Saturday, September 05, 2020

Cessna A188B AGWagon, C-GWWE: Accident occurred July 09, 2020 in Pembina, North Dakota


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fargo, North Dakota

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca

Location: Pembina, ND

Accident Number: CEN20LA270
Date & Time: 07/09/2020, 0805 CDT
Registration: C-GWWE
Aircraft: CESSNA 188
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Non-U.S., Non-Commercial

On July 9, 2020, about 0805 central daylight time, a Cessna 188 airplane, Canadian registry C-GWWE, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Pembina, North Dakota. The commercial pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was operated as a Canadian Aviation Regulations (CAR) Subpart 702 aerial work flight.


About 0745, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer observed the airplane spraying fungicide on a canola field in Canada adjacent to the U.S. border. Following each southbound spray pass, the airplane would fly into the U.S. and make a left turn back toward the Canadian field. After observing a post-crash fire about 1.5 miles north of his position, the officer responded to the accident site and rendered assistance to the pilot. Due to his injuries, the pilot did not recall events of the accident.


Examination by Federal Aviation Administration inspectors revealed the airplane impacted the canola field left wing down and came to rest with the right wing laying over the left wing. The debris path was oriented toward the southeast and about 150 ft long.


The airplane was retained for further examination.


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: CESSNA

Registration:C-GWWE
Model/Series: 188
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:No
Operator: Southeast Air Services
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K2C8, 893 ft msl
Observation Time: 0755 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / 19 knots, 250°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.7 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Altona, MB (CJL6)
Destination: Altona, MB (CJL6)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Serious

Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 48.991944, -97.375833



U.S. Border Patrol Agent Renders Aid After Witnessing Airplane Crash on Patrol

Release Date: July 9, 2020

PEMBINA North Dakota — On July 9th, 2020 at approximately 8:00 a.m., a Grand Forks Sector Border Patrol Agent assigned to the Pembina Station witnessed an airplane crash in a field while on patrol west of Pembina, ND. The Agent, who is also a certified Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), immediately responded to the scene and requested support from Emergency Medical Services and local law enforcement via Grand Forks Sector Dispatch.

Upon arrival, the Agent observed the injured pilot outside of the burning aircraft. He assisted in moving the man to safety and immediately rendered first aid while waiting for additional personnel to arrive. Due to recent precipitation, the field was too muddy to access with patrol vehicles. Additional agents arrived on scene and assisted in carrying the man out of the field on a litter to the nearest road. Local EMS arrived shortly after and transported the man to the nearest hospital where he was provided medical attention for his injuries.

Local law enforcement also responded and provided scene security. The Federal Aviation Administration is primary investigative agency for this incident.

“Nationwide, law enforcement officers respond to incidents on a daily basis, which are far from routine,” said Acting Chief Patrol Agent William J. Maddocks. “Quite often, complex life threatening situations unravel right before our eyes, and this situation was no different. Just as many departments, we are fortunate to have agents that are both trained and prepared to respond in an instant to a variety of emergencies. I am thankful that we had an agent, who is also an EMT, who happened to be right there when this crash occurred.”

In addition to fulfilling our border security mission, agents provide an additional emergency response capability in the areas they are assigned and are often amongst the first on scene at accidents and critical incidents. Grand Forks Sector currently has 18 agents that are certified as EMTs. They have received emergency medical training beyond that of basic lifesaving skills such as CPR.

Residents are encouraged to report suspicious activity anonymously at 1-800-982-4077, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week or email at gfndispatch@cbp.dhs.gov.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of our nation's borders at and between official ports of entry. CBP is charged with securing the borders of the United States while enforcing hundreds of laws and facilitating lawful trade and travel.

https://www.cbp.gov


Ayres S-2R-R1340 Turbo Thrush, N3104S: Accident occurred July 12, 2020 near Keokuk Municipal Airport (KEOK), Lee County, Iowa

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa (and) Minneapolis, Minnesota
Ayres Thrush

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N3104S

Location: Keokuk, IA
Accident Number: CEN20LA276
Date & Time: 07/12/2020, 1110 CDT
Registration: N3104S
Aircraft: Rockwell S2R R1340
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Ferry

On July 12, 2020, about 1110 central daylight time, a Rockwell Thrush S2R, N3104S, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Keokuk, Iowa. The commercial pilot was not injured. The airplane was being operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 ferry flight.

