Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Rix Rocket, N959Z: Incident occurred October 04, 2017 near Mount Sterling Municipal Airport (I63) , Brown County, Illinois

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Illinois

Aircraft force landed on a road.


http://registry.faa.gov/N959Z


Date: 04-OCT-17
Time: 20:00:00Z
Regis#: N959Z
Aircraft Make: RIX
Aircraft Model: ROCKET
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MOUNT STERLING
State: ILLINOIS









Brown County, IL - Brown County, Illinois, emergency management said authorities responded to an emergency plane landing Wednesday evening on a highway north of Mt. Sterling.

Emergency Management Director Curt Hannig said the plane landed on IL 99, approximately 1.5 miles north of Mt. Sterling. The Brown County Sheriff's Office stated they were called to the incident at 5 p.m.

"It was a small, private plane that landed just north of the golf course," Hannig said. "But they landed safely."

Hannig said the sheriff's office went to the scene, along with the airport manager.

The sheriff's office said John Musgrave, 66, of Morris, Illinois, took off from Mt. Sterling Municipal Airport, but had engine problems shortly after takeoff. The sheriff's office said the Musgrave made an emergency landing on IL-99 about two miles north of town.

A witness said he was driving north on IL-99 when he saw the plane coming down a hill going south. He said the pilot got out of the plane and told the witness to call 911.

"I came over the hill and saw the plane coming right at me," the witness said. "I'm just glad the pilot is alright and nobody was injured."

The sheriff's office said there was no damage to the plane or the road. They said the road was blocked for two hours so the plane could be towed back to the airport.

Brown County Sheriff Karl Groesch said the Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the incident.

Story and photo gallery ➤ http://www.wgem.com

New England Patriots take first flight on their new plane; head to Tampa for Thursday night game



WARWICK, R.I. (AP) — The New England Patriots are celebrating the inaugural flight of their very own Boeing 767 — and they hope it brings good luck after their early season struggles.

The team will be at T.F. Green Airport in Rhode Island on Wednesday before heading to Florida, where they play the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Thursday.

They'll take their customized aircraft, which is painted with the team's logo and red-white-and-blue colors, and includes the Pats' five Lombardi trophies painted on the tail.

In a video the team posted online, Jim Nolan, chief operating officer of Gillette Stadium, explained the team can now bring all their people and equipment on every trip. He said they've installed the widest and largest seats the plane can handle, and added five inches of legroom beyond a typical first-class seat.

The team has two of the planes and will use one as a backup.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.eagletribune.com

U.S. Air Force contradicts report of involvement with package that fell from plane

WAYNE TOWNSHIP, OH (FOX19) -  The Ohio State Highway Patrol said a package that fell from a plane over Warren County on Wednesday belonged to the U.S. Air Force. The U.S. Air Force says this is not true.

A bomb squad, state police, and Warren County deputies were called to the 6700 block of Furnas-Oglesby Road early Wednesday. Construction workers told police they'd seen a package fall from a low-flying plane around 10:20 a.m.

Wednesday afternoon, OSHP officials said the package belonged to the U.S. Air Force, and that the USAF had retrieved the property.

The U.S. Air Force says not only didn't they retrieve it, the package does not belong to them.

No details have been released as to what was in the package.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.fox19.com

Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport (KPKB) manager prepares for departure

WILLIAMSTOWN — Although he’ll be working alongside incoming Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Airport Manager Glen Kelly over the next month, current Manager Jeff McDougle had his final regular meeting with the Wood County Airport Authority Tuesday.

“I wanted to thank you guys for all your support for the last four years. It’s gone by fast,” said McDougle, whose last day will be Nov. 3. “We’ve got a lot accomplished; there’s a lot to do, and you’ve got a great guy coming in.”

“Thank you for all that you’ve done,” authority President Bill Richardson said. “We’re in the black.”

The airport had $283,000 in debt when McDougle came aboard four years ago. The last of that debt was retired in July 2016 when the airport paid off the remainder of a $184,882.64 note provided by United Bank in 2013 to pay off another line of credit without refinancing at a higher rate.

Kelly, a retired Army colonel who started at the airport in mid-September after a five-month stint as Washington County’s Emergency Management Agency director, said he appreciates the opportunity to “come to a place that’s so well-run.”

Kelly said he plans to stay in touch with McDougle and draw on the expertise of authority member Terry Moore, also a former airport manager, and the employees.

“Institutional knowledge is priceless,” he said.

Kelly said the top priority for the airport is providing a safe landing environment for pilots. The airport has done that, he said, and Kelly wants to maintain that quality while also boosting economic development efforts.

He and McDougle will be working over the next few weeks with Lumos Networks on a right-of-way agreement. The company wants to place approximately 5,700 feet of fiberoptic lines and some poles on airport property for a project to provide service to Memorial Health System facilities on both sides of the Ohio River, Lumos representatives at Tuesday’s meeting said.

McDougle said he’d rather work out a deal for high-speed Internet service at the airport than receive a payment for the rights of way.

