues
Water - Contributed to outcome


Factual Information

On March 12, 2017, about 1335 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N8447R, impacted the water during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Peter O Knight Airport (TPF), Tampa, Florida. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight to Sebastian Municipal Airport (X26), Sebastian, Florida. The personal flight was conducted in accordance with the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he rented the airplane two days prior to the accident flight, to fly from X26 to TPF for several days. The flight on March 10 was uneventful. On March 12, he arrived at the airport around 1230 and started his preflight inspection of the airplane. The pilot stated he "sumped" the tanks and the fuel was clear of debris. The rest of the preflight inspection was normal and no anomalies were noted. The engine run-up and magneto checks were normal, and he started his take-off roll on runway 22.

At 60 knots airspeed, he rotated and started to climb. Upon reaching about 100 ft above ground level, he noticed a loss of engine power and the rpm started to drop. He verified fuel and oil pressure were good and started looking for a place to land. He further stated he could not abort the take-off and land safely on the runway, so he decided to try to turn back to the airport and land on the cross runway. During the turn, he realized he would not make it back to the airport and decided to ditch the airplane into the surrounding water. Once he ditched the airplane, he exited through the cockpit door and a local boater picked him up and took him to shore.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the left wing separated from the airplane. The windshield was fractured in several areas and the right wing leading edge was damaged.

Further examination of the wreckage by an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board revealed the induction hose from the air filter to the carburetor was collapsed and the spring inside the duct was positioned sideways.

The duct was sent to the airframe manufacturer for a visual examination. The examination revealed that the duct was not approved for installation on the PA-28-140 aircraft. Specifically, duct was not of a type that was approved for negative pressure environments. Also, the duct was not of the correct length, and it was not a double walled duct. Based on available information, it could not be determined when the duct had been installed onto the airplane.

The FAA issued a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB), CE-14-23, on August 6, 2014, which recommended that operators and owners of the PA-28 inspect the air inlet hose [duct] and verify that it was an approved part and did not exhibit any loose or broken cords on the external surface. The inspection should also confirm that there was no loose or displaced supporting wire, or signs of wear, perforation, deterioration, and that the part had not collapsed. If any of these conditions were observed, then the hose must be replaced before next flight.

The operator reported that they were unaware of the SAIB, and following the accident, immediately grounded their fleet of airplanes and inspected them for the approved Piper duct. They found that all the airplanes had the unapproved duct installed and immediately ordered and installed the approved part.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/14/2012
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  231 hours (Total, all aircraft), 75 hours (Total, this make and model), 135 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N8447R
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-22331
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/07/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5400 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 0-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 140 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTPF, 8 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0735 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 7°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 100°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Tampa, FL (TPF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: SEBASTIAN, FL (X26)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1537 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E 

Airport Information

Airport: PETER O KNIGHT (TPF)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 7 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 22
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3583 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 27.910556, -82.449722 (est) The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N8447R


Location: Tampa, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA128
Date & Time: 03/12/2017, 1335 EDT
Registration: N8447R
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 12, 2017, about 1335 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N8447R, impacted the water during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Peter O Knight Airport (TPF), Tampa, Florida. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight to Sebastian Municipal Airport (X26), Sebastian, Florida. The personal flight was conducted in accordance with the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he rented the airplane two days prior to the accident flight, to fly from X26 to TPF for several days. The flight on March 10 was uneventful. On March 12, he arrived at the airport around 1230 and started his preflight inspection of the airplane. The pilot stated he "sumped" the tanks and the fuel was clear of debris. The rest of the preflight inspection was normal and no anomalies were noted. The engine run-up and magneto checks were normal, and he started his take-off roll on runway 22.

At 60 knots airspeed, he rotated and started to climb. Upon reaching about 100 ft above ground level, he noticed a loss of engine power and the rpm started to drop. He verified fuel and oil pressure were good and started looking for a place to land. He further stated he could not abort the take-off and land safely on the runway, so he decided to try to turn back to the airport and land on the cross runway. During the turn, he realized he would not make it back to the airport and decided to ditch the airplane into the surrounding water. Once he ditched the airplane, he exited through the cockpit door and a local boater picked him up and took him to shore.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the left wing separated from the airplane. The windshield was fractured in several areas and the right wing leading edge was damaged.

Further examination of the wreckage by an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board revealed the induction hose from the air filter to the carburetor was collapsed and the spring inside the duct was positioned sideways.

The duct was sent to the airframe manufacturer for a visual examination. The examination revealed that the duct was not approved for installation on the PA-28-140 aircraft. Specifically, duct was not of a type that was approved for negative pressure environments. Also, the duct was not of the correct length, and it was not a double walled duct. Based on available information, it could not be determined when the duct had been installed onto the airplane.