The agricultural airplane had just completed major repairs at a certified repair facility in Hayti, Missouri. Part of the repairs included the removal and reinstallation of both wings. The intent of the flight was to ferry the airplane cross-country from Hayti to its home base in Vinton, Iowa, with a planned fuel stop in Keokuk, Iowa. According to the pilot, he had topped off the airplane with 197 gallons of fuel prior to departure from Hayti. The pilot stated that after an uneventful enroute flight, he was flying about 1,500 -1,800 ft above ground level on a straight-in approach to runway 32 at Keokuk when there was an engine temperature surge and then a decrease. The engine stopped running and the pilot attempted restart procedures. The pilot assessed that he was not going to make it to the airport, which was about 3-4 miles away, and decided to land the airplane in a field. During the landing, the airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot exited the airplane uninjured and emergency personnel arrived to assist.

Examination of the airplane after the accident revealed that a fuel vent line in the right wing was creased across a structural beam. The creased fuel vent was not consistent with impact damage, and restricted air from entering the fuel tank. Further examination of the vent line revealed that the installation right wing's vent line was not correct and the left wing's vent was installed properly.


Figure 1. Creased Fuel Vent Right Wing

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Rockwell
Registration: N3104S
Model/Series: S2R R1340 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Wayson Air
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: , 869 ft msl
Observation Time: 1252 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 50 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4600 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 360°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Hayti, MO (M28)
Destination: Vinton, IA (VTI)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.442778, -91.424167 (est)






Cirrus SR22, N733CD: Fatal accident occurred September 04, 2020 in Chester, Crawford County, Arkansas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas
Cirrus; Duluth, Minnesota 
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 
Cirrus Owners & Pilots Association; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Location: Chester, AR
Accident Number: CEN20LA379
Date & Time: 09/04/2020, 2055 CDT
Registration: N733CD
Aircraft: Cirrus SR22
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 4, 2020, about 2055 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR22 airplane, N733CD, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Chester, Arkansas. The private pilot and three passengers sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to initial information, the accident pilot called his flight instructor/airplane mechanic at the Muskogee-Davis Regional Airport (MKO), near Muskogee, Oklahoma, on September 4, 2020, about 1900, and advised the mechanic that he intended to fly to North Carolina. The mechanic advised the pilot to leave in the morning. Fueling records showed the accident airplane was refueled about 1949, with 36.41 gallons of 100 low lead aviation gasoline.

