Thursday, July 13, 2017

Fountain City bridge named after hero who saved people in plane crash: Douglas DC-4-1009, National Airlines, N74685, fatal accident occurred January 14, 1951 at Philadelphia International Airport (KPHL), Pennsylvania



KNOXVILLE (WATE) – A Fountain City native who saved people in a plane crash 66 years ago had a bridge named after her on Thursday.

Central High School graduate Mary Frances Housley was once described as the “bravest woman in America.” Housley, who went by “Frankie,” had just started working as a flight attendant on January 14, 1951, when National Airlines Flight 83 crashed after landing and skidding off an icy runway at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

“To me it’s a big honor. Mary Frances will always have her name up on a bridge in a community that she grew up with,” said her nephew John Housley.

When the plane crashed landed it caught fire. Frankie Housley, the lone flight attendant, quickly led 10 passengers to safety.

“She did her job. She was one of the best of the best at that time in ’51,” said her nephew.

After saving 10 people, Frankie Houseley courageously returned to the burning DC-4 to try to rescue a four-month-old baby. After the fire was extinguished, her body was found holding the tiny baby in her arms.

“And she was only feet from the doorway when they found here. She almost made it,” said John Housley.




The Carnegie Hero Fund Commission posthumously awarded Frankie Housley its bronze medal for her bravery. Chris Hammond and the Central High Alumni Association led the effort to name the bridge in Fountain City in her honor.

“She literally went to school about a stone’s throw away from this bridge,” said Central High School teacher Chris Hammond.

From now on, Mary Frances Housley’s name will be known to many who drive across this bridge. The story of her bravery made national headlines in 1951. A passenger called her a real hero, a congressman labeled her the bravest American, and Reader’s Digest wrote she was the “bravest woman in America.”

She was an honor student at Central High School and attended the University of Tennessee for one year, but left college to get married. She was only 25 years old when she died.

http://wate.com

Extra EA-300/L, N210MX: Fatal accident occurred July 13, 2017 in Winchester, New Hampshire

JOHN E. EVERSON 1952 - 2017 

PLAINFIELD - John E. Everson, 65, died Thursday, July 13, 2017 from injuries he suffered in a plane crash in the woods of Winchester, NH. He was the beloved husband of the late Melanie (Sweet) Everson. 

Born in Providence, RI, he was the son of the late Kirke B. Everson, Jr. and the late Rebecca E. (Chaney) Everson. John was an owner and officer of Narragansett Improvement Company in Providence. 

John was the RI director for the National Asphalt Paving Association and a trustee for the New England Laborers Pension Board as well as the treasurer for the Construction Industries of Rhode Island. His philanthropic interests included the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Habitat for Humanity, and the United Way.

He was a licensed pilot with almost 3000 hours of flying time. At the time of his death, he was flying his Extra 300L, a two-seat unlimited class aerobatic airplane, in which he had over 1000 hours of flying time. John's fascination with flying began at a very early age due to the influence of his father's service in WWII as a combat fighter ace. At the age of 14, John began flying gliders which began his over 50 year love of flying that culminated in his most recent accomplishment of finishing 1st place in his skill class at a recent aerobatic competition.

He is remembered as a man who loved his family, who valued hard work, with an undeniable passion for aviation.

He is survived by two sons: Dustin J. Everson (wife Carrie) of Danielson, CT and Kirke E. Everson (wife Erin) of Vienna, VA; two sisters: Mary E. Everson of Arlington, TX and Catherine "Peggy" Hayes of Miami, FL; five grandchildren: Dylan John Everson, Elizabeth Rebecca Everson, Katherine Margaret Everson, Brady Edward Everson and Claire Evelyn Everson and one nephew: Graeme Everson, son of his late brother Daniel D. Everson. For the past 15 years, he was the companion of Patricia Campbell.

He was the step-son of the late Beverly J. (Hanson) Phillips-Everson and the step-brother of her sons, Kurtis A. Phillips of Atlanta and Dana J. Phillips of Saunderstown.

Calling hours will be at Carpenter-Jenks Funeral Home & Crematory, 659 East Greenwich Avenue, West Warwick, RI on Thursday, July 20 from 4:00 - 7:00 PM. A memorial service will be held at the funeral home on Friday, July 21 at 11 AM immediately followed by a reception at the Kirkbrae Country Club in Lincoln, RI. A private interment service will be held by his family in Swan Point Cemetery, Providence.

In lieu of flowers, the family request memorial donations be made to: American Cancer Society, 931 Jefferson Boulevard Suite 3004, Warwick, RI 02886-2213 (or online at www.cancer.org). Condolences may be offered and memories shared at carpenterjenks.com.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N210MX

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA241 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 13, 2017 in Winchester, NH
Aircraft: EXTRA FLUGZEUGBAU GMBH EA 300/L, registration: N210MX
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 13, 2017, about 1125 eastern daylight time, an Extra Flugzeugbau GMBH EA 300/L, N210MX, was destroyed after it impacted trees and terrain near Winchester, New Hampshire. The private pilot was fatally injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated around 1030 from Danielson Airport (LZD), Danielson, Connecticut. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 and was destined for Hartness State Airport (VSF), Springfield, Vermont.

