Sunday, January 27, 2019

Fuel Starvation: Piper PA-32RT-300T, N39650; accident occurred January 27, 2019 in Pflugerville, Travis County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas
Piper Aircraft 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
https://registry.faa.gov/N39650


Location: Pflugerville, TX
Accident Number: CEN19LA076
Date & Time: 01/27/2019, 1514 CST
Registration: N39650
Aircraft: Piper PA32RT
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 27, 2019, at 1514 central daylight time, a Piper PA-32RT-300T airplane, N39650, suffered a partial loss of engine power resulting in an off-field landing near Pfugerville, Texas. The pilot received minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Stew Industries, LLC., and was operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Austin Executive Airport (EDC), Austin, Texas, with an intended destination of Taylor Municipal Airport (T74), Taylor, Texas.

The pilot reported he started the day with 40 gallons of fuel onboard and confirmed a pilot logbook entry for 1.3 flight hours on the day of the accident. The 1.3 hours included flights flown from T74 to EDC and from EDC to Lakeway Airpark (3R9). The logbook did not include an entry for a subsequent flight from 3R9 to EDC or the accident flight. The pilot departed EDC to fly to T74 and had flown only a few miles when the engine started running rough. He stated he moved the fuel selector handle alternatively between the left and right fuel tank positions, turned on the fuel pump, and advanced the mixture to full rich, but the engine roughness continued. He tried to return to EDC, but could not make it. He performed an off-field landing to a road, where the airplane hit a parked car. The right wing separated from the fuselage during impact and the airplane flipped upside down.

FlightAware captured the airplane's recorded flight track from 1355 to 1514 on the day of the accident. The data showed the airplane flying in the area between EDC and 3R9.

The airplane was equipped with a J.P. Instruments, Inc.(JPI) engine data monitor (EDM) 700 configured to record individual cylinder head temperatures (CHT), cylinder exhaust gas temperatures (EGT), EGT span, and battery voltage. The unit was undamaged National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigators extracted data from the unit while it remained in the airplane wreckage. There were 5 distinct sessions on January 27, 2019, including the accident flight. The fourth session on the day of the accident recorded only 4 seconds of data and was not considered in the investigation. Ninety-four (94) minutes of data was recorded.

Data associated with the accident flight showed a consistent decrease in CHTs during the final 3 minutes of flight. EGT data showed a series of decreases and increases in temperatures during the same period. (Figure 1) 

Figure 1 – Final Minutes of Accident Flight JPI Data

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane had a total fuel capacity of 98 gallons. The usable fuel was 47.0 gallons in each wing tank (47.0 gallons is the total per side, each side having two interconnected tanks).

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was initially moved to EDC, where it was stored outdoors with the left wing attached. It was later relocated to a secure storage facility in Lancaster, Texas. Recovery personnel retrieved 9 gallons of liquid consistent with aviation fuel from the left wing prior to removing it from the fuselage for transportation. The right wing tank did not contain any fuel and the right fuel cap was secure on the wing when viewed at the accident scene by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors. The right tank fuel lines were compromised where the wing separated from the fuselage during the accident. Little evidence of fuel leakage from the right wing tank was evident at the accident scene and no fuel was found in the tank by recovery personnel. FAA inspectors documented the fuel selector handle in a position about 1 to 2 inches past center towards the right tank position (see figure 2).

Figure 2 - Fuel Selector Position

An examination of the wreckage and functional engine test runs were conducted by the NTSB Investigator in Charge (IIC) and parties to the investigation on August 13, 2019. The fuselage with the engine attached had been loaded on a trailer and secured in preparation for an attempted engine run. The following observations were made during the post-accident examination at the storage facility.

Fuselage

The fuselage was upright and secured with ratchet straps on a trailer. The wings were separated from the fuselage. The stabilator flight control cables were continuous from the cockpit to the stabilator bellcrank. The rudder cables were continuous from the rudder pedal assembly to the rudder sector at the empennage. The continuity of the aileron flight control cables in the cabin was not established. The fuel selector handle was in the "LEFT" position and the control rods were intact and continuous to fuel selector valve which was also in the left tank position. Low air pressure was applied to the left and right tank inlet ports on the fuel selector valve which allowed air to pass when placed in both the left and right detents. The valve rotated smoothly and the detents were noticeable.

In preparation for running the engine, the fuel line from the fuel selector valve to the electric fuel pump was disconnected and a flexible fuel line was connected to the inlet port of the electric fuel pump. This line continued outside the fuselage and was connected to a portable fuel container to facilitate running the engine.

Left Wing

The left wing was separated from the fuselage. The flap and aileron both remained attached to their hinges. The fuel filler cap was located in the fuel filler opening and was unremarkable. The fuel line fitting was disconnected from the outlet port of the inboard fuel tank and a borescope was used to look into the fitting and observe the fuel strainer. No debris was observed in the screen.

Right Wing

The right wing was separated from the fuselage. The flap was separated from the wing. The aileron remained attached to its hinges. The leading edge exhibited impact damage forward of the aileron and outboard of the outer fuel tank. The fuel filler cap was not accessible or examined due to the positioning of the right wing. The fuel line fitting was disconnected from the outlet port of the inboard fuel tank and a borescope was used to look into the fitting and observe the fuel strainer. No debris was observed in the screen.

Empennage

The vertical stabilizer remained attached to the tailcone and the rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer. The rudder stops were intact and unremarkable. The stabilator had been removed from the vertical stabilizer.

Engine

The engine remained attached to the truss mount and the truss mount remained attached to the firewall. A visual examination of the engine did not reveal any impact damage to the engine crankcase, cylinders, components, or accessories. The oil dipstick was intact and indicated an oil quantity of 8 qts when removed and examined. No evidence of fuel or oil leakage were observed.

