Thursday, August 16, 2012

Airplane to Make Low-Level Flights Over Parts of Northern Sacramento Valley, California

MENLO PARK, Calif. — Residents should not be alarmed to witness a low-flying airplane over the northern Sacramento Valley and surrounding hills starting around August 17. 

For about two months, an airplane operated under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey will be making low-level flights over parts of northern Sacramento Valley, from the western margin to the eastern margin of the valleys.  The survey will cover as far north as the city of Shasta Lake and as far south as Stony Gorge Reservoir. The survey will cover the cities of Redding, Red Bluff, Orland, and numerous other towns in the area with the purpose of collecting and recording geologic measurements.

Anyone observing the low-flying plane should not be alarmed when they see it fly over or pass below the horizon. The airplane is operated by experienced pilots who are specially trained for low-level flying. 

This survey is designed to remotely study geologic and hydrologic units that lie below land surface. It is part of an ongoing USGS program to identify hidden features such as changes in rock types, ultimately providing a better understanding of the geology and hydrology of the area. 

The airplane is operated by Firefly Aviation of Calgary, Canada, which is working with the Federal Aviation Administration to ensure flights are in accordance with U.S. law.

Editor:  In the public interest and in accordance with Federal Aviation Administration regulations, the USGS is announcing this low-level airborne project.  Your assistance in informing the local communities is appreciated.  


http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=3365#.UC2eSpb3u70

Jetstar A320-232, VH-VQA: Flight under investigation; Incorrect aircraft configuration near Queenstown International Airport, New Zealand, July 16, 2012

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) is investigating a Jetstar flight which flew lower than it was supposed to part way through its descent into Queenstown. 

 The incident happened on an Airbus A320 flight from Auckland to Queenstown on July 16.

"During descent, the crew had an incorrect descent profile selected and subsequently descended below the minimum safe altitude," the ATSB said.

Jetstar said the plane's pilots had reported that on approach an incorrect autopilot setting resulted in the aircraft going off its pre-determined track.

"This never put the aircraft in danger and the incident didn't trigger any cockpit alerts. The pilots realised the error and corrected it promptly. Even if the error had not been corrected, the aircraft would still have landed safely," Jetstar said.

The two pilots had a combined total of 23,000 hours experience and have been flying in-and-out of Queenstown for the past two years without incident.

A company spokesman said that for a short time when the plane was supposed to be at 7300 feet (2225 metres) it had dropped down to 6300 feet, and had then gone back up to 7300 feet.

The ATSB expects to have its investigation finished by November.


http://www.stuff.co.nz

http://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/investigation_reports/2012/aair/ao-2012-103.aspx

RAW VIDEO: August 06, 2012 - NORAD Fighters Intercept Two General Aviation Aircraft - Long Island, New York

 

Aug 6, 2012 by LIBEACH19 T

"This video was taken on 8-6-12 at approximately 7:20pm. I heard my house shake andt hough a plane was going to crash. To my surprise I looked up in the sky and found several fighter jets flying across the sky. I was able to capture this single jet majestically flying. The location of this video was on the South Shore of Suffolk County, Long Island, NY. The exact location was Bellport. UPDATE: I found out that two F-15 fighter jets intercepted two separate private planes flying in a "NO FLY ZONE" while the president was campaigning in the tri-state area. One of the fighter jets forced one of the private planes to land at Islip Airport where Secret Service and police were waiting for this plane to land.. This is an example that a lot has changed since 911. While we go about our day and rest our eyes, our Military is protecting us 24 hours a day.... God Bless America...."

Aug. 6, 2012

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. – Two F-15 fighters under the direction of the North American Aerospace Defense Command intercepted two general aviation aircraft during separate responses.

The fighters intercepted the first aircraft at approximately 7:00 p.m. EDT over Long Island, NY after it entered the temporary flight restricted area. After intercepting the aircraft, the F-15’s followed it until it landed without incident, where the plane was met by local law enforcement. The second aircraft was intercepted at approximately 7:30 p.m. EDT near New Haven, CT in the temporary flight restricted area. Following the intercept the aircraft was allowed to proceed to its destination.

Read more:  http://www.norad.mil/News/2012/080612.html

Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche: C-GLGJ: Accident occurred August 13, 2012 near Brenda Mines, about 22 kilometres west of Peachland - Canada

Aviation Investigation Report A12P0136  

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) investigated this occurrence for the purpose of advancing transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

Collision with Terrain
Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche C-GLGJ
Kelowna, British Columbia, 18 nm W
13 August 2012

Summary

The privately operated Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche (serial number 30-300, registration C-GLGJ) departed Penticton Airport, British Columbia, at 1432 Pacific Daylight Time on a visual flight rules flight plan during daylight hours, to Boundary Bay; 1 pilot and 3 passengers were on board. The aircraft flew northbound over Okanagan Lake for approximately 20 nautical miles, before turning west into a valley; this was about 14 nautical miles further than planned, due to a lower-than-expected rate of climb. At 1454, an overflying airliner received an emergency locator transmitter signal, which the airliner pilot relayed to the area control centre, and the area control centre relayed to the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre. The aircraft wreckage was located about 2½ hours later, in a wooded area near the Brenda Mines site, approximately 18 nautical miles west of Kelowna. There was no fire. All 4 occupants were critically injured; 1 occupant died at the site, and a second died in hospital 2 days later.

Ce rapport est également disponible en français.

Factual information

History of the flight

The first of the 2 flight legs originated at Boundary Bay (CZBB), British Columbia, where the pilot had C-GLGJ's main, auxiliary, and tip tanks filled. Full fuel is 120 U.S. gallons, or 708 pounds, giving the aircraft a flight duration of about 6 hours. The aircraft departed Boundary Bay at 1230 Footnote 1 for Penticton Airport (CYYF), British Columbia, on a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan, with the pilot and 1 passenger on board. It arrived in Penticton, about 140 nautical miles (nm) east of Boundary Bay, at 1343, after an air time of 1.2 hours.

The aircraft was on the ground at Penticton for 49 minutes, during which time the pilot phoned the Kamloops flight information centre (FIC) to file a VFR flight plan for the return flight. The flight plan stated the intended route as Penticton to Boundary Bay via Princeton and Hope. With the headwind component considered, the return flight would have taken approximately 1.4 hours. The FIC. The FIC agent advised of a recent pilot report that described visibility in the Princeton area as 2 nm in haze, and asked the occurrence pilot if visibility on the flight to Penticton had been hazy in that area. The pilot confirmed it had been.

Two more persons boarded the aircraft with their baggage. Immediately before departure, the pilot advised the Penticton Flight Service Station (FSS) of the intention to depart on Runway 34 and climb to 5000 feet above sea level (asl), before turning westbound for Boundary Bay. After take-off from Penticton Airport, the pilot observed that the aircraft's climb rate was significantly lower than it had been 2 days earlier, when it had departed Penticton with only 2 persons on board. Consequently, the pilot did not turn west onto the published VFR route approximately 6 nm north of Penticton (the route taken on the previous flight from Penticton to Boundary Bay), but instead flew approximately 20 nm north, before turning west near Peachland (Figure 1).

It is not known what altitude C-GLGJ reached before it turned west toward rising mountainous terrain, but the aircraft did not appear on radar. Radar had identified other aircraft in that area as low as 4000 feet asl. After turning west, the aircraft proceeded up the Trepanier Creek valley following Highway 97C (also known as the Okanagan Connector) for about 10 nm, before it crashed at 4595 feet asl into a level, treed area on the Brenda Mines tailings dam.

A driver on Highway 97C reported seeing the accident aircraft about 2 nm down-valley from the accident site, climbing slowly toward the tailings dam at roughly the same altitude as the accident site. The driver also reported poor visibility in the area due to smoke.

