Saturday, January 27, 2018

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, N7905P, N7905P LLC : Incident occurred January 27, 2018 at North Las Vegas Airport (KVGT), Clark County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas

Aircraft on landing experience a gear collapsed.

N7905P LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N7905P

Date: 28-JAN-18
Time: 01:36:00Z
Regis#: N7905P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 24 250
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LAS VEGAS
State: NEVADA

NORTH LAS VEGAS, Nev. (KSNV) —   A small plane was involved in an emergency landing Saturday evening at the North Las Vegas Airport.

According to McCarran International Airport, the emergency landing was reported around 5:37 p.m.

The small plane, identified as a Comanche, landed without its landing gear.


The plane landed safely and no injuries were reported.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://news3lv.com

A small aircraft had to make an emergency landing at the North Las Vegas Airport around 5:37 p.m. 

Officials say it didn't have any landing gear.

The plane was able to land safely with no injuries.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktnv.com

Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) E/A-18G Growler Electronic Warfare Platform: Incident occurred January 27, 2018 on Nellis Air Force Base, Clark County, Nevada

An airman from the Royal Australian Air Force participates in Red Flag exercises at Nellis Air Force Base, Clark County, Nevada, January 26, 2018


An aircraft from the Royal Australian Air Force arrives at Nellis Air Force Base for Red Flag exercises, Clark County, Nevada, January 26, 2018 



ST. GEORGE — A military aircraft burst into flames Saturday morning at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada following an incident during takeoff.

Emergency personnel responded to the incident at 10:45 a.m. PST on the Nellis Air Force Base flight line.

A Royal Australian Air Force E/A-18G Growler Electronic Warfare Platform experienced a critical engine failure upon takeoff at Nellis Air Force Base, according to a Twitter post by national security analyst firm Strategic Sentinel.

“The aircraft skidded off the runway and the pilot was able to exit the aircraft safely,” the tweet reads. “Both the pilot and ground crew are safe.”

No serious injuries have been reported, according to a news release issued by the base.

Smoke could reportedly be seen billowing from the area of the crash from several miles away. The base is situated just northwest of Las Vegas.

Members of the Royal Australian Air Force are currently at Nellis Air Force Base participating in Red Flag exercises currently underway.

Story and photos ➤ https://www.stgeorgeutah.com

Incident occurred January 27, 2018 in New Jersey

Authorities ended their search for a missing plane after the aircraft was reported to have landed in New Jersey.

Contact with the plane, described as a propeller plane, was lost at about 10:30 a.m., according to police radio reports. 

Authorities were initially converging on the area of Walnut Drive and Sycamore Drive in Lehigh Township.

The Northampton County 911 Center was told the plane had landed in New Jersey.

The Federal Aviation Administration could not immediately be reached for more information.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.mcall.com

Low-flying helicopter to measure radiation levels during Super Bowl festivities

If you're headed downtown to partake in Super Bowl festivities over the coming week, you might see a low-flying helicopter circling above you.

It's a good chance that helicopter is measuring "naturally occurring background radiation," a routine test performed by the federal government during large public events, according to the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

A twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter is expected to take measurements around Minneapolis from Monday to February 5, according to the NNSA. It is operated by the Remote Sensing Laboratory Aerial Measuring System in Joint Base Andrews, a Maryland military facility.

The helicopter will fly about 80 miles per hour in a grid pattern 300 feet above ground or higher. The tests will only be done during daylight hours and usually take about three days, according to the administration.

This baseline level of radiation in the city is then used toward security and emergency preparedness measures, according to the NNSA.

The radiation-testing helicopter will be just one of many small planes and copters buzzing the city's skies during Super Bowl week.

Many of them owe their presence to heightened security measures, others to monitoring traffic, yet others for aerial TV coverage and practice flights before the game itself.

Story and comments ➤ http://www.startribune.com

American Airlines, Airbus A330-300: Incident occurred January 27, 2018 at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (KPHX), Maricopa County, Arizona



An American Airlines flight headed toward Honolulu returned to Phoenix on Saturday afternoon because of a mechanical issue, officials said.

Flight 692 left Sky Harbor International Airportabout 2 p.m., but the pilot reported a mechanical issue and rerouted the flight back to the airport, Phoenix fire spokesman Capt. Rob McDade said. 

The plane carrying 270 passengers and 10 crew members was nearing California when the plane's maintenance indicator light turned on, said American Airlines spokeswoman Katie Cody.

