Thursday, August 20, 2015

Bristow helicopter crash: Funeral mass for Peter Bello holds without corpse

First Officer Peter Bello, of Nigeria



A church service in honor of pilot Peter Bello of the Bristow helicopter that crashed Aug. 12 at a Lagos lagoon was held in Calabar on Thursday.

The service was held at St Patrick’s Church, Ikot Ansa, for the 26-year-old pilot, the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) reports.

The Parish Priest, Rev. Father Patrick Cochran, who drew his Bible reading from John 14:1-6, admonished Christians to continue to have faith in God, in spite of challenges.

Cochran also consoled the family of the deceased and urged them to be thankful to God that their son died a Christian.

“At this period of your mourning, I urge you to take heart and pray fervently for the soul of the young pilot to rest with the lord,’’ he said.

NAN reports that the corpse was not brought to the church for reasons the family said were personal, yet the service attracted dignitaries from all walks of life.

Efforts by NAN to speak with the parents of the late pilot yielded no result as they both declined comments.

However, Mrs Femi Bello, a relative of the deceased, said that death took the young pilot too early, when his services were most needed at Bristow.

She prayed for the soul of Bello to rest in peace.

A family friend, Mrs Theresa Okon, said that the late Bello was a celebrated pilot, diligent and dedicated to his job.

Okon enjoined the family of the deceased to be courageous and be consoled by the fact that their son left a trade mark in his profession.

Late Bello was the co-pilot of the Bristow helicopter 5N-BDG that crashed with 12 passengers on board, leaving six dead.

He was born on the July 4, 1989 in Calabar to the family of Mr and Mrs Peter Bello (Snr.), who all hails from Cross River.

He gained employment as a trainee pilot with Bristow Helicopters in 2013 and got his flying licence in 2014.

Source:  http://dailypost.ng

Stinson L-5E Sentinel, N944LB : Accident occurred August 20, 2015 at Tucson International Airport (KTUS), Arizona

NTSB Identification: GAA15CA249
Accident occurred Thursday, August 20, 2015 in Tucson, AZ
Aircraft: STINSON L 5E, registration: N944LB

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Date: 20-AUG-15
Time: 19:56:00Z
Regis#: N944LB
Aircraft Make: STINSON
Aircraft Model: L5
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Activity: Personal
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07
City: TUCSON
State: Arizona

AIRCRAFT GROUND LOOPED AFTER LANDING, TUCSON, AZ.

WESLEY B.  DAVIS: http://registry.faa.gov/N944LB




TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -  A small plane crashed at the Tucson International Airport on Thursday afternoon. 

One person was on board, but no injuries were reported, according to a tweet from TIA. 

The plane was a Stinson L-5E Sentinel. 

The aircraft has since been moved and the runway has been reopened. 

Story and photo: http://www.tucsonnewsnow.com




Richland County Sheriff's Department suspended from military surplus program

wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina

RICHLAND COUNTY, SC (WIS) - The Richland County Sheriff's Department is suspended from a federal military surplus program after Sheriff Leon Lott traded two airplanes that were not his to trade, according to federal court documents.

Now, the department is at risk of losing millions of dollars of equipment all because of those two planes. The Defense Logistics Agency is part of the U.S. Department of Defense, and an office with that agency runs the 1033 program that lends out surplus military equipment to civilian law enforcement agencies.

The trade

The C-23 Sherpa is an aircraft capable of higher altitudes and longer distances than helicopters. It's a plane primarily used to transport troops, but also an aircraft that the Richland County Sheriff's Department was, at one point, interested in. It's also a plane that legal expert Dr. Greg Adams says has landed Richland County and Lott in hot water with the federal government.

"Very serious trouble, which could make a huge difference in the budget of the Richland County Sheriff's Department," said Adams, who is a law professor at the University of South Carolina.

Court documents say, back in June 2013, the Department of Defense provided two Sherpas to Richland County as part of the federal government's 1033 program, a program that transfers excess military equipment like guns, armored vehicles, and aircraft to law enforcement agencies.

A court filing submitted by the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois says, just six days after getting the planes, Lott made an "Exchange and Use Agreement" with Win Win Aviation, a private aviation company west of Chicago, to swap the two Sherpas, and eventually their titles, for one Cessna Stationair. The contract says the Cessna is an aircraft "better suited for most operations conducted by the Department than the Sherpas, including drug surveillance and interdiction."

"Unless you have a lot of experience in that area with those kinds of transactions, it's difficult to foresee what can go wrong," Adams said. 

The trade did go wrong.

The U.S. government says it wasn't aware of the swap until roughly a year and a half later in January 2015. Court filings say the Federal Aviation Administration notified the feds of the possible misuse. In those documents, the government contends the two Sherpa aircraft are still U.S. government property and have always been U.S. government property, adding that Lott violated a "Memorandum of Agreement" by "improperly" trading the planes to a private company.

"It's like if your daddy lets you borrow his pick-up truck, and you took it down to Honest John's used car lot and traded it for a fancy convertible, because that'd be more fun to drive. Daddy's not going to be very happy with that, and that is what the situation is right here," Adams said.

In fact, the first page of the memorandum submitted as evidence by the U.S. Attorney reads, "Property will not be obtained for the purpose of sale, lease, rent, exchange {or} barter."

At the request of the federal government, the Richland County Sheriff's Department e-mailed the private company demanding the planes be returned to Columbia.

"Failure to comply with this request will result in the de-registration of these aircrafts," an attorney for the Sheriff's Department wrote in an e-mail this past February to Win Win Aviation.

But Win Win fought back with a lawsuit.

"This is the sort of case where the facts are clear, the law is clear, and the parties, I'm sure, will work out a settlement that's to everyone's advantage," Adams said.

In the suit, Win Win says it spent more than $1 million on modifications and upgrades on the two Sherpa planes after trading the Cessna to Lott in the seemingly legitimate agreement. Win Win, which contracts out planes to members of the public and branches of the military, says without the Sherpas it'll have to cancel agreements with clients. Win Win says if the government takes back the planes, it'll cause "irreparable harm" to the company's business operations.