An airliner flying overhead of the accident site received a 121.5 megahertz (MHz) emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signal, which it reported to the Vancouver Area Control Centre (ACC). The ACC notified Victoria Joint Rescue Coordination Centre, which dispatched search-and-rescue personnel, who air-dropped to the site at 1731. One occupant was found deceased at the accident site. The 3 critically injured occupants were transported by helicopter to hospital, where a second occupant later died.



http://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/aviation/2012/a12p0136/a12p0136.asp

NTSB Identification: ANC12WA087 
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Monday, August 13, 2012 in Kelowna, Canada
Aircraft: PIPER PA-30, registration: C-GLGJ
Injuries: 1 Fatal,3 Serious.

On August 13, 2012, about 1729 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-30 airplane, (Canadian Registration C-GLGJ) was on a VFR flight plan from Penticton to Boundary Bay, British Columbia. The Canadian Joint Rescue Coordination Centre received an ELT signal, and a search was commenced. The aircraft had crashed in a wooded area near the Brenda Lake mine site, approximately 18 nm west of Kelowna, BC. One of the occupants was deceased, and the other three were transported to the hospital with critical injuries.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Canadian government. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the Canadian government. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Transportation Safety Board of Canada
200 Promenade du Portage
Place du Centre, 4th Floor
Hull, Quebec K1A 1K8
Canada

Tel.: (1) 819-994-4252
(1) 819-997-7887 (24 hour)
E-mail: airops@tsb.gc.ca
Fax: (1) 819-953-9586
Website: http://www.tsb.gc.ca



Friends said Jayson Dallas Wesley Smith and Lauren Sewell were a good match. On Thursday, the BC Coroners Service confirmed both were killed in a plane crash near Kelowna Monday. 

Jayson Dallas Wesley Smith

Lauren Sewell, 24, was enrolled in BCIT's first-year human resources program.


 

 A second fatality in this week's plane crash near Kelowna has been identified as 24-year-old Lauren Patricia Sewell, a Vancouver resident originally from South Surrey.

B.C.'s chief coroner announced Thursday morning that Sewell died in hospital the day after a four-seat Piper Twin Commanche crashed 30 kilometres west of Kelowna Monday afternoon.

She was the girlfriend of 30-year-old Jayson Dallas Wesley Smith, who was pronounced dead at the scene. Smith was a Vancouver resident who grew up in the White Rock area.

Two survivors of the crash reportedly remain in hospitals in Kamloops and Vancouver in critical condition. Their identities have not yet been released.

According to an employee of the company listed as a registered owner of the airplane, Maplewood Landscaping in Delta, one survivor is a family member of one of the business owners.

In her Thursday statement, chief coroner Lisa Lapointe said that with the consent of her family, Sewell became an organ donor.

"The BC Coroners Service commends the family for the generosity of their decision in a time of immense grief," Lapointe said.

Friends of Smith and Sewell said the two became a couple after Smith returned from a nearly year-long trip around the world in 2011.

Alexis Bennett, a long-time friend of Smith, described Sewell a "super-nice girl."

"She was a good fit for Dallas because she was so calm and centered."

When Smith turned 30 on June 30, Sewell bought him flying lessons as a birthday present.

It isn't clear whether the flight they were on was part of the gift.

Sewell attended Elgin Park Secondary school in South Surrey, while Smith went to Semiahmoo Secondary.

Even though each moved to Vancouver after finishing high school, they made regular trips back to the Peninsula to visit, friends said.

On Tuesday, friends held an informal memorial get-together for Smith, remembered as an avid outdoorsman and traveller who possessed great personal charm.

As well, friends and family of Dallas Smith have established a memorial fund in his memory. Donations can be made to the account "Pamela Smith in trust" at any branch of the Coast Capital Savings Credit Union.

Meanwhile, the Transportation Safety Board is investigating the cause of the crash, and has appealed for witnesses.

The wreckage has been removed from the site and the next phase is a detailed examination of the evidence, said TSB investigator Bill Yearwood, noting all parts of the plane have been accounted for.

That's not always the case with crashes of this kind, Yearwood said. The plane had a full gas tank and the impact could easily have sparked an evidence-destroying fire, as was the case with a floatplane crash in the same area four months ago.

In Monday's crash, the plane was found in a treed area not far from a large clearing on the Brenda Mines site, a few kilometres beyond the Brenda Mines turnoff.

The Joint Rescue Co-ordination Centre in Victoria was first notified that the flight had gone down around 3 p.m. when an emergency beacon was triggered by the impact. The pilot had not placed a distress call.

A Buffalo search and rescue plane located the crash site by 5 p.m. Rescuers parachuted into the scene to find the plane in pieces and only one person still conscious.

Yearwood said there is little information so far to determine what the pilot was attempting to do.

"We're hoping to find people who may have seen the flight go down," said Yearwood. "We only have one person who thinks they may have seen the flight in its last moments."

Anyone with information is encouraged to call the TSB at 604-666-5826.

Landing at Vegas in a Cessna Citation V: Showers and a 25 kts crosswind on the approach to runway 19R

Crew: 
Guido Warnecke
Mike Piraru

Landing at Las Vegas (KLAS) runway 19R
Rain showers and strong crosswinds
N365EA  Citation V 

 
August 11, 2012

Piper PA-38-112 Tomahawk, Flintshire Flying School, G-BODP: Accident occurred August 16, 2012 on Chapel Lane, Bruera, Churton, near Chester, Cheshire - United Kingdom

The instructor and student were conducting PPL training for slow flight aircraft handling. At an estimated height of between 2,000 and 3,000 ft, the aircraft turned rapidly through about 180° and descended at a high rate, crashing in a field. The evidence indicated that the aircraft had been in a spin to the left when it struck the surface. Both occupants were fatally injured.

A manufacturer’s revision to the Pilot’s Operating Handbook (POH), dated May 2012, included advice on the altitudes at which slow flight and stall manoeuvres should be initiated, to provide an adequate margin of safety in the event of an inadvertent spin. This revision, which related to a Safety Recommendation made by the United States of America’s National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) in 1997, reached the flying school in the month following the accident.

http://www.aaib.gov.uk


NTSB Identification: CEN12WA562 
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Thursday, August 16, 2012 in Bruera, Cheshire, United Kingdom
Aircraft: PIPER PA-38-112, registration: G-BODP
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

On August 16, 2012, about 1940 universal coordinated time, a Piper PA-38-112 airplane, United Kingdom registration G-BODP, impacted terrain during an instructional flight near Bruera, Cheshire, United Kingdom. The flight instructor and student pilot were fatally injured. The local flight departed from Hawarden Airport (EGNR).

On August 16, 2012, about 1940 universal coordinated time, a Piper PA-38-112 airplane, United Kingdom registration G-BODP, impacted terrain during an instructional flight near Bruera, Cheshire, United Kingdom. The flight instructor and student pilot were fatally injured. The local flight departed from Hawarden Airport (EGNR).

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB). This report is for informational purposes only and contains information released by or obtained from the government of the United Kingdom.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Air Accidents Investigation Branch
Farnborough House
Berkshire Copse Road
Aldershot, Hampshire
GU11 2HH, United Kingdom

Tel: +44(0) 1252 510300
Website: http://www.aaib.gov.uk
Email: enquiries@aaib.gov.uk



 
Police guard the area in a field where the pilot and passenger came down in a light aircraft last night near Chester 

 

Police helicopter at the scene 
Credit: Andy Bonner

 

Two men have been killed in a light aircraft crash near Chester. 
Credit: Andy Bonner


Police investigations are underway after two men were killed in a light aircraft crash near Chester. 

Air accident investigators are currently at the scene. The bodies are still thought to be in the wreckage.
 

A police helicopter is also at scene of the crash, where it will help search for the wreckage.

Emergency services were called to a field near Chapel Lane, Aldfrod, where crews found a two seater plane had crashed into a field yesterday evening.

The two men on board the aircraft, one from North Wales and a second man from Surrey, sustained fatal injuries.

Story and photos:   http://www.itv.com

Two men have been killed in a light aircraft crash on England’s border with Wales. Police have confirmed their plane came down near the village of Churton, south of Chester, last night.

The two victims of the crash have not yet been named.

'Sadly the two men on board the aircraft, one from North Wales and a second man from Surrey, sustained fatal injuries,' a Cheshire Police spokeswoman said today.