According to initial radar data, the airplane departed from MKO about 2027. The airplane flew eastward, had climbed up through 8,500 ft, and the pilot established radio communication with an air traffic controller. The pilot was asked by the controller where the flight was destined and the pilot said it was Pickens County Airport, near Pickens, South Carolina. The airplane was radar-identified, was issued depicted weather, and the controller suggested a 20° right turn for the weather. The airplane flew about 4 four miles on this heading and then reversed course. The flight was queried on its heading and the pilot replied that they were returning to MKO. The airplane was observed on a northwest heading by the controller who asked the pilot if he still intended to return to MKO, and advised the pilot that the airplane appeared to be on a heading of 340°. The pilot replied that the airplane had been caught by the wind and he was correcting its course. However, the airplane turned northeast and began descending. The controller issued the flight a 20° left turn and no response was received in reference to that turn. The controller then advised the flight to turn left heading 270°. The pilot acknowledged the 270° heading. The airplane continued to descend and turn right. The controller then advised that the flight appeared to be losing altitude rapidly and advised the pilot to level the airplane's wings, and fly southbound. The controller subsequently queried the flight multiple times, advised that radar contact was lost, and no response was received. An alert notice was issued, a search conducted, and the wreckage was found in wooded terrain on September 5, 2020.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 31-year-old pilot reported that he had accumulated 11 hours of total flight time and 11 hours of flight in last six months before his last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) examination for a third-class medical certificate dated November 29, 2017, issued with no limitations. The pilot was given a notice of disapproval after his initial attempt at a private pilot examination on October 27, 2019. The pilot's areas of deficiency were in preflight preparation, operation of systems, which included knowledge of constant speed propellers and knowledge of instruments associated with the pitot and vacuum systems. The pilot successfully passed the retesting for his private pilot certificate on November 3, 2019.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to its website, Cirrus Embark is a program designed exclusively for new owners of pre-owned Cirrus aircraft. The program includes complimentary training to address the specific needs of pilots and owners of pre-owned Cirrus aircraft. The program consists of a maximum of 3 full days of flight training. The pilot requested and was granted this training program on January 13, 2020. According to initial information, the pilot accumulated about 100 to 120 hours of total time at the time of his application. Direct owners or designated pilots of pre-owned Cirrus aircraft must enroll into Cirrus Embark within 30 days of aircraft delivery. Once enrolled into the program, the owner or designated pilot must complete the training within 60 days. According to Cirrus training records, the pilot completed all the flight training lessons. However, he did not complete all the online self-study lessons.

The accident airplane was a four-place, single engine, low-wing airplane. An FAA bill of sale document showed the airplane was sold to the accident pilot on January 4, 2020. According to copies of airplane logbook entries, an annual inspection was completed on June 2, 2020 and the airplane accumulated 2,053.8 hours of total time at the time of that inspection. The airplane was equipped with an ARNAV Systems, Inc ICDS (integrated cockpit display system) 2000 unit, which is a moving map multifunction display that also displays engine data.

The airplane was fitted with a Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS) advertised by the airplane manufacturer to recover the airplane and its occupants to the ground in the event of an in-flight emergency. The CAPS contains a parachute (within a deployment bag) located within a fiberglass CAPS enclosure compartment, a solid-propellant rocket contained within a launch tube to deploy the parachute, a pick-up collar assembly and attached Teflon-coated steel cable lanyard and incremental bridle, a rocket activation system that consisted of an activation T-handle, an activation cable, and a rocket igniter, and a harness assembly which attached the parachute to the fuselage.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted wooded terrain about 22 miles north of the Fort Smith Regional Airport, Fort Smith, Arkansas. An FAA inspector examined and documented the wreckage site. A section of upper tree canopy exhibited signs consistent with blighting. The wreckage path exhibited a descending path, about 30° down, through the woods from the upper canopy to the engine and cabin impact site had a heading of about 220°. The debris field, which started about the area of blighting and continued southwest beyond the cabin and engine impact area was consistent with this heading as well. Charring and discoloration consistent with a small ground fire was present on items in the impact area. The propeller was found separated from the engine, and a propeller blade was separated just outboard of its hub. The remaining two blades exhibited leading edge nicks and gouges. A portion of the CAPS parachute was strewn out in the debris field northeast of the impact area and the remainder of the CAPS parachute was observed in its deployment bag. The CAPS rocket was found in a ravine about 200 ft north of the impact site. Components of the wings, engine, empennage, and fuselage were identified at the accident site. The cockpit instrumentation was fragmented, and no useful information was able to be collected from them. However, non-volatile memory installed in the ICDS unit has been retained to see if it contains data in reference to the accident flight.

The airplane and engine were recovered and have been retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cirrus
Registration: N733CD
Model/Series: SR22 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFSM, 449 ft msl
Observation Time: 2053 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 22 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Muskogee, OK (MKO)
Destination: Pickens, SC (LQK) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 35.686111, -94.252500 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.










CHECOTAH, Oklahoma — A family is in mourning following a plane crash that left four people dead, including a child.