"Win Win is also saying that Sheriff Lott told Win Win that he had already gotten approval from the government for this transaction. The government disputes that," Adams said.

For now, Richland County and Lott can't get any more rifles, armored vehicles, or airplanes from the federal government because the Richland County Sheriff's Department has been suspended from the government program that gives them the excess military equipment.

Currently, the federal government's Law Enforcement Support Office is reviewing whether the Sheriff's Department should be removed from suspension or be terminated from the program altogether. If Richland County is terminated from the program, the planes would only be one of their worries, because they'd have to give back everything they've ever received as part of the program, including guns, armored vehicles, and a helicopter.

The latest court filings indicate a settlement is in the works.

Lott says he couldn't do an interview, however, he sent a statement.

It is not appropriate for me to publicly discuss this issue in that it is still in litigation and we are waiting for a judge to sign off on the negotiated agreement, which we expect in the very near future. I can say though that at no time did the Richland County Sheriff's Department do anything illegal or improper. 

All equipment obtained by RCSD through the 1033 program remains in our possession and is used for the safety and security of Richland County citizens and our law enforcement partners. We remain a big supporter of the 1033 program and are very grateful for the equipment we have obtained over the years. We will continue to participate in the 1033 program for the benefit of our citizens and deputies.

Lott disputes the federal government's claim that he traded the planes only "six days" after getting them, adding the planes were traded after receiving them in February 2013 – four months earlier than court documents suggest.

Story, comments. video and photo gallery: http://www.wistv.com

Flight Diverted - Because Air Traffic Controller Went Home

Glenys Hanna Martin

Transport and Aviation Minister Glenys Hanna Martin yesterday accused members of the Bahamas Air Traffic Controllers Union of “strong arming” aviation officials after an international flight to Grand Bahama was diverted to the Lynden Pindling International Airport amid disputes about overtime pay.

According to reports, a Sunwing Airlines flight carrying 186 passengers was 15 minutes away from Grand Bahama when it had to be diverted to Nassau after an air traffic controller opted not to direct the flight in because it would have arrived past 10pm, when his shift ended.

Mrs Hanna Martin said the union’s recent tactics have been nothing short of a “leveraging act” to get the government to bend to its way in ongoing negotiations.

Earlier this month, air traffic controllers in Grand Bahama gave notice that they would no longer work beyond the 10pm services deadline because they have not been paid overtime owed to them.

In response, the Ministry of Transport and Aviation announced that it would put in place the necessary contingencies to assure that there would be no disruption in services.

Meanwhile, Mrs Hanna Martin said due to the union’s ongoing negotiations with her ministry, she thought members would work in good faith, with both sides working to avoid matters similar to what transpired Tuesday night.

She told The Tribune that BATCU has decided to use its importance to the industry as means to get what it wants.

However, BATCU President Lashan Gray, in a statement released yesterday, said it was “unfortunate” that union members had to take a stand in order for their fundamental rights to be acknowledged.

In an effort to clarify Tuesday night’s incident, Mrs Gray said the Department of Civil Aviation had been contacted Tuesday afternoon by an airline about its late flight. She added that officials are tasked with ensuring that the necessary staff is in place if a flight is due to land after an airport is closed.

Mrs Gray claimed that instead of advising the company of the department’s inability to accommodate the after hours flight, the department encouraged the flight to continue and informed the employees that it would be in before 10pm.

She said non-payment of overtime to air traffic controllers is no new issue within the Department of Civil Aviation, nor the Ministry of Transport & Aviation.

She said: “It is unbelievable that the minister would therefore seek to place the blame at the feet of the employee where the Bahamas government seeks to continue in its abuse and disregard of the Bahamian workers and the very laws they themselves legislated.

“The Bahamas Air Traffic Controllers’ Union will not continue to allow foreign interests and convenience to trump the fundamental rights and dignity of our members.

“It is unfortunate that the government’s negligence has led to an international airline being inconvenienced, especially where these airlines are charged overtime fees for the very services the government refuses to pay.

“Nonetheless, members of the Bahamas Air Traffic Controllers’ Union cannot and will not continue to shoulder such burdens which are unreasonable for them to bear at the expense of themselves, their rights and overall well-being, nor at the detriment of their families.

“It is confusing that having information well in advance of 10pm that the controller was incapable of remaining beyond his shift, and having contingency measures, that nothing was put in place. That responsibility lies solely on the department.”

She said the operating hours for Freeport’s airport are internationally published as 6am to 10pm.

“The department now seeks to vilify an employee who had emergency personal affairs to attend to when the department, ministry and government have failed in their duty to do what is right and fair by the employees in order to have been able to better accommodate the late flight.”

Mrs Hanna Martin noted that aviation officials are awaiting a full report of Tuesday’s incident and would withhold direct statements until it has been received.

The 186 passengers of the Sunwing flight were all accommodated over-night in Nassau and flown to Grand Bahama yesterday afternoon at the cost of the airline.

Earlier this month, Ministry of Transport and Aviation officials requested a meeting with members of BATCU, along with representatives from two other government departments with the object of brokering “fairness and industrial harmony” in the industry.

Story and comments:  http://www.tribune242.com

Drone tip line aims to curtail amateur flights in fire zones

A U.S. Forest Service poster cites the danger of amateur drones flying in firefighting zones. 
U.S. Department of Agriculture




A tip line has been set up to report drones being flown in wildland fire zones.

The toll-free tip line, similar to a crime tip line, is designed to gather information about amateurs flying drones in fire zones. Drones at times have forced officials in California to ground aerial firefighting out of fear of possible midair collisions.

Tipsters can call 844-376-6311.

The tip line is not for reporting emergencies. If a drone is observed dangerously flying at an active disaster or emergency, call 911.

“Most drone pilots don’t necessarily intend to interfere, but those who do put us all at great risk of a midair collision with our first responders, said Mark Ghilarducci, director of the state Office of Emergency Services.