'Their next of kin have been informed but formal identification has not yet taken place.'

Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service said last night it was called to Chapel Lane, Aldford, at 8.45pm after reports that a light aircraft crashed in a field.

'Two fire engines from Chester went to the scene and on arrival crews found a two-seater plane had crashed into a field,' a spokesman said.

'Police and paramedics were also on the scene and firefighters assisted them in gaining access to the aircraft which contained two men.'

Story and photo: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

 
9:13pm: A short while ago a light aircraft crashed near the English/Welsh border this evening, sadly with reports of two fatalities. One of our reporters is en route to Chapel Lane, Saighton where the incident took place. 

 UPDATE 10:45pm:
The light aircraft, incorrectly reported locally to be a ‘glider’, crashed to the north east of Wrexham just outside of Alford.

The crash site is located by the eastern / waverton approach to the Grosvenor estate, home of the Duke of Westminster, just off Chapel Lane near the hamlet of Bruera .

When we arrived on the scene, several emergency vehicles were parked outside the local church including one fire engine and several police and medical cars.

Currently a recovery operation is underway with the scene illuminated by emergency vehicles, as pictured in the distance.

Police say the plane was reported ‘missing’ at 20:55 this evening and a police helicopter spotted the wreckage. They went on to say “Two fire engines from Chester went to the scene and on arrival crews found a two-seater plane had crashed into a field. Police and paramedics were also on the scene and firefighters assisted them in gaining access to the aircraft which contained two men.”

Cheshire Police also told us Air Accident Investigation Branch have been informed.

UPDATE 00:45
The plane involved is a Piper PA-38 Tomahawk. The plane is two seater and often used for training purposes with a cruising speed of 103 mph. Local flying schools around Chester & Liverpool all have fleets of this type of aircraft for day & night training purposes.

http://www.wrexham.com


 A light aircraft with two people on board has crashed in Cheshire, police said. 

The aircraft came down near the village of Churton, south of Chester and close to the border with Wales, a Cheshire Police spokesman said.

He was unable to confirm the condition of the pilot or passenger.

"Police remain at the scene and the Air Accidents Investigation Branch has been informed," he said.

Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service said it was called to Chapel Lane, Aldford, at 8.45pm on Thursday after reports of a light aircraft crashed in a field.


"Two fire engines from Chester went to the scene and on arrival crews found a two-seater plane had crashed into a field," a spokesman said.

"Police and paramedics were also on the scene and firefighters assisted them in gaining access to the aircraft which contained two men."

North West Ambulance Service said it sent an ambulance and two rapid response vehicles to Chapel Lane but they were not used. 


http://icnorthwales.icnetwork.co.uk

Beech A36TC Bonanza 36, N678DR: Accident occurred August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, New York

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA508
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, NY
Aircraft: BEECH A36TC, registration: N678DR
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 15, 2012, at 0727 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36TC, N678DR, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Clifton Park, New York. The certificated airline transport pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed from Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York at 0724, and was destined for Plattsburg Airport (PBG), Plattsburg, New York. The business flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Review of air traffic control (ATC) information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot contacted ATC about 0720 and requested clearance to taxi for departure. The controller initially advised the pilot to taxi to runway 1 via taxiway D and A. The pilot subsequently advised the controller that he could accept an intersection departure from runway 1 at D, and was subsequently issued that clearance. At 0722, the pilot requested to depart from runway 1 at D, but was advised that there would be a 3 minute delay due to wake turbulence from a previously departed Boeing 737. The pilot then requested to “waive” the delay, and was issued a takeoff clearance about 1 minute later. In addition to a warning of wake turbulence, the pilot was issued a departure heading of 040 degrees.

The airplane departed from runway 1 at 0724, turned northeast, and continued to climb. At 0725, at an altitude of 1,100 feet msl, the pilot advised ATC, “eight delta romeo just lost our engine”. No further transmissions were received from the pilot, and radar contact was lost about 30 seconds later at an altitude of 300 feet msl.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 68, held an airline transport pilot certificate with numerous ratings, including airplane single engine land, as well as a flight instructor certificate with numerous ratings including airplane single engine. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 1, 2012 with the limitation, “must have available glasses for near vision.” A review of the pilot’s flight logs showed that he had accumulated 11,008 total hours of flight experience, 1,110 hours of which were in the accident airplane make and model. During the 90 days preceding the accident, the pilot had accumulated 143 hours of flight experience, 34 hours of which were in the accident airplane.

According to the pilot’s son, the pilot was a friend of the accident airplane’s owners, and was allowed to utilize the airplane anytime he needed. He further described that the pilot flew very often, and had previously flown many people in the accident airplane. While the passenger did hold a pilot certificate, he had not flown a great deal in the recent past. The purpose of the flight was for the pilot and passenger to attend a business meeting in Plattsburg, New York.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to airworthiness records maintained by the FAA, the airplane was manufactured in 1981 and was equipped with a Continental Motors TSIO-520-UB turbo-supercharged, fuel injected engine. Review of maintenance records showed that a factory rebuilt engine was installed on the airplane in May 1996, at an aircraft total time of 1,591 flight hours. The airplane’s most recent annual inspection was completed on October 15, 2011 at 3,190 total aircraft hours. At the time of the accident, the airframe had accumulated 3,364 total flight hours, and the engine had accumulated 1,773 total flight hours since its installation.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The ALB airport was comprised of two intersecting runways oriented in a 1/19 and 10/28 configuration, at an elevation of 285 feet. Runway 1 was 8,500 feet long by 150 feet wide. Taxiway A ran parallel to runway 1 and was located to the west of the runway. Taxiway D intersected runway 1 about 3,250 feet beyond the runway approach threshold. From that intersection, about 5,250 feet of runway was available for a departure.

The airplane was most recently serviced with 85 gallons of 100LL fuel by a fixed base operator at ALB on the day preceding the accident. Following the accident, a fuel quality assurance review was conducted by the fixed based operator, and no deficiencies were noted during the inspection.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 0753 weather observation at ALB included calm winds, 10 statute miles visibility with patches of fog present to the west and southwest, few clouds at 100 feet, scattered clouds at 8,000 feet, a broken ceiling at 13,000 feet, and a broken ceiling at 25,000 feet. The temperature was 19 degrees Celsius (C), the dew point was 18 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 29.90 inches of mercury.

FLIGHT RECORDERS

The airplane was not equipped with any flight data recording devices, nor was it required to be; however, a hand-held global positioning system (GPS) receiver was recovered from the wreckage, and found to contain data pertaining to the accident flight. The initial data point was recorded at 0721, as the airplane taxied toward runway 1 at ALB via taxiway D. The airplane subsequently taxied onto runway 1 at 0723, at the point where the runway intersected taxiway D.

The airplane accelerated down the runway and began climbing at 0724:26, and 8 seconds later had climbed to a GPS-derived altitude of 341 feet, at a GPS groundspeed of 88 knots. At that point, the airplane began a right turn about 1,600 feet prior to reaching the runway departure end. The airplane continued to climb while on an approximate 40-degree magnetic track. At 0725:50, the airplane reached a maximum altitude of 1,115 feet, at a GPS groundspeed of 111 knots, about 2 nautical miles northeast of the runway 1 departure end.

Over the next 30 seconds, the airplane turned about 90 degrees left as it descended and slowed. By 0726:24, the airplane had established a heading of 305 degrees, descended to 627 feet, and slowed to a GPS groundspeed of 85 knots. About 25 seconds later, the airplane’s final position was recorded at an altitude of 302 feet and a GPS groundspeed of 76 knots.

