Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Melbourne, Florida, to consider helping air and space show

Last year the Melbourne City Council kicked in about $10,000 of services to the Melbourne Air & Space Show, and Thursday night the council will consider doling out more for this year's event.
 
Organizers of the Melbourne Air & Space Show say they will ask the namesake city to chip in about $20,000, twice the amount they received last year, for the October airshow.

When the show debuted in Melbourne last year, the city helped cover costs of services like police and traffic routing. Similar services for this year's two-day event, as well as additional operation and security expenses incurred because the show is being held at Melbourne International Airport, could cost about $80,000, according to city documents.

The airshow is on the hook to cover those costs, unless the council agrees to help. The council can contribute more, or less, than organizer Bryan Lilley plans to ask for at a meeting Thursday night.

"We're going to inquire about that once again this year, and see what the council's appetite is to support us again," said Lilley, chairman of the National Air, Sea & Space Foundation, the organizer of the show. He may approach the Melbourne Airport Authority with a similar request.

Other events that receive this kind of municipal money are the Melbourne Art Festival, which receives $3,100, and the light parade, which gets $7,000, according to city records.

A lack of such municipal aid, among other factors, drove the somewhat nomadic airshow from Cocoa Beach two years ago. Melbourne grabbed the event last year and it was held at Paradise Beach in the city's beachside enclave.

This year the show returns to a two-day run and features the comeback of military aircraft, which pulled out of shows during a government sequester. The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds will roar over the Oct. 4 and 5 airshow, which is sponsored by Northrop Grumman.

The airport venue has added dynamics unlike other years. Commercial flights will briefly interrupt aviation acts, and there must be extra crowd control because of security restrictions on airport property.

Lilley said benefits to the airport, and Melbourne, outweigh any hurdles.

"Now, with (the show) at the airport it becomes a vehicle for economic development," Lilley said, adding that more than half of tickets sold so far were purchased by people outside Brevard County. "Just this year we've got ... all brand new sponsors that are supporting us because the aerospace industry is booming in Melbourne. There is no better way to showcase aerospace in your community."
 

TICKET INFORMATION

General admission tickets are $10 per day (for children ages 6-12) and $15 per day (for those age 13 and up) if purchased in advance at airandspaceshow.com. The cost per ticket increases by $5 if purchased at the gate. Parking is $10 per vehicle.

If you go

The Melbourne City Council will consider a request to help fund the Melbourne Air & Space Show at its meeting at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at City Hall, 900 E. Strawbridge Ave.

-Source:  http://www.floridatoday.com

Piper PA-28R-201, N237PA: Incident occurred September 09, 2014 in Coral Springs, Florida

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A LEVY, NEAR CORAL SPRINGS, FL

Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Miami FSDO-19

FXE FLIGHT CENTER CORP:  http://registry.faa.gov/N237PA

CORAL SPRINGS, Fla. (WSVN) -- The pilot of a small plane was forced to make an emergency landing near a busy South Florida highway, Tuesday afternoon.  

Officials said the pilot of the Piper PA-28 single-engine plane made a clean landing on a levee that runs on the west side of the Sawgrass Expressway, near Sample Road.

Neither the pilot nor the passenger were injured. They were nevertheless checked out by paramedics.

The aircraft is owned by FXE Flight Center Corporation, a company based at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport.


http://www.wsvn.com


CORAL SPRINGS, Fla. -  No injuries were reported after a small plane was forced to make an emergency landing in Coral Springs.

The incident happened just before 6 p.m. Tuesday on the access road just west  of the Sawgrass Expressway. Two people were onboard the plane at the time.

According to fire officials, the plane had an oil pressure indication light on and the pilot landed on the levy as a precaution.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating and told Local 10 News the Piper PA-28R aircraft lost power before it landed.
CORAL SPRINGS (CBSMiami) — A plane landed on the levy just west of the Sawgrass Expressway on Tuesday, Coral Springs Fire Department officials said. 

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane lost power forcing the pilot to make an emergency landing.

No injuries were reported.

Broward Sheriff’s deputies are at the scene investigating.










Van’s RV-10, N104HN: Accident occurred September 09, 2014 near Ellington Airport (KEFD), Houston, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas    FSDO-09

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N104HN

NTSB Identification: CEN14LA495 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 09, 2014 in Houston, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/13/2017
Aircraft: NOLIN VANS RV-10, registration: N104HN
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that the accident occurred during the airplane's second flight after receiving an experimental airworthiness certificate. The purpose of the flight test was to complete basic flight maneuvers, verify and calibrate cockpit instrumentation, and perform several takeoffs and landings at a nearby airport. After the pilot completed several landings, the engine, while at an idle power setting, experienced a total loss of power during the landing roll. After several unsuccessful engine starts, attempted over a period of 15 to 20 minutes, the pilot was able to restart the engine and depart on the return flight to the departure airport. The airplane then experienced another total loss of engine power about 3 miles east of the intended destination. The airplane did not have sufficient altitude remaining to glide to the airport, and the pilot completed a forced landing to a nearby vacant field, during which the left main and nose landing gear collapsed.

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of a malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal engine operation; however, postaccident damage to the electrical system prevented a complete evaluation of the ignition system.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The total loss of engine power for reasons that could not be determined during postaccident examination.

On September 9, 2014, about 1500 central daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Nolin model Vans RV-10 single-engine airplane, N104HN, was substantially damaged during a forced landing while on approach to the Ellington Airport (EFD), Houston, Texas. The private pilot and pilot-rated-passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight test that originally departed EFD about 1400.

The pilot reported that the accident occurred during the airplane's second flight since receiving its experimental airworthiness certificate on July 1, 2014, and that he was still operating under the restrictions of the initial flight test phase. The pilot stated that the airplane's maiden flight was completed earlier in the day and was flown by another pilot. The pilot reported that the accident occurred during his first flight in the airplane and that he was being assisted by the pilot who had completed the earlier flight. The purpose of the second flight test was to complete basic flight maneuvers, verify/calibrate cockpit instrumentation, and to perform several takeoff-and-landings at the nearby RWJ Airpark (54T), Baytown, Texas, before returning to EFD. The pilot reported that during his final landing at 54T, the engine, while at an idle power setting, experienced a total loss of power during landing roll. After several unsuccessful engine starts, attempted over a period of 15-20 minutes, the pilot was able to restart the engine and depart on the return flight to EFD. While en route, shortly after the pilot had established communications with EFD air traffic control tower, the airplane experienced another total loss of engine power about 3 miles east of the airport. The airplane did not have sufficient altitude remaining to glide to the airport and the pilot completed a forced landing to a nearby vacant field. The left main and nose landing gear collapsed during landing roll, which resulted in substantial damage to the left wing primary structure and the forward fuselage structure.