More than a dozen hobby drones have interfered with or hampered firefighting this year, according to Cal Fire.

“When hobby drone operators fly in fire zones, we can’t” said Cal Fire director Ken Pimlott.

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com

New company awarded King Airport lease for hangar

ST. THOMAS - A newly formed company said it plans to bring King Airport's general aviation space a new hangar and maintenance building within the next three years.

"General aviation is maxed out," Manuel Gutierrez Jr., a V.I. Port Authority Governing Board member, said Wednesday morning. "There are more clients coming and the maintenance building is in horrible shape."

At its monthly meeting Wednesday, the governing board voted to approve the request and lease for Standard Aviation, LLC to construct an aircraft hangar; to sublease a hangar and office space; and to conduct fixed based operations.

The development will require the company to invest $5 million dollars to put to use 26,000 square feet of semi-improved space, and rent will initially cost $1.50 per square foot for a total of $3,250 per month.

On the agreement's fifth anniversary and every five years, the rent will increase based on the consumer price index or 5 percent, depending on which is greater.

The Port Authority also would reap additional revenue from fuel services.

The hangar is slated to cost the investors $4 million and the maintenance building roughly $1.6 million, according to the request.

The estimated gross income of the facility over five years is $2.8 million, according to supporting documents.

However, the vote was taken after Acting Attorney General Claude Walker - who was participating in his first governing board meeting as a committee designee - amended the request to no longer include an option to extend the lease beyond 30 years.

The result of the amended request was one dissenting vote from governing board member Jose Penn.

Board Vice Chairman and Tourism Commissioner Beverly Nicholson-Doty abstained from the vote, which passed on ayes from Walker, Gutierrez and Yvonne Thraen.

The Port Authority's long-term plan already included enlarging the existing general aviation hangar and renovating the maintenance building, according to Executive Director Carlton Dowe.

In October 2014, it released a request for proposals seeking a company to relocate the maintenance building to the Bournefield area and demolish the old building to construct a new hangar or expand the existing one, according to the request.

Two months later, the Port Authority canceled the request.

Earlier this year, Hairoun Aviation, an existing fixed base operator, met with the Port Authority to discuss similar renovations when Shaun Miller, Standard Aviation owner, and his team entered the conversation.

The project will displace three tenants, but the company "will work with them" to ensure their ability to operate, according to the request. The Port Authority would lose $39,000 in monthly rent from the existing tenants.

According to supporting documents he supplied, Miller also owns and operates St. Thomas-based UEI Services, a state-of-the-art technology manufacturing, assembly, test and shipping facility to supplying customers worldwide.

Its customer base includes the following industrial sectors: automotive, aerospace, petroleum/refining, simulation, semiconductor manufacturing, medical, HVAC and power generation, according to Miller.

Source:  http://virginislandsdailynews.com

Missing man found with help of Alabama Law Enforcement Agency chopper, but officials worry service could end

MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) -  A 71-year-old missing man was rescued overnight Wednesday in Montgomery with the help of the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency’s (ALEA) Aviation Unit. 

The man, whose name was not released, had been missing for several hours when ALEA brought in its helicopter to assist with the search. The chopper crew ultimately found the man and helped guide ground units to his exact location through the Project Lifesaver system.

“Project Lifesaver is an invaluable program designed to aid in the rescue of individuals who wander because of autism, Down syndrome, Alzheimer’s, dementia or other cognitive conditions,” Secretary of Law Enforcement Spencer Collier said. “Because the elderly man was wearing a Project Lifesaver bracelet, rescue efforts were reduced from hours to mere minutes. Once in the area of the missing man, ALEA’s Aviation Unit guided ground units to the area and located him safely in less than 15 minutes.”

ALEA Aviation has responded to situations in each of Alabama's 67 counties since 2010 and is responsible for 369 successful rescues and captures. Crews have responded to 537 missing persons requests, 949 search requests and 1,240 emergency requests in that span of time.

Collier has reason to worry, however, as Alabama's legislators have yet to come up with a solution to a huge hole in the state's budget. Governor Bentley has been outspoken in his position that new revenue is needed, to the tune of $300 million, to keep the state afloat. Legislators have pushed back, vowing not to raise taxes and instead pushing for more cuts to Medicaid and state agencies.

“Proposed budget cuts of 22 to 47 percent will dramatically hinder -- if not halt -- our Aviation Unit’s lifesaving rescue efforts provided to the citizens of Alabama," Collier warned. " We ask that citizens contact their Legislators and ask them to support Governor Bentley’s solution to the budget crisis and put our state on a strong path forward.” 

Story and comments: http://www.wsfa.com

Cessna 172P, N62731: Fatal accident occurred August 19, 2015 in Townsend, Broadwater County, Montana

Johnny Ray Gluhm


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Johnny Ray Gluhm:   http://registry.faa.gov/N62731
 
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Helena FSDO-05

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA247
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 19, 2015 in Townsend, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172P, registration: N62731
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The non-instrument-rated pilot notified his wife at 2211 that he would be departing the airport momentarily. The direct route to the destination of the dark night cross-country flight crossed a mountain range with elevations over 7,200 ft. The following morning, an emergency locator transmitter signal was detected, and the wreckage was subsequently located in the mountains at an elevation of about 5,000 ft along the direct route of flight. The wreckage pattern and ground scars indicated that the airplane impacted a rock formation on the face of a mountain during a steep right turn. An examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. 

Although the pilot had accumulated some experience crossing the mountain range, he had never completed this flight in nighttime conditions, and he had only 3.8 hours of night flight experience. The pilot's wife reported that she had made the flight several times with the pilot, and he would typically fly over the mountain range unless the clouds were low, in which case he would take a longer route to avoid the mountains. The departure airport was reporting an overcast cloud layer that was about 8,000 ft mean sea level. Further, a witness at the destination airport reported that the sky condition was "pitch black," which was likely the result of a partially illuminated moon blocked by the overcast layer. In addition, mountain obscuration due to smoke and haze was present at the time of the accident, which would have further decreased the pilot's ability to recognize obstructions. As stated in a January 2008 National Transportation Safety Board safety alert, Controlled Flight Into Terrain in Visual Conditions, "darkness may render visual avoidance of high terrain nearly impossible," and "the absence of ground lights may result in loss of horizon reference." 