“The airport really does need it up here,” he said, noting the airport, Via Air, the control tower and River Road Investments, which has a hangar at the airport, could all benefit. He described the airport’s current DSL Internet service as slow and cumbersome.

Robert Legg, outside plant manager for engineering with Lumos, said a conduit running under the runway could cut down on a lot of the expense for the airport. McDougle said just getting permission to do that would take a long time.

In other business, enplanements were down to 306 in September, the lowest monthly tally since March. McDougle said there were six flights canceled in the month, all due to mechanical issues, but nowhere near as many as in January and February, when enplanements didn’t top 180.

For the quarter, there were eight more enplanements than during the same period last year, the final three months of Silver Airways’ service to Cleveland Hopkins International Airport.

McDougle said Via Air’s service to Orlando and St. Augustine, Fla., by way of Charlotte Douglas International Airport, remains popular. Passengers from Columbus and Akron have flown out of the airport in recent weeks due to the price, he said.

Nearly 11,000 gallons more of fuel were sold in September than during the same month in 2016. McDougle said a variety of factors contributed to those figures.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.mariettatimes.com

Lockheed Martin T-50A Reaches 100 Flights in Greenville, South Carolina



GREENVILLE, S.C., Oct. 4, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Lockheed Martin Corp. achieved a new milestone this week as the T-50A aircraft flew its 100th sortie at the Greenville, South Carolina, facility. This flight continues to demonstrate the company's low-risk, Ready Now approach to the Advanced Pilot Training (APT) competition.

Flight operations began at the Greenville site in November 2016 as the team worked toward a March 2017 proposal deadline and submission of the required flight test data at the end of June.

"We've met the U.S. Air Force flight test requirements for the proposal, however our flight operations team continues to produce a regular rhythm of sorties to keep the pilots proficient, the aircraft operational and ensure we're prepared to ramp up operations on day one of a decision," said Doug Batista, T-50A program director.

"This particular flight in TX-2, included simulated air-to-air engagements, simulated air-to-surface attacks, and instrument proficiency training," said Elliott "Hemo" Clemence, Lockheed Martin test pilot.

In February 2016, Lockheed Martin announced its plans to offer the T-50A in the APT competition and build the aircraft at a final assembly and checkout (FACO) facility in Greenville. Lockheed Martin formally unveiled its T-50A FACO and operations center in August 2016.

The T-50A is ready on day one of contract award and is purpose-built around 5th Generation thinking. It will train the F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II pilots of tomorrow, as well as pilots for frontline 4th Generation aircraft. The T-50A builds upon the proven heritage of the T-50 family of aircraft with more than 150 T-50s flying today – 150,000 flight hours and counting – and more than 2,000 pilots who have trained in this aircraft.

Lockheed Martin's accompanying T-50A Ground-Based Training System features innovative technologies that deliver an immersive, synchronized ground-based training platform. The T-50A team also brings extensive experience in world-class, worldwide logistics support.

About Lockheed Martin

Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 97,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.

SOURCE Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company

http://www.lockheedmartin.com

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.prnewswire.com

Cessna 401B, N401HH, Haddock Flying Service Inc: Fatal accident occurred October 04, 2017 in Salters, Williamsburg County, South Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Carolina
Textron; Wichita, Kansas
CMI; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Haddock Flying Service Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N401HH

NTSB Identification: ERA18FA004
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 04, 2017 in Salters, SC
Aircraft: CESSNA 401B, registration: N401HH
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 4, 2017, about 1745 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 401B, N401HH, was destroyed after it impacted terrain while maneuvering near Salters, South Carolina. The commercial pilot and a passenger were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

A witness at the airport reported seeing the airplane takeoff. About 10 minutes later, the pilot made a low pass over the grass strip and then began a steep climb. The witness stated the airplane rolled left, the left wing dropped and the airplane was inverted and descending in a nose low attitude. The airplane's wings were level before it disappeared behind trees. The airplane was located in an open field that was surrounded by trees about 1 mile southwest from the departure airport.

The airplane was examined at the accident site and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path began in trees about 50 ft above the ground, and was oriented about 280° magnetic. The main wreckage came to rest inverted, facing 230° and was consumed by a postcrash fire.

The outboard portion of the left wing was located at the initial tree strike. Fragments of the airframe were located at a second tree strike, about 350 ft from the initial tree strike. The outboard portion of the right wing was located about 320 ft beyond the second tree strike. The main wreckage was about 930 ft from the initial tree strike, the right engine was about 90 ft past the main wreckage.

The flaps and the landing gear were in the up position. Flight control cable continuity was confirmed from the all flight control surfaces to the cockpit area. Flight control cable continuity within the cockpit could not be confirmed due to fire damage. All cockpit instrumentation was destroyed by fire.

The left engine was separated from the nacelle and the wing, and found inverted by the left wing. All six cylinders remained attached at their bases, the cooling fins sustained impact damage. The engine was manually rotated, thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. A borescope inspection of the cylinders revealed the tops of all pistons and all intake and exhaust valves exhibited normal combustion signatures. The propeller separated from the engine at the attachment bolts.