At 1450, the EFD automated surface observing system (ASOS) reported: wind 120 degrees at 6 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 4,000 feet above ground level, temperature 32 degrees Celsius, dew point 23 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.95 inches of mercury.

A postaccident examination, completed by an aviation mechanic, found no anomalies or obstructions to the fuel lines while compressed air was applied to the fuel system. Additionally, a functional check of the fuel selector confirmed its proper operation. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. Both magnetos provided spark on all leads when rotated by hand.

The airplane was equipped with a standard Bendix-style magneto/ignition multiple-position rotary switch. The magneto/ignition switch had the following positions: Off/Left/Right/Both/Start. The wiring between the cockpit magneto/ignition switch and the starting vibrator appeared to be wired correctly. In addition to the normal magneto P-lead wire, each magneto had an additional wire connected to its P-lead terminal. These extra two wires traced back through the firewall and terminated at a two-position cockpit switch labeled "Mag Drop Selector." The two-position switch was also connected to a multi-pin connector and a wire bundle. The wire bundle to the multi-pin connector had been cut by the pilot/owner following the accident; presumably to remove components from the airplane before it was sold shortly after the accident. As such, the P-lead circuit path beyond the multi-pin connector could not be tested further.

The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of a malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal engine operation; however, the postaccident damage to the electrical system prevented a complete evaluation of the ignition system. Specifically, it was not determined if there was an unintended ground path in the P-lead circuit that could have rendered the magnetos inoperative.

NTSB Identification: CEN14LA495
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 09, 2014 in Houston, TX
Aircraft: NOLIN VANS RV-10, registration: N104HN
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 9, 2014, about 1500 central daylight time, an experimental Nolin model Vans RV-10 airplane, N104HN, was substantially damaged during a forced landing while on approach to the Ellington Airport (EFD), Houston, Texas. The private pilot and pilot-rated-passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight test that originally departed EFD about 1400.

The pilot reported that the accident occurred during the airplane's second flight since receiving its experimental airworthiness certificate on July 1, 2014, and that it was still operating under the restrictions of the initial flight test phase. The pilot stated that the airplane's maiden flight was completed earlier in the day and was flown by another pilot. He stated that the accident occurred during his first flight in the airplane and that he was being assisted by the pilot who had completed the earlier flight. The purpose of the second flight test was to complete basic flight maneuvers, verify/calibrate cockpit instrumentation, and to perform several takeoff-and-landings at the nearby RWJ Airpark (54T), Baytown, Texas, before returning to EFD. The pilot reported that during his final landing at 54T, the engine, while at an idle power setting, experienced a total loss of power during landing roll. The pilot was able to restart the engine and subsequently departed 54T for the return flight to EFD. Shortly after the pilot had established communications with EFT air traffic control tower, the airplane experienced another total loss of engine power about 3 miles east of the airport. The airplane did not have sufficient altitude remaining to glide to EFD, and as such, the pilot performed a forced landing to a nearby vacant field. The left main landing gear and nose landing gear collapsed during landing roll, which resulted in substantial damage to the left wing primary structure and the forward fuselage structure.

At 1450, the EFD automated surface observing system (ASOS) reported: wind 120 degrees at 6 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 4,000 feet above ground level, temperature 32 degrees Celsius; dew point 23 degrees Celsius; and an altimeter setting of 29.95 inches of mercury.



LA PORTE, Texas -   Two people survived a plane crash near La Porte on Tuesday.

The Harris County Sheriff's Office received reports of a small plane crash landing on the 9500 block of New Decade Road and Underwood Road.

The two people who were on board are in decent condition, according to EMS.

Officials say the Texas Department of Public Safety will be the lead agency to investigate the case.


Story and Comments:  http://www.click2houston.com
 
PASADENA, TX (KTRK) --  There were scary moments for two people on board an experimental aircraft that came down in southeast Harris County Tuesday.

According to the FAA, the pilot reported losing engine power before making the unexpected landing a little more than 3 miles northeast of Ellington Field.

At this point, it's not clear where the aircraft was heading or from where it took off.

Story and Video:  http://abc13.com



Cessna 177B Cardinal, N34880: Accident occurred September 02, 2014 in Neihart, Montana

CHRISTOPHER J. WILSEY: http://registry.faa.gov/N34880

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA362 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 02, 2014 in Neihart, MT
Aircraft: CESSNA 177B, registration: N34880
Injuries: 1 Fatal,3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 2, 2014, about 1230 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 177B, N34880, impacted terrain about 5 miles southeast of Neihart, Montana. There were four soles on board; the private pilot and two passengers were seriously injured and one passenger was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence and subsequent post impact fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Great Falls International Airport (GTF), Great Falls, Montana at about 1200.

The pilot reported to local law enforcement that he was flying in a valley when he observed rising terrain ahead. He attempted to climb over the ridge, but the airplane wouldn't climb. The pilot turned the airplane towards the valley when the airplane struck trees and descended to the ground.

The airplane has been recovered to a secure location for further examination.






GREAT FALLS - Rachel Lukasik, the 11-year-old girl who survived the crash of a small plane near Neihart last week, continues recovering in a burn unit in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The crash claimed the life of her grandmother, Susan Majerus, and seriously injured her grandfather, 68-year-old Robert Majerus, 68. A fourth passenger, Christopher Wilsey, 55, was also injured.

John Thurston has created a Go Fund Me web page to raise money to help Rachel - known as Ladybug - and her family.