The family from Checotah was flying to South Carolina to visit extended family Friday for the holiday weekend when their plane crashed in Crawford County, Arkansas, 21 miles north of Fort Smith.

Paul “PD”, 57, Kevin, 32, Holly, 29, and 7-year-old Gavin Herron all died in the crash. Kevin and Holly are married, Gavin is their son, and Paul is Kevin’s dad. The three adults all graduated from Checotah High School.

Kevin served in the U.S. Marines for four years, including three deployments abroad. Holly was finishing up school to become a teacher. Gavin was a student at Marshall Elementary School in Checotah, and loved Legos and Batman.

Paul was well known in the community and served as assistant fire chief at the FAIC Volunteer Fire Department until 2017.

The family all loves the outdoors and lived life to the fullest.

Family of the victims says they are grateful for the love, support, and prayers from the community, saying in a statement, “PD, Kevin, Holly as well as Gavin all lived life to the fullest. They loved their families, they loved their work, and enjoyed everything life had to offer. We want the memories of the life they lived to outlast the tragedy of their death”

You can donate to the funeral costs here.

https://www.fox23.com


Kevin Herron, center, and his seven-year-old son Gavin, right, have fun riding logs with Gavin's uncle David Ward during a family outing in Checotah. Kevin and Gavin along with David's sister and Kevin's wife Holley and Kevin's father Paul were killed in a plane crash on September 4th, 2020 outside of Chester, Arkansas, in Crawford County.


Amanda Schulz of Checotah said the Herron family is very special to her.

Paula Herron, also a Checotah resident, was a home health nurse for Schulz's special-needs son for seven years. Paula's husband, Paul, 57, along with her son Kevin, 32, Kevin's wife Holley, 29, and their 7-year-old son Gavin were killed Friday night as a result of injuries resulting from a plane crash in Crawford County, Arkansas, just outside the town of Chester.

Paula "was in my home 10-12 hours a day, three to four days a week, helping me take care of my special-needs son," Schulz said. "I've know her about 15 years -- she became part family to me, so I'm very protective of them."

Schulz started a GoFundMe page, "Expenses for Herron Family," to help raise money for funeral expenses.

"Kevin, Holley and Gavin did not have life insurance, so we wanted to take that step to relieve the families of the burden of trying to deal with that on top of the insurmountable issues that they're having with losing their loved ones quite suddenly and all at once," Schulz said. "So the GoFundMe is set up to help with the funeral expenses surrounding that."

Schulz, for the time being, is acting as a spokesperson for the families involved. During a Zoom meeting on Monday, Schulz read a statement prepared by the Herrons and Holley's parents: Dee Ann and Elbert Ward. Family members expressed their gratitude to the community and thanked everyone for their support.

"It's been a long few days, and it's not over," Schulz said. "I could never have imagined being in this situation. I am proud and honored that the families have asked me to represent them."

The four Herrons who perished were traveling to the East Coast to visit family on the East Coast. Because they had been unable to travel due to COVID-19, and decided fly.

Kevin was a sales representative for Snap-On Tools who served four years during three deployments with the U.S. Marine Corps. He was a licensed pilot and owned a Cirrus SR22. 

Crawford County Sheriff Ron Brown said the plane crashed Friday evening and was found Saturday morning.

Brown said air traffic controllers at the Fort Smith airport tower lost contact with the Cirrus SR22 while trying to help Kevin Herron land at Drake Field near Fayetteville. Brown said the aircraft was destroyed.

"They thought rather than drive and expose themselves to lots of different people and lots of different situations, they had decided that Kevin would fly them to see extended family for the holiday weekend," Schulz said."  

Paul, who was known to everyone as PD, served as an assistant chief at the FAIC Volunteer Fire Department until 2017 and worked in the oil fields. 

Holley and Kevin graduated from Checotah High School.

Holley attended Connors State College and Northeastern State University. She expected to receive during her test scores Tuesday and find out whether she had qualified for her teaching license. 

Gavin was enrolled in at Marshall Elementary.