It is likely that the airplane collided with terrain because the pilot could not see and avoid the surrounding terrain given the dark night conditions and mountain obscuration. Pilot spatial disorientation may also have occurred due to multiple risk factors including the pilot's lack of night flight proficiency and his absence of mountain flying experience in dark night conditions. Because the airplane was in a steep turn, it could not be determined whether the pilot was trying to avoid terrain that he saw at the last minute or if he was disoriented and inadvertently banked the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The non-instrument-rated pilot's decision to conduct a cross-country flight over a mountain range in dark night conditions with limited night flight experience, which resulted in a collision with mountainous terrain.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT 

On August 19, 2015, about 2230 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 172P, N62731, was substantially damaged after it collided with mountainous terrain near Townsend, Montana. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a personal flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed about the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed for the local flight. The flight originated from Helena Regional Airport (HLN) about 2215, and was destined for White Sulphur Springs Airport (7S6), White Sulphur Springs, Montana. 

According to the pilot's wife, her husband departed 76S for HLN about 2000 to pick-up a friend who was scheduled to arrive on a commercial flight at 2100. He landed approximately 45 minutes later, picked up the passenger and then called his wife at 2211 before they departed on the accident flight. 

On the following morning, Salt Lake Center recorded an emergency locator transmitter signal near Bozeman, Montana, that was also picked up by a low flying aircraft. The pilot's flight instructor, who was the Chief of Safety for the Montana Department of Aeronautics, subsequently initiated an aerial search, and located the airplane about 0830.

The accident pilot's wife reported that her husband had flown from 7S6 to HLN twice on the day of the accident. During the first trip, her husband collected some belongings from Helena, and then returned to their home in White Sulphur Springs, Montana. The pilot's wife had driven to HLN to help transport some of the items that would not fit on the airplane. She then returned to White Sulphur Springs at the same time her husband was preparing to leave on his second trip to HLN to pick-up his friend who was returning to White Sulphur Springs after visiting his daughter in Ohio. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

A review of the pilot's logbook revealed that he had amassed a total of 280 flight hours at the time of the accident; about 277 of which were in the accident airplane make and model. The pilot had accrued a total of 3.8 hours of total night flight experience; 3 hours of which were completed with an instructor in October 2013, and 0.8 hours were completed over two separate flights without an instructor. The pilot's first night flight without his instructor took place in December 2014 over 0.4 flight hours. He recorded another night flight about 1 month before the accident, during which time he accumulated 0.4 flight hours. The logbook indicated that both flights consisted of 3-4 landings in the airport traffic pattern. According to the pilot's flight instructor, they completed one instructional cross country night flight from Helena to Bozeman. The second instructional night flight consisted of 12 landings at a local airport and did not include any cross-country flight time. The last entry in the logbook showed that the pilot had flown from 7S6 to HLN on August 19, 2015.

Flight Training

According to the pilot's flight instructor, the pilot began taking flight lessons from him in April 2013 when the instructor was employed by a flight school at HLN. The pilot received instruction in a Cessna 172M model airplane until he purchased the accident airplane later that year. In September 2014, his flight instructor endorsed him to fly solo to commute between 7S6 and HLN. The instructor stated that the pilot's upset recovery abilities and aeronautical decision making were "typical of someone starting in their late 50's." 

Private Pilot Examination

Records furnished by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) indicated that the pilot was unsuccessful during his initial private pilot check ride. According to the designated pilot examiner who administered the check ride, the pilot did not demonstrate adequate pilotage during the examination. The pilot deviated from his assigned course by approximately 7 nautical miles, and was unable to identify multiple terrain features. The pilot subsequently completed two instructional flights that included navigation practice to prepare for the follow-up examination to his private pilot check ride. 

72-Hour History

A follow-up interview with the pilot's wife was used to construct a 72-hour history of the pilot's activities. On Sunday, August 16, 2015, the pilot attended a church service, and completed some activities around the house. During the following 2 days, the pilot attended gatherings at a local cafĂ© for coffee, and performed some work within the community. The pilot's wife observed no abnormalities in the pilot's behavior or sleep patterns on the day of the accident and the 3 days that preceded it. 

The pilot's wife reported that she had flown with him between 7S6 and HLN about four times. During these flights, they would typically fly over the mountain range; however, if the clouds were "too low," they would circumvent the mountain.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1982, and registered to the pilot and his wife on July 26, 2013. 

The airplane was powered by a Lycoming O-320-D2J, a normally-aspirated, direct drive, air cooled, 160 hp engine. A maintenance history was constructed from a collection of work orders that were provided by the pilot's maintenance facility as the aircraft logbooks were not recovered. The work orders indicated that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on June 25, 2015; at that time, the recorded tachometer reading was 9,056.6 flight hours. Although the tachometer was found a few feet from the main wreckage, the tachometer time at the time of the accident could not be verified due to the condition of the unit. 

Refueling records provided by the 76S airport manager showed that the pilot purchased 13.6 gallons of 100 low lead aviation grade gasoline on August 13, 2015, at a self-service fuel pump. The pilot noted "fuel" under some entries in his personal logbook, but did not include the total fuel quantity; therefore, a fuel quantity for the accident flight could not be computed.

COMMUNICATIONS

According to an NTSB Air Traffic Control Specialist, there was no available audio for the pilot's departure on the night of the accident as HLN tower had closed at 2000.