Thurston writes:

Ladybug was burned horrifically in the crash and her grandma, Sue Majerus, gave her life saving Ladybug from the wreckage. Ladybug was flown from Great Falls, Montana to Salt Lake City almost immediately as a result of the severity of her burns.

Ladybug's father is in Salt Lake at the burn center with her while she goes through the process of healing. The course of mending will take a great deal of time, time Mr. Lukasik will be away from work.

While he is away there are bills that need to be paid and because he is the sole means of income for Ladybug and her brother, Mr. Lukasik should not have the worry of losing his home or having his power disconnected after just losing his mother, Sue, and while he is caring for his daughter Ladybug while she heals.

The friends and family of the Lukasiks have come together to help during this time but they are asking the community for help as well. Donations are appreciated and will insure Mr. Lukasik and Ladybug will have a comfortable home to return to when it is time.

Click here to visit the Go Fund Me page.

Source:  http://www.kbzk.com

Susan Majerus:   She gave her life to save her granddaughter

Susan Majerus

Sep 08, 1946 - Sep 02, 2014  


Susan Kay (Murray) Majerus, 67, of Great Falls/Monarch, died on Tuesday, September 2, 2014 in an airplane crash on Kings Hill.

A vigil service will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 at Corpus Christi Catholic Church. A funeral liturgy will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 10, 2014 at Corpus Christi Catholic Church. Schnider Funeral Home is handling arrangements.

Sue was born on September 8, 1946 in Great Falls, Montana to James L. Murray and Dorothy (Lanning) Murray. She attended St. Thomas Grade School and graduated from Central Catholic High School in 1964. She married Leonard Lukasik in 1965; the marriage was later annulled.  Sue married Bob Majerus in 1992.

Sue had a ceramics business, taught classes, and won many awards for her creations. She was the manager’s secretary at the Great Falls International Airport, membership director at the Great Falls Area of Commerce and Job Service in the programs department. She wrote articles for the Consumer’s Press “Great Falls Positive” and had just started writing for the Judith Basin Press in Stanford. Sue was involved with the Monarch Neihart Historical Group in restoring the Monarch Railroad Depot and moving a caboose from Belt to Monarch. She also helped cook and advertise events at the Monarch Neihart Senior Center.

She was a devoted lifelong Catholic. Sue retired to become a full time caregiver for her grandchildren. In 2011, Sue and Bob bought a cabin near Monarch. She loved spending time in the mountains and making friends with all the people in the Belt Creek Valley.

Sue is survived by her husband, Robert Majerus; son Rodney Lukasik; siblings Mary Jo Lacher of Fairfield, Colleen Love of Fontana, CA, Michael Murray of San Jose, CA, Jackie Strosnider of Swan Lake, MT and Tim Murray of Great Falls; step-daughter Shonda (Steve) Cornell; grandchildren Rachel and Ryan; step-grandchildren Gabe, Levi and Faith; and former husband, Leonard Lukasik.

She was preceded in death by her mother, Dorothy (Lanning) Murray; father James L. Murray; sister Bettie Cornish; and two baby brothers.

She gave her life to save her granddaughter.

Memorials in Sue’s name may be made to the Rachel Lukasik Burn Account, C/O Wells Fargo, 1400 3rd St. NW, Great Falls, MT, 59404 to help her granddaughter in the Salt Lake Burn Center.


- See more at: http://www.schniderfuneralhome.com  

Eight Apply to Fill Vacancy on Airport Commission: Martha's Vineyard (KMVY), Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts

An opening on the Martha’s Vineyard Airport Commission has attracted strong interest.

Following Peter Bettencourt’s resignation from the commission in August, eight candidates have applied for the appointment to carry out his term, which ends in 2016. The airport commission is appointed by the Dukes County Commission.

The vacancy comes amid a months-long dispute over the seven-member airport commission’s legal independence from the county commission and other internal conflicts.

Mr. Bettencourt said in his letter of resignation that he was no longer able to devote the time required to be a commissioner.

The county commission is scheduled to review the applications and possibly vote on the appointment at a meeting on Sept. 17, county manager Martina Thornton said this week.

The eight applicants are Myron Garfinkle, James A. Graham Jr., Jeffrey (Skipper) Manter 3rd, Benjamin Hall Jr., Robert H. Rosenbaum, Beth Toomey, Geofrey Wheeler and Kirstin Zern.

Two applicants have recent or existing ties to the airport. Mr. Hall served on the airport commission until April, but was not reappointed for a second three-year term. Ms. Zern currently serves on the airport’s master plan committee.

Many of the applicants have extensive experience in the aeronautical industry, which Ms. Thornton said is often the case. There are no requirements for joining the commission, she said, but at least one member must have aeronautical experience.

She said there were more applicants than in past years, but that the number often varies.

- See more at: http://mvgazette.com

CAVU Flight Academy expands to Manitowoc

MANITOWOC – CAVU Flight Academy has been helping northeastern Wisconsin residents experience the fun of flight since it opened a school in Green Bay in 1998.

Owner Sherwood Williams hopes a second location, which recently opened at Manitowoc County Airport, will help more people achieve the dream to “fly like a bird.”

“The dream to ‘fly like a bird’ is one dreamt by many — to feel the freedom, experience the view from the sky, shed the traveling constraints of ground-based transportation,” Williams writes on his company’s website.

CAVU stands for “ceiling and visibility unlimited” and instruction from the company can be the catalyst for a career in aviation, not just flying for pleasure. Students must be at least 17 years old to earn a private pilot’s license. The school’s oldest student is 78.

“We focus on safety,” said Williams, who noted that Manitowoc’s flight school instructors — Jim Wheeler and Leon Sigman — were honored last year with the Wright Brothers Award in recognition of 50 years of safety in aviation. “Most of our students have a healthy fear of flying, so we work with our students to overcome that.”

Wheeler and Sigman said lessons can be the kickstart to students eventually serving as pilots in 747 jumbo jets circumnavigating the globe. After all, they said, most all of them got their start behind the controls of single engine planes like the Savage and Cessna 172 at the airport off Menasha Avenue on the city’s north side.

Manitowoc resident Greg Langman started taking flying lessons in June 2013. He earned his private pilot’s license in November with Williams serving as his Federal Aviation Authority checkoff examiner.