The Herrons were remembered as a bowling family. Lori Barnard of Fast Lanes Bowl in Checotah said it's a "tragic loss."

"All we can say at Fast Lanes is they will all be missed — greatly," Barnard said. "We are all grieving and very upset right now."

Services remain pending. The Federal Aviation Administration, National Transportation Safety Board and Crawford County Sherif

f's Department are still investigating the cause of the crash.


"Any donations will be appreciated," Schulz said. "We are just trying to help a family not have to stress about something like that in a situation like this."

https://www.gofundme.com

https://www.muskogeephoenix.com

Loss of Control on Ground: Beech 95-55, N1332Z; accident occurred July 14, 2020 at David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport (KDWH), Harris County, Texas

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N1332Z

Location: Spring, TX
Accident Number:CEN20CA284
Date & Time: 07/14/2020, 1240 CDT
Registration: N1332Z
Aircraft: Beech 95 55
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

The cabin entry door popped open during the takeoff roll. The pilot immediately rejected the takeoff; however, the airplane did not slow down. As the pilot attempted to exit onto a taxiway at the end of the runway, the airplane departed the pavement and came to rest in a ditch causing substantial damage to the forward fuselage, and damage to nose gear and propellers. during a postaccident inspection, a Federal Aviation Administration inspector determined that the left main landing gear brake disc was discolored consistent with overheating. The brake liners were worn at or beyond service limits. The right main landing gear brake disc and liners remained within service limits; although, the disc was warped. No other anomalies were observed.

Flight Instructor Information


Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 27, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/19/2019
Occupational Pilot:Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/24/2019
Flight Time: 686 hours (Total, all aircraft), 246 hours (Total, this make and model), 591 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 136 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 28 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot Information


Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 46, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/07/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/10/2020
Flight Time: 4352 hours (Total, all aircraft), 954 hours (Total, this make and model), 3900 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 49 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 19 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N1332Z
Model/Series: 95 55
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1961
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number:TC-141
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:5
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/26/2020, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 5100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 148 Hours
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6218.8 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-470
Registered Owner: Up And Up Aviation LLC
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: TexasFlight
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: DWH, 152 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1253 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Spring, TX (DWH)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Spring, TX (DWH)
Type of Clearance:VFR
Departure Time: 1240 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information


Airport: David Wayne Hooks Memorial (DWH)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 152 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 17R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7009 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire:None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None

Latitude, Longitude: 30.054167, -95.551667








Loss of Control on Ground: Air Tractor AT-502B, N2038Q; accident occurred July 15, 2020 in Washington, Beaufort County, North Carolina

Left side of wing and overview of fuselage.

Damage overview of outer left wing area.


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N2038Q


Location:Washington, NC
Accident Number: ERA20CA253
Date & Time: 07/15/2020, 0715 EDT
Registration: N2038Q
Aircraft: Air Tractor AT502
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

The pilot reported that after the completion of an aerial application flight, during the landing roll on a wet grass runway, the airplane slid off the left side of the runway, where the left wing subsequently impacted corn stalks, which "further drug the aircraft into the corn and ditch." The fuselage, wings, and empennage sustained substantial damage. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 70, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Center
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/24/2020
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/02/2019
Flight Time: 15100 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2500 hours (Total, this make and model), 14800 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 162 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 100 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Air Tractor
Registration: N2038Q
Model/Series:AT502 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2013
Amateur Built:No
Airworthiness Certificate:Restricted
Serial Number: 502B-2878
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/08/2020, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 9400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 2455.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: P&W Canada
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-34AG
Registered Owner: Tim Whitfield Aviation Inc.
Rated Power: 750 hp
Operator: Tim Whitfield Aviation Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light:Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 7W6, 6 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0715 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 90°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 10000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 30°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 25°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Washington, NC (23NR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed:None
Destination: Washington, NC (23NR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0700 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Whitfield's East (23NR)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 26
IFR Approach:None
Runway Length/Width: 3300 ft / 23 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.561111, -76.231944 (est)