Propeller

The three-blade Hartzell propeller had been removed from the crankshaft propeller flange. The blades remained captured in the hub and the spinner remained attached to the spinner bulkhead. The blades were marked with "A", "B", and "C" to assist with the examination. Blade "A" exhibited aft bending, curling of the blade tip, and abrasion on the trailing edge near the blade tip. Blade "B" exhibited curling of the blade tip and abrasion on the leading edge and cambered face near the blade tip. Blade "C" exhibited aft bending, curling of the blade tip, and abrasion on the leading edge, cambered face, and trailing edge.

A two-blade, variable pitch propeller was installed to facilitate running the engine.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Prior to the first engine run attempt the fuel line was disconnected from the main fuel servo at the engine and reconnected. No liquid/fuel was present in the fuel line. The fuel filter/screen was removed from the main fuel servo and no liquid/fuel was present. No debris or obstructions were noted within the fuel filter screen. The fuel line was disconnected and reconnected at the engine firewall on the engine side of the firewall. No liquid or fuel was noted at that location.

Examination inside the cockpit revealed the Pitch Trim, Fuel Pump, Loran, Audio Panel, Com 1, GPS/RNAV 1, Com 2, Nav 2, Transponder, MFD, WSI, AC/Air Blower circuit breakers were in the "popped"/out position. The fuel pump circuit breaker was reset prior to attempting to turn on the electric fuel pump. The circuit breaker remained in (did not pop out) during all subsequent fuel pump switch actuations and engine runs. No attempts were made to reset or troubleshoot the remaining circuit breakers.

Engine Run 1

The electric fuel pump was primed 15 to 20 seconds after electrical power was applied to the pump. The engine subsequently started within 10 seconds utilizing the engine starter. The engine was allowed warm up and engine RPM was advanced to accommodate a magneto and propeller check. Both magnetos operated normally and the propeller cycled correctly when commanded. The engine power was advanced to 2,650 RPM and 34 inches of manifold pressure for 4 minutes before the engine run was terminated. Fuel flow indicated 31 gallons per hour (gph) and remained steady during the engine run. No anomalies were noted with the engine during the run. Additionally, the engine ran without interruption at idle and high power settings when the electric fuel pump was turned on and off, verifying the operability of the engine driven fuel pump.

Engine Run 2

Prior to the second engine run the fuel supply was rerouted to feed to both the left and right fuel inlets on the fuel selector valve concurrently. The engine started normally and the engine power was advanced to 2650 RPM, 34 inches of manifold pressure, and 31 gph fuel flow. After the engine stabilized at the set power setting the fuel selector handle was manipulated from left and right tank settings and back. The fuel selector handle was then moved to multiple intermediate settings between the left and right tank settings. The engine ran without interruption or changes in power or fuel flow during the entire engine run. The fuel selector handle was placed to the "Off" position. The engine continued to operate at the set power setting about 10 seconds before the engine stopped running altogether.

Engine Run 3

Prior to the third engine run the fuel supply was rerouted to feed to the left fuel inlet on the fuel selector valve. About 12 inches of fuel line was attached to the right fuel inlet port on the fuel valve and placed in a vertical position. The fuel selector handle was placed on the left fuel tank position and the fuel system was primed using the electric fuel pump. The engine subsequently started and the engine power was advanced to 2650 RPM, 34 inches of manifold pressure, and 31 gph flow. The fuel selector handle was then manipulated from left tank setting to a position about halfway between the left and the right fuel tank positions. The engine continued to run at the set power setting for about 10 seconds and the fuel selector handle was moved to a position about ¼ way from center towards the right tank position. The engine continued to run at the set power setting for an additional 10 seconds. The fuel selector handle was then moved about ½ inch towards the right fuel tank. Fuel flow almost immediately decreased and the engine quit about 5 seconds later.

The fuel pump was primed again using the electric fuel pump and the engine was restarted again with the fuel selector handle on the left tank position. The tachometer did not operate during this engine run for an undetermined reason. The engine power was again increased to 34 inches of manifold pressure and the fuel flow set at 31 gallon per hour. The fuel selector handle was moved to a position about 1 inch past center towards the right tank position. About eight seconds later the fuel flow began dropping and the engine manifold pressure dropped until the fuel flow reached about 20 gph. The fuel flow then fluctuated between 19 and 23 gph for about 25 seconds before the engine quit running altogether. The fuel pump switch was activated during the fluctuations. A momentary increase in fuel flow was noted whenever the switch was activated.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Piper PA-32RT-30 Lance II Service Manual Excerpt:

FUEL SELECTOR VALVE OPERATION. When the fuel selector handle is not in a positive selector detent position, more than one fuel port will be open at the same time. It should be ascertained the fuel selector is positioned in a detent, which can be easily felt when moving the handle through its various positions.

Piper PA-32RT-30 Lance II Pilot Operating Handbook (POH) Excerpts:

"In order to keep the airplane in best lateral trim during cruise flight, the fuel should be used alternately from each tank at one hour intervals.

Always remember that the electric fuel pump should be turned "ON" before switching tanks, and should be left on for a short period thereafter. To preclude making a hasty selection, and to provide continuity of flow, the selector should be changed to another tank before fuel is exhausted from the tank in use. The electric fuel pump should be normally "OFF" so that any malfunction of the engine driven fuel pump is immediately apparent. If signs of fuel starvation should occur at any time during flight, fuel exhaustion should be suspected, at which time the fuel selector should be immediately positioned to a full tank and the electric fuel pump switched to the "ON" position."