According to local law enforcement, two witnesses reported that they could not see the airplane due to low clouds, but they could hear the engine sound which was "very loud." A third witness stated that the airplane was flying around, then it climbed and then came "straight down." 

A preliminary review of radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) indicated that the airplane was flying on a northerly heading before it made nearly three complete right turns. The last 3 minutes of data indicated that the airplane climbed from 2,000 ft mean sea level (msl) to 6,425 ft msl. Then, the airplane began to descend and radar contact was lost at 5,800 ft msl.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. The pilot was issued a third-class medical certificate on October 19, 2016, with the limitation of "must wear corrective lenses." At that time, he reported 2,810 total flight hours and 108 hours during the6 months prior to the medical examination. The pilot did not possess an instrument rating.

According to FAA records, the two-place monoplane was manufactured in 2005, and was registered to the pilot in 2006. It was equipped with a Lycoming AEIO-540-L1B5 series, 300-horsepower, engine that drove a four-bladed, constant speed, MT-Propeller. According to airplane maintenance logbooks, an annual inspection was completed on April 18, 2017, at 956.57 total aircraft hours.

At 1052, the recorded weather observation at Orange Municipal Airport (ORE), Orange, Massachusetts, about 11 miles to the south of the accident location, included wind from 040° at 7 knots, visibility 10 miles, overcast clouds 800 ft above ground level, temperature 19° C, dew point 18° C; and an altimeter setting of 30.00 inches of mercury.

Examination of the accident site revealed a strong odor of fuel, and all major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene. The main wreckage came to rest oriented on a 025° heading, in a heavily wooded area, at an elevation of 680 ft msl. The airplane struck a 100 ft tree prior to impacting the ground about 25 ft beyond the initial tree strike. The main wreckage came to rest about 15 ft beyond the initial impact crater against two trees. The initial impact crater was about 4 ft deep and approximately 6 ft in diameter. Linear ground scars consistent with the length and dimension of the leading edge of each wing were visible on either side of the impact crater.

The cockpit was destroyed and fragmented by impact forces Both seats remained attached to the airframe. Both 4-point harnesses were latched. Flight control continuity was obtained from all flight control surfaces to the cockpit through breaks and fractures consistent with overload. The right wing was impact separated and fractured. A majority of the pieces were located forward of the impact crater. The stall warning indicator was located about 1 ft forward of the initial impact crater and was separated from the right wing. The left wing was impact separated and fractured. Several sections of the left wing and aileron were located aft of the initial impact crater.

The empennage remained attached to the fuselage. The left horizontal stabilizer and elevator remained attached to the empennage. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer and approximately 8 inches of its upper section was impact damaged. The right horizontal stabilizer was impact separated but remained attached to the empennage through cables. The right elevator was impact separated and was located just aft of the right horizontal stabilizer. The elevator trim tab was impact separated, but remained attached to the right elevator through cables.

All four wooden propeller blades were impact separated and fragmented. Several pieces of the propeller blades were located in the initial impact crater and a few pieces were located about 25 ft from the initial impact crater. The propeller hub remained attached to the crankshaft flange.

The engine came to rest upright, facing opposite the direction of travel. Three of the four engine mounts were impact separated from the crankcase. Impact fractures were noted throughout the crankcase and sections were missing on the Nos. 1, 3, and 5 -cylinder side. Cylinder No. 1 was impact separated from the engine. Cylinder Nos. 3 and 5 were impact separated from the crankcase, but remained attached through the piston and connecting rods. The No. 2 cylinder head was impact separated and the Nos. 4 and 6 cylinders remained intact and attached to the crankcase. All cylinders exhibited impact damage on the cooling fins. The Nos. 3, 5, and 2, pistons were visible, and carbon deposits were noted on the piston faces. The crankshaft would not rotate; however, no fractures or thermal discoloration were noted. The camshaft remained intact and no anomalies were noted with the visible camshaft lobes. No thermal discoloration or damage was noted inside the engine crankcase.

There were a few branches between the initial tree strike and the main wreckage location that exhibited 45° cuts. In addition, chips of white paint were lodged in the wood.

A JPI EDM 700 was retained and sent to the NTSB Recorders Laboratory for data download.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.










WINCHESTER, N.H. — A man who died after crashing his plane last week was part of a family known for spending time in the air.

John E. Everson, 65, of Danielson, Conn., was flying a stunt plane that went down on Scotland Road in Winchester on Thursday. His cousin believes the crash might have involved mechanical failure with the plane.

"I'm named after our grandfather Kirke B. Everson, who's my mother's father so also John's grandfather," said Kirke McVay. "John's father was Kirke D. Everson Jr. He was Rhode Island's first, if not only, World War II ace pilot — supposedly the first person to ever shoot down a jet in World War II. That was according to my younger brother."