A plot of the airplane’s position for the final moments of the flight showed that an open field about 1,000 feet long, and aligned with the airplane’s final approach path, was located about 1,000 feet west of its final GPS-recorded position. Additionally, a two-lane asphalt road paralleled the airplane’s final approach path; however utility wires paralleled and crossed the road at numerous points in the vicinity of the accident site.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in a residential area approximately 3 miles northeast of ALB, at an elevation of 260 feet. The initial impact point (IIP) was identified by several damaged tree limbs, at a height of about 30 feet, and was located about 45 feet west of the airplane’s final GPS-recorded position. The wreckage path about was about 150 feet long, and oriented approximately 320 degrees magnetic. A ground scar, along with the outboard portion of the right wing and aileron, were located about 95 feet beyond the IIP, along the wreckage path. The main portion of the wreckage consisted of the fuselage and inboard portions of both wings, and was located about 45 feet from the ground scar. The fuselage remained upright, and was oriented on a 280-degree magnetic heading. The outboard portion of the left wing was located about 10 feet beyond the main wreckage.

The left wing remained attached to the fuselage by all four of its attachment bolts. The outboard portion of the wing separated in the vicinity of the landing gear, and the left main landing gear remained stowed in its well. The right wing also remained attached to the fuselage by its attachment bolts, with the outboard portion separating near the outer portion of the flap. The right main landing gear remained stowed within its well. The landing gear actuator was in the retracted position.

Control continuity was confirmed from the control column to the elevator and left aileron, and through a fracture of the right aileron bellcrank to the right aileron, and rudder control continuity was confirmed from both rudder pedals to the rudder. Measurement of the left and right elevator trim tab actuators revealed extensions corresponding to a 10-degree tab-down position (nose up trim). Measurement of both flap actuator rods corresponded to a flaps retracted position.

The fuel selector was found in the left tank position. Examination of the fuel system revealed that it remained continuous from the firewall, through the selector valve, to both fuel tanks, with no breaches or obstructions noted. Residual fuel was observed in both main and both auxiliary wingtip fuel tanks. The color and odor of the fuel appeared consistent with 100LL aviation fuel, and all samples taken were absent of water or debris. The auxiliary fuel pump switch was found in the HIGH position, though the structure surrounding the switch was deformed consistent with impact.

The pilot and copilot seats remained attached to the seat rails with no deformation noted. The mounting points and buckles for both the pilot and copilot restraints appeared intact and undamaged, and first responders reported that the pilot and passenger were wearing both lap and shoulder restraints upon arriving at the accident scene.

The engine remained attached to the fuselage, and 2 of the 3 propeller blades exhibited impact-related damage. One blade was bent aft about 45 degrees near the mid-span point and the other blade was bent aft about 90 degrees near the mid-span point. None of the blades exhibited chordwise scratching or leading edge gouging.

The engine was separated from the airframe and shipped to the manufacturer for a test run. The impact-related damage was generally concentrated near the aft portion of the engine. The induction system riser to the number one cylinder, the induction system “Y” pipe, and oil cooler, along with several fuel system fittings, were replaced to facilitate the test run. During preparation for the test run, a red clay/dirt-like substance was found at an impact-damaged port of the fuel metering unit. The fuel manifold valve screen, located downstream of the fuel metering unit within the fuel system, was examined and found to be absent of debris or contamination.

The engine was subsequently placed in a test cell and started normally on the first attempt without hesitation or stumbling. The engine rpm was advanced in steps to 1,200, 1,600, and 2,450 rpm for a period of 5 minutes per step to allow for warm-up. The throttle was then advanced to full power for 5 minutes before the throttle was rapidly advanced from idle to full power 6 times. The engine performed normally throughout each of the tests without any hesitation, stumbling, or interruption of power; however, testing of the magnetos showed that the right magneto was inoperative.

Following the test run, the right magneto was removed from the engine and examined. The points of the magneto exhibited corrosion. The corrosion was subsequently cleaned from the points, and the magneto was then run on a test stand. The magneto operated normally, and further disassembly revealed no anomalies.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot sustained serious injuries during the accident and subsequently succumbed to those injuries on August 28, 2013. An autopsy and toxicological testing were not performed.

ADDITONAL INFORMATION

The airframe manufacturer published an emergency procedure detailing the actions pilots should take following a loss of engine power immediately after lift-off. After eliminating the possibility of fuel exhaustion, the procedure advised the pilot:

“2. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – LOW If a Failed Engine-Driven Fuel Pump is Suspected (Indicated by zero fuel flow):

3. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – HI”

A warning was noted below that stated:

“The only reason for the high (HI) boost position is to supply fuel for priming prior to starting and to supply fuel to the engine if the engine-driven fuel pump fails. DO NOT USE THIS POSITION FOR ANY OTHER REASON. If high (HI) boost is selected when the engine-driven pump is operating, the engine will run rich and may quit depending on throttle setting, temperature and altitude.”

The checklist advised that if an ignition problem was suspected, the pilot should verify that the magnetos were selected to the “BOTH” position.

The first step of the procedure for a rough running engine immediately after lift-off stated, “Ensure auxiliary fuel pump is not on HI.”



 NTSB Identification: ERA12FA508
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, NY
Aircraft: BEECH A36TC, registration: N678DR
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


On August 15, 2012, at 0727 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36TC, N678DR, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Clifton Park, New York. The certificated airline transport pilot was seriously injured, and the certificated commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight departed from Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York at 0724, and was destined for Plattsburg Airport (PBG), Plattsburg, New York. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Review of preliminary air traffic control information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), revealed that the airplane departed from runway 01 at ALB, turned northeast, and continued to climb. At 0725, at an altitude of 1,100 feet msl, the pilot advised air traffic control, “eight delta romeo just lost our engine”. No further transmissions were received from the flight, and radar contact was lost about 30 seconds later at an altitude of 300 feet msl.

According to FAA records, the left seat pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane single-engine land, as well as a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 1, 2012, at which time he reported 10,691 total hours of flight experience. The pilot seated in the right seat held a commercial pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on December 20, 2011.

The accident site was located in a residential area approximately 3 miles northeast of ALB. The initial impact point was identified by several damaged tree limbs, and a wreckage path about 150 feet in length, oriented approximately 320 degrees magnetic, extended through the impact area. Fragments of the airplane, including portions of right wing, right wing tip fuel tank, and ailerons were located approximately 40 feet prior to where the fuselage came to rest between two pine trees. The left wing was located approximately 20 feet beyond the fuselage along the wreckage path. The engine remained attached to the fuselage, and 2 of the 3 propeller blades exhibited impact-related damage. One blade was bent aft about 45 degrees near the mid-span point and the other blade was bent aft about 90 degrees near the mid-span point. None of the blades exhibited chordwise scratching or leading edge gouging.


 Watch the NTSB press conference in its entirety

CLIFTON PARK, N.Y. -- "So there's one of the wings," said Waterford resident Matthew Rushkowski. "Where's the other one?" 

 A steady stream of curious onlookers made their way to Van Vranken Road in the hamlet of Vischer Ferry to see the wreckage from the deadly plane crash that killed prominent businessman Walter Uccellini and left his second in command, James Quinn, critically injured. Most were looking for answers as well.

"It's not every day you have a plane crash in Clifton Park. It's just...I mean, it's not every day you hear of a plane crash," Rushkowski said.

Family members of the victims were also at the crash site, seeking closure. NTSB investigators are still combing the scene for clues.

"We have recovered three pieces of electronic equipment, electronic devices that were either handheld in nature or installed in the airplane that we hope may contain recorded data," said NTSB Air Safety Investigator Dennis Diaz.

Quinn was named as the pilot of the Beechcraft that took off from Albany International Airport Wednesday morning for an ill-fated trip to Plattsburgh. Officials said both Uccellini and Quinn were certified as pilots. Complicating the investigation was that the plane was equipped with dual controls where both men were seated.

Diaz said, "It can be sometimes difficult to make an exact determination of who may have been flying the plane at any one particular point."

Though engine trouble was initially reported, NTSB officials said naming a cause will take some time. A preliminary report will be issued in 5 to 10 days. In 9 to 12 months they will release a factual report which will contain all the information they've gathered throughout the investigation. About three months after that, a probable cause will be named.