The Piper Turbo Lance II performance manual provided fuel planning rates for cruise flight. The highest rate provided was 24 gph at best power, and the lowest rate provided was 13.8 GPH at best economy. Twenty-four GPH equates to about 0.4 gallons per minute (GPM) and 13.8 GPH equates to about 0.23 GPM.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 47, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/17/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  1741 hours (Total, all aircraft), 120 hours (Total, this make and model), 70 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N39650
Model/Series: PA32RT 300T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:1978 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 32R-7887132
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/20/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6000 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: TIO-540
Registered Owner: Stew Industries LLC
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: Stew Industries LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: edc
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 1515 CST
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Unknown
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Unknown
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Austin, TX (EDC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Taylor, TX (T74)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Austin Executive (EDC)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 620 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 30.424167, -97.568611 (est)








PFLUGERVILLE, Texas (KXAN) — A pilot of a small plane was forced to do a crash landing in Pflugerville shortly after taking off from Austin Executive Airport Sunday afternoon.


Austin-Travis County EMS first tweeted about the crash that happened around the area of 5500 Pleasanton Parkway just before 3:30 p.m. The area is just east of State Highway 130.


One person was on board and had minor injuries. 


A spokesperson with the Texas Department of Public Safety said the pilot took off from Austin Executive Airport, but the reason for the abrupt landing is unknown.


It landed in a residential area and hit a parked car, a spokesperson with the Federal Aviation Administration said. 


The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the situation.


Story and video ➤ https://www.kxan.com

Cirrus SR22 GTS X G3, D-EUFO: Fatal accident occurred July 18, 2019 in Leutasch, Tyrolia, Austria









NTSB Identification: GAA19WA444
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Thursday, July 18, 2019 in Leutasch, Austria
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR22, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of Austria has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a CIRRUS SR22 airplane that occurred on July 18, 2019. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Austria's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All investigative information will be released by the government of Austria.

Piper PA-28RT-201 Arrow IV, G-BVDH: Fatal accident occurred August 25, 2019 in Simplon Pass, Switzerland

NTSB Identification: CEN19WA287
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Sunday, August 25, 2019 in Simplon Pass, Switzerland
Aircraft: Piper PA28RT, registration:
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


The government of Switzerland has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a Piper PA28RT airplane that occurred on August 25, 2019. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Switzerland's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.


All investigative information will be released by the government of Switzerland.



Trois personnes ont perdu la vie dimanche matin dans le crash d'un petit avion au col du Simplon (VS). Parmi les victimes figure un bébé. Les causes de l'accident sont pour l'heure inconnues, a communiqué la police valaisanne.

Le petit avion de type «Piper» a décollé vers 09h00 d’un aérodrome vaudois dans le but d’atterrir en Italie. Pour une raison indéterminée, vers 10h25, l'avion s’est écrasé, avant de s’enflammer dans le secteur du col du Simplon.

Les secours sont rapidement intervenus sur le site, mais n'ont pu que constater le décès du pilote et de ses deux accompagnants, une personne adulte et un bébé. L’identification formelle des victimes est en cours.

L'Autorité fédérale chargée des enquêtes de sécurité (SESE) a entamé une enquête afin de déterminer la cause de l'accident. Le Ministère public de la Confédération est responsable des poursuites pénales et coordonne les mesures à prendre avec la police cantonale valaisanne.

Lors de la même matinée, un monomoteur a dû atterrir d'urgence dans un champ à Bauma (ZH). Le pilote et sa passagère, âgés de 68 et 67 ans, s'en sont sortis indemnes. Ils effectuaient un vol panoramique lorsque le moteur a montré des défaillances.

Cessna TU206G Turbo Stationair II, XB-FZN: Fatal accident occurred August 02, 2019 in Mesa del Barro, Guachochi, Mexico

NTSB Identification: CEN19WA301
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 02, 2019 in Guachochi, Mexico
Aircraft: CESSNA TU206, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On August 2, 2019, about 1600 universal coordinated time, a Cessna TU206G airplane, XB-FZN, impacted terrain near Guachochi, Mexico. The two people on board sustained fatal injuries. The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC). This report is for informational purposes only and contains information released by or obtained from the government of Mexico.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil
Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes
Providencia No. 807 - 6o piso
Colonia del Valle
Codigo Postal 03100
México, D.F.
Mexico

Una avioneta con dos pasajeros de la ciudad de Chihuahua se cayó en la comunidad Mesa del Barro, municipio de Guachochi, frente a la pista aérea del lugar.

Resultaron heridos Jorge Montoya Leo de 9 años de edad y su padre Octavio Montoya Domínguez de 41 años.

Ambos tienen su domicilio en la ciudad de Chihuahua y se sabe que iban a Guachochi para estar en la ruta ciclista.

Padre e hijo tienen lesiones por contusión, así como quemaduras leves, pero hasta el momento fueron reportados como estables.

Los dos tripulantes partieron de la ciudad de Chihuahua en un avión, tipo cessna modelo 206 con placa XB FZN.


Al momento de la aproximación de la pista de Guachochi, el aeroplano perdió el control desplomándose antes de llegar a la misma. Ambos fueron internados en la clínica del seguro social de esta ciudad.

Trading a tractor for an airplane

At 63, Tom Hassenfritz of Mt. Pleasant, Iowa traded a tractor for an airplane.


The flight instructor asked Tom what he would do if he was going in for a landing and there was a horse in the middle of the runway. Tom thought for a moment and replied, “Well, I guess I'd do a go-around. The instructor said, “You'd better do it, because there is a horse on the runway.”

That was 40 years ago. Tom Hassenfritz of Mt. Pleasant was taking his in-flight test for a pilot's license at Hannibal, Mo. Tom received his pilot's license and bought a Cessna 182. But as his family grew, he became immersed in his farm implement business. When he found out what his life insurance was going to cost with a pilot's license, he decided it might be time to sell the airplane. Which he did.

