Friday, June 29, 2018

Piper PA-18 Super Cub: Accident occurred June 29, 2018 at Lake Hood Seaplane Base (PALH), Anchorage, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N7675D

Location: Anchorage, AK
Accident Number: ANC18LA051
Date & Time: 06/29/2018, 1307 AKD
Registration: N7675D
Aircraft: Piper PA18
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 29, 2018, about 1307 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Piper PA-18 airplane, N7675D, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a partial power loss after takeoff at Lake Hood Seaplane Base (LHD), Anchorage, Alaska. The airline transport pilot, who was acting as pilot-in-command (PIC) from the back seat, sustained minor injuries and the pilot rated passenger in the front seat was uninjured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 visual flight rules personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight was destined for a private cabin near Rainy Pass, Alaska, about 100 miles northwest of LHD.

According to the PIC, when the airplane was about 150 ft above ground level (agl) following a departure from the north water lane, the engine began to "sputter" and stopped producing sufficient power to climb. He then turned the airplane to the east to land on runway 14 (gravel) while he "pumped" the throttle and had the passenger check that the fuel selector valve was in the "ON" position. The airplane impacted the grass area between runway 14 and taxiway hotel, just north of H3. The airplane came to rest on a heading of about 070° and sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and wings.

The airplane was removed from the runway and secured for further investigation. A detailed airframe and engine examination is pending.

The airplane was equipped with a Lycoming O-320 series engine. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N7675D
Model/Series: PA18 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PALH, 90 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 ADT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 360°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 11000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.79 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Departure Point: Anchorage, AK (LHD)
Destination: Willow, AK

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 61.186667, -149.966111 (est)



A small float plane crashed as it took off from Anchorage's Lake Hood Seaplane Base on Friday, according to officials.

Initial investigations showed that the plane, a Piper PA-18 Super Cub, was departing Lake Hood when it lost engine power, said Clint Johnson, chief of the National Transportation Safety Board Alaska Region.

The float plane took off from the water and headed north, Johnson said.

When the engine lost power, the pilot tried to make an emergency landing at Lake Hood's air strip, but didn't quite make it, landing instead in the grass next to the runway, Johnson said.

Two people on board suffered minor injuries, Johnson said. The National Transportation Safety Board was notified of the crash around 1:45 p.m. Friday.

The plane's wings and floats sustained significant damage, said sergeant Daniel Nowak with Anchorage Airport Police and Fire.

The Anchorage Fire Department responded and the two occupants of the plane declined medical treatment, Nowak said. The pilot was later taken to the hospital, according to Johnson.

Johnson didn't have additional details on Friday afternoon, including where the plane was heading when it crashed. An NTSB investigator was en route to the scene on Friday afternoon, he said.

As of 2:45 p.m., the Lake Hood air strip remained shut down, Nowak said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.adn.com







Emergency crews and investigators responded Friday to a plane crash at the Lake Hood airstrip in Anchorage.

Clint Johnson, the National Transportation Safety Board’s Alaska chief, said the crash involved "substantial damage but minor injuries."

Trudy Wassel, a Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport spokeswoman, said the crash was reported shortly before 1:30 p.m.

The National Transportation Safety Board says the Piper PA 18 Supercub was taking off from the water when the plane lost engine power. The pilot, who has not yet been identified, was able to turn the aircraft around and attempted to land at the airstrip but landed in a grassy area. 

The pilot sustained a minor leg injury, the NTSB says; the passenger was not injured. There were only two people onboard at the time of the incident. 

"A light aircraft did go down next to the strip," Wassel said. "The pilot did exit the aircraft."

The same airstrip was the site of a June 13 landing by midair collision survivor Bruce Markwood, after Wasilla pilot James Poelman crashed into the Susitna River and died.

Last week, a floatplane ran aground with damage but no injuries during a landing on the lake.

Story and video ➤ http://www.ktva.com

Cessna 320D Executive Skyknight, N320MF, registered and operated by GV Air Inc: Fatal accident occurred June 28, 2018 in Fairfield, Utah County, Utah

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N320MF

Location: Fairfield, UT
Accident Number: WPR18FA186
Date & Time: 06/28/2018, 1054 MDT
Registration: N320MF
Aircraft: Cessna 320
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation 

On June 28, 2018, about 1054 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 320D, airplane, N320MF, collided with mountainous terrain about 9 miles southeast of Fairfield, Utah. The air transport pilot was the sole person on board and was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered and operated by GV Air, Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a cross-country aerial photography flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed along the route of flight and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Caldwell Industrial Airport (EUL), Caldwell, Idaho at 0905 and had a destination of PVU.