The right engine was separated forward of the main wreckage; it was found inverted and attached to the wing nacelle. All six cylinders remained attached; Nos. 2, 4 and 6 had cooling fin impact damage. The engine was manually rotated and thumb compression was obtained on all cylinders. A borescope inspection of the cylinders revealed the tops of all pistons and all intake and exhaust valves exhibited normal combustion signatures. The propeller was separated from the engine at the propeller flange.

The six-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear equipped airplane was manufactured in 1969. It was powered by two Continental TSIO-520E, 300-horsepower engines, driving McCauley three-bladed, constant speed, full feathering propellers.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane single and multiengine land, and rotorcraft/helicopter ratings. He also held ratings for single and multiengine instrument airplane, and airframe and powerplant mechanic. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration second-class airman medical certificate was issued on July 27, 2017, with the limitation, "must have glasses for near vision." At that time, he reported 15,000 total flight hours.


At 1735, the weather reported at Williamsburg Regional Airport (CKI), Kingstree, South Carolina, about 14 miles north of the accident site, included wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles; scattered clouds at 4,700 ft, scattered clouds at 6,500 ft; temperature 26° C, dew point 17° C, and altimeter 30.28 inches of mercury.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov


Henry Curtis Haddock, a Kingstree native who turned a love of flying into a lifelong career, died on October 4, 2017. He was 66.

Mr. Haddock graduated from Kingstree High School before earning a degree in Aircraft Technology from Florence-Darlington Technical College. As an aircraft mechanic at the Florence airport, Mr. Haddock yearned to get off the ground. At 17, he learned to fly. He earned local notoriety when he built a 1949 Piper Clipper from a “pile of parts” he had purchased.

Alec Taylor of Taylor Helicopters saw potential in the young Mr. Haddock. He offered him his first flying gig, crop dusting with a Cessna “Ag Wagon” in Latta, SC. Several years later Mr. Haddock started his own company, Haddock Flying Service, Inc. The company used Hiller helicopters to spray timber and crops throughout the Southeast.

Mr. Haddock often piloted family and friends to his favorite vacation destination in Eleuthera, Bahamas. They enjoyed SCUBA diving, deep sea fishing, and cooking fresh catch. Over the course of his life, Mr. Haddock flew more than 30,000 hours. On October 4, he flew for the last time.

The youngest son of the late Dargan Carroll Haddock and the late Thelma Brown Haddock, Henry Haddock was a resident of Salters, SC.

He is survived by his wife of 29 years, Stephanie Lynn Haddock; son, Dargan Dewey “Dee” Haddock (Erica), of Pawleys Island; son, Ashley Clayton Haddock (Erin) of Pawleys Island; grandchildren, Henry James Haddock, Mary Clayton Haddock, Clayton Cartwright “Wright” Haddock, and Elizabeth Dargan Haddock; brother, Richard Brown Haddock (Bonita); brother, William Carroll Haddock (Peggy); and many more nieces and nephews.

A celebration of Mr. Haddock’s life will be held at the Haddocks’ hangar located at 1111 Gourdin Rd, Salters, SC on Saturday, October, 21, 2017 at 4:00 p.m. Memorial gifts may be made to Angel Flight Inc., 12345 East Skelly Drive Tulsa, OK  74128.


Wilson Kenneth “Ken” Britton II, 47, of Cameron, SC died Wednesday, October 4, 2017, as a result of injuries received in an airplane accident.

A memorial service will be held on Monday, October 9, 2017 at 11 o’clock AM at James A. Dyal Funeral Home. A gathering of friends and family will follow after the service.

Born March 3, 1970, in Charleston, he was the son of Wilson Kenneth Britton and Brenda Branton Britton of Hollywood, SC. He was a 1993 graduate of Clemson University with a BS degree in Wildlife, Fisheries and Biology. He was quarry manager for Argos US in Harleyville. Ken was an avid hunter and loved to be outdoors. Most importantly, he loved his two children, Madeleine and Wilson and spending time with them.

In addition to his parents of Hollywood, he is survived by his daughter, Madeleine Britton; his son, Wilson Britton, III of Mayesville, SC; his sister, Dixie Ellenberg (Jack); and three nephews, Briar, Britton and Banks Ellenberg, all of Hollywood.

In lieu of flowers and food, memorials may be made to Thomas Sumter Academy Archery Club, 5265 Camden Highway, Rembert, SC 29128. 

A memorial message may be written to the family by visiting our website at www.jamesadyal.com.


ARRANGEMENTS BY JAMES A. DYAL FUNERAL HOME, 303 SOUTH MAIN STREET, SUMMERVILLE, SC 29483



WILLIAMSBURG COUNTY, SC (WCSC) -  Co-workers and family members are remembering a man who piloted a plane that crashed in Williamsburg County. 

The crash happened just before 6 p.m. on Wednesday and took the lives of 66-year-old Henry Haddock and 47-year-old Wilson Kenneth "Ken" Britton II.

"It's just sad," said Charlie Wilkins, a friend of Haddock's."I loved Henry to death. He loved to fly helicopters, planes, whatever, he had them."