“I just like to fly ... I’ll fly in circles around the airport,” said Langman, a salesman at a Two Rivers vehicle parts and accessories firm.

He has his sights set on earning his instrument rating.

“Then I could fly on cloudy, rainy days with a low ceiling ... not just sunny afternoons,” Langman said.

CAVU is associated with Utah Valley University, which offers associate and bachelor degrees in Aviation Science.

It offers an “introductory discovery flight” for $99. For $219, an intermediate discovery flight gives participants a chance to plan their own flight experience including 45 minutes of ground instruction and flight planning, flying the one-hour plan and finishing with review.

Training for a private pilot license costs about $8,000 or more, which includes 20 to 30 hours of ground-based instruction and about 50 hours of flight training including fuel costs.

- Source:  http://www.postcrescent.com

NTSB report shows growing role of drugs in fatal air crashes

WASHINGTON — Four times as many pilots killed in airplane crashes tested positive for drugs over the past two decades, tracking a broader societal trend in the use of antihistamines, painkillers and marijuana.

While most of the substances wouldn't affect the ability to fly a plane, some of the drugs, including pain medication and sleep aids, would hurt performance, according to a draft of a report being released by the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board on Tuesday. The most prevalent drugs are antihistamines like Benadryl that can cause drowsiness and decreased mental skills.

Pilots aren't being adequately warned about the dangers these substances pose, accident investigators at the NTSB said. Four out of every 10 pilots killed in crashes in 2011 had over- the-counter, prescription or illegal drugs in their systems, a fourfold increase since 1990, the report shows.

"Some drugs have the potential to significantly impair the user's level of alertness, judgment, reaction time or behavior leading to transportation accidents," the NTSB said.

About 23 percent of pilots who tested positive from 2008 through 2012 had taken drugs that impaired performance, according to the NTSB. The percentage more than doubled from 11 percent in the period 1990 through 1997.

Since 1990, the Federal Aviation Administration has tested all pilots killed in accidents for drugs. Results for 6,677 pilots involved in 6,597 accidents were included in the study.

Illegal drug use was a small portion of those who tested positive. It grew to 3.8 percent in the 2008-2012 period from 2.3 percent in 1990-1997.

"The increasing trend in illicit drug results was largely attributed to increasing positive findings for marijuana use among study pilots," the NTSB said.

Marijuana was found in 3 percent of pilots in 2008-2012, or 79 percent of those with illicit drugs, according to the NTSB.

The largest category of drugs found in pilots was over-the- counter sedating antihistamines, according to the NTSB. These drugs include diphenhydramine, known by the trade name Benadryl, used to treat allergies or as a sleep aid.

The study found 7.5 percent of pilots who tested positive had taken over-the-counter antihistamines. The rate increased to 9.9 percent in 2008-2012, from 5.6 percent in 1990-1997.

The FAA doesn't publish a list of drugs prohibited for pilots. While the agency provides guidance to doctors on classes of banned drugs, it's difficult for non-medical professionals to understand, according to the agency.

The NTSB recommended the FAA do more to educate aviators and said the regulator should develop a clear policy on marijuana use. It also recommended the FAA study drug use among pilots who aren't in accidents to assess the risks.

The NTSB also urged U.S. states to develop guidelines to better inform people prescribed pain medication about the risks of operating autos, aircraft and other vehicles.

The board, which has no regulatory powers, makes safety recommendations after investigations.

Most of the accidents in the study were pilots on private flights, the NTSB found. About 4 percent involved commercial operations and fewer than 1 percent included major airlines.

Alcohol wasn't included in the study because it can form in body tissue after death even if a person hadn't ingested any, according to the NTSB. The agency found a link between alcohol intoxication and accidents in fewer than 2 percent of fatal crashes.


 - Source:  http://www.chicagotribune.com

Family of Case Western Reserve University plane crash victim considers lawsuit against fraternity, flight club: Cessna 172R Skyhawk, T & G Flying Club, Inc., N4207P, Accident occurred August 25, 2014 in Willoughby Hills, Ohio

Friends of Abraham Pishevar said the 18-year-old sent this Snapchat with the caption "rush" minutes before he and three others died in a plane crash near Willoughby Hills Aug. 25.



CLEVELAND, Ohio — The family of one of four Case Western Reserve University students killed in a 2014 plane crash is suing the estate of the student pilot, the flight club that owned the plane and a fraternity.

The parents of Abraham Pishevar, 18, claim the nighttime flight he and three other students took Aug. 25 was part of fraternity recruitment, and that the flight club did not properly inspect the plane before letting 19-year-old William Felten fly it.  

The wrongful death lawsuit, filed Oct. 22 in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court, seeks at least $75,000 damages.

Pishevar, Felten, Lucas Marcelli, 20, and John Hill, 18, died when their rented Cesna airplane crashed minutes after taking off from the Cuyahoga County Airport in Willoughby Hills.

It was the first day of classes at Case Western Reserve. Marcelli and Pishevar were on the wrestling team.

Felten and Marcelli, both sophomores, were members of the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity's Lambda chapter at the campus. Pishevar and Hill were both freshmen.

The lawsuit claims Felten was acting as an agent of the fraternity's national headquarters in Indianapolis when he reserved the plane through T&G Flying Club two hours in advance as part of "rush," the period when fraternities and sororities recruit new members.

Images and text messages that Pishevar sent to his friends from the airport reference "rushing." 

The fraternity has denied that the flight was connected to rush.  

The suit also accuses T&G Flight Club and its owner, Laurence Rohl, of not properly inspecting the plane before clearing it for takeoff, failing to properly maintain its planes and entrusting Felten with the plane. 

A representative from the flight school could not immediately be reached for comment.

The flight club trained Felten to get his pilot license a year earlier, and should have known he was "unskilled and incapable" of flying the plane safely, the suit alleges.

Pishevar's family is asking for damages that cover pain and suffering, burial and funeral costs and Pishevar's lost earning potential.

A hearing has not been set.

The family filed a petition for discovery in September 2014, seeking a litany of documentation from the fraternity, the flight club and the university. They withdrew the petition in December.