The FAA issued a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB), CE-14-23, on August 6, 2014, which recommended that operators and owners of the PA-28 inspect the air inlet hose [duct] and verify that it was an approved part and did not exhibit any loose or broken cords on the external surface. The inspection should also confirm that there was no loose or displaced supporting wire, or signs of wear, perforation, deterioration, and that the part had not collapsed. If any of these conditions were observed, then the hose must be replaced before next flight.

The operator reported that they were unaware of the SAIB, and following the accident, immediately grounded their fleet of airplanes and inspected them for the approved Piper duct. They found that all the airplanes had the unapproved duct installed and immediately ordered and installed the approved part.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/14/2012
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  231 hours (Total, all aircraft), 75 hours (Total, this make and model), 135 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N8447R
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-22331
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/07/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5400 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 0-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 140 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTPF, 8 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0735 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 7°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 100°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Tampa, FL (TPF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: SEBASTIAN, FL (X26)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1537 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class E 

Airport Information

Airport: PETER O KNIGHT (TPF)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 7 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 22
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3583 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 27.910556, -82.449722 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA128
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 12, 2017 in Tampa, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N8447R
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 12, 2017, about 1537 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N8447R, impacted the water during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Peter O Knight Airport (TPF), Tampa, Florida. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight to Sabastian Municipal Airport (X26), Sabastian, Florida. The personal flight was conducted the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he rented the airplane two days prior to the accident flight, to fly from X26 to TPF for several days. The flight on March 10 was uneventful. On March 12, he arrived at the airport around 1230 and started his preflight inspection of the airplane. The pilot stated he "sumped" the tanks and the fuel was clear of debris. The rest of the preflight inspection was normal and no anomalies were noted. The engine run-up and magneto checks were normal, and he started his take off roll on runway 22.

At 60 knots airspeed, he rotated and started to climb. Upon reaching about 100 feet above ground level, he noticed a loss of engine power and the rpm started to drop. He verified fuel and oil pressure were good and started looking for a place to land. He further stated he could not abort the take-off and land safely on the runway, so he decided to try to turn back to the airport and land on the cross runway. During the turn, he realized he would not make it back to the airport and decided to ditch the airplane into the surrounding water. Once he ditched the airplane, he exited through the cockpit door and a local boater picked him up and took him to shore.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the left wing separated from the airplane. The windshield was fractured in several areas and the right wing leading edge was damaged.

The airframe and engine were retained for further investigation.




TAMPA -- First responders were on the scene of a downed Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee in the waters off Peter O. Knight airport on Davis Islands in Tampa.

According to Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office, only one person was aboard the Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee at the time of the crash around 1:37 p.m.

The pilot was pulled from the water from nearby boaters and is reportedly uninjured, according to Tampa Police Department.

HCSO said that the Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee experienced a loss of power after takeoff and landed in the water.

TPD Marine units will assist in pulling the plane out of Tampa Bay.

The dive team for the Tampa Police Department was able to finally pull the Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee from the shipping channel several hours following the crash. 

The Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee will be kept at the Peter O' Knight Airport for further investigation into the cause of the crash. 

Story and video:   http://www.wtsp.com





TAMPA — Those spending their Sunday afternoon at the Davis Island Yacht Club knew the small plane was in trouble the moment they spotted it.

The Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee was less than 200 feet in the air when it started circling back to Peter O. Knight Airport just moments after takeoff, its engine already sputtering.

"It sounded terrible," said Robert Woithe, 14.

The plane didn't make it back, however. Seconds later Woithe saw it hit the water tail first, falling just short of the runway.

"It looked like it was going to snap in half," Woithe said.

It was worse than it looked, however. Tampa police said the pilot was the plane's lone occupant and managed to escape injury — and the plane, before it sank into the waters off Davis Islands.

The incident took place about 1:37 p.m. The pilot was not identified. Tampa police said the plane lost power shortly after takeoff and couldn't make it back to the airport in time.

Witnesses said the pilot opened the cockpit in time to swim away from the plane before it sank into the water.

A motorboat rushed over to pick the pilot out of the water.

A second boat, captained by Michael Zonnenberg, arrived and started tossing buoys into the water around the sinking plane so officials could find it later.

Zonnenberg, 24, of St. Petersburg is a sailing coach at the yacht club and was teaching kids at the moment of the crash. He does not know who was in the boat that rescued the pilot.

Woithe, who participated in the yacht club's Fireball and Friends Regatta earlier in the day, said he and other club members rushed to the water with life preservers just in case.

"I'm glad they weren't needed," he said.

Tampa police divers were sent to the scene to recover the plane. The plane flipped over under water and came to rest on its roof. The divers placed large balloons beneath the wings and inflated them, bringing the plane — wheels first — to the surface. Then they used the balloons and two boats to maneuver the plane to a nearby boat slip.