The American flag was flying at half-staff on Thursday at Haddock Flying Service in honor of Haddock.

Wilkins grew up with Lynn Haddock, Henry's wife. 

She says she learned about his death over the phone.

"I just am in disbelief," Wilkins said."When Lynn called me and told me I just couldn't believe it. It's very sad."

Wilkins grew up with Lynn Haddock and has known her husband for decades. 

She says he's always loved being a pilot.

"Loved it. Both of his sons fly and I just cannot believe that of all people this happened to Henry," Wilkins said."He was such a good pilot. I really hate that I'm having to come up here because of this."

Wilkins says Haddock's wife is on the way to the Haddock home along with other family members and friends to be each other's support during this tragic time.

"He was a very strong-willed person," Wilkins said."He loved to fly. He's been flying forever. I'm just very shocked and sad that this happened."

Story and video ➤  http://www.live5news.com



SALTERS, SC (WBTW) – First responders were on the scene of a deadly plane crash in the Gridiron community of Williamsburg County Wednesday evening.

The Williamsburg County Coroner’s Office announced Thursday that 66-year-old Henry Haddock of Salters and 47-year-old Kenneth Britton of Summerton died in the crash. Deputy Coroner William Horton says Haddock was the owner and pilot of the plane and both men died from multiple system blunt force trauma.

Investigators with the Williamsburg County Sheriff’s Office confirmed the crash in a video posted to their Facebook page around 8 p.m.

According to the video, officials from the sheriff’s office, the Williamsburg County Fire Department, Williamsburg County EMS and the Williamsburg County Coroner’s Office were on scene in the Salters area.

“This is a fluid situation that is currently going on right now so we ask the public to be patient at this time as we release the information. We’re all working together to try and sort through the crash site,” said Investigator Alex Edwards with the Williamsburg County Sheriff’s Office in the video.

Captain William Horton with the Williamsburg County Fire Department said that units found a column of dark smoke when they arrived on scene about 100 yards off a farm road. When officials got closer, they saw that a twin engine Cessna had crashed and was on fire.

Original article and video ➤ http://wbtw.com




WILLIAMSBURG COUNTY, SC (WMBF) – The investigation into a deadly plane crash in Williamsburg County will continue Thursday.

The Williamsburg County Fire Department responded to the crash in the Greeleyville area around 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, according to a news release from the department.


When crews arrived at the scene just off of US Highway 52, close to the Santee River and the Berkeley County line, they reported a column of dark smoke about 100 yards from the farm road used to get to the scene.


Fire crews walked to the crash site where they found the Cessna 401B on fire, according to Captain William Horton with the Williamsburg County Fire Department. The fire was extinguished and the scene was secured.  


According to a video post on the Williamsburg County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page that appeared at some time after 8 p.m., the crash happened in the Gourdin community of the county.


Williamsburg County Deputy Coroner William Horton III confirmed there are two fatalities in the Cessna 401B plane crash. Their remains were sent to the Medical University of South Carolina for autopsies and for identification.  


The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board each have teams on the way to determine a cause for the crash. Until their arrival, local agencies will remain on the scene to keep it secure, according to Captain Horton.


The Williamsburg County Fire Department, EMS, Coroner’s Office and the Williamsburg County Sheriff’s Department were all on the scene for several hours Wednesday afternoon. 


Original article and video ➤ http://www.wmbfnews.com




WILLIAMSBURG COUNTY, SC (WCSC) -  Authorities say two people were killed in a plane crash in Williamsburg County Wednesday evening. 

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a Cessna 401B with two people on board crashed near Greeleyville around 6 p.m.

Officials with the Williamsburg County Sheriff's Office say the incident was in the Gourdin area of the county off of Highway 375. First units on the scene saw a column of dark smoke about 100 yards from the farm road used to access the scene according to Williamsburg County Fire Department captain William Horton. 

WCSO Investigator Alex Edwards said emergency dispatch crews received a call around 5:45 p.m. about a possible crash. 

According to Edwards, when first responders arrived they discovered that two people were in the plane and attempted to render aid, but flames from the wreckage hindered their efforts.

The sheriff's office says it appeared the plane clipped trees on its descent before crashing. 

"It's a very tragic event, our hearts and prayers go out to the families," Edwards said Wednesday night."It's very overwhelming to see something like this. We're very sad about this incident." 

The coroner's office says the deceased have been transported to the Medical University of South Carolina for an autopsy and identification.  

"The  Federal Aviation Administration will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident,"  Federal Aviation Administration officials said. 

The Williamsburg Fire Department, Coroner's Office, and Sheriff's Office will be assisting the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board in the evidence gathering and investigation beginning Thursday according to Williamsburg Fire Captain William Horton

Story, video, photo gallery ➤ http://www.live5news.com

A small airplane with two people on board crashed near the Williamsburg-Berkeley County line early Wednesday night, the Federal Aviation Administration confirmed.

The crash was reported around 6 p.m. near Greeleyville, the Federal Aviation Administration said. The airplane, a Cessna 401B, was carrying two people.

Federal officials refered to local authorities for information on the crash victims' conditions.