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The family members of one of the four Case Western Reserve University students killed in an August plane crash are considering suing the fraternity two of the men belonged to and the flight club that rented the plane, according to court documents filed Tuesday.

Family representing the estate of Abraham Pishevar said they believe the Aug. 25 flight was part of recruitment for Zeta Beta Tau, according to a petition for discovery filed in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court. The fraternity has denied that notion.

The petition names the local and national chapters of Zeta Beta Tau, as well as T&G Flight Club and the club's owner, Laurence Rohl. It seeks a litany of documentation, including communication about and receipts of financial transactions for rush activities from the chapters of the fraternity, and records of the pilot, flight instructors and safety inspectors from the flight club.

The family seeks to gather as much evidence as possible before deciding whether to file a civil lawsuit, Jordan Nebovitz, attorney with Nurenberg Paris, said.

"We're not in the business of suing everybody under the sun," Lebovitz said. "We want to discover what actually happened that night."

Pishevar, of Rockville, Maryland, was killed Aug. 25 along with William Felten, 19, Lucas Marcelli, 20, and John Hill, 18, when their rented plane crashed minutes after taking off from the Cuyahoga County Airport.

The National Transportation Safety Board continues its investigation into the cause of the crash. Investigators would not necessarily look into the reason for the flight, unless they determined it had something to do with the crash, said spokesman Keith Holloway.

Text messages and images captured the night of the flight and sent from Pishevar to a group of friends make reference to rushing, the period in which fraternities recruit new members.

Felten and Marcelli were active members of the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity.

The day after the crash, the fraternity released a statement saying there appeared to be no connection between the flight and rush activities.


- Story, Document,  Photos and Comments:  http://www.cleveland.com

http://s3.documentcloud.org

NTSB Identification: CEN14FA453 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 25, 2014 in Willoughby Hills, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 172R, registration: N4207P
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 25, 2014, at 2158 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172R airplane, N4207P, collided with the terrain in Willoughby Hills, Ohio, following a loss of control shortly after takeoff from the Cuyahoga County Airport (CGF). The private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged by impact and a post impact fire. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by T & G Flying Club, Inc. The pilot rented the airplane and was flying it on a personal flight under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which was not operating on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reserved the airplane from T&G Flying Club, at 2022 using an online reservation system. He reserved the airplane for 4 hours, beginning at 2030. The employees of the flying club had left for the evening by time the pilot and passengers arrived.

Two witnesses, stated that shortly after 2100, they saw 4 males walk across the ramp toward the tie-down area near hangar 7. One of the males had a carry-on type suitcase. The pilot and passengers then boarded a Cessna 172. One of the witnesses stated the airplane stayed on the ramp for about 30 minutes with the engine running. They did not see the airplane after this time.

At 2146, the pilot called ground control for a takeoff taxi clearance stating he was on the ramp south of the T&G Flight Club. The controller issued the pilot a clearance to taxi to runway 6 via the Alpha 7 taxiway to the Alpha taxiway. The controller also issued the wind condition as 140 degrees at 8 knots along with the altimeter setting. The pilot stated his radio was a little "fuzzy" and he asked the controller to repeat the clearance. The controller repeated the taxi clearance, which the pilot subsequently repeated. About 4 minutes later, the controller informed the pilot that he is taxiing to the wrong runway. After asking the controller to repeat what he said, the pilot stated "Thank you I'm sorry." The controller then issued taxi instructions back to the approach end of runway 6.

At 2156, the pilot radioed that he was ready to takeoff on runway 6. The controller asked the pilot what his direction of flight was going to be. The pilot responded that they were going to fly east to sightsee and that they would be back in a little while. The controller issued the takeoff clearance with a right turn after takeoff. At 2158, the pilot radioed that they were not climbing fast and they wanted to immediately make a left turn to turn around. The controller approved the left turn. The controller stated it appeared the airplane began a left turn when it descended to the ground. The controller reported that during the takeoff, the airplane became airborne about 100 feet past taxiway Alpha 6, which was approximately 2,000 feet down the runway.

The airplane impacted the ground, a chain link fence, a guy wire, and a telephone pole prior to coming to rest about 1,000 feet on a bearing of 20 degrees from the departure end of runway 6. This location is just north of the intersection of Bishop Road and Curtiss Wright Parkway.

The wreckage path was along a 210 degree heading. The left wing tip, including the position light, was embedded in the ground at the first impact mark. This mark was east of the chain link fence. The airplane then traveled through the fence, with the left wing contacting one of the fence posts. The main impact crater was in the west side of the fence. Adjacent to the crater were two slash marks in the soft ground. Both marks were about 12 inches long. One of the slash marks was about 7 inches deep and the other was about 4 inches deep. The airplane came to rest on a heading of about 160 degrees with the left wing against the telephone pole. A postimpact fire ensued.


AIRCRAFT CRASHED 1/2 MILE FROM THE CUYAHOGA COUNTY AIRPORT, THE 4 PERSONS ON BOARD WERE FATALLY INJURED, CLEVELAND, OH

Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cleveland FSDO-25

http://registry.faa.gov/N4207P

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Zodiac 601XL, N52EB: Incident occurred September 08, 2014 at Okmulgee Regional Airport (KOKM), Oklahoma

Pilot Rick Beckman and his wife were taking a joy flight from Kansas City to the Gulf on Monday in their Zodiac experimental airplane.  They were planning to land at the Okmulgee Regional Airport (ORA) to refuel, according to Gary Utley Maintenance Foreman and Airport Manager.  Little did Beckman know that his quick stop at ORA would cause he and his wife a little longer stay than intended.

Beckman was making his approach to land and said he felt like he was right above the runway when he realized he had ballooned and was 20 feet high. After his minor miscalculation he lowered the plane's nose to come back in, but apparently lost airspeed and dropped a little bit taking a hard landing nose first. This caused the nose gear to fold up and shattered the prop.

The mishap was likely nothing to do with the aircraft. The Zodiac's are kitbuilt and lighter and less expensive than most FAA-certificated aircraft. It is considered a homebuilt or kit aircraft.