Fire crews were staged at the airport's north runway at 3:30 p.m. Online flight-tracking systems showed the plane, an Airbus 330, landed about 3:35. McDade confirmed the plane landed without incident. 

Cody said the flight was canceled and passengers were being rebooked on other flights as of Saturday afternoon. 

No further details about the aircraft were immediately available.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.azcentral.com

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N9673W: Accident occurred January 27, 2018 near Meriden Markham Municipal Airport (KMMK), Meriden, New Haven County, Connecticut

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Windsor Locks, Connecticut 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N9673W

Location: Meriden, CT
Accident Number: ERA18LA071
Date & Time: 01/27/2018, 1615 EST
Registration: N9673W
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 27, 2018, about 1615 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-28-140, N9673W, was substantially damaged during a forced landing while approaching Meriden Markham Municipal Airport (MMK), Meriden, Connecticut. The airline transport pilot and one passenger were seriously injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for flight that originated at Oxford County Regional Airport (81B), Oxford, Maine about 1330.

The pilot reported that he planned to fly from MMK to 81B and return the same day. He departed MMK with 36 gallons of fuel on board and the flight to 81B was uneventful. He did not refuel at 81B. During the return flight, his flight planning showed that he would land with 6 gallons of fuel on board. Just prior to passing Worcester, Massachusetts, while on the right tank, the fuel gauge began to "flicker," then the engine "faltered." He switched to the left tank and the flight continued. Approaching the Hartford, Connecticut area, his passenger suggested that they stop for fuel, but he was confident in his fuel calculations and did not want to pay a higher price for fuel there, so he continued. About 2.5 miles north of MMK, the fuel pressure gauge flickered and the engine subsequently lost power. He looked for a place to land and realized that a nearby pond would be the best option. During the forced landing attempt, the airplane collided with a fence and came to a stop on dry land.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The airplane came to rest on an embankment after colliding with a chain link fence. Both wings and the lower, forward fuselage was structurally damaged. The left and right wing fuel tanks were not compromised. The airplane was moved to a level position and no visible fuel was observed in either fuel tank.

The wreckage was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N9673W
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MMK, 103 ft msl
Observation Time: 1553 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 8°C / 1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots, 180°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.29 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Oxford, ME (81B)
Destination: Meriden, CT (MMK) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  41.520000, -72.820000 (est)



A small plane crashed in Meriden, Conn., Saturday afternoon, leaving multiple occupants with non-life-threatening injuries, a Meriden police sergeant said.

Police received a report of the crash near 835 Hanover Road at 4:16 p.m., Fry said.

Tony Gianakos, 75, said he was at the American Legion Post at that address with about a dozen other people when he saw the plane quickly descend from the sky. It clipped the top of a fence surrounding a nearby baseball field before coming to a rest on the ground about 150 feet behind the building, he said.

“The first thing [we did] was to see if someone needs help,” Gianakos said. The Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee was damaged, and a man and a woman were inside, he said.

“The woman was already out of the plane, and [the man] was halfway out of the wing, and we pulled him out,” Gianakos said. “He was banged up a bit, but nothing life-threatening. We called 911 right away.”

Neither person’s injuries appeared life-threatening, he said. The man who piloted the plane was bleeding and his face was “banged up,” and the woman was clutching her leg, he said.

No one on the ground was injured, Gianakos said.

Meriden police and firefighters quickly arrived at the scene, and both of the plane’s occupants were taken away by ambulance, he said.

A Meriden Fire Department dispatcher said no one was immediately available to provide further information.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.bostonglobe.com





MERIDEN, CT (WFSB -  Police, Fire, and EMS crews are responding to a small plane crash on Hanover Rd in Meriden.

The Federal Aviation Administration said a Piper PA-28 aircraft made a crash landing with two people on board behind the American Legions Post 45 building at around 4 p.m. on Saturday.

A bartender at the American Legions told Eyewitness News that she heard the crash and called 911 to report that an older couple was injured. 

Eyewitness News Reporter Jennifer Lee is on scene of the crash. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.wfsb.com




A small plane carrying two people crashed in Connecticut on Saturday afternoon, officials said. 

The conditions of the two passengers aboard the Piper PA-28 aircraft wasn't immediately known. 

The Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee crashed in Meriden around 4 p.m., according to Kathleen Bergen, a spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration. 

Photos from the scene show the aircraft in a park near Hanover Pond off Hanover Road. The plane doesn't appear to be seriously damaged. 

Bergen said the FAA will release the aircraft registration after local authorities release the names and conditions of the two people on board. 