Representatives from the Williamsburg County Sheriff's Office and the County Fire Department could not be reached.

The  Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine its probable cause.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.postandcourier.com

Williamsburg County, S.C. (WPDE) — A plane has crashed off of Highway 375 in the Gridiron community of Williamsburg County, according to Alex Edwards, an investigator with the Williamsburg County Sheriff's Office.

Edwards said EMS and fire officials were already on scene as of 7 p.m.

In a post on the Williamsburg County Sheriff's Office Facebook page around 8 p.m, a WCSO investigator said Williamsburg County Fire Department, Williamsburg County EMS, and the Williamsburg County Coroner were all still at scene of the crash.

Investigators said the situation is "fluid" and they are asking for patience from area residents as they "sort through the crash site."

WCSO officials said the crash was deadly.

Information about the identity or identities of those who died will be released by the coroner's office at a later time. 

Story, video and photos ➤ http://wpde.com




WILLIAMSBURG COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — Two people have died after the small plane they were aboard crashed crashed in rural Williamsburg County on Wednesday, officials say.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the Cessna 401B aircraft crashed near Greeleyville at around 6 p.m.

The Williamsburg County Sheriff’s Office says the crash is nearer to the Gourdin community near the town of Lane, a few miles north of the Berkeley County-Williamsburg County line.

Alex Edwards, public information officer for the Williamsburg County Sheriff's Office, says the plane went down in a swampy area off S.C. Hwy. 375., and the two people aboard have died.

Edwards says crews from the sheriff’s office and Williamsburg County Fire-Rescue are on the scene, and first responders are trying to maneuver through heavily wooded areas to the crash site.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://abcnews4.com

Atlantic County plans for new aviation school at Atlantic City International Airport (KACY), Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey



EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP — Atlantic City International Airport will soon be the home of a new aviation maintenance academy. 

Atlantic County announced Wednesday it will partner with Atlantic Cape Community College to create an aviation maintenance, repair and overhaul training institute at the airport that will train students to fix planes for small and major airlines around the country.

The program will take one to two years to be developed by Atlantic Cape with technical support from the county, according to college President Barbara Gaba.

“We have the facility and the interest. What we are lacking is a professionally trained workforce to support this field,” County Executive Dennis Levinson said in a statement, adding the county has had discussions with several airlines interested in participating. “We plan to take advantage of our assets to build an aviation industry. This is yet another step in that direction that should bring good-paying jobs to our region and help us diversify our economy beyond gaming.”

The idea of creating an aviation maintenance academy has been discussed by county officials for more than a year. Last year, the county looked to partner with Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology, located in New York, to create the school, but the plans remained stagnant.

Gaba said Atlantic Cape has worked with Vaughn College in the past, but it is too early to determine what institutions they will partner with for this project.

Both organizations, along with the county, will work to secure funding for implementation and operation of an FAA-approved program.

This initiative is fully supported by the South Jersey Transportation Authority, according to the county. The SJTA operates and maintains the airport and has looked to expand its use in the past. 

The aviation academy will prepare students for FAA certification and provide a foundation for an associate of applied science degree in aviation maintenance with the ability to transfer into a variety of four-year programs, according to a statement from the county. 




Gaba said those in the program will be Atlantic Cape students and they will be available for the same financial-aid opportunities current students have. The FAA will determine the requirements to be accepted in the program. 

Creating an aviation industry was a key element in a report authored by Texas-based economic firm Angelou Economics in 2015 that urged Atlantic County to diversify its economy away from gambling in the wake of five casinos closing in Atlantic City. 

A 2015 Boeing technical outlook forecasts the need for more than 609,000 maintenance technicians during the next 17 years.

The creation of the maintenance program would go along with the building of the Stockton Aviation Research and Technology Park, which the county broke ground on earlier this year. 

“We see this as a tremendous opportunity and are very appreciative of Atlantic Cape President Dr. Barbara Gaba and her team for their shared vision in moving this forward,” Levinson said in the statement. “Aviation maintenance and repair-technician careers should appeal to both our youth as well as those who may be currently underemployed or unemployed.”

Story, comments, photos ➤ http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com

VERIFY: Can a drone fly over my backyard?



Our VERIFY team gets the answers to your questions. A viewer emailed us to ask: can a drone fly over my backyard?

It's a question a lot of people have, especially as drones get more popular.

We looked up the Federal Aviation Administration rules, called Mark Sutton from RM6 Aviation -- they train drone pilots, and talked to our own drone pilot, Sebastian Robertson.

You need to know there are two sets of rules -- one for people flying for fun and one for commercial drones like the one we use at WFAA.

"As a hobbyist, you can fly it pretty much anywhere you have permission to fly," Sutton said.

For the  Federal Aviation Administration that means:

At or below 400 feet
Away from airports and no-fly zones
You can't fly over stadiums, sporting events, or groups of people
No flying over emergency response efforts

Other than that, you're good to go.

"It's not illegal for them to fly over your house or in your neighborhood," Sutton explained. "If they're landing on your property that's a different story."