- Source:   http://www.okmulgeenews.net



Cessna 421 Golden Eagle, N51RX, Elite Medical Air Transport LLC: Accident occurred August 27, 2014 in Las Cruces, New Mexico

Witnesses to the crash are asked to email witness@ntsb.gov and family or friends of the crash victims can email assistance@ntsb.com.

 
NTSB Identification: CEN14FA462
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 27, 2014 in Las Cruces, NM
Aircraft: CESSNA 421C, registration: N51RX
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 27, 2014, about 1900 mountain daylight time, a Cessna Airplane Company 421C, multi-engine airplane, N51RX, was destroyed after impacting terrain during initial climb near Las Cruces International Airport (LRU), Las Cruces, New Mexico. The pilot, two medical crewmembers and one patient were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Elite Medical Air Transport, LLC; El Paso, Texas, and was operated by Amigos Aviation, Inc.; Harlingen, Texas. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at the time of the accident and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 air ambulance flight. At the time of the accident the airplane was departing LRU for a flight to Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX), Phoenix, Arizona.

The airplane arrived LRU about 1834 to pickup a patient for a flight to PHX. The pilot was still seated in the cockpit when he gave the line service technician a verbal order for a total of forty gallons of fuel. The line service technician drove the fuel truck to the front of the airplane and refueled the airplane putting 20 gallons in each wing. The pilot then assisted the line service technician with replacing both fuel caps. They both walked into the office and the pilot signed the machine printed fuel ticket.

After departing LRU to the west a medical crewmember onboard the airplane called their medical dispatcher on a satellite telephone and reported they were returning to LRU because of a problem with smoke coming from the right engine. A witness driving westbound on the interstate highway reported the airplane was westbound and about 200 feet above ground level (agl) when he saw smoke begin to appear from the right engine. The airplane then began descending and started a left turn to the east. Another witness, driving eastbound on the interstate highway, reported the airplane was trailing smoke when it passed over him about 100 feet agl. He saw the descending airplane continue its left turn to the east and then lost sight of it. Several witnesses reported seeing the impact or hearing the sound of impact and they then immediately saw smoke or flames.

Evidence at the scene showed the airplane was generally eastbound and upright when it impacted terrain resulting in the separation of the left propeller and the separation of the right aileron. The airplane came to rest inverted about 100 feet from the initial impact point, and there was an immediate postimpact fire which consumed much of the airplane. Investigators who arrived at the scene on the day following the accident reported detecting the smell of jet fuel.

A postaccident review of refueling records and interviews with line service technicians showed that the airplane had been misfuelled with 40 gallons of Jet A fuel instead of the required 100LL aviation gasoline.

At 1855 the automated weather observing system at LRU, located about 3 miles northeast from the accident location, reported wind from 040 degrees at 5 knots, visibility of 10 miles, broken clouds at 6,500 feet, temperature 23 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 16 degrees C, with an altimeter setting of 30.16 inches of Mercury.


Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01

ELITE MEDICAL AIR TRANSPORT LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N51RX


LAS CRUCES, New Mexico -  The National Transportation Safety Board released a preliminary report stating wrong fuel pumped into the plane caused the deadly crash in Las Cruces last month.

All four passengers on board were killed.
 

The Cessna 421C plane crashed on August 27 shortly after take off from the Las Cruces Airport. It was carrying a medical team and a cancer patient who was being transported to Phoenix for medical treatment.

The airplane was registered to Elite Medical Air Transport from El Paso and was operated by Amigos Aviation.

The NTSB report stated the pilot, Freddy Martinez, 28, was seated in the cockpit before take off and told service technicians to fill the plane with 40 gallons of fuel.

The report, though, does not say if Martinez specified to the technicians what type fuel the plane required.

Forty gallons of Jet A fuel was pumped into the plane instead of the required aviation gasoline.

Martinez was present during the refueling process and helped technicians replace the fuel caps, according to the report. He signed the fuel ticket and prepared for take off.

Shortly after take off, one of the medical personnel on board called a medical dispatcher to notify them the plane was going back to the Las Cruces after smoke was detected from the right engine.

A witness driving westbound on Interstate 10 told investigators the plane was flying about 200 feet above ground level.

According to the report, the aircraft was "generally eastbound and upright when it impacted terrain resulting in the separation of the left propeller and the separation of the right aileron".

The impact of the crash caused the plane to go up in flames.

Investigators at the scene reported the smell of jet fuel.

The information in the preliminary report could change, but it is unclear how long it will take before the final report is released.

Story and Comments:  http://www.kvia.com



Cessna 172R Skyhawk, T & G Flying Club, Inc., N4207P: Accident occurred August 25, 2014 in Willoughby Hills, Ohio

Friends of Abraham Pishevar said the 18-year-old sent this Snapchat with the caption "rush" minutes before he and three others died in a plane crash near Willoughby Hills Aug. 25.



CLEVELAND, Ohio — The family of one of four Case Western Reserve University students killed in a 2014 plane crash is suing the estate of the student pilot, the flight club that owned the plane and a fraternity.

The parents of Abraham Pishevar, 18, claim the nighttime flight he and three other students took Aug. 25 was part of fraternity recruitment, and that the flight club did not properly inspect the plane before letting 19-year-old William Felten fly it.  

The wrongful death lawsuit, filed Oct. 22 in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court, seeks at least $75,000 damages.

Pishevar, Felten, Lucas Marcelli, 20, and John Hill, 18, died when their rented Cesna airplane crashed minutes after taking off from the Cuyahoga County Airport in Willoughby Hills.

It was the first day of classes at Case Western Reserve. Marcelli and Pishevar were on the wrestling team.

Felten and Marcelli, both sophomores, were members of the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity's Lambda chapter at the campus. Pishevar and Hill were both freshmen.

The lawsuit claims Felten was acting as an agent of the fraternity's national headquarters in Indianapolis when he reserved the plane through T&G Flying Club two hours in advance as part of "rush," the period when fraternities and sororities recruit new members.

Images and text messages that Pishevar sent to his friends from the airport reference "rushing." 

The fraternity has denied that the flight was connected to rush.  

The suit also accuses T&G Flight Club and its owner, Laurence Rohl, of not properly inspecting the plane before clearing it for takeoff, failing to properly maintain its planes and entrusting Felten with the plane. 