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Cessna 140A, N140AB; accident occurred July 18, 2020 at Arlington Municipal Airport (KGKY), Tarrant County, Texas

Supplied image of the right-side fuselage. 
The fuselage exhibits wrinkle deformation.
Carb Icing Chart.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N140AB



Location: Arlington, TX
Accident Number: CEN20LA291
Date & Time: 07/18/2020, 0745 CDT
Registration:N140AB 
Aircraft:CESSNA 140 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On July 18, 2020, about 0745 central daylight time, a Cessna 140 airplane, N140AB, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Arlington, Texas. The flight instructor and student pilot were uninjured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.

The flight instructor reported the purpose of the flight was to fly the airplane cross-country for tire repairs, and at the same time, train the student pilot in the airplane. The student pilot started the engine about 0715. The recorded weather indicated the temperature was 79° F and the dew point was 73° F. The flight instructor mentioned that since the outside air temperature was close to the dew point, they would have to be careful and cautious about carburetor icing, even if there was no visible moisture in the air.

The flight instructor related a previous occurrence when he flew this airplane for the first time with another instructor. Then, the condition was almost 100% relative humidity and the carburetor heat was kept on about "10%" during the flight when at cruise power setting, and full carburetor heat at lower than cruise power. However, a rough engine or any sign of carburetor ice was not encountered during that flight.

During the accident flight, the airplane's engine performed as expected during the run up. The student pilot set the carburetor heat on cold for takeoff and departed without issues. The flaps were retracted and the airplane was accelerated to best climb airspeed. The rate of climb was about 250 ft per minute and the engine was running at full power.

About two minutes into the flight, the engine started to run a "little bit rough and shaky." The instructor pulled the carburetor heat on about 10% hot and left it in this position in accordance with his training for this airplane. The engine roughness disappeared, and the airplane kept climbing at the same rate.

About one minute later, the roughness came back, more severe this time. The instructor pulled the carburetor heat all the way on to full hot and waited. The roughness continued and the power available was not allowing the airplane to continue the climb at the same rate.

The airplane's pitch attitude was progressively lowered to maintain the airspeed, and full power was not sufficient to keep the airplane in a level flight attitude at 1,200 ft. There was no suitable area ahead for about the next 8 to 10 miles to perform an off-field emergency landing, so the instructor elected to turn back to the departure airport. He was not confident that the airplane could maintain altitude in the traffic pattern, so he elected to land on a closer runway with a quartering tailwind. During the landing roll, as the airplane slowed down, he retracted the flaps to remove any residual lift and applied the yoke "slightly diving" away from the wind. While the airplane was still moving forward at a low ground speed, the nose "suddenly" yawed very "quickly and strongly" to the right. The instructor pilot applied ailerons, elevators, and full left rudder and brake, but these did not stop the yaw. The airplane subsequently ground looped and came to rest in the grass resulting in substantial damage to the aft fuselage and tailwheel.

Using the pilot's reported departure weather, the plotted relative humidity at this temperature and dew point spread was about 80%. A review of the icing probability chart contained in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35 revealed that the weather conditions at the time of the accident were "conducive to serious icing at glide power."

The operator of the airplane was asked to run the engine after the accident. The engine started and operated "normally." 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:  Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/06/2020
Occupational Pilot:Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/25/2020
Flight Time:  1314 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3.5 hours (Total, this make and model), 978 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 49 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 45, Female
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied:Left 
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/13/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  159 hours (Total, all aircraft), 17 hours (Total, this make and model), 17 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N140AB
Model/Series: 140 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1951
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: 15703
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/14/2020, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 10434 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-200A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGKY, 630 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time:0653 CDT 
Direction from Accident Site: 52°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 150°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:Arlington, TX (GKY) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Fort Worth, TX (FWS)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0730 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: ARLINGTON MUNI (GKY)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 628 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6080 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire:None 
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.663889, -97.094167 (est)