Sebastian told us the same thing. He went through extensive training to be licensed to fly our station drone. The same rules apply to him -- in fact, they're even more strict for commercial pilots.

Now, when it comes to privacy -- legally the owner of the drone can't share or display any photos or video of your private property without your consent.

Sutton knows people worry about this, but he had this to say, "it's not really any different than if someone just had their iPhone out. You're not going to do any in-depth surveillance other than if you're up in the air you'd be able to see inside the fence."

You're totally within your rights to complain about drones to your homeowner's association or the police, but they might not be able to do much about it.

Keep in mind -- you can't shoot down a drone.

So, we can VERIFY -- yes -- drones are allowed to fly over your backyard.

SOURCES:

Federal Aviation Administration
Mark Sutton, RM6 Aviation
Sebastian Robertson, WFAA Drone Pilot

Story and video ➤ http://www.wfaa.com

Notice a helicopter hovering around Honolulu? Here's why



HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

Notice a helicopter hovering around Honolulu lately?

State Department of Transportation spokesman Tim Sakahara said a chopper has doing survey work over the past few days. 

Many viewers, from Waikiki to as far as the Punchbowl area, reported seeing the low-flying helicopter for at least 30 minutes at a time.

Sakahara could not confirm further details about its work because the Department of Transportation does not have jurisdiction over helicopters, flight plans or airspace.

The Federal Aviation Administration, which does have jurisdiction over those areas, also did not provide further details about what the helicopter is doing. 

Sakahara did say, however, that the Federal Aviation Administration told him the helicopter is following all the rules even if it appears to be flying low.

Ian Gregor, public affairs manager for the Federal Aviation Administration, said a pilot wouldn’t need a permit from the Federal Aviation Administration to operate in a certain area, but the pilot would need verbal clearance to enter an area around a major airport such as the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport.

The helicopter is expected to be out in the sky again on Wednesday afternoon, Sakahara said. 

Original article ➤ http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com

Fisher Horizon 2, N428AP: Fatal accident occurred October 04, 2017 near Flying Cloud Airport (KFCM), Eden Prairie, Hennepin County, Minnesota

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N428AP

NTSB Identification: CEN18FA003
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 04, 2017 in Eden Prairie, MN
Aircraft: SCHAFFER Fisher Horizon 2, registration: N428AP
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 4, 2017, at 1108 central daylight time, N428AP, an amateur built Schaffer Fisher Horizon 2 airplane, collided with terrain in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. The private rated pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a postimpact fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual flight rules conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and a flight plan had not been filed. The local flight departed from the Flying Cloud Airport (FCM), Eden Prairie, Minnesota, about 1103.

According to the FCM control tower controller, the pilot had departed on runway 28R. Several witnesses reported seeing the airplane takeoff and just prior to the impact. Witnesses on the airport that saw the takeoff, reported the airplane was "unstable" during the takeoff. They described the airplane pitching up and down, and banking as it climbed out. One witness stated he was able to see the top of the wings as if the airplane was straight up and down before it made a turn to the southeast. Other witnesses who saw the airplane just before the impact reported the airplane was a in a steep nose down, left descending spiral. The witnesses reported seeing the airplane complete between 1 ½ and 3 spirals before it descended below the trees. Several witnesses reported hearing the airplane engine sound. The FCM controller also reported the pilot had aborted a previous takeoff attempt, just prior to the accident flight. The reason for the aborted takeoff is unknown.

The initial impact point was in the parking lot on the south side of the Resurrection Life Church located on Glory Lane, Eden Prairie, Minnesota. The wreckage debris path from the first impact to the main wreckage was on a magnetic heading of 30°. The initial ground impact consisted of scrape marks on the asphalt. About 20 feet further along the path was a gouge mark in the pavement which contained numerous pieces of splintered wood. The right wing was located wrapped around a light pole about 210' from the initial impact. Further along the wreckage path were the burned fuel tanks, the engine, what remained of the cockpit/fuselage, the empennage, and lastly the propeller hub. The wreckage from the right wing to the end of the wreckage path was mostly destroyed by fire. Pieces of the splintered composite propeller blade, plexiglass, and wood were scattered along the entire wreckage path.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov


Schaffer, Philip Anthony Age 77, of Richfield passed away on October 4, 2017. He was preceded in death by his parents, John "Anthony" & Helen, brother Daniel. He is survived by his wife, Rosemary; children, John, Rhonda, & Michael (Jessica). Philip retired from the United States Postal Service and began teaching violin and piano to students of all ages. He had a passion for flight which included building his own plane over the course of 20 plus years. He enjoyed camping, fishing, and traveling with his family. Funeral service will be Monday October 16, 11 AM at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, 4573 3rd Ave S, Minneapolis. Visitation Sunday October 15 from 4-7 PM at Gill Brothers Funeral Home, 5801 Lyndale Ave S, Minneapolis, and 1 hour prior to Mass at the church. 



EDEN PRAIRIE — The pilot who was killed in a plane crash behind Resurrection Church in Eden Prairie on Wednesday, Oct. 4, has been identified as Philip A. Schaffer of Richfield.

The Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office confirmed the identity on Thursday, Oct. 5. 

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash and will issue a preliminary report within seven to 10 days after the incident. The full investigation will take one to two years to complete before a final probable cause report is released, said Eric Weiss, NTSB spokesman. 

The Hennepin County Sheriff's Office, Minnesota State Patrol and Metropolitan Airports Commission and Eden Prairie Police Department assisted with the initial crash investigation. 

Emergency personnel were called to Eden Prairie's Resurrection Life Church, 16394 Glory Lane, at 11:10 a.m. Oct. 4 after Schaffer's Fisher Horizon 2 airplane crashed in the church's parking lot. He was the only person on board, according to the Eden Prairie Police Department. 

Shortly after taking off at Flying Cloud Airport, about 1 1/2 miles southeast, Schaffer reported a fire on the plane, A witness told authorities the plane was circling the area before the crash, Eden Prairie Police Lt. Bill Wyffels said Wednesday. 

Eden Prairie resident Abi Conner was driving on Eden Prairie Road around 11:05 a.m. to go home with her son and stopped at the intersection with Minnesota Highway 5 to make a left turn. As she waited for the light to change, she looked up and saw a white plane flying close to the ground. 

"It was so close to the trees. I thought it was a cool trick," she said, adding that she then realized something was wrong. The plane turned sideways and plummeted straight toward the ground. 

People sitting in traffic around her didn't move even after the traffic light changed. Conner looked at a car next to her and the woman was staring straight ahead with her jaw dropped. They could see black smoke billowing from the area where the plane had gone down, she said. 

"I was hoping it wasn't what i thought it was," she said.

She started to dial 911 but then saw several emergency vehicles rushing toward the scene. "It's not something you expect to see in real life," Conner said.

Police asked drivers to stay away from the scene by Eden Prairie Road and Glory Lane, which is a little north of Highway 212.  Wyffels said they were allowing limited access at the church to community members who use it. 

FAA online registry records indicate the Fisher Horizon 2 is an amateur-built experimental aircraft. Schaffer was a member of a Twin Cities-based chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association, according to the chapter's website. 

The last fatal plane crash in Eden Prairie was in August 2009 when pilot Wayne Monson, 53, of Hibbing and Rivka Chayka-Lev, 29, of Apple Valley were killed in a crash that occurred next to the historic Cummins-Phipps-Grill house, 13800 Pioneer Trail. The National Transportation Safety Board cited pilot lack of experience and partial engine loss as the cause in its 2011 report on the incident.





EDEN PRAIRIE — Emergency personnel were called to Eden Prairie's Resurrection Life Church at 11:10 a.m. Wednesday, after a small experimental airplane crashed in its parking lot.

One person on board, the pilot, is reported dead, according to Eden Prairie Police Lt. Bill Wyffels.

Shortly after taking off at Flying Cloud Airport, located about 1-1/2 miles southeast, the pilot reported a fire on the plane, A witness told authorities the plane was circling the area before the crash, Wyffels said, at a Wednesday afternoon press briefing.

Eden Prairie resident Abi Conner was driving on Eden Prairie Road around 11:05 a.m. to go home with her son and stopped at the intersection with Minnesota Highway 5 to make a left turn. As she waited for the light to change, she looked up and saw a white plane flying close to the ground. 

"It was so close to the trees. I thought it was a cool trick," she said, adding that she then realized something was wrong. The plane turned sideways and plummeted straight toward the ground. 

People sitting in traffic around her didn't move even after the traffic light changed. Conner looked at a car next to her and the woman was staring straight ahead with her jaw dropped. They could see black smoke billowing from the area where the plane had gone down, she said. 

"I was hoping it wasn't what I thought it was," she said.

She started to dial 911 but then saw several emergency vehicles rushing toward the scene. "It's not something you expect to see in real life," Conner said.

The plane crashed near a wooded area in the church parking lot, at 16394 Glory Lane, according to Wyffels. There were no other injuries or property damage caused by the crash.

 Police have asked drivers to stay away from the scene by Eden Prairie Road and Glory Lane, which is a little north of Highway 212.  Wyffels said they will allow limited access at the church to community members who use it. 

The Federal Aviation Administration is already at the site of the crash, according to Patrick Hogan, Metropolitan Airports Commission spokesperson.

The Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office, State Patrol and Metropolitan Airports Commission are assisting Eden Prairie Police with the initial crash investigation and the Hennepin County Medical Examiner will identify the victim, according to the Eden Prairie Police.

The last fatal plane crash in Eden Prairie was in August 2009 when pilot Wayne Monson, 53, of Hibbing and Rivka Chayka-Lev, 29, of Apple Valley were killed in a crash that occurred next to the historic Cummins-Phipps-Grill house, 13800 Pioneer Trail. The National Transportation Safety Board cited pilot lack of experience and partial engine loss as the cause in its 2011 report on incident.


Story, video and photo gallery ➤ http://www.swnewsmedia.com



Emergency crews walk by the wreckage of a small plane that crashed in the parking lot of Resurrection Life Church in Eden Prairie.