Fast forward to this year. Tom is a wheeler-dealer in the farm implement business and has been known to trade motorcycles and snowmobiles for tractors. A customer of Tom's owned a 1976 Cessna 172M. Because of health issues, the customer couldn't fly anymore. Tom thought, “Hmm, maybe I could fly again.” Pilot's licenses never expire. Presto-changeo, Tom traded a tractor for an airplane. It even came with a spare engine.

The airplane was in Burlington and Tom lives in Mt. Pleasant. Tom was under the impression that all he would have to do would be to put some gas in the airplane and fly it to Mt. Pleasant. Wrong. The airplane hadn't been flown in two years and needed to have an annual inspection. It was finally impressed upon Tom that this was an airplane, not a tractor.

The inspections were done and Tom passed his pilot's physical. He looked up his old flight instructor and brushed up on his flying skills. There was no horse on the runway this time.

On his first solo flight, Tom sat at the end of the runway and asked himself, “Do I really want to do this?” A saying kept going through his head, “Takeoffs are optional, landings are mandatory.” He held his breath and went for it.

The only problem was there was fresh snow on the ground, and everything looked different—he lost his perspective. His inclination was to panic, like when you have a scuba mask on and can't breathe. But he kept his composure and made it back to the airport safely. “Wing to the wind, rudder to the runway,” he told himself.

From that point on, his skill set returned. “Heck, flying is like riding a bike,” Tom thought. “You never forget.”

Tom would like to do one of three things: if the right person comes along, he will sell the airplane. Or, if the right person comes along he will form a club to share expenses. If no one comes along, he will keep the airplane.

It's the exhilaration of flying, up there above everything, looking down, the feeling of freedom, working with that edge, maybe, that he and most pilots love. Tom never rides in a big commercial aircraft without being in awe that it can even fly.

He invested in a GoPro, installed it on the dash of the Cessna, and studies his takeoffs and landings. According to his logbook, he's been up 20 times. Tom has plans to visit his brother in Minneapolis, his daughter in Bolingbrook, Illinois, and maybe even his sisters in Florida. Gulp.

During slow times at work, Tom calls the recorded airport message just to hear the voice. “Mt. Pleasant Municipal Airport Automated Weather Observation: One-niner-two-two, zulu, weather: wind calm, visibility one, drizzle, ceiling 600, overcast, temperature: one Celsius, dew point zero, altimeter two-niner-niner-two.”

“Shoot,” Toms says to no one, “It's too crappy to fly.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.oskaloosa.com

Robinson R66 Turbine Marine, RA-07370: Fatal accident occurred July 22, 2019 in Mediterranean Sea near Gorgona' s Island, Livorno, Italy














NTSB Identification: ERA19WA236
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Monday, July 22, 2019 in Gorgona Island, Italy
Aircraft: ROBINSON R66, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of Italy has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a ROBINSON R66 helicopter that occurred on July 22, 2019. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Italy's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All investigative information will be released by the government of Italy.

Zemarcuis Scott: Famous Dex Says He'll Pay Fines, Court Fees and More For Fan Who Tried To Steal A Plane

Last month, a very very dedicated fan who previously tried to steal a plane to go see Famous Dex in concert got sentenced to five years of felony probation. Since the news went viral based on Zemarcuis Scott's crazy stunt, obviously Famous Dex got word of the fan dedication and told TMZ how he plans on doing something about it.

"Nowadays the internet there's so much bullcrap that I thought it was fake," Famous, born Dexter Gore Jr., told the publication. "It was really real. That being said, I'mma fly him out. I'mma put him in the nicest, biggest hotel in LA. I'mma get him, no tickets to the show, but he's gon' stand next to my DJ. So that means he's gon' come in with me. I'mma fly him out to LA and take him shopping."

Read more here ➤ https://www.hotnewhiphop.com


TEXARKANA -- An 18-year-old man arrested July 4th after attempting to steal a commercial jet to fly to a rap concert pleaded guilty Thursday and received a five-year term of felony probation.

Zemarcuis Scott appeared before Circuit Judge Carlton Jones late Thursday afternoon with Managing Public Defender Jason Mitchell and pleaded guilty to attempted theft of property and commercial burglary.

Chief Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Chuck Black said Scott received five years of probation on each charge, to run concurrently. Scott must pay a $1,000 fine, court costs and participate in any mental health treatment deemed necessary by the probation department. Black said Scott is not allowed on Texarkana Regional Airport property while he's on probation.

Scott intended to take an American Eagle twin-engine jet from Texarkana Regional Airport in the early hours of Independence Day to see rapper Famous Dex perform in Illinois, according to a probable cause affidavit and psychological evaluation report.

Airport security personnel had noticed Scott jump a fence onto the property about 2:30 a.m. and immediately called police.

When Texarkana police officers arrived, Scott was sitting in the pilot's seat of the small commercial plane.

Scott told investigators that he wasn't concerned about his lack of training as a pilot and believed that operating the aircraft was just a matter of pulling levers and pushing buttons.

He also told investigators that he had been thinking about stealing a plane for about a month and had been watching the twin-engine jet since 10 p.m. July 3rd.

At a hearing in August at which Scott pleaded innocent to attempted commercial burglary and attempted theft of property, Mitchell asked the court to order a mental evaluation for Scott to determine if he was competent to stand trial.

In a report filed December 21st in Miller County, a psychologist with Southwest Arkansas Counseling and Mental Health Center found that Scott is competent.