A review of Enhanced Radar Intelligent Tool data from the Salt Lake City Air Route Traffic Control Center did not show the accident airplane or its route of flight.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

HLN, a class delta airport, was publicly owned and operated by the Helena Regional Airport Authority at the time of the accident, and did have an operating control tower that closed at 2200 MDT on the night of the accident. The airport was located approximately 18 nautical miles from the accident site at an elevation of 3,877 feet above mean sea level.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

According to an NTSB Meteorological study, the 2253 recorded weather observation at HLN included winds from 250 degrees at 7 knots, visibility 4 statute miles, haze, an overcast cloud layer at 4,100 feet above ground level (agl), temperature 22 degrees C, dew point 5 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.86 inches of mercury.

A Terminal Aerodrome Forecast was issued for HLN at 1908. The field weather forecast for the accident time included visibility of 4 statute miles, haze, and scattered clouds at 4,000 feet agl. An Area Forecast was issued at 2045 by the Aviation Weather Center in Kansas City, Missouri. The narrative forecasted a broken smoke layer at 8,000 feet and occasionally visibility between 3-5 statute miles in smoke and haze. 

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration publishes a Smoke Text Product, which is a narrative used to describe significant areas of smoke associated with active fires. A Smoke Text Product was issued on the day of the accident that reported heavy smoke over parts of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana, forecast for that evening. The report described moderate density smoke farther east into Central Montana.

An Airmen's Meteorological Information (AIRMET) advisory was issued as 2045 for mountain obscuration due to smoke and haze at the time of the accident in a region inclusive of the accident site. 

The United States Naval Observatory, Astronomical Applications Department for Townsend recorded the moon phase as a waxing crescent Moon with 22% of the Moon's visible disk illuminated. The recorded Moonset for Townsend was 2243.

A witness reported the visibility at 76S on the night of the accident was approximately 2 statute miles, and the sky was "pitch black." 

According to Lockheed Martin Flight Services, the pilot did not file a flight plan or request a weather briefing through them or DUATS. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted an area of mountainous terrain that was located on the rising face of a ridge at a terrain elevation of 5,046 feet. All four corners of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. A debris path that measured about 100 feet long by 80 feet wide was oriented on a 351-degree magnetic heading. The initial impact point (IIP) was identified by a broken green aircraft position light and silver colored signatures that were vertically oriented, and spanned approximately 13 feet in length on a rock face. The airplane main wreckage, comprised of the cockpit, fuselage, and empennage, was located about 70 feet beyond the IIP. A local sheriff detected an odor at the accident site that resembled fuel.

Airframe

The outboard section of the right wing was located in the debris path about 30 feet below the initial impact point. A piece of the inboard section of the right wing was identified by the right wing strut, and was located about 15 feet from the main wreckage. The leading edge of the wing was compressed into alternating ridges and grooves that resembled corrugated metal. The right wing fuel tank was breached, and void of fuel. Both the flap bell crank and jackscrew had separated from the right wing, and were found in the energy path about 30 feet from the main wreckage. The flap jackscrew measured 2.9", consistent with a 10-degree flap deployment. 

The left wing came to rest a few feet from the main wreckage, and was co-located with the engine. Several portions of skin were pulled back away from the wing, which revealed a breached left wing fuel tank that was void of fuel. 

The rudder, elevator trim, and elevator cables were traced from the cockpit to each control surface. Both aileron cables had separated at the wing roots; however, the fracture surfaces exhibited signatures consistent with tensile overload. 

The empennage was co-located with the main wreckage, and remained attached to the tail cone by a piece of airframe skin. The vertical stabilizer and rudder assembly were connected, but damaged by the impact. Both elevators remained attached to the horizontal stabilizers; however, the right and left elevator torque tubes had separated in tensile overload. The elevator trim tab measured 1.15", indicative of a 5-degree tab down position. 

The fuel selector handle had separated and exposed the selector pin, which rotated successfully to each detent. Air was directed through the unit as the selector was moved, which confirmed continuity through the left, right, and both positions of the selector. The fuel strainer bowl was found in the debris field, but the fuel strainer screen was not observed.

The attitude indicator was recovered from the debris field. An examination of the unit revealed that the gyro spun normally when turned by hand. The gyroscope surface displayed a significant amount of scoring along its circumference, which indicated that it was rotating at impact. 

Engine Examination 

Both propeller blades were recovered from the debris path along with the propeller hub, which had separated from the crankshaft at the engine flange. Propeller blade one displayed chordwise scratches, gouges, s-bending, and tip curling, but remained attached to the hub. Propeller blade two had separated at the blade tip and the blade root, which was attached to the propeller hub. The propeller blades exhibited both chordwise scratches and gouges at the leading and trailing edges. 

A hole was observed in the crankcase between cylinders three and four that measured approximately 8 inches in diameter. The crankshaft had seized, which precluded a successful rotation of the powertrain; however, drive-train continuity was confirmed through a visual inspection. The cylinders displayed normal operating signatures, and all valves appeared to be seated properly when examined with a borescope.

Both magnetos were removed from the engine accessory section and tested. The right magneto produced spark on all leads when rotated by hand. The left magneto was destroyed, and could not be tested. 

The top and bottom spark plug were removed, and placed in a spark plug inspection tray. The spark plugs to cylinders one and three were dark in color, but exhibited normal wear. Examination of the top and bottom spark plugs from cylinders two and four did not reveal any anomalies.

The carburetor was destroyed, which precluded an examination of the floats and needle valve. The carburetor fuel inlet screen was not recovered. 

The vacuum pump had separated from the accessory housing, and was found in the energy path of the accident airplane. Disassembly of the pump revealed that the rotor had broken into sections; however, the vanes displayed even wear without any signs of binding. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Montana Department of Justice, Forensic Science Division. The autopsy report listed the pilot/owner's cause of death as "multiple blunt force injuries."

Forensic toxicology testing was performed on specimens of the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, which did not detect any ethanol in the pilot's muscle or drugs in the pilot's urine. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to an NTSB Safety Alert that was published January 2008, 

"Terrain familiarization is critical to safe visual operations at night. Use sectional charts or other topographic references to ensure that your altitude will safely clear ter­rain and obstructions all along your route."