Police called in a heavy duty tow truck to lift the plane out of the water.

The plane will be transported and stored at the airport pending an investigation.

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the incident, police said.

Source:  http://www.tampabay.com

Kens Wingless Wonder, N7195R: Accident occurred March 12, 2017 at Mount Airy Airport (KMWK), Surry County, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA17CA129 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 12, 2017 in Mount Airy, SC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/07/2017
Aircraft: KERNS KENNETH H KENS WINGLESS WONDER, registration: N7195R
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot, who was also the owner of the of amateur-built gyroplane, stated that he adjusted the prerotator motor pressure plate before the flight by moving it closer to the clutch to improve rpm. During takeoff, the gyroplane rolled right, and he was unable to maintain control. The gyroplane subsequently impacted the ground and cartwheeled, which resulted in substantial damage to the rotor, mast, and cabin. The pilot further stated that, due to his adjustment, it was likely that the prerotator did not disengage, which resulted in increased right torque and the inability to control the gyroplane during takeoff.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s improper adjustment of the prerotator motor, which resulted in its failure to disengage and the subsequent loss of aircraft control during takeoff.

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Greensboro, North Carolina

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N7195R

NTSB Identification: ERA17CA129
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, March 12, 2017 in Mount Airy, SC
Aircraft: KERNS KENNETH H KENS WINGLESS WONDER, registration: N7195R
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot, who was also the owner of the of amateur-built gyroplane stated he adjusted the prerotator motor pressure plate prior to the flight by moving it closer to the clutch to improve rpm. During takeoff, the gyroplane rolled right and he was unable to maintain control. The gyroplane subsequently impacted the ground and cartwheeled, which resulted in substantial damage to the rotor, mast, and cabin. He further stated that due to his adjustment, it was likely that the prerotator did not disengage, resulting in increased right torque and the inability to control the gyroplane during takeoff.



Surry County —  Just before 2 p.m. Sunday, officials say, a call came in about a gyroplane crashing at Mt. Airy Airport.

The crash happened about 30 yards off the runway.

The pilot was the only person on board and he was taken to Baptist Hospital.

Officials are not releasing his name yet, but do know that he is 65 years old.

Airport officials are on the scene right now and have reported the incident to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Source:  http://www.wxii12.com



 MOUNT AIRY, N.C. - A gyroplane crashed at Mt. Airy Airport Sunday afternoon, according to the Surry County EMS director. 

John Shelton, Director of Surry County EMS, says the gyroplane crashed while the pilot attempted to land. He crashed about 30 yards off of the runway.

According to an airport employee who witnessed the crash, the pilot climbed out of the gyroplane. Shelton says he was taken to the hospital for evaluation. 

The FAA is currently investigating the crash. 

Source:  http://www.wfmynews2.com

Delta Airlines, Boeing 717-200, N965AT: Incident occurred March 12, 2017 at Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport (KGPT), Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi

http://registry.faa.gov/N965AT




GULFPORT, MS (WLOX) -   Authorities in Harrison County responded to a plane in distress at Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport Sunday morning. The call came in shortly after 9:30 a.m., saying that Delta flight #2312 had a "loss of flight control." 

Emergency responders from Harrison County and Gulfport, as well as the Gulfport Combat Readiness Training Center, responded to assist the airport's emergency crews, arriving at the airport shortly before the plane landed. The plane was able to land safely without anyone being injured. Officials say 98 people were on board the plane.

According to Delta's website, the plane is a Boeing 717-200. It was originally scheduled to proceed to Atlanta from Gulfport but is now delayed a little over three hours.

A representative from Delta Airlines says when a flight has an emergency maintenance issue while in the air, they are able to call for a priority landing to ensure they get on the ground quickly and safely. In this incident, she said the plane calling for a priority landing was more precautionary than anything. The Boeing 717 will receive maintenance and any necessary repairs before leaving Gulfport to go on to Atlanta.

"Pilots are always doing everything they can to make sure every flight is safe," said the Delta representative. "But, in situations like this, it's really a priority landing, not anything massively wrong. It sounds a lot scarier than it is." 

No additional emergency precautions were deemed necessary while in the air, added the representative. 

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Authorities in Harrison County responded Sunday morning to a plane in distress at Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport, according to ABC News.

The call came in shortly after 9:30 a.m., saying that Delta Flight 2312 had a "loss of flight control."

The plane landed successfully without any injuries to the 98 people on board.

A representative from Delta Airlines said when a flight has an emergency maintenance issue while in the air, they are able to call for a priority landing to ensure they get on the ground quickly and safely.

In this incident, she said, the call for a priority landing was more precautionary than anything.

The Boeing 717 will receive maintenance and any necessary repairs before leaving Gulfport to go on to Atlanta.

Source: http://www.wsbtv.com