Watch Video:   http://hudsonvalley.ynn.com


 Watch the NTSB press conference in its entirety

 http://registry.faa.gov/N678DR

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N678DR


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 678DR        Make/Model: BE36      Description: 36 Bonanza
  Date: 08/15/2012     Time: 1210

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: CLIFTON PARK   State: NY   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED SHORTLY AFTER DEPARTURE, THERE WERE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD, 1 
  WAS FATALLY INJURED, 1 SUSTAINED SERIOUS INJURIES, CLIFTON PARK, NY

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   1     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ALBANY, NY  (EA01)                    Entry date: 08/16/2012 

SCENE VIDEO: Pilot suffers life-threatening injuries in ultralight plane crash near Calgary

RCMP officers at the scene of an ultralight plane crash in a canola field south of the Indus ultralight airstrip east of Calgary, Alberta, on August 16, 2012. (QMI Agency/MIKE DREW)

RCMP officers at the scene of an ultralight plane crash in a canola field south of the Indus ultralight airstrip east of Calgary, Alberta, on August 16, 2012. One person was injured and taken to hospital by STARS air ambulance. MIKE DREW/CALGARY SUN/QMI AGENCY

 
A member of the Strathmore RCMP inspects the wreckage of an ultralight plane after it crashed into a canola field south of Indus Thursday. Photograph by: Colleen De Neve, Calgary Herald





Pilot hospitalized after plane crash east of Calgary 

A man in his fifties is in hospital  with serious injuries after his ultralight plane crashed near Indus, east of Calgary.

He is stable condition although he suffered potentially life-threatening injuries.

Witnesses say the plane climbed about 130 metres after taking off from the Indus Winters airport, when it suddenly began to descend. It then disappeared below the horizon.

The witnesses launched a search and found the ultralight in a canola field about two kilometres south of the Indus airport.

Emergency crews rushed to the scene and the STARS air ambulance flew the pilot to Calgary’s Foothills Hospital.

Strathmore RCMP and the Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

A man in his 50s suffered serious, possibly life-threatening injuries in an ultralight plane crash on Thursday afternoon.

A light blue ultralight plane crashed into a thick field of canola Thursday afternoon south of Indus.

Witnesses say the single engine plane took off from the Indus Winters airport around 12:30 p.m., reaching a height of 400 feet before disappearing behind the trees, according to Strathmore RCMP Cpl. Mark Harrison.

The two people from the airport then went and checked on him, finding the pilot unconscious under the plane. 

Emergency crews — including the RCMP, EMS and STARS air ambulance — were all called to the scene by the airport, which is off Highway 22X at Range Road 282.

The plane was single engine with 20 foot wingspans and a canvas outerlay. 

"There is extensive damage," Harrison said.

Once paramedics arrived, the man was taken for medical care. At the scene he was determined to have suffered serious, possibly life-threatening injuries. 

"The crews on scene found him beside the airplane so he might have been extricated by one of the witnesses on scene," said EMS spokesman Ryan Collyer.

The man was taken to the Foothills Medical Centre by STARS. 

Strathmore RCMP and the Transportation Safety Board of Canada are investigating the crash.

F-16 Jet Crashes in Northern Belgium; Birdstrike Suspected

 
Photo:   http://www.hbvl.be/limburg/peer/f16-neergestort-in-kleine-brogel.aspx


An F-16 fighter jet crashed in northern Belgium while on a training mission from the Kleine- Brogel air base near the town of Peer, the country’s military said. No one was injured. 

The accident occurred at 3:01 p.m. local time about one kilometer from the Kleine-Brogel base, the military said today in an emailed statement. The pilot was able to eject and was found safe, it said. No one else was hurt in the incident, Belga newswire reported.

An investigation is under way and initial information indicates that a collision with birds could be the cause, according to the statement by the military.

At least 37 of Belgium's F-16 aircraft have crashed in almost 35 years of service in the country, according to Belga. The nation ordered 160 of the planes in the 1970s and 1980s, the newswire said.

The mayor of Peer activated the town’s municipal disaster plan after the accident, according to Belga.

The Kleine-Brogel air base is home to Belgium’s 10th Tactical Wing, which has taken part in international crisis missions in Bosnia, Kosovo, Libya and Afghanistan as well as NATO defense missions, according to its website.  


http://www.bloomberg.com 

F-16 neergestort in Kleine Brogel 

  Even na 15u is op de luchtmachtbasis van Kleine Brogel een F-16-straaljager neergestort. De piloot, Jean Francois Van Cranem (24), raakte slechts lichtgewond. Hij was nog in opleiding, maar had die bijna afgerond. Na de crash heeft de burgemeester van Peer, Theo Kelchtermans, het gemeentelijk rampenplan afgekondigd. Dat werd om 17 uur weer afgeblazen

De F-16 in kwestie vertrok om 14.44 uur van op de basis van Kleine Brogel voor een trainingsvlucht. Bij het terugkeren voerde de piloot een lage overvlucht uit, waarbij de controletoren vuur opmerkte aan de achterkant van het toestel. Het toestel was in een vogelzwerm terechtgekomen.
Schietstoel

Het toestel stortte op zo'n 3 à 4 km van de piste, net buiten het militair domein, neer. De piloot kon zich met behulp van zijn schietstoel redden. Van Cranem kwam met zijn schietstoel en parachute in een boom terecht. Hij hing te hoog om zelf op de begane grond te geraken en daarom moesten de brandweerdiensten hem met een ladder uit zijn benarde situatie bevrijden.

Na de crash was hij nog bij bewustzijn. Hij raakte lichtgewond en klaagde over pijn aan de schouder. Voor een medische controle is hij naar het ziekenhuis in Overpelt overgebracht.

Het toestel zelf vloog een paar honderd meter verder en stortte in een bomenrij neer, waar het in brand vloog. Er bleef niet veel meer over van de F-16. De brandweer van de basis en de korpsen van Lommel en Bree bestreden de vlammenzee.
Bird strike

In totaal had de Waalse man 500 vlieguren ervaring en 132 uren daarvan met een F-16. "Een bird strike zit uiteraard in de training met een vluchtsimulator vervat. Per jaar gebeurt er een tiental bird strikes zonder fatale afloop", zei generaal-majoor Claude Van De Voorde. "We proberen een vogel te ontwijken als we die zien. Naar omhoog gaan is een normale reflex. Als dit hoger gebeurd was, had hij misschien nog kunnen proberen te herstarten."

Deskundigen van het Air Safety Directorate (ASD) van de luchtmachtcomponent zijn gestart met een onderzoek naar het wrak van het neergestorte toestel. Aan de hand van foto's wordt een reconstructie gemaakt van het vliegtuig en er wordt ook bekeken welke vogel in de motor is terechtgekomen.

Photo:   http://www.hbvl.be/limburg/peer/f16-neergestort-in-kleine-brogel.aspx

Pilots: Ryanair pushes us to run on empty; Irish Airline Pilots' Association blames Ryanair 'corporate culture' for three mayday calls

Budget airline Ryanair is putting its pilots under so much pressure to save money that they are flying with just enough fuel on board to reduce costs – a practice that forced three planes to make emergency landings in Spain recently.

"If an airline has to do emergency landings three times on one day due to a lack of fuel, something's wrong with the system," spokesman for the pilots' union Vereinigung Cockpit, Jörg Handwerg, told Financial Times Deutschland on Thursday.

The three Ryanair airplanes were forced to land in Valencia rather than Madrid because their tanks were almost empty, he said.

"Fuel is the biggest cost factor, particularly with budget airlines," Handwerg said.

And the more fuel an aircraft is carrying, the heavier that aircraft is, thereby pushing up consumption, he argued.

Nevertheless, it should be left up to a pilot how much fuel they take on board, because it is ultimately the pilot who is responsible for the safety of a flight, said Handwerg.

Ryanair was exerting heavy pressure on pilots whose jets showed the highest fuel consumption, he complained. "This infringes on the pilots' rights," Handwerg said.

The Irish airline, which stands accused by consumer organisations of having put passengers in danger, said this was not the case. It said both planes landed with enough fuel for another 30 minutes' flight time, or 300 flight miles - in accordance with Boeing security rules and those of the EASA European aviation security authority.