Original article ➤ https://www.arkansasonline.com

de Haviland Canada DHC-2 Beaver, C-FBBG: Fatal accident occurred July 11, 2019 in Hawk Junction, near Wawa, Ontario, Canada

NTSB Identification: GAA19WA459
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Thursday, July 11, 2019 in Hawk Junction ON-Canada
Aircraft: DE HAVILLAND DHC2, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


The government of Canada has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a DE HAVILLAND DHC2 airplane that occurred on July 11, 2019. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Canada's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.


All investigative information will be released by the government of Canada.





"It’s with great sadness that we announce the passing of two of our Hawk Air Family. Pilot, Adam Hobbs and co-worker, Bob Gregorini died in a plane crash shortly after take off from Hawk Lake July 11. Mary and I will do our best to fulfill our obligations for this season. Thank you for all your condolences at this difficult time." -Hawk Air

Hawk Air, a remote fly-in fishing charter located in Wawa, has released some more details on Thursday's fatal plane crash in Hawk Junction.

The company has identified two of its employees as victims in the July 11 crash.

In a Facebook post, it says pilot Adam Hobbs and co-worker Bob Gregorini died in the incident that happened shortly after taking off from Hawk Lake.

Ontario Provincial Police confirmed that two people were on board the plane when it crashed.

A small plane, owned by Hawk Air, crashed just outside of Wawa Thursday morning leaving no survivors.

CTV News has learned that at least two people in the De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver floatplane, both men, have been killed, including the pilot.

It happened near a power substation in the small town east of Wawa around 9 am July 11.

Algoma Power attended to assist with the resulting power outage in the area. 

Transport Canada has been contacted and will be attending the scene. The OPP Forensic Identification Services Unit (FISU) is also assisting with the investigation.

Montgomery Road in Hawk Junction, Ontario, remains closed (other than to local traffic) and will remain so for several hours. OPP is reminding motorists to please avoid the area while the investigation is ongoing.  There has been a plane crash in Hawk Junction, a small town just outside of Wawa, three hours north of Sault Ste. Marie.

de Havilland DH.82a Tiger Moth, N54556: Fatal accident occurred July 21, 2019 in Hythe, Kent, United Kingdom

https://registry.faa.gov/N54556



NTSB Identification: GAA19WA460
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Sunday, July 21, 2019 in Hythe, Kent-UK, United Kingdom
Aircraft: DE HAVILLAND DH82, registration: N54556
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of United Kingdom has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a DE HAVILLAND DH82 airplane that occurred on July 21, 2019. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of United Kingdom's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All investigative information will be released by the government of United Kingdom.

JetBlue, Airbus A320-200, N705JB: Incident occurred September 24, 2019 at Palm Beach International Airport (KPBI), Palm Beach County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft struck a bird and on inspection a hole in the radome was discovered.

JetBlue Airways Corporation

https://registry.faa.gov/N705JB

Date: 24-SEP-19
Time: 15:45:00Z
Regis#: JBU643
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A320
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
City: WEST PALM BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Robinson R22 Mariner, RA-1789G: Fatal accident occurred July 14, 2019 in Solnechnogorsk, Moscow Oblast, Russia


NTSB Identification: ANC19WA041
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Sunday, July 14, 2019 in Moscow, Russia
Aircraft: ROBINSON R22, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On July 14, 2019, at 1551 Moscow time, a Russian registered Robinson R-22M helicopter was destroyed after impacting terrain after takeoff from the Shevlino landing site, Moscow region, Russian Federation. The helicopter was privately owned and operated. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Russian Federation Interstate Aviation Committee. This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the Russian government. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from: 

Russian Federation
Interstate Aviation Committee
22/2/1Bolshaya Ordynka Str.,
Moscow, 119017, Russia
Tel.: (1) 495-953-12-44
E-mail: mak@mak.ru
Website: http://www.mak.ru

Robinson R44 Raven II, Parker Equipment Hire Ltd, DQ-HPT: Fatal accident occurred August 02, 2019 in Nateway Bay, off Korotasere, Fiji

NTSB Identification: WPR19WA234
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Friday, August 02, 2019 in Korotasere, Cakaudrove, Fiji
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration:
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On August 2, 2019, about 1830 local time, a Robinson R44 Helicopter, DQ-HPT, impacted the ocean about 4 nautical miles east of Korotasere, Cakaudrove, Fiji under unknown circumstances. The commercial pilot and two passengers are presumed to be fatally injured, and the helicopter was unable to be located. The helicopter was operated under the pertinent civil regulations of the government to Fiji.

The Civil Aviation Authority of Fiji (CAAF) is investigating the accident. As state of manufacturer of the helicopter and engine, the NTSB has designated a US accredited representative to assist the CAAF in its investigation.

The Civil Aviation Authority of Fiji
Private Mail Bag
Nap 0354
Nadi Airport
Fiji
Telephone: 679 672 1555
Email: info@caaf.org.fj
FAX: 679 672 1500

Aerotek Pitts S-2A Special, G-ODDS, Ultimate Aerobatics: Fatal accident occurred August 24, 2019 in Stonor, near Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom

NTSB Identification: CEN19WA286
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Saturday, August 24, 2019 in Stonor Oxforshire, United Kingdom
Aircraft: Pitts S2, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of United Kingdom has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a Pitts S2 airplane that occurred on August 24, 2019. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of United Kingdom's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All investigative information will be released by the government of United Kingdom.




A top aerobatic pilot who taught Countdown’s Carol Vorderman to loop-the-loop has died while performing a mid-air stunt.

Emily Collett, 36, was practicing spins with Tom Castle, 30, when the Pitts S-2A two-seater crashed into a field.

Police said they were pronounced dead at the scene on Saturday near Stonor village in Oxfordshire.

Air Accidents Investigation Branch experts carried out an on-site examination yesterday before the light aircraft was lifted on to a low loader and driven to their Hampshire HQ.