McVay's younger brother, also a pilot, was closer to Everson. McVay said he spent more time with his cousin as a child. They were very close in age.

McVay said Everson's father was also a champion in New England glider competitions.

"He came from a family of experienced fliers so we were pretty surprised," McVay said of the crash. "We're kind of assuming there must have been a mechanical failure with the plane."

Federal Aviation Administration Spokesman Jim Peters said Everson was flying an Extra 300 when he crashed in Winchester. The aircraft is described on websites as a two-seat aerobatic monoplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash. While the FAA will help in the process, the NTSB will determine a probable cause.

"Our goal is to have a preliminary report out for each fatal accident within two weeks," said Peter Knudson, NTSB spokesman.

He expects a report could come at the end of this week but said it's more likely going to be ready by next week.

Everson's attendance had been anticipated at the Green Mountain Aerobatic Contest in Springfield, Vt.

"We believe [Everson] was in route to our contest Thursday," said Farrell Woods, president of New England Aerobatics Club, a chapter of the International Aerobatic Club. "Our event is rather popular but we were challenged by weather and pilots' ability to arrive this weekend."

About 22 or 23 registered pilots came to the contest. But usually a few more attend, Woods said.

"Many of the pilots didn't arrive until Saturday when the weather finally broke," he said.

Everson had been competing in the Green Mountain Aerobatic Contest for 12 years and came in first place in one contest during last year's event.

Woods said he did not know Everson that well personally, but the two would meet at contests and organized practice session.

"He was an accomplished pilot of powered airplanes and gliders," Woods said. "He was soft-spoken, wise, friendly, happy to share his experiences and an asset to our club. His premature loss was a shock to us."

Everson had been the president of Narragansett Improvement Company, a Rhode Island contractor and asphalt plant operator. The company was incorporated in 1893 by sewer contractors Edward and John A. Everson in an effort to get into the emerging industry of asphalt paving. Everson and McVay's grandfather joined the company in 1920 after graduating from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and serving as a captain of infantry in World War I, according to the company's website.

Everson became president of the company after his grandfather and his grandfather's son, Kirke Jr., had served in the position. Kirke Jr. had been in the United States Air Force for 10 years, according to the company's website.

"In 1970 John E. Everson became the fourth generation family member to join the Narragansett Improvement Company team," the website stated. "He was elected President in 1992 and has overseen and directed the continued growth and modernization of the manufacturing plant during his tenure."

McVay said he expects Everson's son Dustin will take over as president of the company. Dustin "spearheaded the company's retrofit into the recycling of bituminous asphalt products," according to the website.

McVay had never gone out in a plane with his cousin.

"I did go flying with his father in a glider one time. That was an interesting experience, getting towed up into the air then circling around and trying to catch thermals," McVay said, referring to rising hot air that pilots operating motor-less aircraft rely on. "It was exciting. It was different. I had a slight problem with motion sickness at the same time but I was OK. It's like an enclosed go-kart." 


http://www.reformer.com



A Connecticut man who died in a plane crash in Winchester Thursday was an experienced pilot, according to two pilots who knew him or his record in aerobatic competitions.

John E. Everson, 65, of Danielson, Conn., died in the crash which occurred around 11:30 a.m. in a heavily wooded area of the town, in the area of Warwick Road.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is investigating the incident; an investigator arrived at the scene of the fatal crash Friday afternoon, according to Peter Knudson, a spokesman for the federal agency.

On Saturday evening, Knudson didn’t have any information about the cause of the crash. He said it’s too early for the agency to know what happened. The investigator has yet to review information including air traffic control communications, weather reports and radar records from around the time of the crash, he said.

Knudson also said that the NTSB had yet to determine Everson’s intended destination.

However, Everson was expected at the Green Mountain Aerobatic Contest in Springfield, Vt., this weekend, according to contest director Bill Gordon.

The contest is put on by the New England Aerobatics Club, a chapter of the International Aerobatic Club, a nonprofit organization based in Wisconsin with more than 4,000 members across the globe.

The group leads aerobatic flight training and competitions throughout the country. Aerobatic flying involves performing aerial maneuvers or flying in formations, for recreation or sport.

Everson had been a member of the New England Aerobatics Club since 2004, according to Mike Heuer, the president of the International Aerobatic Club.

He also flew in several competitions and frequently attended the annual Green Mountain Aerobatic Contest in Vermont, Heuer said.

Everson competed there in at least nine of the past 12 years, according to records on the website of the International Aerobatic Club,.

According to competition records reviewed by Heuer, Everson finished in first place in the contest last year, out of 11 competitors who flew at his skill level.

Everson flew at the “sportsman” level last year, the second lowest of five skill levels.

At the sportsman level, Everson would have been able to perform maneuvers including spins, rolls and loops in the air, according to Heuer.

Heuer didn’t know Everson personally, but was saddened to learn of his death.

“It’s a huge loss,” he said. “We don’t like to lose any pilots, colleagues,” he said.

Heuer said that accidents in aerobatic airplanes are extremely rare. He added that the plane Everson was flying when he crashed was of high quality.