The Spanish transport ministry said earlier this week it was investigating a complaint by airport operator AENA against Ryanair.

Airline spokesman Stephen McNamara said Ryanair supported the investigation and was ready to cooperate with the authorities.

AFP/The Local/jlb 

IALPA blames Ryanair 'corporate culture' for three mayday calls 

 The IALPA said that Ryanair’s league tables on the use of fuel led to the three planes making low-fuel emergency landings at Valencia Airport.

However, Ryanair has denied its fuel policy was responsible for the mayday calls on 26 July, when bad weather caused the flights to be diverted from Madrid.

It said the mayday calls occurred in extraordinary circumstances after more than an hour of extra flight time.

It added that the planes were not in imminent danger and landed with the required 30 minutes’ worth of fuel on board.

The Spanish Consumer Association has accused Ryanair of jeopardising passenger safety.

The Irish Aviation Authority and its Spanish equivalent are investigating the mayday calls.

Speaking on RTÉ's News at One, IALPA’s Evan Cullen said that Ryanair's corporate culture is putting pressure on pilots to make decisions they are not comfortable with.

Mr Cullen said: "These pilots came under the legal definition, the very regulations, of imminent danger, that's why the mayday calls were issued.

"The reasons why these guys hadn't enough fuel is because of the Ryanair policy and corporate culture with regard to fuel and the fuel policy."

However, speaking on the same programme, Ryanair spokesperson Stephen McNamara denied the claims.

He said the airplanes were not in imminent danger, but were required to make the mayday calls so that they could land with the required amount of leftover fuel.


http://www.rte.ie/news/2012/0816/ryanair-spain.html

Ridge Lowell H JAYBIRD, N365R: Accident occurred August 16, 2012 in Gull Lake, New York

MULTI-MISSION LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N365R
 
 NTSB Identification: ERA12TA542 
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Thursday, August 16, 2012 in Gull Lake, NY
Aircraft: RIDGE LOWELL H J230, registration: N365R
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this public aircraft accident report.

On August 16, 2012, about 0845 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur built Jabiru J230, N365R, received substantial damage during a ditching in Gull Lake, New York after an in-flight separation of the propeller. The public use flight was operated by Patriot Technologies LLC under contract with the Department of Defense (DOD). The commercial pilot and his one crew member were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight which departed Burlington International Airport (BTV), Burlington Vermont about 0800, destined for Griffiss International Airport (RME), Rome, New York.


According to the operator, the purpose of the flight was to provide aerial support for a DOD training exercise. At the time of the accident, the flight was receiving VFR flight following from the New York Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC).


According to the pilot, after departing BVT, he headed westbound and climbed to 6,500 feet above mean sea level. Approximately 45 minutes into the flight, the engine began to run rough "like it was developing carburetor ice" so the pilot applied carburetor heat. The engine however, continued to run rough and began to "cough" like it was being starved for fuel, so the pilot made sure that both fuel valves were open, and turned on the electric fuel boost pump.

The pilot then assessed that the engine might stop running, so he called for the high altitude engine failure checklist. However, before they began the checklist, the propeller came off the airplane, struck the right side of the cowling, struck the right lift strut, and fell away.

The pilot then declared an emergency with the ARTCC, began evaluating landing sites, and elected to ditch in a nearby lake. After ditching, the airplane came to rest on the surface of the lake with the cabin halfway submerged. Both crewmembers then egressed from the cabin and swam to the lake shore, and were later picked up by helicopter.

Four days after the ditching occurred, the airplane was recovered from the lake. Post accident examination revealed that the entire propeller assembly, including the propeller spinner, and propeller flange extension, had separated from the engine crankshaft.

The crankshaft, along with multiple engine parts was retained by the NTSB for further Examination.



IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 365R        Make/Model: EXP       Description: EXP- JAYBIRD
  Date: 08/16/2012     Time: 1235

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: Minor     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: LONG LAKE   State: NY   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT LOST POWER AND MADE A FORCED LANDING. LONG LAKE, NY

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   1     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   1     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ALBANY, NY  (EA01)                    Entry date: 08/17/2012 
  
http://registry.faa.gov/N365R

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N365R


Small plane crashes in western Adirondacks (2nd update)

Two people rescued; no injuries reported

A small, private plane contracted by the U.S. Defense Department to support a military training excercise crashed in a lake in a remote area of the western Adirondacks this morning.

The plane had taken off from Burlington, Vt., was bound for Rome, N.Y., and crashed in Gull Lake, in the northeast corner of Herkimer County: west of Lake Lila, south of Cranberry Lake and north of the Stillwater Reservoir.

"The tail was sticking out of the water, as I understand it," Ray Brook-based state police Lt. Walter Teppo said. "The pilots were able to get to shore. They were unharmed."

The New York Air National Guard helped rescue the two men involved in the crash. A pair of HH-60 helicopters from the Guard's 106th Rescue Wing, based on Long Island, were flying in the area at the time of the plane went down, according to Maj. Giuseppe Scaglione.

"We were en route to the Army base at Fort Drum, doing some training," Scaglione said. "We heard the mayday message over the radio. Air traffic control asked us if we could support and vectored us into the last known coordinates. Our pilots took over from there and conducted some search operations. They found the aircraft as well as the two crew members. My understanding is they were both standing along the shore, so they had made it out of the aircraft on their own."

The two were not seriously injured, Scaglione said. They were picked up and helicoptered to Fort Drum to be checked out by medical personnel there.


"It's just very fortunate for the crew that went down that our guys happened to be nearby," Scaglione said. "Our mission here at the 106th Rescue Wing is, of course, rescue. These guys train for it, day in and day out."

The Vermont National Guard issued a press release about the crash late this afternoon. It says the small, fixed-wing aircraft was a civilian plane contracted by the Department of Defense to support a Vermont Air National Guard military training excercise in the local area. It was not carrying any weapons, the release states.

"The Department of Defense regularly contracts civil aircraft to provide support for training exercises," the release says. "The crash occurred in a remote location and will not affect public safety. A formal investigation will take place and until the investigation concludes no other information is available at this time."

The Federal Aviation Administration has been called in to investigate the crash. FAA spokesman Jim Peters said in an email that the plane was a single-engine, home-built aircraft. It reportedly had an engine problem shortly before the crash, he said.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation spokesman David Winchell said his agency received notice of the crash around 9 a.m.

"We have state police helicopters, forest rangers, environmental conservation officers and spill response staff on the ground trying to locate the site of the crash and secure the crash site and determine if there's any fuel leaking or environmental issues," Winchell said just after 11 a.m.

The names of those involved and the type of plane they were flying have yet to be released.


 http://www.adirondackdailyenterprise.com


 Two people were reportedly rescued by a military helicopter after their small, private plane crashed in a lake in a remote area of the western Adirondacks this morning.

 Emergency services officials and state Department of Environmental Conservation Region 5 spokesman David Winchell said the plane crashed in Gull Lake, which is located in the northeast corner of Herkimer County: west of Lake Lila, south of Cranberry Lake and north of the Stillwater Reservoir.

"It was a civilian aircraft with two occupants," Winchell said. "Fort Drum responded to a mayday and picked up the two occupants and brought them back to Fort Drum."

Winchell said DEC received notice of the crash around 9 a.m. He said he didn't have any more specific information about the incident at this point.

"We have state police helicopters, forest rangers, environmental conservation officers and spill response staff on the ground trying to locate the site of the crash and secure the crash site and determine if there's any fuel leaking or environmental issues," Winchell said. "We're waiting for the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) or NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) to step in and take over the investigation of the crash."

A Ray Brook-based state trooper said the two occupants of the plane were not seriously injured and were transported to a medical unit at Fort Drum, the Army base near Watertown, to be checked out. He said the military helicopter was in the area on a training mission when it heard the distress call.

Both Winchell and the trooper said they were told that the small plane was some type of experimental aircraft.