A representative from the flight school could not immediately be reached for comment.

The flight club trained Felten to get his pilot license a year earlier, and should have known he was "unskilled and incapable" of flying the plane safely, the suit alleges.

Pishevar's family is asking for damages that cover pain and suffering, burial and funeral costs and Pishevar's lost earning potential.

A hearing has not been set.

The family filed a petition for discovery in September 2014, seeking a litany of documentation from the fraternity, the flight club and the university. They withdrew the petition in December.

NTSB Identification: CEN14FA453 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 25, 2014 in Willoughby Hills, OH
Aircraft: CESSNA 172R, registration: N4207P
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 25, 2014, at 2158 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172R airplane, N4207P, collided with the terrain in Willoughby Hills, Ohio, following a loss of control shortly after takeoff from the Cuyahoga County Airport (CGF). The private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged by impact and a post impact fire. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by T & G Flying Club, Inc. The pilot rented the airplane and was flying it on a personal flight under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which was not operating on a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reserved the airplane from T&G Flying Club, at 2022 using an online reservation system. He reserved the airplane for 4 hours, beginning at 2030. The employees of the flying club had left for the evening by time the pilot and passengers arrived.

Two witnesses, stated that shortly after 2100, they saw 4 males walk across the ramp toward the tie-down area near hangar 7. One of the males had a carry-on type suitcase. The pilot and passengers then boarded a Cessna 172. One of the witnesses stated the airplane stayed on the ramp for about 30 minutes with the engine running. They did not see the airplane after this time.

At 2146, the pilot called ground control for a takeoff taxi clearance stating he was on the ramp south of the T&G Flight Club. The controller issued the pilot a clearance to taxi to runway 6 via the Alpha 7 taxiway to the Alpha taxiway. The controller also issued the wind condition as 140 degrees at 8 knots along with the altimeter setting. The pilot stated his radio was a little "fuzzy" and he asked the controller to repeat the clearance. The controller repeated the taxi clearance, which the pilot subsequently repeated. About 4 minutes later, the controller informed the pilot that he is taxiing to the wrong runway. After asking the controller to repeat what he said, the pilot stated "Thank you I'm sorry." The controller then issued taxi instructions back to the approach end of runway 6.

At 2156, the pilot radioed that he was ready to takeoff on runway 6. The controller asked the pilot what his direction of flight was going to be. The pilot responded that they were going to fly east to sightsee and that they would be back in a little while. The controller issued the takeoff clearance with a right turn after takeoff. At 2158, the pilot radioed that they were not climbing fast and they wanted to immediately make a left turn to turn around. The controller approved the left turn. The controller stated it appeared the airplane began a left turn when it descended to the ground. The controller reported that during the takeoff, the airplane became airborne about 100 feet past taxiway Alpha 6, which was approximately 2,000 feet down the runway.

The airplane impacted the ground, a chain link fence, a guy wire, and a telephone pole prior to coming to rest about 1,000 feet on a bearing of 20 degrees from the departure end of runway 6. This location is just north of the intersection of Bishop Road and Curtiss Wright Parkway.

The wreckage path was along a 210 degree heading. The left wing tip, including the position light, was embedded in the ground at the first impact mark. This mark was east of the chain link fence. The airplane then traveled through the fence, with the left wing contacting one of the fence posts. The main impact crater was in the west side of the fence. Adjacent to the crater were two slash marks in the soft ground. Both marks were about 12 inches long. One of the slash marks was about 7 inches deep and the other was about 4 inches deep. The airplane came to rest on a heading of about 160 degrees with the left wing against the telephone pole. A postimpact fire ensued.


Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cleveland FSDO-25

http://registry.faa.gov/N4207P

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A series of text messages and photographs captured the last few moments before four Case Western Reserve University students died in the August plane crash near Willoughby Hills. 

The images provided to the Northeast Ohio Media Group, and confirmed by Karman Parpovi, a student who described himself as a friend of one of the passengers, show the men on the runway and the interior the Cessna that crashed shortly after takeoff from the Cuyahoga County Airport.

A text message also makes reference to "rushing."

Parpovi, one of several people who received the images and texts Aug. 25, told the Northeast Ohio Media Group that he suspects the flight was related to fraternity rush. It's a claim that the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity denies.

"I'm very certain, without a doubt the reason for the flight had something to do with rushing this fraternity," Parpovi said.

Parpovi was friends with 18-year-old Abraham Pishevar. Pishevar, of Rockville, Maryland, was killed Aug. 25 along with William Felten, 19, Lucas Marcelli, 20, and John Hill, 18, when their rented plane crashed minutes after taking off from the Cuyahoga County Airport.

In the National Transportation Safety Board's preliminary report, investigators said the men boarded the plane with a suitcase and described the 10 p.m. flight to air traffic controllers as a short sightseeing trip.

But Parpovi said Pishevar sent several text messages and Snapchats in the minutes leading up to the flight. One image shows a picture of one of the men standing outside the plane, and was captioned only "rush."

Felten and Marcelli were members of the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity. Marcelli, Pishevar and Hill were also members of the university's varsity wrestling team.

The day after the crash, the fraternity released a statement confirming the crash came on the first day of recruitment. But it insisted that the flight itself was not tied to rushing activities.

"We sympathize with the friends and family of the men killed in that plane crash and understand the need of some to create a reason for this senseless tragedy," the fraternity said. "This tragedy may have occurred during the University's recruitment week. 

However, outside of the fact that two of the men killed were our brothers, the plane crash appears to have had nothing to do with recruitment or the fraternity."

Laurence Bolotin, ZBT International executive director, did not immediately respond to a list of questions.

In one of his final text messages, Pishevar was asked how his first day of classes went.

"It was alright, not bad," he wrote. "I'm rushing right now.

"See the Snap I sent you. I'm excited and terrified," he wrote.

Felten, a licensed pilot, reported to air traffic controllers that the plane was having trouble ascending after takeoff, and asked to pull a 180-degree left turn to return to the landing strip, according to the NTSB report.

The plane struck the ground, a chain link fence, a guy wire, and a telephone pole before it came to rest about 1,000 feet from the end of the runway just north of the intersection of Bishop Road and Curtiss Wright Parkway.