According to the operator, the airplane was scheduled to perform aerial photography in an area west of Lake Mountain at a planned altitude of 7,255 feet (GPS altitude).

Preliminary radar data revealed a primary target, consistent with the accident airplane, at an altitude of 7,325 ft mean sea level (msl) traveling east then south, along the west side of Lake Mountain. The target then made a wide right 270-degree oval shaped turn to the east at an airspeed between 169 to 194 knots and an altitude of 7,325 ft. As it reached the foothills of Lake Mountain, the target turned southeast, and the airspeed decreased to 152 knots. The last radar return was about a 1/4 mile from the accident site at an altitude of 7,375 ft msl.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an Alert Notification (ALNOT) for the airplane. Search and rescue efforts followed, and on June 29, 2018, wreckage was located on the east face of Lake Mountain.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted terrain at an elevation of 6,560ft. The wreckage debris field was contained to within 500 ft of the main wreckage. The wreckage was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N320MF
Model/Series: 320 D
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Gv Air Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPVU
Observation Time: 1656 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 150°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.89 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  40.218333, -111.931389 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.




UTAH COUNTY -- A plane that was scheduled to arrive in Provo Thursday crashed and the lone person on board was killed.

The Utah Department of Public Safety and the Civil Air Patrol began aerial searches of the area.

It took search teams nearly 24 hours, but just after 2 p.m. Friday, the plane's wreckage was located on Lake Mountain west of Utah Lake.

“Some of the areas are easy to access, this particular area where the crash site is is not,” said Sergeant Spencer Cannon with Utah County Sheriff’s Department.

Search officials hadn’t confirmed the name of the pilot as of Friday night, but the family of Tracy Roesler confirmed he was the pilot.  According to the family, he worked for a company that did aerial mapping.

“Small twin engine aircraft,” confirms Sgt. Cannon. “It was doing some commercial work. The plane was supposed to be going to Provo to refuel.”

Only it never made it back. The cause of the crash is still under investigation though fast wind speeds did whip through Utah county Thursday and Friday.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration will be on scene to investigate the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://fox13now.com




SPANISH FORK — A man is dead after an aircraft that departed from Idaho on Thursday crashed in Utah County, officials confirmed Friday.

The wreckage of the plane was found west of Utah Lake on Friday afternoon, according to Federal Aviation Administration communications manager Ian Gregor. The plane burned after it crashed, he said.

The wreckage was located on the south end of Lake Mountain, which is the peak directly west of Utah Lake, Utah County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Spencer Cannon said. Officials did not know exactly when the crash took place.

There was only one person on the plane when it crashed, Cannon said. He did not know the cause of the crash.

The Cessna 320 took off from Caldwell, Idaho, on Thursday and was scheduled to return there, but did not return on time, according to Gregor. The plane also was scheduled to make a refueling stop at the Provo Airport, Cannon said.

The pilot was working a commercial operation and was taking photos for a company, Cannon said. Some of his co-workers became concerned about the man about 4:30 p.m., he said. The pilot was not expected to stop in Provo until 5 or 6 p.m., but was not consistently checking in, Cannon added.

Cannon said the pilot was an adult man, whose identity was not released. The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the crash, but neither agency identifies people involved with aircraft accidents, Gregor said.

Civil Air Patrol and Utah Department of Public Safety also assisted with the search for the plane, Cannon said.

Story and video ➤ https://www.ksl.com

SARATOGA SPRINGS — A pilot has been found dead in Utah County a day after his small plane went missing.

The Cessna 320 Skyknight departed from Caldwell, Idaho, on Thursday, according to Ian Gregor, communications manager for Federal Aviation Administration Pacific Division.

The pilot was expected to stop at the Provo Airport for fuel, Gregor said.

When the pilot's co-workers hadn't heard from him by about 4:30 p.m., they became concerned and contacted authorities, Provo Sheriff Sgt. Spencer Cannon said.

The pilot was the only person on board the plane, which was part of a commercial photography operation, according to Cannon.

Searchers found the plane's wreckage Friday afternoon on the south end of Lake Mountain, Cannon said.