A Fort Drum spokeswoman said the helicopter that assisted in the rescue was a U.S. Air Force Black Hawk, not a helicopter based at the home of the Army's 10th Mountain Division. She confirmed that the plane's occupants were treated at Fort Drum but wasn't immediately able to provide any other information.

http://www.adirondackdailyenterprise.com

 
 LONG LAKE — A small seaplane crashed into Gull Pond here Thursday morning, but all three occupants were rescued safely. 

The pilot and two passengers were all picked up with only minor injuries, officials said.


The State Police helicopter based at Saranac Lake Regional Airport was used to rescue the trio from the water, after a passerby called 911.

It’s not known if the float plane was trying to land or take off at the time of the crash.

State Police, Long Lake Fire Department and Emergency Squad and State Department of Environmental Conservation forest rangers are all at the site.

The names of the occupants have not been released.

Gull Pond is located near the St. Lawrence, Hamilton and Franklin counties lines.


http://pressrepublican.com

A search is underway after 911 dispatchers say a single engine plane went down in the Town of Long Lake in Hamilton County on Thursday. 

Dispatchers say there are two victims and that there is no word on the extent of the injuries.

The emergency call came in around 8:43 a.m. on Thursday morning. That call initially came in from Herkimer County, who sent it over to Hamilton County.

Fort Drum was called into service shortly afterward to help search for the plane, and the Long Lake Fire Department has set up at the scene.

As of this writing, there is no word on where the plane was coming from or where it was going.
 

Beech A36TC Bonanza 36, N678DR: Accident occurred August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, New York

NTSB Identification: ERA12FA508
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, NY
Aircraft: BEECH A36TC, registration: N678DR
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
 

On August 15, 2012, at 0727 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36TC, N678DR, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Clifton Park, New York. The certificated airline transport pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed from Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York at 0724, and was destined for Plattsburg Airport (PBG), Plattsburg, New York. The business flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Review of air traffic control (ATC) information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot contacted ATC about 0720 and requested clearance to taxi for departure. The controller initially advised the pilot to taxi to runway 1 via taxiway D and A. The pilot subsequently advised the controller that he could accept an intersection departure from runway 1 at D, and was subsequently issued that clearance. At 0722, the pilot requested to depart from runway 1 at D, but was advised that there would be a 3 minute delay due to wake turbulence from a previously departed Boeing 737. The pilot then requested to “waive” the delay, and was issued a takeoff clearance about 1 minute later. In addition to a warning of wake turbulence, the pilot was issued a departure heading of 040 degrees.

The airplane departed from runway 1 at 0724, turned northeast, and continued to climb. At 0725, at an altitude of 1,100 feet msl, the pilot advised ATC, “eight delta romeo just lost our engine”. No further transmissions were received from the pilot, and radar contact was lost about 30 seconds later at an altitude of 300 feet msl.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 68, held an airline transport pilot certificate with numerous ratings, including airplane single engine land, as well as a flight instructor certificate with numerous ratings including airplane single engine. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 1, 2012 with the limitation, “must have available glasses for near vision.” A review of the pilot’s flight logs showed that he had accumulated 11,008 total hours of flight experience, 1,110 hours of which were in the accident airplane make and model. During the 90 days preceding the accident, the pilot had accumulated 143 hours of flight experience, 34 hours of which were in the accident airplane.

According to the pilot’s son, the pilot was a friend of the accident airplane’s owners, and was allowed to utilize the airplane anytime he needed. He further described that the pilot flew very often, and had previously flown many people in the accident airplane. While the passenger did hold a pilot certificate, he had not flown a great deal in the recent past. The purpose of the flight was for the pilot and passenger to attend a business meeting in Plattsburg, New York.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to airworthiness records maintained by the FAA, the airplane was manufactured in 1981 and was equipped with a Continental Motors TSIO-520-UB turbo-supercharged, fuel injected engine. Review of maintenance records showed that a factory rebuilt engine was installed on the airplane in May 1996, at an aircraft total time of 1,591 flight hours. The airplane’s most recent annual inspection was completed on October 15, 2011 at 3,190 total aircraft hours. At the time of the accident, the airframe had accumulated 3,364 total flight hours, and the engine had accumulated 1,773 total flight hours since its installation.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The ALB airport was comprised of two intersecting runways oriented in a 1/19 and 10/28 configuration, at an elevation of 285 feet. Runway 1 was 8,500 feet long by 150 feet wide. Taxiway A ran parallel to runway 1 and was located to the west of the runway. Taxiway D intersected runway 1 about 3,250 feet beyond the runway approach threshold. From that intersection, about 5,250 feet of runway was available for a departure.

The airplane was most recently serviced with 85 gallons of 100LL fuel by a fixed base operator at ALB on the day preceding the accident. Following the accident, a fuel quality assurance review was conducted by the fixed based operator, and no deficiencies were noted during the inspection.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 0753 weather observation at ALB included calm winds, 10 statute miles visibility with patches of fog present to the west and southwest, few clouds at 100 feet, scattered clouds at 8,000 feet, a broken ceiling at 13,000 feet, and a broken ceiling at 25,000 feet. The temperature was 19 degrees Celsius (C), the dew point was 18 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 29.90 inches of mercury.

FLIGHT RECORDERS

The airplane was not equipped with any flight data recording devices, nor was it required to be; however, a hand-held global positioning system (GPS) receiver was recovered from the wreckage, and found to contain data pertaining to the accident flight. The initial data point was recorded at 0721, as the airplane taxied toward runway 1 at ALB via taxiway D. The airplane subsequently taxied onto runway 1 at 0723, at the point where the runway intersected taxiway D.

The airplane accelerated down the runway and began climbing at 0724:26, and 8 seconds later had climbed to a GPS-derived altitude of 341 feet, at a GPS groundspeed of 88 knots. At that point, the airplane began a right turn about 1,600 feet prior to reaching the runway departure end. The airplane continued to climb while on an approximate 40-degree magnetic track. At 0725:50, the airplane reached a maximum altitude of 1,115 feet, at a GPS groundspeed of 111 knots, about 2 nautical miles northeast of the runway 1 departure end.

Over the next 30 seconds, the airplane turned about 90 degrees left as it descended and slowed. By 0726:24, the airplane had established a heading of 305 degrees, descended to 627 feet, and slowed to a GPS groundspeed of 85 knots. About 25 seconds later, the airplane’s final position was recorded at an altitude of 302 feet and a GPS groundspeed of 76 knots.

A plot of the airplane’s position for the final moments of the flight showed that an open field about 1,000 feet long, and aligned with the airplane’s final approach path, was located about 1,000 feet west of its final GPS-recorded position. Additionally, a two-lane asphalt road paralleled the airplane’s final approach path; however utility wires paralleled and crossed the road at numerous points in the vicinity of the accident site.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in a residential area approximately 3 miles northeast of ALB, at an elevation of 260 feet. The initial impact point (IIP) was identified by several damaged tree limbs, at a height of about 30 feet, and was located about 45 feet west of the airplane’s final GPS-recorded position. The wreckage path about was about 150 feet long, and oriented approximately 320 degrees magnetic. A ground scar, along with the outboard portion of the right wing and aileron, were located about 95 feet beyond the IIP, along the wreckage path. The main portion of the wreckage consisted of the fuselage and inboard portions of both wings, and was located about 45 feet from the ground scar. The fuselage remained upright, and was oriented on a 280-degree magnetic heading. The outboard portion of the left wing was located about 10 feet beyond the main wreckage.

The left wing remained attached to the fuselage by all four of its attachment bolts. The outboard portion of the wing separated in the vicinity of the landing gear, and the left main landing gear remained stowed in its well. The right wing also remained attached to the fuselage by its attachment bolts, with the outboard portion separating near the outer portion of the flap. The right main landing gear remained stowed within its well. The landing gear actuator was in the retracted position.

Control continuity was confirmed from the control column to the elevator and left aileron, and through a fracture of the right aileron bellcrank to the right aileron, and rudder control continuity was confirmed from both rudder pedals to the rudder. Measurement of the left and right elevator trim tab actuators revealed extensions corresponding to a 10-degree tab-down position (nose up trim). Measurement of both flap actuator rods corresponded to a flaps retracted position.