Jim Peters, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman, said in an email Thursday night that the plane that crashed was an Extra 300.

According to FAA aircraft registry records, Everson owned an Extra EA 300/L manufactured in 2005.

“They’re probably one of the highest-quality built airplanes in the world,” Heuer said of planes built by the German company, EXTRA.

The planes aren’t only good for performing maneuvers in the sky, but also for “cross-country flying,” he said.

EXTRA planes are expensive and hand-built, Heuer said. This contradicts what Peters had previously told The Sentinel, that the aircraft that crashed in Winchester was home-built.

According to FAA records, Everson owns at least two other planes, neither of which was manufactured by EXTRA.

Everson appears to have been the president of a Providence, R.I.-based asphalt paving and site construction services company, Narragansett Improvement Co., according to the company’s website.

The website says that in 1970, Everson became the fourth-generation family member to join the company and that in 1992, he became its president.

No one at the company could be reached Saturday to confirm these facts. However, the company’s address matches the one Everson listed in his plane registration records with the FAA.

Sheldon Apsell, 74, of Boston is the treasurer of the New England Aerobatics Club and knew Everson from competitions.

“He was a skillful pilot. He was experienced; he was competent; he had a good head on his shoulders,” he said of Everson. “That’s why I’m totally shocked by this.”

He described Everson as level-headed and modest.

“This whole thing is just so hard for us to believe,” he said.


http://www.sentinelsource.com

Kumaran Spaulding talks with emergency personnel about a plane crash at 375 Scotland Road, in Winchester, N.H., around 11:30 a.m. on Thursday. Spaulding said he was out in the field with his son, Darian, when they heard the sound of an airplane engine throttling up and down, then saw the plane exiting the clouds going over the tree line. The father said he may have heard a crash; the son said the valley suddenly went silent. 


WINCHESTER, N.H. — Emergency personnel responded to Scotland Road at just before 11:30 a.m. on Thursday after receiving a 911 call about a possible plane crash in Mirey Brook Swamp, which straddles the state line between Winchester and Warwick, Mass.

Following an intensive search that ended around 5:40 p.m., searchers confirmed a downed aircraft in the vicinity of Curtis Pond off of Warwick Road, also known as Route 78. They also confirmed the pilot of the aircraft was dead.

The first call to 911 came in around 11:20 a.m., after Kumaran Spaulding heard a strange noise in the air. Spaulding was walking in a field on his father's property on Scotland Road with his 13-year-old son, Darian, who was visiting from Indiana. Darian Spaulding said he heard the sound of an airplane engine but it sounded like the engine was being throttled up and down. Then he and his father spotted the airplane pop out of the low-hanging clouds before it went over the tree line and disappeared from view.

While Kumaran Spaulding said he heard what appeared to be the sounds of a crash, Darian said "Suddenly, the valley was very silent."

Emergency personnel from around the region — including members of the Winchester Fire Department and Winchester Police Department, the Walpole Fire Department, the Keene Fire Department, the New Hampshire State Police and New Hampshire Fish and Game — converged in a field on the Spaulding property shortly after the Spauldings called 911. At the same time, other witnesses were also making emergency calls.

Bradley Brewer was working in his barn on Manning Hill when he heard the same sounds Kumaran and Darian Spaulding described. "I heard an engine sputtering and I heard one whale of a thump right in line with the trees and nothing after that. It made the hair on my arms stand up."

Lt. Aaron Cooper, of the Keene Fire Department, was put in charge of the search team. He told the media that they had received nearly a half-dozen phone calls reporting the crash and at the time considered it very credible that the crash had occurred.

As emergency personnel were working to triangulate the location using the witness accounts, a pair of drones were launched from the field on Scotland Road to search Mirey Brook Swamp, which straddles the state line between New Hampshire and Massachusetts. With more information collected, the drones returned to the field and Winchester Fire Chief Barry Kellom moved the command center to the Winchester Fire Department at about 3:20 p.m.

Fire Mutual Aid then sent a call out to recruit 20 people to conduct a foot search of the area where the plane was suspected of crashing.

Kellom held a press conference at the fire department at 3:30 p.m. He said accounts from different witnesses matched up and it was just a matter of triangulating the witness accounts to determine where best to conduct the search. Fish and Game wardens were searching the Upper Snow Road and Manning Hill Road area, which he described as ledgey and mountainous.

"At this point, any search will be very challenging and time consuming," said Kellom during the press conference. "But right now we are taking this as a rescue operation so time is of the essence."

With a weather front expected to move into the area around 6 p.m., all search helicopters had been grounded.

"We've been in contact with airports and they have no reports of missing aircraft or even any aircraft that has taken off," said Kellom. At 6:45 p.m., when Kellom held a press conference with Fish and Game Warden Lt. Dave Walsh and Michael Todd, from the N.H. Department of Safety, it was still unknown where the plane had originated from or who the pilot was.

"It's in the hands of the [Federal Aviation Administration] and the [National Safety and Transportation Board] now," said Kellom.