"In remote areas, especially in overcast or moonless conditions, be aware that darkness may render visual avoidance of high terrain nearly impossible and that the absence of ground lights may result in loss of horizon reference." 

"When planning a nighttime Visual Flight Rules (VFR) flight, follow Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) practices, such as climbing on a known safe course until well above sur­rounding terrain. Choose a cruising altitude that provides terrain separation similar to IFR flights (2,000 feet above ground level in mountainous areas and 1,000 feet above the ground in other areas)."

According to the FAA Aeronautical Information Manual, Chapter 7-5-6, "Mountain Flying,"

"Understand Mountain Obscuration. The term Mountain Obscuration (MTOS) is used to describe a visibility condition that is distinguished from IFR because ceilings, by definition, are described as "above ground level" (AGL). In mountainous terrain clouds can form at altitudes significantly higher than the weather reporting station and at the same time nearby mountaintops may be obscured by low visibility. In these areas the ground level can also vary greatly over a small area. Beware if operating VFR-on-top. You could be operating closer to the terrain than you think because the tops of mountains are hidden in a cloud deck below. MTOS areas are identified daily on the Aviation Weather Center located at: http://www.aviationweather.gov."

"Some canyons run into a dead end. Don't fly so far up a canyon that you get trapped. ALWAYS BE ABLE TO MAKE A 180 DEGREE TURN!"

"VFR flight operations may be conducted at night in mountainous terrain with the application of sound judgment and common sense. Proper pre-flight planning, giving ample consideration to winds and weather, knowledge of the terrain and pilot experience in mountain flying are prerequisites for safety of flight. Continuous visual contact with the surface and obstructions is a major concern and flight operations under an overcast or in the vicinity of clouds should be approached with extreme caution."

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA247 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 19, 2015 in Helena, MT
Aircraft: CESSNA 172P, registration: N62731
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 19, 2015, about 2230 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 172P, N62731, collided with mountainous terrain during low altitude flight near Helena, Montana. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings, fuselage, and empennage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed about the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed for the local flight. The flight originated from the Helena Regional Airport (HLN) at 2215 and was destined for White Sulphur Springs Airport (7S6), White Sulphur Springs, Montana. 

According to local law enforcement, the pilot contacted his wife about 2207 and subsequently departed for 7S6, with a family member onboard. The following morning Salt Lake Center recorded an electronic locator transmitter signal near Bozeman, Montana that was also picked up by a low flying aircraft. The pilot's flight instructor then initiated an aerial search and located the airplane about 0830 the day after the accident.

The airplane impacted an area of rising mountainous terrain in a valley between two ridges at a terrain elevation of 5,046 feet. The initial impacted point (IIP) was identified by a green marking that resembled an aircraft position light located below an aluminum material transfer mark that spanned about 13 feet in length on a vertical rock face. The outboard section of the right wing was located at the base of the rock face about 30 feet from the IIP. Multiple sections of right wing were located in a tree that sat on a hillside about 30 feet beyond the IIP and surrounded by portions of the right wing and propeller at the base of the tree. Both the engine and left wing were located in the energy path about 20 feet from the tree, but before the main wreckage which was located about 20 feet beyond the engine at a lower elevation.

An onsite examination of the airplane by the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge revealed that the airplane impacted right wing first and subsequently came to rest on the downhill slope about 70 feet from the IIP. The rudder, trim and elevator cables were traced from the cockpit to their respective control surfaces. Both the elevator trim tab actuator and aft chain were intact and in their original position within the horizontal stabilizer. The flap bell crank and jackscrew assembly had separated from the right wing and were found in the energy path about 30 feet from the main wreckage. The flap jackscrew measured 2.9", consistent with a 10 degree flap position, which corroborated the flap indicator position. Both propeller blades were accounted for at the accident site and exhibited chordwise scratches, leading edge nicks, and bending. 

The 2153 recorded weather observation at HLN, located approximately 18 nautical miles west of the accident site, included winds from 250 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 5 statute miles, haze, an overcast cloud layer at 4,800 feet, temperature 22 degrees C, dew point 4 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 29.86 inches of mercury.

The density altitude at the time of the accident from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration was 7,192.1 feet. 

The pilot, age 59, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land that was issued on September 30, 2014. A review of the logbook revealed that the pilot had accumulated a total of 280.4 flight hours; 276.9 of which were in the accident airplane make and model, and 3.8 were at night. The pilot accumulated a total of 0.8 night flight hours in the preceding 8 months. 


Friday morning, Broadwater County Sheriff-Coroner Brenda Ludwig released the identities of the two people who perished in a plane crash Wednesday night in Avalanche Gulch in the Big Belt Mountains as 59-year-old Johnny Gluhm and 86-year-old William Findley. Both were residents of White Sulpur Springs. 

Two people are confirmed dead after a single engine airplane crashed in the Big Belt Mountain range just northeast of Canyon Ferry Lake Wednesday night.

Lewis and Clark County Sheriff Leo Dutton told KFBB they received a call at 11:46 Wednesday evening from the brother of a man whose wife had called him saying her husband had left the Helena International Airport about two hours earlier and had not yet arrived in White Sulfur Springs, less than 70 miles away.

Dutton says Montana Aeronautics coordinated an air search early Thursday morning that located the aircraft and provided the coordinates to ground crews. The wreckage was located at about 9 a.m. at Avalanche Gulch in Broadwater County by a crew who hiked into the area.

The plane has been confirmed as a Cessna 172, which matched the callers description.

Broadwater County Sheriff Brenda Ludwig confirmed two people on board are deceased. Their identities have not yet been released. 

Terry Williams, a spokesperson with the National Transportation Safety Board also tells us that a preliminary investigation shows the airplane crashed around 10:30 Wednesday evening. He says the NTSM is investigating the crash alongside the Federal Aviation Administration, and that an on-site  investigator will be on scene Friday morning to document the site and to identify all portions of the aircraft.

http://www.kfbb.com

Two men died Wednesday night in a plane crash in the Big Belt mountains northeast of Helena.