A small airplane caught fire and crashed late Wednesday morning in a church parking lot shortly after leaving Flying Cloud Airport in Eden Prairie, killing the pilot.

Police and fire personnel were on the scene, where the plane crashed in a wooded area next to the Resurrection Life Church parking lot at 16394 Glory Lane. That's just north of Hwy. 212 and 2½ miles from the airport.

Law enforcement asked motorists stay clear of the area. Authorities say the pilot was the only fatality.

"We did hear information from the airport that they did say there was a fire on board," said Police Lt. Bill Wyffels.

A witness "saw the plane go into a circle right before it went down," Wyffels added.

The heavily mangled and charred wreckage outside the church sent gray smoke skyward that nearby traffic control cameras picked up. Authorities including the Minnesota State Patrol and Eden Prairie police were on the scene, where a large piece of debris was wrapped around a lamppost and a red screen was set up, shielding the wreckage.

There were no passengers and no other injuries or property damage resulting from the crash.

"It is fortunate that it did not hit a building and landed in the parking lot," Wyffels said. "There were no cars in close proximity."

Federal Aviation Administration records show that the Fisher Horizon 2 aircraft is an "experimental ... amateur built" plane with one engine. It is owned by a man from Richfield, according to the FAA's aircraft registry, but authorities have yet to disclose any information about the person on board.

In 2006, the man joined Chapter 25 of the Experimental Aircraft Association and noted in a newsletter want ad then that he was in the market for instruments for an aircraft project he was working on "almost daily."

Along with the FAA, the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the crash.

Authorities said an employee at an electrical company across the street from the crash saw the plane circling twice before it crashed. Chad Willard, an assistant funeral director at nearby Huber Funeral Home & Cremation, said he was in his office when he heard the crash.

"It was an impact and then the explosion; it was out of the ordinary," said Willard, who went outside to see the debris and flames. He said he did not hear any engine sound before the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.startribune.com





EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. - Authorities say one person was killed when a small plane crashed in an Eden Prairie church parking lot Wednesday morning.

Eden Prairie police Lt. Bill Wyffels says they received the call at 11:10 a.m. Wyffels says shortly after takeoff, Flying Cloud Airport said they got a report that a small single engine aircraft had a fire on board.

The plane crashed near a wooded area in the parking lot of Resurrection Life Church, about one and a half miles northwest of the airport.

Police say the pilot was killed, and no one else was on board. Metropolitan Airports Commission Spokesperson Patrick Hogan says the plane was an experimental aircraft.

"It is fortunate that it did not hit a building," Wyffels said. "It landed in the parking lot, there was no cars close proximity that it even damaged and everything was contained within the parking lot. So that part was fortunate, but it is an unfortunate event."

Wyffels said because the plane started on fire, there's too much damage to determine the make and model at this point.

A witness told police they saw the aircraft circling right before it went down.

Eden Prairie Police and Fire, and the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office assisted at the scene. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating.

No roads in the area appeared to be closed, and Wyffels says police are working with the church to give that community limited access to the building.

"They've been very helpful for us today," he said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kare11.com






MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Authorities say one person is dead after a small plane crashed in a parking lot in the west Twin Cities metro Wednesday morning.

Eden Prairie police and fire responded to the crash at about 11:08 a.m. Police were notified of a pilot on an in-flight plane reporting a fire on board. Authorities say it was a small, single-engine aircraft and it crashed near Eden Prairie Road and Glory Lane. The location was in a wooded area in the parking lot of Resurrection Life Church.

A spokesperson with the city of Eden Prairie said the pilot was killed in the crash and was the lone occupant of the plane. The pilot has not been identified.

The Eden Prairie Police Department is being assisted at the scene by the Metropolitan Airports Commission, Federal Aviation Administration, Minnesota State Patrol, Hennepin County Crime Lab, National Transportation Safety board and Hennepin County Medical Examiner.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://minnesota.cbslocal.com





An experimental aircraft crashed Wednesday morning shortly after taking off from Flying Cloud Airport. The pilot, who'd reported a fire on board just after 11 a.m., is dead, police say.

Eden Prairie police and fire units responded in the morning to a report of a plane down at Eden Prairie Road and Glory Lane, just north of Minnesota Highway 212. They found the wreckage in the parking lot of Resurrection Life Church.

Radio traffic between the pilot and the Flying Cloud tower indicated the pilot was attempting a takeoff and landing maneuver.

Eden Prairie police Lt. Bill Wyffels said a witness told officers the plane was circling above the crash site shortly before it went down. The plane, he added, did not hit the church or any other building, and damage was contained to the parking lot.

There were no passengers and no other injuries or property damage resulting from the crash, the department said.

The pilot's name was not released. The Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office is expected to identify the victim later.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate. The NTSB identified the plane as a Fisher Horizon II, an experimental craft that is purchased as a kit and intended to be built by the owner.

In 2009, two people died when a small plane crashed on the grounds of a historical farmstead outside Minneapolis shortly after taking off from Flying Cloud.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.mprnews.org