Emily had earlier taken off from White Waltham airfield near Maidenhead, Berks, where she and husband Mike ran Ultimate Aerobatics. Both were pilots who competed as part of the British Aerobatics team.

Emily had learned her skills in the Pitts S-2A which crashed and taught TV’s Countdown legend Carol in it in July, 2017.

Carol posted snaps of the pair and wrote: “I loved doing the loop with this top woman Emily Collett . . . just brilliant x.”

In a haunting message on her website, ­Cambridge- educated Emily said of the plane: “She shows up all your mistakes, so that you quickly learn how to ­prevent them!”

Graeme Fudge, from the British Aerobatic Association, said: "Emily was an incredibly talented and highly experienced aerobatic pilot.

"A caring and considerate nature, Emily’s generosity in sharing her knowledge and time to help others was well known in the aerobatic community and beyond, helping many pilots achieve their goals.

"Emily will be sadly missed by all who knew her and our thoughts are with her family and friends who have lost a wonderful daughter, wife and friend."

https://www.thesun.co.uk

SkyWest Airlines, Canadair Regional Jet CRJ-700, N760SK: Incident occurred October 02, 2019 at Santa Fe Municipal Airport (KSAF), New Mexico

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque

Aircraft on landing struck a bird.

https://registry.faa.gov/N760SK

Date: 02-OCT-19
Time: 21:19:00Z
Regis#: N760SK
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CL600 2C10
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Flight Number: SKW3163
City: SANTA FE
State: NEW MEXICO

Delta Air Lines, McDonnell Douglas MD-88, N974DL: Incident occurred October 03, 2019 at Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (KSAV), Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta

Aircraft aborted takeoff due to engine failure and it appeared debris came loose and caught the grass on fire.

Delta Air Lines Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N974DL

Date: 03-OCT-19
Time: 21:03:00Z
Regis#: DAL1983
Aircraft Make: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS
Aircraft Model: MD88
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
City: SAVANNAH
State: GEORGIA

Medical Event: X-Air XA85, N20XA; fatal accident occurred December 23, 2017 in Oskaloosa, Mahaska County, Iowa

Bruce Gene Devick


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa (and) Ankeny, Iowa

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N20XA



Location: Oskaloosa, IA
Accident Number: CEN18FA060
Date & Time: 12/23/2017, 1420 CST
Registration: N20XA
Aircraft: X-AIR LLC XA85
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Medical event
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 23, 2017, about 1420 central standard time, a light sport X-Air LLC XA85 airplane, N20XA, collided with power lines while maneuvering at low altitude near Oskaloosa, Iowa. The private pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to the pilot who was operating it as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, departed Oskaloosa Municipal Airport (OOA), about 1345 with the intended destination of Marshalltown Municipal Airport (MIW), Marshalltown, Iowa.

The pilot's partner reported that they had driven to OOA to retrieve the airplane after the left main tire was replaced because it had deflated during a landing at OOA on December 16. The plan was for the pilot to fly the airplane back to MIW by himself. After arriving at OOA, the airplane was pulled out of the hangar for a preflight inspection. The partner noted that it was extremely cold and that the pilot taxied the airplane between 5 and 10 minutes to warm up the engine before the flight while she configured the onboard GPS to navigate to Grinnell Regional Airport, Grinnell, Iowa, an intermediate airport along the direct route to MIW. After the engine had warmed up, the pilot taxied back to the fixed base operator (FBO), where he stopped the engine and the pilot's partner exited the airplane. The pilot's partner stated that she and the airport manager watched the pilot start the airplane, taxi to the runway, and take off about 1345. She noted that the pilot had flown between OOA and MIW numerous times and that his use of the GPS to navigate would not have been necessary for the flight. She further noted that the pilot typically flew the airplane at 3,500 ft mean sea level (msl) during cruise flight.

A review of available Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control (ATC) radar data revealed no transponder or primary track data that could be correlated to the accident flight. The lower limit of ATC radar coverage in the general area of the accident site was about 2,000 ft above ground level (agl).

Several witnesses reported seeing an airplane flying at low altitude in the general area of Oskaloosa, Iowa. One witness, who was driving south on Highway 63 about 1/2 mile east of the accident site, reported seeing an airplane flying west at low altitude near 210th Street. There were no eyewitnesses to the final portion of the flight; however, an individual heard the airplane's engine from inside his residence located near the accident site. After the crash, he saw the airplane in the field outside his residence and flames from the power lines along the road. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 70, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/06/2012
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1806 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2.9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2.2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

According to FAA records, the 70-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane ratings. His most recent aviation medical examination was on July 6, 2012, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses. On the application for that medical certificate, the pilot reported 1,610 hours of total flight experience, of which 26 hours were flown within the previous 6 months. The medical certificate expired on July 31, 2014; however, federal regulations only required the pilot to possess a valid driver's license to operate the light sport airplane. According to local law enforcement, the pilot held a valid Iowa driver's license. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings.

The pilot's logbook was not located during the investigation. On June 6, 2016, the pilot reported a total flight experience of 1,806 hours on an insurance application for the accident airplane. An airplane use log recovered from the wreckage was used to calculate the pilot's recent flight experience. According to the airplane use log, he had flown 16.9, 11.7, 2.9, and 2.2 hours during the 1 year, 6 months, 90 days, and 30 days before the accident, respectively. The accident flight was about 35 minutes and was the only flight conducted within 24 hours of the accident.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: X-AIR LLC
Registration: N20XA
Model/Series: XA85 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2009
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport
Serial Number: XA850006
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/27/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1234 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 20 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 308.5 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Jabiru
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 2200J
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 85 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The two-seat, light sport airplane, serial number XA850006, was manufactured in 2009 and was a high-wing monoplane constructed of aluminum tubes covered with fabric. The airplane was powered by an 85-horsepower, 4-cylinder, Jabiru 2200J reciprocating engine, serial number 22J795. The engine provided thrust through a ground-adjustable, two-blade, DUC Hélices Swirl propeller, serial number 5339. The airplane was equipped with fixed tricycle landing gear and wing flaps and had a maximum gross weight of 1,234 pounds. The FAA issued the light sport airplane a special airworthiness certificate and associated operating limitations on March 18, 2009.