One was 86 years old, and both are believed to be Montana residents, Broadwater County Undersheriff Wynn Meehan said. He did not release their names.

The small plane crashed in Broadwater County about 17 miles east-northeast of the Helena airport.

Meehan was on the scene of the crash coordinating response much of the day Thursday. He said that based on his conversation with Federal Aviation Administration officials, it appears a couple inches of the plane's wing caught a rock outcropping and that "slingshotted him basically into a cliff wall."

Meehan did not know how experienced the pilot was.

The Cessna 172 and its passengers were first reported missing to the Lewis and Clark County Sheriff's Office around 11 p.m. Wednesday, Sheriff Leo Dutton said.

A woman called and said her husband took off from the Helena airport shortly after 10 p.m. and was bound for White Sulphur Springs, but he never arrived.

Around 12:30 a.m. Thursday, contact was made with the aeronautics division of the Montana Department of Administration, which is responsible for locating missing and overdue civilian aircraft.

The division launched its search aircraft at 6:15 a.m. Thursday, according to Safety and Education Bureau Chief Harold Dramstad.

The search team located the wreckage around 8 a.m. in Avalanche Gulch.

Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board were scheduled to arrive Friday to examine the crash.

http://helenair.com




HELENA - Two people died in the crash of a small plane in Broadwater County on Wednesday night. 
 
Broadwater County Sheriff Brenda Ludwig made the announcement on Thursday afternoon.

A joint recovery effort between her office, the Broadwater County Search & Rescue team, Lewis & Clark Search & Rescue, and the U.S. Forest Service took place on Thursday near Avalanche Creek Gulch, located on the northeast side of Canyon Ferry Reservoir.

The search effort began late Wednesday night when an overdue aircraft was reported to Lewis & Clark County dispatch.

On Thursday morning, a search plane spotted the wreckage on the peaks above Avalanche Creek Road.

Search crews had to hike nearly vertical terrain to reach the site.

Sheriff Ludwig confirmed that two people on board the aircraft died.

The names of the victims has not yet been released, pending notification of relatives.

Once the bodies are recovered, they will be sent to the state lab in Missoula for autopsies.

Sheriff Ludwig says an investigation into the cause of the crash is being conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board.

More than 20 people from the three agencies took part in the search effort.

(Update, 6:25 p.m.) Broadwater County Undersheriff Wynn Meehan says that two men were killed in the crash.

Meehan tells MTN News that a Cessna 172 flying from Helena to White Sulphur Springs at about 10 p.m. on Wednesday crashed in the mountains above Avalanche Creek Gulch.

The crash site was located Thursday morning by Montana Aeronautics, which was able to pick up the plane's emergency transponder beacon.

Meehan says that the search revealed that the plane clipped a rock ledge with its wing and cart-wheeled into a cliff wall. Both men are believed to have died on impact.

It took more than five hours for searchers to move the bodies to a location level enough for a landing site.

The bodies were then picked up by a contract helicopter flying for the U.S. Forest Service.


Source: http://www.kxlh.com



HELENA, Mont. - Searchers have located a single-engine airplane that crashed in the Big Belt Mountains just northeast of Canyon Ferry Lake. The condition of the plane's occupants has not been released.

The Lewis and Clark County sheriff's office received a call at about 11 p.m.

Wednesday from a woman who reported her husband had left the Helena airport at about 10 p.m. and had not yet arrived in White Sulphur Springs.

Officials with the Department of Transportation's Aviation Division told the Independent Record that a search began at about 6:15 a.m. Thursday and the plane was located at about 8 a.m. in Avalanche Gulch, which is in Broadwater County. Ground crews hiked into the site.

The National Transportation Safety Board planned to begin investigating Friday morning.

Source:  http://www.nbcmontana.com





Authorities have located a small plane that crashed in the Big Belt mountains last night.

The plane was reported as a single engine Cessna 172 with a pilot and possibly one other passenger, Lewis and Clark County Sheriff Leo Dutton said.

The crash occurred in Broadwater County about 17 miles east, northeast of the Helena airport. The condition of the plane's occupants has not yet been released.

The Lewis and Clark County Sheriff's Office received a call at about 11 p.m. Wednesday night from a woman who reported her husband had never arrived at his destination, Dutton said. She said her husband took off from the Helena Regional Airport shortly after 10 p.m. and was bound for White Sulphur Spring, but he never arrived.

At around 12:30 a.m. Thursday, contact was made with the aeronautics division of the Montana Department of Administration, which is responsible for locating missing and overdue civilian aircraft.

The division launched its search aircraft at 6:15 a.m. Thursday, according to Safety and Education Bureau Chief Harold Dramstad.

The search team located the wreckage at about 8 a.m. in Avalanche Gulch. Ground units from Lewis and Clark and Broadwater counties are now on scene.

Dramstad said the National Transportation and Safety Board is expected to arrive Friday to investigate the cause of the crash.

Source:   http://mtstandard.com

HELENA - Authorities have located a small plane that crashed in the Big Belt mountains last night. 

The plane was reported as a single engine Cessna 172 with a pilot and possibly one other passenger, Lewis and Clark County Sheriff Leo Dutton said.

The crash occurred in Broadwater County about 17 miles east, northeast of the Helena Regional Airport. The condition of the plane's occupants has not yet been released.

The Lewis and Clark County Sheriff's Office received a call at about 11 p.m. Wednesday night from a woman who reported her husband had never arrived at his destination, Dutton said. She said her husband took off from the Helena airport shortly after 10 p.m. and was bound for White Sulphur Spring, but he never arrived.

At around 12:30 a.m. Thursday, contact was made with the aeronautics division of the Montana Department of Administration, which is responsible for locating missing and overdue civilian aircraft. 

The division launched their search aircraft at 6:15 a.m. Thursday, according to Safety and Education Bureau Chief Harold Dramstad.