The fuel selector was found in the left tank position. Examination of the fuel system revealed that it remained continuous from the firewall, through the selector valve, to both fuel tanks, with no breaches or obstructions noted. Residual fuel was observed in both main and both auxiliary wingtip fuel tanks. The color and odor of the fuel appeared consistent with 100LL aviation fuel, and all samples taken were absent of water or debris. The auxiliary fuel pump switch was found in the HIGH position, though the structure surrounding the switch was deformed consistent with impact.

The pilot and copilot seats remained attached to the seat rails with no deformation noted. The mounting points and buckles for both the pilot and copilot restraints appeared intact and undamaged, and first responders reported that the pilot and passenger were wearing both lap and shoulder restraints upon arriving at the accident scene.

The engine remained attached to the fuselage, and 2 of the 3 propeller blades exhibited impact-related damage. One blade was bent aft about 45 degrees near the mid-span point and the other blade was bent aft about 90 degrees near the mid-span point. None of the blades exhibited chordwise scratching or leading edge gouging.

The engine was separated from the airframe and shipped to the manufacturer for a test run. The impact-related damage was generally concentrated near the aft portion of the engine. The induction system riser to the number one cylinder, the induction system “Y” pipe, and oil cooler, along with several fuel system fittings, were replaced to facilitate the test run. During preparation for the test run, a red clay/dirt-like substance was found at an impact-damaged port of the fuel metering unit. The fuel manifold valve screen, located downstream of the fuel metering unit within the fuel system, was examined and found to be absent of debris or contamination.

The engine was subsequently placed in a test cell and started normally on the first attempt without hesitation or stumbling. The engine rpm was advanced in steps to 1,200, 1,600, and 2,450 rpm for a period of 5 minutes per step to allow for warm-up. The throttle was then advanced to full power for 5 minutes before the throttle was rapidly advanced from idle to full power 6 times. The engine performed normally throughout each of the tests without any hesitation, stumbling, or interruption of power; however, testing of the magnetos showed that the right magneto was inoperative.

Following the test run, the right magneto was removed from the engine and examined. The points of the magneto exhibited corrosion. The corrosion was subsequently cleaned from the points, and the magneto was then run on a test stand. The magneto operated normally, and further disassembly revealed no anomalies.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot sustained serious injuries during the accident and subsequently succumbed to those injuries on August 28, 2013. An autopsy and toxicological testing were not performed.

ADDITONAL INFORMATION

The airframe manufacturer published an emergency procedure detailing the actions pilots should take following a loss of engine power immediately after lift-off. After eliminating the possibility of fuel exhaustion, the procedure advised the pilot:

“2. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – LOW If a Failed Engine-Driven Fuel Pump is Suspected (Indicated by zero fuel flow):

3. Auxiliary Fuel Pump – HI”

A warning was noted below that stated:

“The only reason for the high (HI) boost position is to supply fuel for priming prior to starting and to supply fuel to the engine if the engine-driven fuel pump fails. DO NOT USE THIS POSITION FOR ANY OTHER REASON. If high (HI) boost is selected when the engine-driven pump is operating, the engine will run rich and may quit depending on throttle setting, temperature and altitude.”

The checklist advised that if an ignition problem was suspected, the pilot should verify that the magnetos were selected to the “BOTH” position.

The first step of the procedure for a rough running engine immediately after lift-off stated, “Ensure auxiliary fuel pump is not on HI.”



 NTSB Identification: ERA12FA508
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 15, 2012 in Clifton Park, NY
Aircraft: BEECH A36TC, registration: N678DR
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


On August 15, 2012, at 0727 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36TC, N678DR, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Clifton Park, New York. The certificated airline transport pilot was seriously injured, and the certificated commercial pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight departed from Albany International Airport (ALB), Albany, New York at 0724, and was destined for Plattsburg Airport (PBG), Plattsburg, New York. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Review of preliminary air traffic control information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), revealed that the airplane departed from runway 01 at ALB, turned northeast, and continued to climb. At 0725, at an altitude of 1,100 feet msl, the pilot advised air traffic control, “eight delta romeo just lost our engine”. No further transmissions were received from the flight, and radar contact was lost about 30 seconds later at an altitude of 300 feet msl.

According to FAA records, the left seat pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane single-engine land, as well as a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 1, 2012, at which time he reported 10,691 total hours of flight experience. The pilot seated in the right seat held a commercial pilot certificate with multiple ratings, including airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on December 20, 2011.

The accident site was located in a residential area approximately 3 miles northeast of ALB. The initial impact point was identified by several damaged tree limbs, and a wreckage path about 150 feet in length, oriented approximately 320 degrees magnetic, extended through the impact area. Fragments of the airplane, including portions of right wing, right wing tip fuel tank, and ailerons were located approximately 40 feet prior to where the fuselage came to rest between two pine trees. The left wing was located approximately 20 feet beyond the fuselage along the wreckage path. The engine remained attached to the fuselage, and 2 of the 3 propeller blades exhibited impact-related damage. One blade was bent aft about 45 degrees near the mid-span point and the other blade was bent aft about 90 degrees near the mid-span point. None of the blades exhibited chordwise scratching or leading edge gouging.




 Watch the NTSB press conference in its entirety

CLIFTON PARK, N.Y. -- "So there's one of the wings," said Waterford resident Matthew Rushkowski. "Where's the other one?" 

 A steady stream of curious onlookers made their way to Van Vranken Road in the hamlet of Vischer Ferry to see the wreckage from the deadly plane crash that killed prominent businessman Walter Uccellini and left his second in command, James Quinn, critically injured. Most were looking for answers as well.

"It's not every day you have a plane crash in Clifton Park. It's just...I mean, it's not every day you hear of a plane crash," Rushkowski said.

Family members of the victims were also at the crash site, seeking closure. NTSB investigators are still combing the scene for clues.

"We have recovered three pieces of electronic equipment, electronic devices that were either handheld in nature or installed in the airplane that we hope may contain recorded data," said NTSB Air Safety Investigator Dennis Diaz.

Quinn was named as the pilot of the Beechcraft that took off from Albany International Airport Wednesday morning for an ill-fated trip to Plattsburgh. Officials said both Uccellini and Quinn were certified as pilots. Complicating the investigation was that the plane was equipped with dual controls where both men were seated.

Diaz said, "It can be sometimes difficult to make an exact determination of who may have been flying the plane at any one particular point."

Though engine trouble was initially reported, NTSB officials said naming a cause will take some time. A preliminary report will be issued in 5 to 10 days. In 9 to 12 months they will release a factual report which will contain all the information they've gathered throughout the investigation. About three months after that, a probable cause will be named.

Watch Video:   http://hudsonvalley.ynn.com


 
http://wnyt.com

REXFORD, N.Y. -- The National Transportation Safety Board will hold a press conference today to discuss the plane crash in Saratoga County that killed one man and left another critically injured.

The single engine plane had taken off from Albany International Airport shortly before 7:30 a.m. Wednesday and was headed for Plattsburgh. Just a few minutes after takeoff, the pilot reported engine problems and went down off Van Vranken Road in the hamlet of Vischer Ferry.

The passenger, Walter Uccellini, 67, died in the crash. The pilot, James Quinn, 68, was taken to Albany Medical Center and is in critical condition.

The 3 p.m. press conference will be held at the Vischer Ferry Volunteer Fire Company in Rexford and will be led by NTSB. Other local officials who responded to the scene will also be at the press conference.


http://registry.faa.gov/N678DR

http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N678DR

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 678DR        Make/Model: BE36      Description: 36 Bonanza
  Date: 08/15/2012     Time: 1210

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: CLIFTON PARK   State: NY   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED SHORTLY AFTER DEPARTURE, THERE WERE 2 PERSONS ON BOARD, 1 
  WAS FATALLY INJURED, 1 SUSTAINED SERIOUS INJURIES, CLIFTON PARK, NY

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   1     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: ALBANY, NY  (EA01)                    Entry date: 08/16/2012