The airplane's hour meter indicated 308.5 hours at the accident site. The most recent condition inspection of the airplane was completed on June 27, 2017, at 288.6 total airframe hours.

According to the airplane's pilot operating handbook, the expected cruise speed was about 90 mph with the engine operating at 2,900 rpm.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OOA, 840 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1415 CST
Direction from Accident Site: 133°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 350°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.24 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: -6°C / -11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Oskaloosa, IA (OOA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Marshalltown, IA (MIW)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1345 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G

A postaccident review of available meteorological data established that day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The nearest aviation weather reporting station was located at OOA, about 12 miles southeast of the accident site. At 1415, about 5 minutes before the accident, the automated surface observing system reported wind from 350° at 9 knots, 10 miles surface visibility, a clear sky, temperature -6°C, dew point -11°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.24 inches of mercury. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 41.344167, -92.662778 

The accident site was located in an open agricultural field about 12 miles north-northwest of the departure airport. The initial point of impact was a power line about 35 ft above the ground. The damage to the airplane was consistent with it impacting the ground in a nose-down pitch attitude on a southerly heading. The airplane subsequently came to rest inverted in the field about 230 ft from the power line. An 80-ft section of steel-braided power line was found wrapped around the main landing gear. The nose gear had separated from the airframe. All major structural components and flight controls were identified at the accident site, and flight control continuity was confirmed. The wing flaps were found fully retracted. First responders reported that they turned the electric master switch from ON to OFF. The electric fuel pump switch was in the ON position. Both electronic ignition switches were in the ON position. The starting fuel control was in the OFF position. The carburetor heat control was in the OFF position. The cabin heat control was in the ON position. The altimeter's Kollsman window was centered on 30.24 inches of mercury. The communication radio was turned on, and the active frequency was set to the common traffic advisory frequency for the departure airport. First responders reported that they observed fuel leaking from the estimated half-full fuselage tank. The fuel tank was subsequently removed from the fuselage. The fuel selector was found in the ON position. The engine remained attached to the fuselage through its engine mounts. An external examination of the engine did not reveal any damage. The carbon-composite propeller was fragmented. The damaged propeller was removed from the engine to facilitate an operational engine test. The engine started and ran at various engine speeds without any hesitation or anomalies. The postaccident airframe examination and operational engine test revealed no evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal operation. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Iowa Office of State Medical Examiner, Ankeny, Iowa, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was attributed to multiple blunt force injuries. The medical examiner also identified atherosclerotic and thrombotic cardiovascular disease, and the probable component of positional asphyxia. Toxicological test results from the autopsy identified warfarin and diphenhydramine (0.062 ug/ml) in femoral blood. Clinical testing for electrolytes in vitreous were normal for postmortem results.

The autopsy identified several areas of significant natural disease. At some point previously, the pilot had had his left lung completely removed. There was a scar in his larynx. The heart was enlarged, weighing 560 grams with right ventricular dilation and a floppy mitral valve. Average heart weight for a 215-pound man is 387 grams with a range of 293 to 511 grams. There was severe coronary artery disease with 50% stenosis of the left anterior descending vessel, 75% stenosis of the anterolateral distribution of the right coronary artery, and greater than 75% stenosis of the posterior descending branch. The right and posterior descending branches had areas of brown discoloration of the wall consistent with previous hemorrhage into the plaques. In addition, these vessels had partial occlusion of the lumen by intraluminal thrombus (clot). The remainder of the cardiac exam was unremarkable.

A neuropathologist examined the brain as part of the postmortem examination. The cerebral vessels revealed moderate to severe atherosclerosis and the intracerebral vessels demonstrated vasculopathy that could not be specifically typed. There were lacunar infarcts (previous small strokes) scattered throughout the right and left frontal lobes and the right occipital lobe. There was an area of scar in the left frontal lobe consistent with a previous brain contusion.

Toxicology testing performed at the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory identified atorvastatin, diphenhydramine (0.072 µg/ml), gabapentin (12.79 µg/ml), loratadine, losartan, metoprolol, sotalol, and warfarin in femoral blood. Except for loratadine and metoprolol, the above substances were also detected in urine. Metoprolol was detected in liver. The toxicology results were negative for carboxyhemoglobin in femoral blood and ethanol in vitreous.

Diphenhydramine is a sedating antihistamine used to treat allergy symptoms and as a sleep aid. It is available over-the-counter under various names, including Benadryl and Unisom. Diphenhydramine carries the following warning: "May impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery)." Compared to other antihistamines, diphenhydramine causes marked sedation; it is also classed as a CNS depressant and this is the rationale for its use as a sleep aid. Altered mood and impaired cognitive and psychomotor performance may also be observed. In fact, in a driving simulator study, a single dose of diphenhydramine impaired driving ability more than a blood alcohol concentration of 0.100%. The range of blood levels thought to coincide with therapeutic and psychoactive effects from diphenhydramine is 0.0250 to 0.1120 µg/ml.

Gabapentin, commonly marketed with the name Neurontin, is an antiseizure medication often used to treat nerve pain. The associated drug information warns that gabapentin may cause dizziness, somnolence, and other symptoms and signs of CNS (central nervous system) depression. The range of blood levels thought to coincide with therapeutic and psychoactive effects from gabapentin is 2.00 to 10.00 µg/ml.