The search team located the wreckage at about 8 a.m. in Avalanche Gulch. Ground units from Lewis and Clark and Broadwater counties are now on scene.

Dramstad said the National Transportation and Safety Board is expected to arrive tomorrow to investigate the cause of the crash.

Source:   http://missoulian.com
  
HELENA -  Search and Rescue personnel have located the wreckage of a small plane that crashed in the mountains above Canyon Ferry Reservoir.

There is no information yet about how many people were on board the plane, or if any of them were injured.

Reported overdue last night, the plane crashed in the mountains north of Avalanche Creek Gulch.

The original call came in to the Lewis & Clark Sheriff's Office on Wednesday night, and deputies worked through the night to locate the wreckage.

A search aircraft located the crash scene early Thursday morning, and SAR units from Broadwater and Lewis & Clark County responded to the area.

Search crews had to hike nearly vertical terrain to reach the site, and are still at the scene.

Source:  http://www.kbzk.com

Martha's Vineyard Airport (KMVY) Manager Will Step Down

Manager Sean Flynn with assistant manager Deborah Potter. Mrs. Potter has assumed control of daily operations at the airport.



Martha’s Vineyard Airport manager Sean Flynn is leaving his job, the chairman of airport commission said on Thursday, capping months of tension over operational issues and workplace disputes.

“We’re negotiating an amicable separation,” commission chairman Myron Garfinkle told the Gazette. “We hope it will be concluded within the next two weeks.”

Mr. Flynn, who began an unscheduled two-week vacation last week, will not return to work, Mr. Garfinkle said. Assistant airport manager Deborah Potter “has assumed day-to-day responsibilities” and will continue to do so, he said.

A formal search for a new airport manager will follow, he added.

Mr. Flynn has served as airport manager since 2005. This February, the airport commission renewed his contract for three years at an annual salary of $138,822, a 20 percent increase over the salary set in 2010 when he signed a five-year contract. Three of the five commissioners who voted for the contract were replaced the following month.

His departure ends a 10-year career that in recent years has been marred by controversy over his management style, including a lawsuit alleging workplace harassment by a female employee. More recently, Mr. Flynn came under fire for his handling of a routine inspection conducted in May by the Federal Aviation Administration.

He could not immediately be reached for comment Thursday.

At an airport commission meeting last week, Mr. Garfinkle said he and vice chairman Robert Rosenbaum had met with officials from the FAA and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation to discuss the results of the inspection. The officials identified four areas of concern: a wildlife management plan, plans for a new safety building, poor employee performance and inadequate runway markings. Two of the areas triggered a noncompliance status, the wildlife management plan and runway markings issue. According to Mr. Rosenbaum, officials said they had had difficulty resolving the issues with airport management, a situation he characterized as “highly unusual.”

On Friday, August 7, commissioners met in executive session to consider an unspecified non-union employee matter. On the following Monday, Mr. Flynn left for a two-week unscheduled vacation.

At the commission meeting last week, Mr. Garfinkle said the airport is under an Oct. 15 deadline to correct deficiencies identified by the FAA or face loss of millions of dollars in federal grant money and potentially its certification as a commercial airport.

Mr. Flynn was criticized at a May 28 commission meeting by Mr. Rosenbaum and another commissioner, Rich Michelson, for not advising commissioners that the inspection was taking place and for excluding them from an exit briefing.

Mr. Michelson described how after he and Mr. Rosenbaum asked to be included in the exit briefing with FAA inspectors, Mr. Flynn abruptly moved the meeting from a conference room into his office.

“So when I walked in, Sean said, ‘No, Rich,’ and I said, ‘No what, Sean?’ And he said, ‘You are not invited to this meeting. This is a private meeting.’ So I said to him, ‘Okay, Sean, so there are two airport commissioners here who would like to attend this meeting and you are refusing us access to that meeting. Is that correct?’ And he said yes,” Mr. Michelson said.

Mr. Rosenbaum added, “I thought the treatment was rather inappropriate and disrespectful for commissioners. I thought that was a very poor way, in front of employees and the FAA inspectors, to deal with that.”

Mr. Flynn, who was present at the May 28 meeting, offered no comment to the criticism from Mr. Rosenbaum and Mr. Michelson. Earlier in the meeting, when asked about the inspection results, he said, “It was a successful inspection. We did find more things than we’re usually used to. Most of them are paperwork in nature.”

Even before the FAA inspection, relations between the airport manager and some new members of the commission had been strained, stemming from their appointment by the Dukes County Commission. At odds with the airport commission for years over control of the airport, county commissioners in March ousted two members of the seven-member airport commission and appointed Mr. Garfinkle, Mr. Rosenbaum and Clarence (Trip) Barnes 3rd.

For two months following the new appointments, Mr. Flynn refused to schedule monthly meetings of the commission, citing legal concerns about the validity of the appointments. On May 21, commissioners called their own meeting, and elected Mr. Garfinkle chairman and Mr. Rosenbaum vice chairman. Mr. Flynn did not attend that meeting. The May 28 meeting when the FAA inspection was discussed was his first meeting with the newly-constituted commission.

Since then, a personnel committee headed by Mr. Rosenbaum has been working on new personnel policies. At a meeting several weeks ago, the committee voted to hire a human resources consulting firm to assist in the process. Though Mr. Flynn attended that meeting, he later filed an open meeting law complaint, claiming it was improperly held. The commission plans respond to the meeting complaint in September.

In February 2014, a female airport employee filed a complaint against Mr. Flynn and others alleging sexual harassment and workplace retaliation.

In the past week, Mr. Garfinkle and Mr. Rosenbaum have been meeting regularly with assistant airport manager Deborah Potter, who is heading airport operations in Mr. Flynn’s absence. This week, they attended a staff meeting with the operations team that Mr. Garfinkle described as “upbeat” and “very well received.” He said the staff is dedicated to rectifying the issues and hopes to exceed the minimum requirements during next year’s annual FAA inspection.

Story and comments: http://vineyardgazette.com