Crews are working now to recover the victim and wreckage, which are in an area that is difficult to reach, the sergeant said. Heavy-duty vehicles and possibly a helicopter will be brought in for the recovery.

Details about the victim, including his name and age, were not immediately released.

Cannon said a possible cause for the crash was unknown Friday.

Original article ➤ https://www.deseretnews.com

Commander halted Randolph training flights over pilots’ concerns



An Air Force squadron commander halted flight operations in San Antonio on Monday after pilots expressed concerns about the safety of the T-6A Texan II, a plane that was grounded earlier this year after a rash of problems with its onboard oxygen system. Several refused to fly the aircraft.

Lt. Col. J.C. Gorman, who had taken command of the 559th Flying Training Squadron at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph days earlier, said he decided to cancel flights for the day in the Air Force’s main training aircraft after meeting that morning with his pilots.

In an interview Wednesday, Gorman said his operations officer told him pilots had “significant concerns” but that some who had ruled out flying changed their minds after talking over the situation. The squadron returned to a regular flying schedule Tuesday, logging 40 to 45 sorties.

Pilots always have the option not to fly and he would never take punitive action against those who decide not to, Gorman said, adding, “I don’t need guys being afraid or unconfident in the airplane. In my mind, it’s my responsibility to address their concerns and that’s what we did, and what we continue to do.”

The unusual action came a few days after an instructor was incapacitated by an unexplained physiological episode, or UPE in Air Force parlance, while flying the T-6A. The squadron trains pilots to be instructors and he credited his student with landing the plane and saving his life, according to a version of the incident shared among other pilots.

It was the latest in a series of mysterious occurrences involving the T-6A’s Onboard Oxygen Generation System, or OBOGS. A spike in the episodes in January — 21 of them, when the most ever recorded in one month was five — caused the Air Force to ground the plane for all of February. Investigators uncovered several problems but no root cause, and continue to probe the system. The Air Force resumed training flights in March with a more frequent maintenance and cleaning schedule.

A physiological event occurs when aircrews experience symptoms that can hinder a pilot's ability to fly safely. It can result from hypocapnia, hypercapnia or other factors. Hypocapnia is a state of reduced carbon dioxide in the blood. Hypercapnia is excessive carbon dioxide in the blood, usually caused by inadequate respiration.

Gorman said he didn’t know how many pilots Monday said that they would not fly, but they weren’t rebelling, a view shared by Lt. Col. Matt Strohmeyer, commander of the 560th Flying Training Squadron.

“It may be a mischaracterization to say that people are just saying, ‘I’m not doing it,’’’ Strohmeyer said. “(Gorman) has said he wants openness, he wants transparency, and that’s exactly what he got, is that his guys in his squadron voiced up to him and said, ‘Boss, we’ve got concerns.’”

Based on his conversations with others, one instructor said Thursday that up to 11 pilots have refused to fly since Monday, including some avoiding getting in the cockpit for weeks. He agreed that it wasn’t a rebellion or mutiny, adding, “I’d describe it as a very real sense of trepidation and a growing sense of mistrust.”

Veteran instructors believe the Air Force, which has been hemorrhaging aviators, cares about safety but places a higher priority on producing new pilots, the instructor said — a view the service denies. He was among five aviators in the squadron who said in recent interviews that concerns about the OBOGS are widespread among pilots, who believe the Air Force hasn’t moved quickly enough to give them new safety equipment. They spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of possible retribution.

“I have never in my career seen so much safety attention put on a problem to try to get to the root cause of what’s going on and what’s wrong,” responded Col. Randy Oakland, acting commander of the 12th Flying Training Wing. “And I’ll say that in the same breath as I’ll tell you we don’t know what it is, but we’re absolutely interested in finding out what it is, and that’s why that attention is being put there.”

The Air Education and Training Command and the T-6 System Program Office planned to study the feasibility of installing an automatic backup oxygen system in the plane and is educating pilots about physiological events. The office is contracting for a $30 million accelerated purchase and installation of new OBOGS components, an Air Force spokesman said.

A single-engine, two-seat plane used in the Air Force and Navy, the T-6 is critical for training pilots and new instructors. It has been flying at Randolph for about 18 years. The grounding in February affected all 444 of its T-6 trainers at Randolph and other AETC bases. The problem has been seen elsewhere in different airplanes.