He described the area the plane was found in as heavily wooded and "a tough-access location." At the time of the press conference, law enforcement personnel were securing the scene in advance of the arrival of investigators from the FAA and the NSTB.

http://www.reformer.com

Bradley Brewer, of 342 Manning Hill Road, in Winchester, N.H., stands in the spot where he said he heard an aircraft go down around 11:30 a.m. on Thursday.


WINCHESTER — A Connecticut man is dead after a plane he was flying crashed in a heavily wooded area of town Thursday.

John E. Everson, 65, of Danielson was the plane's pilot, according to Winchester Police Chief Gary Phillips.

After an effort that included multiple agencies, spanned several hours and employed ATVs and drones, searchers on the ground found the downed plane at approximately 5 p.m. in the area of Warwick Road, according to Winchester Fire Chief Barry Kellom. A N.H. Department of Safety news release said a Winchester firefighter found the plane.

Jim Peters, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman, said in an email Thursday night that the plane was an Extra 300 — a small, aerobatic plane, according to the company’s website. The plane was a registered homebuilt aircraft, he said.

Early Thursday afternoon, 10 vehicles from various agencies were parked in a field on a rural property on Scotland Road, where one of the early witness reports had originated.

Kumaran Spaulding, the property owner’s son, said he had seen what could have been a one- or two-seat stunt plane plummeting straight down from approximately 400 feet. He indicated an area beyond the tall trees ringing the field, where he thought it would have landed. “The plane came down very fast, and we heard a crash,” he said.

Patrick McLoud, who lives on Scotland Road, said he was on his porch at about 11 a.m. when he saw a small plane circling the area, as if it were looking for something, before it headed north. Not long after, he heard what he thought was the same engine, only this time it was a “roaring” that came to a sudden stop. “The engine sounded way too loud. There was roaring, and it cut off abruptly.”

The investigation has been turned over to the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board, Kellom said. N.H. Fish and Game Lt. David Walsh said this is standard procedure for aircraft crashes.

It's unclear where the plane took off from. Representatives of several area airports, including Keene's Dillant-Hopkins in North Swanzey, Orange (Mass.) Municipal Airport, Northampton (Mass.) Airport and Silver Ranch in Jaffrey said the plane had not launched from their runways.

The Winchester Fire Department first received a call about a possible plane crash Thursday at 11:26 a.m., then another minutes later, Kellom said. Town police and fire personnel spoke to witnesses, he said.

In total, officials received at least a half-dozen calls from people reporting hearing or seeing a plane, or both, Keene Fire Lt. Aaron Cooper said Thursday afternoon.

The Winchester Fire Department then called in other local and state agencies, Kellom said. Crews from Hinsdale, Keene, Richmond, Swanzey, Troy, Walpole, Northfield, Mass., and Warwick, Mass., joined the search effort, the Department of Safety news release says.

The search was run jointly by Winchester Fire and N.H. Fish and Game, according to Kellom.

He said his department requested plane and helicopter support for the search, but inclement weather made that impossible. According to Southwestern N.H. District Fire Mutual Aid, a State Police helicopter had to turn around. Keene and Walpole fire personnel did send up drones from multiple locations.

At the Scotland Road property, about 20 emergency personnel moved about in what Phillips called “search mode,” trying to figure out where the plane might have come from and where to focus the search.

No one had seen smoke, Phillips said, complicating the search.

The wide strip of mowed grass on which operations unfolded happened to be a seldom-used private airstrip. Howard Spaulding, the retired aircraft engineer who owns the property, said he used to commute by air to New Jersey, Long Island and Amherst, Mass., but hasn’t flown in many years.

By about 2:45 p.m., most vehicles and personnel had left Scotland Road as the search shifted elsewhere.

Fish and Game sent ATVs to an area off Manning Hill Road, according to Kellom.

Nearby, Keene Fire personnel operated a drone from a lawn at the end of Curtis Road that provided expansive views of the surrounding terrain.

Local residents also expressed a willingness to help with the search, Kellom said.

By 5:30 p.m., though officials had yet to confirm the search’s end, fire personnel from the search sites were filtering back to the Winchester fire station.

At a news conference an hour later, Walsh, the Fish and Game lieutenant, said, "It might be worth thanking at least the three witnesses who called in descriptions, because without them we would have no idea it disappeared."



Dennis Croteau, of Walpole Rescue, from Walpole, N.H., prepares a Typhoon H model drone at 375 Scotland Road, in Winchester, N.H., after witnesses said they saw a plane crash around 11:30 a.m. on Thursday.


WINCHESTER, N.H. — Police have publicly released the identity of a pilot killed Thursday in a plane crash in Winchester.

John Everson, 65, of Danielson, Connecticut, was the sole occupant of the plane, police said.

Several witnesses reported seeing a small plane doing stunts, then nose-diving into the woods in the area of Upper Snow Road and Scotland Road in Winchester.


According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane was an Extra 300 aircraft. The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the cause of the crash.