Metoprolol is a beta-blocker used to treat hypertension and to prevent recurrent heart attacks, commonly marketed with the names Lopressor and Toprol. Sotalol is another beta blocker with more prominent pro- and anti-arrhythmic effects. It is indicated for the treatment of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and atrial fibrillation with significant symptoms. Sotalol is associated with an increased risk of a life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, Torsade de Pointe.

Warfarin is a blood thinning medication used to prevent the formation of clots in patients with atrial fibrillation or other thrombotic disorders. Commonly marketed with the name Coumadin, treatment requires regular blood testing to ensure the degree of blood thinning remains in the desired range. It is associated with an increased risk of bleeding.

Loratadine, commonly marketed with the name Claritin, is a non-sedating antihistamine available over-the-counter. Losartan is a prescription blood pressure medication commonly marketed with the name Cozaar. Atorvastatin is a cholesterol-lowering medication commonly marketed with the name Lipitor. These three medications as well as metoprolol, sotalol, and warfarin are not generally considered to be impairing.

The pilot's personal medical records, obtained from the pilot's primary care provider for the period from January 1, 2015, through December 23, 2017, were reviewed by a National Transportation Safety Board Medical Officer. The first office visit during this period was on February 9, 2015, at which time the pilot's medical conditions included type 2 diabetes, hypothyroidism, hypertension, high cholesterol, sarcoidosis, a history of squamous cell cancer of the neck during 1999, a snoring disorder other than sleep apnea treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (initial diagnosis July 2011), a transient ischemic attack (January 4, 2013) and a spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (March 2013). The pilot had a previous hernia surgery as a child and bilateral carotid stents placed in January 2013 (left) and February 2013 (right).

Over the subsequent years, the pilot remained off diabetes medication with a hemoglobin A1C that ranged from 6.1 to 6.9%. In July 2015, the pilot developed atrial fibrillation as a complication of sepsis from a urinary tract infection. In August 2015, the pilot was diagnosed with non-occlusive coronary artery disease by cardiac catheterization and underwent cardioversion that returned him to a normal sinus rhythm. Detailed catheterization results were not available in the primary care records. In June 2016, the pilot fell a couple of times at home and had lower-than-usual blood pressures. He had also developed a cough. The chest X-ray findings were initially thought to represent a pneumonia, but the symptoms failed to clear and additional evaluation demonstrated squamous cell lung cancer. In August 2016, the pilot underwent a left pneumonectomy, and in September 2016 had a central venous port placed in order to receive chemotherapy. He also received external beam radiation. During November 2016, the pilot developed peripheral neuropathy as a result of the chemotherapy with numbness and tingling in his fingertips and the bottoms of his feet and difficulty with balance. His strength and mobility improved with physical therapy and his subjective symptoms were treated with gabapentin.

Records from November 26, 2017, indicate that the pilot had developed a cough, dizziness, and shortness of breath. He was admitted to the hospital with pneumonia in his remaining lung. He was discharged but returned to the emergency department with persistent symptoms and weakness and was readmitted. At his last outpatient visit, dated December 18, 2017, the pilot's daily medications included warfarin, losartan, metoprolol, gabapentin, magnesium, cholecalciferol (Vitamin D), cyanocobalamin (Vitamin B-12), pyridoxine (Vitamin B-6), atorvastatin, levothyroxine, diphenhydramine, sotalol, and loratadine.

The pilot's partner stated that the pilot's health had been a "little off" from pneumonia during the previous 2 months. She noted that, on occasion, the pilot would hold onto her arm for support when walking. She added that the pilot's mental condition was normal for a 70-year-old individual.

The airport manager at MIW reported that he recently saw the pilot walking with difficulty into the FBO building. The airport manager also stated that the pilot seemed to be talking slower than normal and was out of breath. The airport manager believed the pilot's general health had worsened during the previous 2 months.

Tests And Research

The airplane was equipped with a Dynon EMS-D10 electronic engine monitor. The undamaged device was removed from the instrument panel and its non-volatile memory was downloaded. A review of the recovered engine parameter data revealed consistent readings throughout the flight and no anomalies with engine operation. According to the recovered data, 35 minutes 40 seconds into the flight, the engine speed abruptly decreased from a typical cruise power setting (2,850 rpm) to 0 rpm and the oil pressure dropped from 67 psi to 0 psi. The end of the accident flight was identified by the abrupt decrease of the engine speed and a momentary power interruption to device. The abrupt engine stoppage, loss of oil pressure, and momentary power interruption were consistent with the airplane's impact with the power line and terrain.

The airplane was equipped with a Garmin GPSmap 396. The GPS device was normally installed in a cradle located on the right side of the instrument panel. The GPS device was recovered outside of the airplane with no apparent damage. The device had separated from its antenna coaxial cable and external power supply during impact. The device was powered-on using its battery, and its non-volatile track data was downloaded. A review of the downloaded data established that the last recorded flight was on December 16, 2017, from MIW to OOA. There was no track data recorded on the day of the accident. Further examination of the last recorded map position, alerts, and calendar/clock established that the device was not powered on during the accident flight. A review of the device settings revealed that it was configured to automatically power on when an external power source was detected and to automatically record the airplane's flight path. The device normally received power through the airplane's electrical system and was protected by a 3-ampere, fast-acting fuse installed on the primary bus. A postaccident examination of the fuse associated with the GPS external power supply revealed that it had blown; however, the GPS battery remained installed and was capable of powering on the device if the power button was depressed. 

Additional Information

The intended destination (MIW) was 65 miles north-northwest of the departure airport (OOA), and the estimated time en route was about 43 minutes based on the typical cruise airspeed (90 mph) for the airplane with no wind.