The FAA is investigating and the NTSB will determine the probable cause of the accident, Bergen said. 

Story and video ➤  https://www.nbcnewyork.com

Vans RV-10, N9738J, regisiered to Gemini Professionals LLC: Accident occurred December 07, 2017 near Limon Municipal Airport (KLIC), Lincoln County, Colorado

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 


Gemini Professionals LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N9738J




Location: Limon, CO

Accident Number: GAA18CA075
Date & Time: 12/07/2017, 1950 MST
Registration: N9738J
Aircraft: JONES KENT C VANS RV-10
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The pilot reported that, during a night approach, the runway precision approach path indicator lights indicated that the airplane was on a proper glidepath. Shortly after, the airplane encountered a "strong gust of wind" and "lost significant altitude." He added engine power and raised the airplane's nose to intercept the glidepath. A few seconds later, he felt a slight bump and heard a scraping noise to his right. He looked to the right, and when he returned his focus to the approaching runway, he noticed that the airport lights were no longer lit, and the airport was in "complete darkness." He added that he "couldn't really see anything and wasn't sure exactly where the runway was, [but he] knew [he] was going to have a hard landing." He then pulled the power back, moved the mixture to idle cut off, and turned the fuel selector off. Subsequently, the airplane landed hard off the runway, bounced, slid sideways, struck a tree, and then came to rest.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, both wings, and empennage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Following the accident, it was discovered that, during the approach, the airplane struck a power line that supplied the airport power.

The automated weather observation system at the accident airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 330° at 6 knots. The pilot was on a visual approach for runway 34.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector assigned to the accident, the power line was estimated to be 75 ft above the ground and 1/2 mile from the runway threshold. The power line crossed perpendicular to the runway.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 
The pilot's unstabilized approach and failure to go around at night, which resulted in the airplane impacting a power line and a subsequent hard landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Descent/approach/glide path - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Wire - Effect on operation (Cause)
Gusts - Effect on operation
Dark - Effect on personnel
Tree(s) - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach
Other weather encounter
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Landing
Hard landing
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 45, Male 
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/23/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 355 hours (Total, all aircraft), 259.4 hours (Total, this make and model), 315 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 109.9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 28.4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: JONES KENT C
Registration: N9738J
Model/Series: VANS RV-10 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2010
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 40296
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/05/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2700 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 925 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-X
Registered Owner: GEMINI PROFESSIONALS LLC
Rated Power: 290 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLIC, 5374 ft msl
Observation Time: 0255 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 270°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: -3°C / -12°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots, 330°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: OLATHE, KS (OJC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Limon, CO (LIC)
Type of Clearance: VFR; VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1745 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: LIMON MUNI (LIC)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 5374 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4700 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Precautionary Landing; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  39.275000, -103.665833 (est)

Zenith STOL CH701, N701TF: Accident occurred December 01, 2017 at Mount Airy/Surry County Airport (KMWK), North Carolina

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N701TF 

Accident Number: GAA18CA067
Date & Time: 12/01/2017, 1600 EST
Registration: N701TF
Aircraft: TODD FOLEY ZENITH 701
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:
Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack during takeoff, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

Findings

Aircraft
Angle of attack - Capability exceeded (Cause)
Heading/course - Not attained/maintained

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Aerodynamic stall/spin
Abnormal runway contact
Part(s) separation from AC
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Roll over

Analysis

The pilot of the experimental amateur-built airplane reported that, during takeoff, he raised the nose after reaching about 20 miles per hour (mph), and about 40 mph the airplane lifted off the runway. He "held the stick back just a little [too] long and it started to tip stall to the left and [he] pushed the stick forward." He added that he applied right aileron and rudder because the airplane was drifting to the left side of the runway. Subsequently, the airplane aerodynamically stalled, bounced on the runway and the right wheel separated from the airplane. He then, with full power, continued to fly and make right aileron and rudder inputs to get back over the runway. The airplane impacted the ground and came to rest inverted.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, empennage and wings.