Keene, N.H., Fire Department Lt. Aaron Cooper points while Lt. Raymond Phillips operates a DJI Phantom 3 Drone while searching the area for a plane that had crashed. 


Update, 6:55 p.m.: Winchester Fire Chief Barry Kellom has confirmed that one person is dead after a plane crashed in a heavily wooded area of town today. 

The plane was found in the general vicinity of Route 78 at approximately 5 p.m. in a search that included multiple agencies and spanned several hours. 

No information has been released on the person's identity, including gender or approximate age. 

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will take over the scene.

WINCHESTER — Authorities are searching off Scotland Road in Winchester today after a report that a plane crashed in the area. 

Winchester Fire Chief Barry Kellom said in an interview at the fire station this afternoon that search aircraft were grounded because of the weather and they expect another storm this evening, but this won’t halt the ground search. “Right now we’re taking this as a rescue operation, so time is of the essence.”

Kellom said the search is a joint operation of N.H. Fish and Game and Winchester Fire. Fish and Game is now searching on ATVs on Manning Hill Road, Kellom said.

Witness Kumaran Spaulding says he saw a plane that looked like it could have been a one or two-seat stunt plane approximately 400 feet up that was going straight down. "The plane came down very fast and we heard a crash," Spaulding said.

Patrick McLoud, who lives on Scotland Road, said that at around 11 a.m., he saw a single-engine plane circling in the area, then headed north. At that point, McLoud said, he didn’t perceive trouble. Then, maybe 10 to 15 minutes later, he heard what he thought was the same engine but this time it was “roaring” and then came to a sudden stop. “The engine sounded way too loud. There was roaring, and it cut off abruptly.”

Keene Fire Lt. Aaron Cooper said officials have gotten at least a half dozen calls from people reporting hearing or seeing a plane, or both — “enough that it’s pretty credible.”

N.H. Homeland Security and Emergency Management tweeted that it has activated the state Emergency Operations Center to coordinate and assist with any search and rescue operations.

Winchester Police Chief Gary Phillips said emergency personnel are searching in the area between Scotland Road and Route 78.

Southwestern N.H. District Fire Mutual Aid said a State Police helicopter had to turn around due to weather but drones have been sent up to search.

If a plane did crash, it's unclear where it may have taken off from. Representatives of several local airports, including Dillant-Hopkins in Keene, Orange (Mass.) Municipal, Northampton (Mass.) Airport and Silver Ranch in Jaffrey said the plane had not launched from their runways.

Representatives for the Turners Falls airport in Montague, Mass., did not immediately respond to queries.

A dispatcher with Southwestern N.H. District Fire Mutual Aid was heard saying they received two reports of a loud noise that sounded like a plane crash.  

http://www.sentinelsource.com



WINCHESTER, N.H. —  Investigators are trying to determine what caused a deadly plane crash deep in the woods in Winchester.

"They discovered that there was one occupant in the plane that was deceased at that time," said Winchester Fire Chief Barry Kellom.

Several witnesses reported seeing a small plane doing stunts, then nose-diving into the woods in the area of Upper Snow Road and Scotland Road.

"It sounded like they were flying down and then back up and then down," said witness Bradley Brewer.

Brewer never saw the plane, but he heard it. "And then I could hear the plane sputtering, so I ran out here and I heard one thump right in line with the tree there. Nothing after that," he said.

Local, state and federal agencies searched by foot and ATV.

They also used drones because rain forced them to call off air rescue efforts.

Without the calls from witnesses, officials say they never would've known about the crash.

It's not clear what kind of plane is in the woods and right now, the pilot's name isn't being released.

Investigators are trying to figure out where the plane took off from.

"We did call local airports. we had called Orange Airport, the Keene Dillant-Hopkins Airport. They had no reports of any missing aircrafts from this area," said Kellom.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are handling the investigation.

http://www.wmur.com



WINCHESTER, N.H. (AP) - New Hampshire authorities say aircraft, drones and ATVs were used in an hours-long search to find a small plane that crashed in a heavily wooded area. The pilot was found dead.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the pilot was the only person aboard the Extra 300 aircraft Thursday. The pilot's name has not been released.

Authorities said local dispatchers started getting reports at about 11:30 a.m. about a plane crash in Winchester in the southwestern part of the state, near the Massachusetts state line.

The state Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency said attempts to search for the downed plane by aircraft were hindered by inclement weather and air rescue efforts were called off. Drones provided by surrounding, fire departments, continued search efforts. Teams entered one area by foot and with ATVs and a firefighter found the plane.



WINCHESTER, New Hampshire (WWLP) – One person is dead after their single engine plane crashed just over the state line in New Hampshire Thursday morning.

Winchester Fire Chief Barry Kellom told 22News that around 11 a.m., dispatch received multiple calls for a plane that sounded like it was having motor troubles and may have crashed in the area of Upper Snow Road.

When emergency crews got there they could not locate the plane.

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department were called in.

The Winchester Fire Department sent out multiple ATV’s to search the area.