Story, Photos and Comments:  http://www.cleveland.com


One of Pishevar's friends, Karman Parpovi, said he is certain the flight had something to do with fraternity recruitment, or rushing, for Zeta Beta Tau. 
  Northeast Ohio Media Group


This text message, provided by a close family friend, shows Pishevar saying he was rushing the night he and three other Case Western Reserve University students died in the crash. 
  Northeast Ohio Media Group


Pishevar, of Rockville, Maryland, died along with pilot William Felten, 19, of Saginaw, Michigan, Lucas Marcelli, 20, of Massillon, and John Hill, 18, St. Simons, Georgia. Felten and Marcelli were ZBT brothers. 

Officials watch over the wreckage from the fatal Willoughby Hills plane crash as a private jet approaches the runway at Cuyahoga County Airport.

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N20469: Accident occurred September 09, 2014 in Watertown, Connecticut

NTSB Identification: ERA14CA430
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 09, 2014 in Watertown, CT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/09/2014
Aircraft: CESSNA 172M, registration: N20469
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that he was utilizing an iPad for navigation, and mistakenly landed in a field rather than his intended destination, an airport with a turf runway. After landing, he taxied the airplane to a corner of the field and commenced a takeoff roll, estimating the available takeoff distance to be about 600 feet. Just after takeoff, the left wing struck a tree and the airplane subsequently impacted the ground, resulting in substantial damage to the left wing and engine firewall. The pilot reported no mechanical malfunctions or abnormalities with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to takeoff from a field which resulted in a collision with trees and the ground. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to correctly identify the destination airport and runway, which resulted in an off-airport landing in the field.      

A small plane has gone down near Park Road in Watertown.  

Watertown fire officials say the plane went down in a field behind homes just before 9 a.m. in the 300 block of Park Road, not far from Mattatuck State Forest.

Pilot Daniel Kropas, of Ridgefield, was heading from Danbury to Waterbury Airport in Plymouth when his plane went down, missing power lines in the area and hit the ground, landing backwards and coming to rest against a group of trees.

There are no injuries, a fire official said. Kropas was transported to the hospital to be evaluated as a precaution.

John Moskaluk, of Watertown, a resident in the area witnessed the crash and said that the pilot weaved in between powerlines and that if he got caught in the wires it might have been a much different outcome.

"If he had that it would have been like a razor blade. It would have sliced that plane right up," Moskaluk said. "I don't think he would have pulled those lines down. They're heavy lines and stuff. He would have been a mess. It's a miracle how he landed that plane in the bushes over there.

Fuel spilled as a result of the crash and The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection is responding to the scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration is also responding to investigate.


Story and Comments:  http://www.nbcconnecticut.com
 
WATERTOWN, Conn. (WTNH) — A Ridgefield pilot walked away from a small plane crash in Watertown this morning. 

The incident happened near 320 Park Road around 8:55 a.m., when a small plane went down in a field. 

Witnesses tell News 8’s Kent Pierce the Cessna 172 went under high power lines, flipped backwards and into trees.

The plane is registered to a man in Ridgefield.

Watertown police or fire officials have not yet commented on the incident, other than to confirm a plane went down.

A spokesperson for the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection says one of its crews has been dispatched out to the area to deal with any fuel spill from the crash.

Story, Photo and Video:  http://wtnh.com


Conway, Arkansas: Council to take up Dave Ward Dr. storage rezoning, Cantrell Field (KCWS)/Central Landing Planned Unit Development

The Conway City Council will on Tuesday take up the business it couldn’t at the previous meeting, where absences on the council didn’t give enough votes to pass ordinances.

The Council will meet at 5:30 p.m. in the District Court building at 810 Parkway Street to discuss city health insurance benefits before the full meeting at 6:30.

One item to be discussed is rezoning the Cantrell Field airport property that would be the site of the Central Landing shopping center. The shopping center is dependent on the city election that decides if the city will reissue municipal bonds, and the results of the election should be known sometime after the polls close at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday. The rezoning would make the 150 acres, currently zoned for industrial use, a Planned Unit Development (PUD) with guidelines specific to the project.

In other “new” new business, the council will vote on approving the sale or re-purposing of infrastructure and equipment at the “old” airport to go toward the new one in the farmland west of town. This includes the T-hangars and the old property and a disused tractor/mower that the airport administration has traded in toward the cost of a new one. Hangar doors and the motors that power them are one valuable asset that the city will try to sell to re-invest in the new site.

Also, Allison Leasing, owner of one of the larger “corporate” hangars at the old airport, has donated their hangar. The city will look at other uses for it, because the hangar doesn’t conform to the new airport’s design standards. Airport Manager Josh Zylks said it wouldn’t seem fair for the city to put up a hangar that the public couldn’t. If the city can’t find a good use for it, it will be marketed for sale.

The council will also decide on a rezoning that would allow the owner of property at 2215 Dave Ward Drive to proceed with plans to build a self-storage facility there. The issue has drawn opposition from a neighboring property owner and others who have spoken to the council about the suitability of the area of Dave Ward Drive, which is mostly retail shops, offices and restaurants, for self-storage. 

Read more:  http://thecabin.net

Airport Manager Josh Zylks

Piper PA-28-140, N6693W: Accident occurred September 07, 2014 in Belen, New Mexico

Student pilot crashes into Belen plane hangar
 
BELEN, N.M. —A student pilot crashed a plane into a hangar in Belen Sunday.

Around 1:30 p.m., the student pilot was on the radio with his flight instructor trying to talk his way through a landing.

The student  pilot wasn’t coming in right, and his flight instructor told him to pull up and try again. While trying to do that, the plane hit the hangar.

Luckily, the 45-year-old student pilot only suffered minor injuries.

-Source: http://www.koat.com


NTSB Identification: CEN14CA488
Accident occurred Monday, September 08, 2014 in Belen, NM
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140, registration: N6693W


NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK A HANGAR, BELEN, MN

Flight Standards District Office: FAA Albuquerque FSDO-01

PRESTON RICHARD KYLE: http://registry.faa.gov/N6693W

http://www.asias.faa.gov/N6693W