Other Air Force fighter and trainer aircraft have seen UPE spikes over the past 10 years. The Navy grounded its T-45C trainer, a British-made jet that can land on carriers, for three months last year after instructor pilots refused to fly it because of similar problems.

The problems have persisted with the T-6A this year, with UPEs steadily rising. The rates from March through May rising from roughly 30 to 60 occurrences per 100,000 flight hours, according to an Air Force document obtained by the Express-News. For comparison, the January spike topped 100 incidents per 100,000 flight hours.

“The same conditions that existed before the standdown exist now,” he said. “It wasn’t safe then, nothing changed, and suddenly it’s safe again? Makes no sense. At a minimum, there is not robust confidence in the OBOGS system. Everyone knows it’s an issue.”

Concerns over the possibility of OBOGS failures have prompted new rules. To mitigate risk, instructor pilots at Randolph are not allowed to fly solo. Familiarization rides, typically given to crew chiefs and others who are not pilots, are no longer allowed. The minimum weather conditions for flying have been toughened.

Gorman said he established procedures Monday to quickly forward accurate information about UPE incidents to his pilots, saying, “I want them to know exactly what I know about it,” but didn’t describe the measures. He said he learned from Monday’s meeting with the pilots that “there are lots of misperceptions and quite frankly misinformation.” He didn’t elaborate, and said pilots in the room might tell a different story following the meeting.

“They may still have concerns about the aircraft, and again, I have empowered them — like they’ve always been empowered — but I’ve re-emphasized to them that they’re able to make the … judgment as pilots, rated pilots in the Air Force, to determine what the level of risk they’re willing to take,” he said. “And there have been some folks who have been very, very forthright with me and we’re working on solutions for them.”

Story and photo gallery ➤ https://www.expressnews.com

United Airlines, Boeing 737-900: Incident occurred June 29, 2018 at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (KPHX), Maricopa County, Arizona



Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport officials say no one was injured when a United aircraft aborted takeoff just seconds before departure.

United Flight 1600, which was scheduled to fly from Phoenix to Newark, NewJersey, pulled off the runway on Friday morning after a possible issue with overheated brakes, airport officials confirmed to Fox 10.

“Phoenix Fire responded, per standard procedure. Fire reported no injuries,” a spokesperson for Phoenix Sky Harbor said in a statement obtained by Fox News. “There is no impact to airport operations. Other flights are departing and arriving as usual.”

A passenger aboard the flight, who identifies himself as John Pentecost on Twitter, claims the plane was at “full power accelerating down the runway.” In a later tweet, he added that the pilot told passengers they were traveling at 130 miles per hour when a warning light presumably signaled the crew to abort.

“I thought for sure we’d skid off the runway. Plane sitting lopsided now… must have blown a tire,” wrote Pentecost.

United has since released a statement blaming a "mechanical issue" for the aborted takeoff, but says the airline is working to reaccommodate passengers.

"United flight 1600 from Phoenix to Newark experienced a mechanical issue during takeoff. The aircraft returned to the gate where customers deplaned normally.

"We apologize for the inconvenience and are working to get our customers to Newark as quickly as possible."

Original article ➤ http://www.foxnews.com

Cessna T210N Turbo Centurion, N6386C, registered to and operated by ALC Aviation Services LLC: Accident occurred June 28, 2018 at Pocahontas Municipal Airport (M70), Randolph County, Arkansas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N6386C

Location:  Pocahontas, AR
Accident Number: CEN18LA241
Date & Time: 06/28/2018, 1130 CDT
Registration: N6386C
Aircraft: Cessna T210
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 28, 2018, about 1130 central daylight time, a Cessna T210N airplane, N6386C, lost directional control while landing at Pocahontas Municipal Airport (M70), Pocahontas, Arkansas. The pilot was not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by ALC Aviation Services LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed at the time of the landing, which departed without a flight plan from Henry County Airport (PHT), Paris, Tennessee about 1025.

While landing on Runway 36, the pilot stated he was unable to maintain directional control after the left brake "froze up". The airplane subsequently exited the left side of the runway, hit a ditch, and nosed over, damaging the right wing.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N6386C
Model/Series: T210 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: ALC Aviation Services LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KARG, 273 ft msl
Observation Time: 1156 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C / 25°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots / , 230°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Smithfield, NC (JNX)
Destination: Pocahontas, AR (M70)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 36.245556, -90.955278 (est)





No one was injured Thursday morning when a small plane crashed and flipped at an airport in northeast Arkansas, authorities said.