A state police helicopter was also sent in to look but had to turn around because of severe storms.

At 5 p.m. the plane was found in the area of Warwick Road.

The pilot was the only person believed to be on board.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are now investigating this crash.

http://wwlp.com

Cirrus SR22T, N821SG, DDLV LLC: Fatal accident occurred July 13, 2017 near Sonoma Skypark (0Q9), Sonoma County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

DDLV LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N821SG


NTSB Identification: WPR17FA150
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 13, 2017 in SCHELLVILLE, CA
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22T, registration: N821SG
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 13, 2017, about 1245 Pacific daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corp SR22T, N821SG, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain about 1/2 mile west of the Sonoma Skypark Airport (0Q9) Sonoma, California. The private pilot was fatally injured, two passengers were seriously injured, and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to DDLV LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The personal flight departed from Sonoma Skypark about 1244 with a planned destination of Reid-Hillview Airport of Santa Clara County, San Jose, California.

Several witnesses located near 0Q9 reported that they heard the engine "sputter" a few times as it passed their position. Subsequently, they heard a louder sound and shortly afterwards observed the airplane's parachute system deploying at a low altitude. Most of the witnesses saw the airplane descend just prior to losing sight of it at the tree tops, and shortly before it impacted the ground. 

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), investigator-in-charge (IIC), revealed that all major structural components and primary flight controls of the airplane, were located at the accident site. 

The airplane was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.




William Sachs Goldman 
February 10, 1979 to July 13, 2017

William Sachs Goldman passed away on Thursday in Sonoma County, California. A proud father, dedicated husband, accomplished professor and historian, and passionate philanthropist, he was 38 years old.

The son of Susan Sachs Goldman and the late Richard Walter Goldman, Bill was born and raised in Washington D.C. where he attended the Sidwell Friends School. He earned a B.A. in History from Yale University where he was a member of the Yale Glee Club and a photographer for the Yale Daily News. He received his master's degree and doctorate in history at the University of California, Berkeley. 

Since 2012, he was an assistant professor of international studies at the University of San Francisco, where he specialized in early modern Spanish history. Bill loved sharing his knowledge not only with his students but also with family and friends - on trips, at dinner parties, and wherever he could find an audience. He had previously taught at Stanford University and was a former research fellow at the University of California, Los Angeles. 

He cared deeply about giving to his community and was active in a variety of philanthropic endeavors. In 2012, he and his siblings founded the Richard W. Goldman Family Foundation to help underserved children and communities gain access to education, health, and financial resources. He was treasurer of the International Board of Directors of the New Israel Fund, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fostering civil rights and democracy in Israel. He served as president of the board of directors for the Walter and Elise Haas Fund, a family foundation that supports economic security, education, Jewish life, and the arts in the Bay Area. 

He also was a volunteer pilot with Angel Flight West, flying 13 missions since 2013 to transport critically ill adults and children to receive medical treatment. He was passionate about flying, political discourse, gourmet food, a good Manhattan, long bike rides, the Washington Redskins, and the San Francisco Giants, but his greatest love was his family.

He is survived by his wife, Serra Falk Goldman, and their two children, George Richard Goldman and Marie Aliena Goldman. He is also survived by his mother, Susan Sachs Goldman; his brother Daniel Sachs Goldman and sister-in-law Corinne Goldman; his sister Alice Goldman Reiter and brother-in-law Benjamin Reiter; his brother-in-law Harry Falk IV and wife Rochelle Falk; and his brother-in-law Taylor Falk and his wife, Rachel Falk. Bill was a beloved uncle to 10 nieces and nephews. He was a staunchly loyal and devoted friend. He was a dedicated leader, teacher, mentor, and advocate for the disadvantaged. The past few days have been a moving reminder of the many people whose lives Bill touched with his kindness, humor, and intellect. 

A memorial service will be held on Monday, July 17, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. at the Nourse Theater in San Francisco. The family encourages memorial donations be made to his children's school, La Scuola International School, or the New Israel Fund.

Published in San Francisco Chronicle on July 17, 2017



SONOMA, Calif. (KGO) -- When investigators from the FAA and NTSB arrived at the crash site Friday morning they found a crumpled Cirrus SR22T plane and descriptions from witnesses of an engine failure shortly after take off from the Sonoma Skypark. 

"When the engine stopped, it became a glider and looked really good," said airport manager Ron Price. "I was hoping they could land in that field."

Instead, for reasons unknown, pilot Bill Goldman pulled the handle on the parachute designed to save planes in distress. It worked on June 30 near Davis, when a pilot and passenger walked away after an engine failure.

But it did not work in Sonoma for a plane at maybe 300 feet, according to witnesses.

"The parachute needs about a thousand feet to deploy, and that is only if you're lucky," said San Rafael aviation attorney Lou Franecke. He made a case against Cirrus after a similar crash.

He cannot discuss the settlement terms but insists the plane has a flaw. "The parachute is used to deploy when you have a problem," Franecke told ABC7 News. "And the problem with the Cirrus is its aerodynamic characteristics are awful in stall."