The automated weather observation system at the accident airport reported, that about the time of the accident, the wind was from 090° at 4 knots. The pilot was departing on runway 18.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 62, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/24/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/22/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 185 hours (Total, all aircraft), 185 hours (Total, this make and model), 125 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: TODD FOLEY
Registration: N701TF
Model/Series: ZENITH 701 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2016
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 4714
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/04/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 940 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT:  C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: 912
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMWK, 1247 ft msl
Observation Time: 2105 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 178°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point:  17°C / -3°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 90°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:  Mount Airy, NC (MWK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:  Mount Airy, NC (MWK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1600 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: MOUNT AIRY/SURRY COUNTY (MWK)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1249 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4301 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  36.461111, -80.553056 (est)

Preventing Similar Accidents  

Prevent Aerodynamic Stalls at Low Altitude

While maneuvering an airplane at low altitude in visual meteorological conditions, many pilots fail to avoid conditions that lead to an aerodynamic stall, recognize the warning signs of a stall onset, and apply appropriate recovery techniques. Many stall accidents result when a pilot is momentarily distracted from the primary task of flying, such as while maneuvering in the airport traffic pattern, during an emergency, or when fixating on ground objects.

An aerodynamic stall can happen at any airspeed, at any altitude, and with any engine power setting. Pilots need to be honest with themselves about their knowledge of stalls and preparedness to recognize and handle a stall situation. Training can help pilots fully understand the stall phenomenon, including angle-of-attack (AOA) concepts and how weight, center of gravity, turbulence, maneuvering loads, and other factors can affect an airplane's stall characteristics. The stall characteristics may be different in each type of airplane, so learn them before you fly.

The stall airspeeds marked on the airspeed indicator (for example, the bottom of the green arc and the bottom of the white arc) typically represent steady flight speeds at 1G at the airplane's maximum gross weight in the specified configuration. Maneuvering loads and other factors can increase the airspeed at which the airplane will stall. For example, increasing bank angle can increase stall speed exponentially.

Reducing AOA by lowering the airplane's nose at the first indication of a stall is the most important immediate response for stall avoidance and stall recovery. This may seem counterintuitive at low altitudes, but is a necessary first step.

See http://www.ntsb.gov/safety/safety-alerts/documents/SA_019.pdf for additional resources.


The NTSB presents this information to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Note that this should not be considered guidance from the regulator, nor does this supersede existing FAA Regulations (FARs).

Hughes 269C, N9685F, Charlottesville Aero LLC: Accident occurred November 22, 2017 in Woodlawn, Carroll County, Virginia

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charleston, West Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N9685F

Location: Woodlawn, VA
Accident Number: GAA18CA060
Date & Time: 11/22/2017, 1100 EST
Registration: N9685F
Aircraft: HUGHES 300
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis


The helicopter pilot reported that, he was landing on a pad in a confined area. He added that, as he approached the landing pad, he slowed the helicopter to transition to a hover. The main rotor RPM began to drop and he applied full throttle, but the RPM continued to decline. The helicopter was unable to maintain altitude and slowly settled into the trees on the hillside about 20 ft. short of the landing pad. Subsequently, the helicopter struck the trees, and rolled onto its right-side.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and main rotor system.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that, after the accident, he noticed there was a significant right quartering tailwind, which required the application of more left pedal than anticipated. He further explained that the increased application of anti-torque pedal lessened the available power to maintain the main rotor RPM. He concluded the approach could have been completed safely with a steeper and faster approach to better manage engine power. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 

The pilot's inappropriate descent profile during landing with a quartering gusting tailwind, which resulted in a loss of main rotor rpm. 

Findings

Aircraft
Descent/approach/glide path - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Tailwind - Effect on operation
Gusts - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Miscellaneous/other
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Attempted remediation/recovery
Settling with power/vortex ring state
Landing area undershoot
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Roll over

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/11/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/26/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 4241 hours (Total, all aircraft), 127 hours (Total, this make and model), 4173 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 34 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: HUGHES
Registration: N9685F
Model/Series: 300 C
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1972
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 620147
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 3
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/08/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2050 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5598 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: HIO-360-D1A
Registered Owner: CHARLOTTESVILLE AERO LLC
Rated Power: 190 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHLX, 2693 ft msl
Observation Time: 1555 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 96°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / -2°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 17 knots/ 25 knots, 320°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: GALAX HILLSVILLE, VA (HLX)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Woodlawn, VA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1045 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  36.771944, -80.898333 (est)

AutoGyro Cavalon, N953LS: Accident occurred November 18, 2017 at Casa Grande Municipal Airport (KCGZ), Pinal County, Arizona

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
http://registry.faa.gov/N953LS

Location: Casa Grande, AZ
Accident Number: GAA18CA049
Date & Time: 11/18/2017, 1745 MST
Registration: N953LS
Aircraft: JOHN ROSCOE AUTOGYRO CAVALON
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis


The pilot reported that, during landing, the right wheel touched down first on the runway and the gyroplane veered to the right. He added that, the "aircraft bounced from one wheel to the other" multiple times until the main rotor blade struck the runway. The gyroplane then rolled to the right, slid off the runway and came to rest on its left side. A post-crash fire ignited in the engine compartment and consumed the gyroplane.