Pocahontas police Chief Cecil Tackett said the male pilot was attempting to land at 11 a.m. at the city's municipal airport when the crash occurred. When the aircraft touched down on the runway, it veered to the left and flipped.

It's possible a mechanical problem with the brakes caused the wreck, the chief said.

A National Transportation Safety Board investigation is ongoing.

The pilot, whose name and age have not been released, refused medical treatment and was seen walking around unharmed after the crash, authorities said.

Original article ➤ http://www.arkansasonline.com

Piper PA-18-150, N4714Y: Accident occurred June 28, 2018 in Anchorage, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage

http://registry.faa.gov/N4714Y

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA385
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 28, 2018 in Anchorage, AK
Aircraft: Piper PA18, registration: N4714Y

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Crashed on river bank landing and flipped over.

Date: 28-JUN-18
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N4714Y
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 18 150
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ALEXANDER CREEK
State: ALASKA

Piper PA-32-300 Cherokee Six, N8440F: Incident occurred June 29, 2018 at Mid-Carolina Regional Airport (KRUQ), Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte

Made a forced landing in a field.

Sky High Flyers Flying Club Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N8440F


Date: 29-JUN-18
Time: 20:08:00Z
Regis#: N8440F
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 32 300
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SALISBURY
State: NORTH CAROLINA





ROWAN COUNTY, NC (WBTV) - An unknown amount of fuel spilled due to a hard plane landing at an airport in Rowan County Friday afternoon.

According to the Salisbury Fire Department, a small aircraft crash landing happened at the Mid-Carolina Airport.

Mid-Carolina Airport officials said it appears the aircraft’s engine went out and they had to make an emergency landing which resulted in the hard landing.

Officials say all passengers were free and no injuries were reported.

Rowan Communications said there is no word on how much fuel was spilled.

Everything going forward at the airport will be precautionary, such as securing the runway and cleaning up the fuel spill, according to Rowan Communications.

WBTV's Sky 3 flew over the scene after the landing happened.

Fire officials said crews are applying foam at this time.


Story and video ➤ http://www.wbtv.com



According to Salisbury Fire Department, a small plane has crashed at Mid-Carolina Airport Friday afternoon.

The fire department reports all of the people on board are free and there are no reported injuries.

Hazmat crews are on scene assisting fire rescue.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wcnc.com

Southwest Airlines, Boeing 737-700, N708SW: Incident occurred June 29, 2018 at Tulsa International Airport (KTUL), Oklahoma

Southwest Airlines Company: http://registry.faa.gov/N708SW 

TULSA, Oklahoma - Quick Facts:

Southwest Flight 471 from Dallas made an emergency landing in Tulsa early Friday.
The plane headed for Kansas City redirected to Tulsa International Airport.
Southwest Airlines said the captain landed for a maintenance check after a gauge issue.
Police told FOX23 the plane landed safely.
Airport security said the plane will refuel, passengers will remain on the plane and it will continue to Kansas City.
Firefighters and police were on the scene.


TULSA, Okla. - Southwest Flight 471 from Dallas to Kansas City made an emergency landing at Tulsa International Airport Friday morning.

It left Dallas Love Field at 7:11am, bound for Kansas City when it was forced to divert. The plane landed safely at Tulsa International Airport just around 8:20.

A representative from Southwest Airlines confirms one of the gauges in the cockpit didn't match the others, and the captain decided to land in Tulsa to have maintenance check it out. Southwest said the plane made a routine landing and was able to taxi to the gate.

Southwest says protocol requires the pilot to declare an "emergency" to be able to deviate from a field flight plan and land at any airport that wasn't planned.

The airline is working with passengers who may miss a connecting flight due to the delay.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kjrh.com

Beech 35-B33 Debonair, N9745Y: Accident occurred June 29, 2018 near Ocean City Municipal Airport (KOXB), Worcester County, Maryland


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9745Y

Gary's Flight Journal: http://gmflightlog.blogspot.com




Location: Berlin, MD
Accident Number: ERA18LA181
Date & Time: 06/29/2018, 0920 EDT
Registration: N9745Y
Aircraft: Beech 35B33
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On June 29, 2018, about 0920 eastern daylight time, a Beech 35-B33, N9745Y, was substantially damaged during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Ocean City Municipal Airport (OXB), Berlin, Maryland. The private pilot was seriously injured, and the passenger sustained minor injuries. A flight plan was filed for the personal flight that was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight was destined for a fuel stop in Dublin, Virginia, then continuing to Tullahoma, Tennessee.