The Cirrus Aircraft Company makes a selling point of the plane's built-in parachute.

Today it told us: The Cirrus Aircraft whole-plane parachute system has been deployed 72 times over the last 18 years, resulting in 148 saved lives who were returned to their families.

But as Coast Guard video shows, deployment does not happen instantly. It takes a few seconds for the straps to deploy, the chute to fill, and for the plane to level.

Friday, witnesses say the plane landed almost nose first. Would the chute have made a difference at low altitude? The company says it can work at 400 feet.

"If you are straight and level," said Franecke. "But if you are straight and level, why would you deploy the parachute?

The answers may lie somewhere in the wreckage.

Watch Video:  http://abc7news.com











William S. Goldman, left, and son, George.























The grandson of San Francisco’s renowned philanthropists Richard and Rhoda Goldman died Thursday and his two children and a woman believed to be their nanny were seriously injured when their single-engine Cirrus SR22 plane crashed south of Sonoma soon after takeoff.

William “Bill” S. Goldman, 38, a University of San Francisco assistant professor of international studies, was pronounced dead at the scene.

The woman, Valeria Anselmi of Milan, Italy, and his two grade school age children, George and Marie, were hospitalized.

His wife, Serra Falk Goldman, a San Francisco attorney, could not be reached Thursday. A woman answering the phone at Falk, Cornell & Associates law firm declined comment.

The plane took off from Sonoma Skypark airport around 12:45 p.m., according to the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office, and went down about two minutes later, crashing in a nearby field.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Assistant Schell-Vista Fire Chief Mike Mulas said a half-dozen civilians arrived at the crash site before emergency personnel and pulled the children from the wreckage.

“All three of the injuries were severe to critical,” Mulas said, adding that emergency medics tried to shield the survivors from Goldman, moving them away from the wreckage.

“It was just a tragic situation, tragic thing,” he said.

The children were taken to Children’s Hospital Oakland by helicopter, one by REACH at 1:45 p.m. and the other by Sheriff’s Office helicopter Henry 1 at 2:07 p.m., according to a Redcom dispatcher. Anselmi was taken by ambulance to Queen of the Valley Hospital at 1:20 p.m.

Neither hospital was able to provide status updates on their conditions.

The Goldman name is attached to several prestigious philanthropic efforts. Best known is the Goldman Environmental Prize, begun by Bill Goldman’s grandparents, Richard N. and Rhoda H. Goldman. It honors grassroots environmental individuals from around the world for significant efforts to protect and enhance the natural environment. Each winner receives an award of $150,000 — the largest award in the world for grassroots environmentalists — and is often referred to as the “Green Nobel.”

The eponymous foundation gave $700 million to more than 2,500 grantees in its 60 years of existence. The fund closed in 2012.

Numerous other foundations related to the family exist, including the Richard W. Goldman Family Foundation that Bill Goldman and his brother and sister founded in 2012 in memory of their father.

Bill Goldman also served on the board of directors for the New Israel Fund, a nonprofit based in New York City, that supports civil rights and democracy in Israel, and the Walter and Elise Haas Fund in San Francisco that’s dedicated to economic security, education, Jewish life and the arts in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Bill Goldman was also a descendant of Levi Strauss, who in 1873 patented denim blue jeans.

He was born and raised in Washington, D.C, the son of Richard Goldman and Susan Sachs Goldman. He attended the Sidwell Friends School, received his undergraduate degree at Yale University, and both his master’s and doctoral degrees from UC Berkeley. He had taught at USF since 2012.

University President Paul Fitzgerald released a statement late Thursday about Goldman, saying the USF community was “devastated,” calling him “an accomplished scholar, a beloved and generous teacher, and a valued member of our community.”

Goldman enjoyed choral music, photography and especially flying for Angel Flight West, a charitable organization providing transportation for critically ill patients and their families.

Goldman’s plane is registered out of Palo Alto but the family lives in San Francisco. The aircraft wasn’t based at the Sonoma Skypark, according to Robin Tatman, president of the airport’s Experimental Aircraft Association chapter.

Cirrus planes are equipped with a unique parachute system that can be deployed in case of emergencies. While there was no official word on whether Goldman deployed his plane’s parachute, a witness thought he did.

Gina Isi, of Sonoma, was on her lunch break outside cork company Ganau America on Carneros Oak Lane in Sonoma watching the runway when she heard the plane take off.

“It was just at the beginning of its ascent, when I heard it — like it was going to stall,” she said. “It sounded like it choked a little bit, so I was like, ‘Holy cow!’ and then it seemed like it was going to recover, like I heard more revving, and then it just died.”

She watched as the plane disappeared behind a grove of trees, and then heard a pop — what she believes was the sound of the parachute.

“He must have deployed it under 200 feet,” she said. Isi said she did not hear the plane crash.

Editor's note: An early version of this story originally misidentified the woman injured in the crash as Goldman's wife based on information provided by public safety officials.

http://www.pressdemocrat.com