The gyroplane was destroyed.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the gyroplane that would have precluded normal operation. 


Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in loss of directional control and a subsequent runway excursion.

Findings

Aircraft
Landing flare - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Dragged wing/rotor/float/other

Landing-landing roll
Runway excursion

Landing
Roll over

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Gyroplane
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 300 hours (Total, all aircraft), 200 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 12 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: JOHN ROSCOE
Registration: N953LS
Model/Series: AUTOGYRO CAVALON NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Gyroplane
Year of Manufacture: 2013
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: V00110
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/18/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 990 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 241 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 914
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 115 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCHD, 1243 ft msl
Observation Time: 0047 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 353°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / -2°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 300°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: SAN MANUEL, AZ (E77)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Casa Grande, AZ (CGZ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1620 MST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: CASA GRANDE MUNI (CGZ)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1464 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 05
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5200 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  32.953611, -111.769444 (est)


Preventing Similar Accidents

Stay Centered: Preventing Loss of Control During Landing

Loss of control during landing is one of the leading causes of general aviation accidents and is often attributed to operational issues. Although most loss of control during landing accidents do not result in serious injuries, they typically require extensive airplane repairs and may involve potential damage to nearby objects such as fences, signs, and lighting.

Often, wind plays a role in these accidents. Landing in a crosswind presents challenges for pilots of all experience levels. Other wind conditions, such as gusting wind, tailwind, variable wind, or wind shifts, can also interfere with pilots’ abilities to land the airplane and maintain directional control.

What can pilots do?

Evaluate your mental and physical fitness before each flight using the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) “I'M SAFE Checklist." Being emotionally and physically ready will help you stay alert and potentially avoid common and preventable loss of control during landing accidents.

Check wind conditions and forecasts often. Take time during every approach briefing to fully understand the wind conditions. Use simple rules of thumb to help (for example, if the wind direction is 30 degrees off the runway heading, the crosswind component will be half of the total wind velocity).

Know your limitations and those of the airplane you are flying. Stay current and practice landings on different runways and during various wind conditions. If possible, practice with a flight instructor on board who can provide useful feedback and techniques for maintaining and improving your landing procedures.

Prepare early to perform a go around if the approach is not stabilized and does not go as planned or if you do not feel comfortable with the landing. Once you are airborne and stable again, you can decide to attempt to land again, reassess your landing runway, or land at an alternate airport. Incorporate go-around procedures into your recurrent training.

During landing, stay aligned with the centerline. Any misalignment reduces the time available to react if an unexpected event such as a wind gust or a tire blowout occurs.

Do not allow the airplane to touch down in a drift or in a crab. For airplanes with tricycle landing gear, do not allow the nosewheel to touch down first.

Maintain positive control of the airplane throughout the landing and be alert for directional control difficulties immediately upon and after touchdown. A loss of directional control can lead to a nose-over or ground loop, which can cause the airplane to tip or lean enough for the wing tip to contact the ground.

Stay mentally focused throughout the landing roll and taxi. During landing, avoid distractions, such as conversations with passengers or setting radio frequencies.

Interested in More Information?

The FAA’s “Airplane Flying Handbook” (FAA-H-8083-3B), chapter 8, “Approaches and Landings,” provides guidance about how to conduct crosswind approaches and landings and discusses maximum safe crosswind velocities. The handbook can be accessed from the FAA’s website (www.faa.gov).

The FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) provides access to online training courses, seminars, and webinars as part of the FAA’s “WINGS—Pilot Proficiency Program.” This program includes targeted flight training designed to help pilots develop the knowledge and skills needed to achieve flight proficiency and to assess and mitigate the risks associated with the most common causes of accidents, including loss of directional control. The courses listed below can be accessed from the FAASTeam website (www.faasafety.gov).

Avoiding Loss of Control
Maneuvering: Approach and Landing
Normal Approach and Landing
Takeoffs, Landings, and Aircraft Control

The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Air Safety Institute offers several interactive courses, presentations, publications, and other safety resources that can be accessed from its website (www.aopa.org/asf/).

The NTSB’s Aviation Information Resources web page, www.ntsb.gov/air, provides convenient access to NTSB aviation safety products.


The NTSB presents this information to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Note that this should not be considered guidance from the regulator, nor does this supersede existing FAA Regulations (FARs).