The pilot stated he was instructed to climb to 3,000 ft, but the airplane had difficulty climbing. He made an emergency radio call that he was returning to the airport; however, the airplane was unable to fly to the runway, and the pilot performed a forced landing on a golf course. The pilot told first responders the engine lost all power. After landing there was a small postcrash fire in the engine compartment.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector examined the airplane where it came to rest, about 1/3 mile west of OXB. The left wing had leading edge damage and was canted upwards from midspan to the wingtip. The engine was partially separated from the airframe, and the landing gear was in the retracted position.

The four-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear equipped airplane was manufactured in 1963. It was powered by a Continental IO-470, 225-horsepower engine.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class airman medical certificate was issued on September 6, 2017, with the limitation, "Must wear corrective lenses."

At 0853, the weather conditions reported at OXB included, wind from 060° at 8 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, sky clear, temperature 28°C, dew point 20°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.00 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N9745Y
Model/Series: 35B33 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOXB, 12 ft msl
Observation Time: 0853 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 20°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 60°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR/IFR
Departure Point: Berlin, MD (OXB)
Destination: Dublin, VA (PSK)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  38.311389, -75.130000




BERLIN, Md. - In Maryland, officials are still trying to figure out exactly what went wrong after a plane crashed at a golf course in Berlin. 

The incident occurred shortly around 9:15 this morning at the Assateague Greens Golf Center. 

The airplane, flown by Berlin couple Gary and Mary Mascelli, had just taken off from the Ocean City Municipal Airport.

Police say the couple was safely able to get out of the plane, which was on fire at the time. 

We're told no one on the ground was injured. Gary was flown to PRMC while his wife was taken to the same hospital for treatment of their injuries.

"I swung by to take a look and basically I could see the airplane from the street no fire, lots and lots of emergency vehicles I didn't see any lights on so apparently there wasn't a great deal of damage hopefully," said a witness Bob Hudson.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wmdt.com


Lt. Earl Starner gives details about the plane crash at Assateague Greens Golf Center in Berlin, Maryland on Friday.

The small plane that crashed Friday morning on the Assateague Greens golf course was carrying two Berlin residents, state police reported.


The Beech 35-B33 Debonair was being flown by Guerrino Mascelli, 60, and Mary Mascelli, 60, both of Berlin, according to Ron Snyder, a Maryland State Police public information officer.


Guerrino Mascelli was airlifted to Peninsula Regional Medical Center, and Mary Mascelli was taken by ambulance to the Salisbury hospital, Snyder said. Both were able to get out of the plane, which was on fire at the time, police said. 


Both are in stable condition at Peninsula Regional Medical Center, according to Lt. Earl Starner of the Maryland State Police Berlin Barracks. 


The aircraft was taking off from the Ocean City Municipal Airport with a destination of Nashville, Tennessee, when it crashed on the golf course at about 9:20 a.m., police said. No one was injured on the ground and the aircraft was holding no other occupants, Snyder said. 


Starner said investigators determined that shortly after takeoff, the pilot experienced engine trouble and communicated that they could not safely land back at the airport. 


The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are also investigating alongside Maryland State Police to determine the cause of the crash. 


Ocean City emergency personnel responded to the crash and units arrived on scene to see smoke coming from a plane and requested aviation and multiple ambulances for serious injuries, according to Ryan Whittington of the Ocean City Fire Department.


The golf center is located on Stephen Decatur Highway (Route 611) and right next to the Ocean City's airport.


Golf course employee Larry Fordham said he called in the crash. He was speaking with a customer when they both heard a loud boom. 


"You could see the plane right out the window, it was smoking," said Fordham. "I called 911 and the ambulances started showing up." 


Earlier this year, another small aircraft crashed near Assateague Island on its way to the Ocean City Airport on Feb. 28.


According to the National Transportation Safety Board, the preliminary accident report showed the plane was destroyed on impact after hitting the water. 


The Cessna 172S aircraft was holding two passengers. The pilot's body, Marcson Ngwa, of Windsor Mill, Maryland, was recovered on March 1. According to multiple authorities, Benica Mesha Richards-Robinson, 28, of Gwynn Oak, Maryland, is still missing.


The National Transportation Safety Board report said Ngwa held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating, along with a Federal Aviation Administration first-class airman medical certificate issued Aug. 24, 2017, with no limitations. Ngwa accumulated about 81 hours of total flight experience, according to flight school records.


The National Transportation Safety Board report states the aircraft was registered to Middle River Aviation and left the Martin State Airport in Baltimore at about 5:55 p.m.


The plane was rented for the day for a flight to the Ocean City Airport, but the National Transportation Safety Board report states the plans were canceled when the plane was approaching the airport, but there were no further radio communications with the pilot.


Story and video ➤ https://www.delmarvanow.com







LAUREL, Md. — Two people are in the hospital with serious injuries after their small plane crashed onto a golf course near Ocean City, Maryland, Friday morning.

According to Maryland State Police, the Beech 35-B33 Debonair went down just before 9:20 a.m. at the Assateague Greens Golf Center in Berlin, Maryland.


“The plane had taken off a short time earlier from the Ocean City Municipal Airport,” said police spokesman Ron Snyder.


The two people on board, a husband and wife, were able to get out of the plane without help.


Snyder said the plane was on fire when it hit the ground, but it was not immediately clear whether the fire started while it was still in the air.


The two have been identified as pilot Guerrino Mascelli, 60, and passenger Mary Mascelli, 60, from Berlin.


No one on the ground was injured.


“We’re lucky,” said Snyder. “With a nice day like today and a holiday weekend coming up, this could have been a situation where there could have been people on the ground at the site of this crash. It could have been a lot worse.”


State police are still investigating the circumstances surrounding the crash.


The Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement that it’s also investigating.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://wtop.com





OCEAN CITY, Md. —  Two people have been hospitalized, one with serious injuries, after a plane crash near the Ocean City Municipal Airport, according to the Worcester County Sheriff's Office.


Maryland State Police, the department handling the investigation, says the crash was reported at 9:17 a.m. at the Assateague Greens Golf Center in Berlin, shortly after takeoff from the Ocean City Municipal Airport.


Both victims were able to get out of the aircraft and no one on the ground was injured.


One of those victims was transported to the hospital via Maryland State Police helicopter.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://wjla.com








BERLIN – A small twin engine plane crashed on the Assateague Greens golf course Friday morning, hospitalizing its two occupants.


According to Ryan Whittington of the Ocean City Fire Department (OCFD), crews from the OCFD responded to the eighth hole of the Assateague Greens golf course off Route 611 just after 9 a.m. Friday for a plane crash.


OCFD arrived to find a small fire in the engine area of the plane, which had reportedly just taken off from the nearby Ocean City Municipal Airport. The plane is reportedly a Beech 35-B33 Debonair.


Whittington confirmed two individuals have been hospitalized as a result of the crash. One was taken by ambulance while the other was flown by MSP Aviation.


According to MSP Office of Communications, the occupants of the aircraft, Guerrino Mascelli and Mary Mascelli, both 60 of Berlin, were able to get out of the plane, which was on fire at the time. Guerrino Mascelli was flown to Peninsula Regional Medical Center, while Mary Mascelli was transported by ambulance to the same hospital for treatment of their injuries.


Once the fire was extinguished, OCFD crews turned the scene over to Maryland State Police and the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office.


No one on the ground was injured as a result of the crash. The cause of the crash remains under investigation.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://mdcoastdispatch.com



Worcester County, MD. - Maryland State Police said two people were injured this morning after a plane crashed onto a golf course near Ocean City.


Police say the crash happened shortly after 9:15 Friday morning at the Assateague Greens Golf Center on Stephen Decatur Highway in Berlin.


State Police said the plane is a Beechcraft Debonair that had just taken off from the Ocean City Municipal Airport, located a short distance from the golf course.  Investigators said the plane caught fire on impact and the two people on board were able to escape the plane.  State police said the two people on board were Guerrino and Mary Mascelli, both 60 years old, and both of Berlin.


Guerrino Mascelli was flown to PRMC to be treated for his injuries, Mary Mascelli was taken by ambulance to PRMC.  State Police said no one on the ground was injured as a result of the crash.  And the cause of the crash remains under investigation.


Story and video ➤ http://www.wboc.com