Friday, July 28, 2017

Bob Howell, Howell Special, N4393H: Accident occurred May 27, 2016 at Minden-Tahoe Airport (MEV), Douglas County, Nevada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA117
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 27, 2016 in Minden, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: HOWELL BOB HOWELL SPECIAL, registration: N4393H
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that the landing was “normal” but that, during the landing roll, he noticed that the experimental, amateur-built airplane started veering to the left. Shortly thereafter, the right wing suddenly dropped and impacted the runway. He was unable to maintain directional control of the airplane, and it veered off the runway because the right main landing gear (MLG) had collapsed. 

Postaccident examination of the right MLG assembly revealed that the right main tire and wheel had separated from the airplane and that a strut had separated about midpoint. Examination of the fracture features of the right MLG assembly revealed that they exhibited matte-gray features on slant angles, consistent with a ductile overstress fracture. No evidence of preexisting cracks or significant corrosion was observed. The right MLG assembly likely failed due to a hard landing and/or side loading on the MLG. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the right main landing gear assembly due to overstress fracture. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4393H

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA117
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 27, 2016 in Minden, NV
Aircraft: HOWELL BOB HOWELL SPECIAL, registration: N4393H
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 27, 2016, about 1050 Pacific daylight time, an amateur built - experimental Bob Howell, Howell Special airplane, N4393H, sustained substantial damage during the landing roll at the Minden-Tahoe Airport (MEV), Minden, Nevada, following a landing gear collapse. The private pilot and sole passenger on the airplane were not injured. The airplane was registered and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight which originated from Bryant Field Airport, Bridgeport, California, about 1015.

The pilot reported a normal landing, however, during the landing roll he noticed the airplane started to veer to the left. He counteracted the veering with right rudder, and brake. Shortly thereafter, about 400 ft down the runway, the right wing suddenly dropped and impacted the runway. He was unable to maintain direction control of the airplane as it veered off the runway. There were no witnesses to the accident.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the right wing was substantially damaged. The wreckage was transported to a secure location for further examination.

Postaccident examination of the right landing gear assembly revealed that the right main wheel and tire assembly had separated from the airplane. Further, the remaining main gear, a-frame structure, had a strut that had separated about at the midpoint. The bolts and their respective attachment structures that attached the gear assembly to the airframe were intact. All fracture surfaces of the main gear assembly were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for further examination.

The laboratory determined that the fracture features in the tubular steel structure portions showed matte gray features on slant angles consistent with a ductile overstress fracture. Some areas were observed that were consistent with sliding contact between the fracture surfaces under bending or shear loads. The end fitting was fractured in the threads and also had matte gray fracture features and the adjacent deformation of the threads was consistent with a ductile overstress fracture. No evidence of preexisting cracks or significant corrosion was observed.

The owner/builder stated that several years earlier he made a repair to the landing gear where he heated the welds to realign the gear. However, a ductile overstress fracture would be consistent with a hard landing and/or side loading on the main gear.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA117
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 27, 2016 in Minden, NV
Aircraft: HOWELL BOB HOWELL SPECIAL, registration: N4393H
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 27, 2016, about 1050 Pacific daylight time, an experimental, amateur built, Howell Special, N4393H, sustained substantial damage during the landing roll at the Minden-Tahoe Airport (MEV), Minden, Nevada, following a landing gear collapse. The airplane was registered and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and sole passenger on the airplane were uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight which originated from Bryant Field Airport, Bridgeport, California, at about 1015. 

The pilot reported a normal landing, however, during the landing roll he noticed the airplane settled to the right and he was unable to maintain direction control of the airplane as it veered off the runway, to the left.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the right wing was substantially damaged. The wreckage was transported to a secure location for further examination.

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N73524: Incident occurred July 28, 2017 in Helena, Montana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

http://registry.faa.gov/N73524

Aircraft force landed on a highway.

Date: 28-JUL-17
Time: 19:25:00Z
Regis#: N73524
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: HELENA
State: MONTANA




HELENA -  A small plane made an emergency landing on Interstate 15 north of Helena on Friday.

Dispatchers received reports of a Cessna 172 having engine trouble just before 1:30 p.m.

The pilot brought the plane down safely near mile marker 211 in the northbound lanes about two miles north of the Gates Of The Mountains exit.

Two people were on board when the plane landed - a student pilot and an instructor. Neither one was injured.

A mechanic from the Helena airport was dispatched to examine the plane and a faulty throttle cable was determined to be the problem.

The Montana Highway Patrol and Lewis & Clark County Sheriff’s Office responded to the scene.






A small airplane made an emergency landing on Interstate 15 north of Helena after experiencing a mechanical error Friday afternoon. 

After a throttle cable broke during a training flight from Helena, officials said, the trainer got the attention of a semi-truck driver by flying directly above the vehicle. The truck then slowed down, allowing the plane to land in front of it near the Sieben exit about 25 miles north of Helena.

Two people were on board the 1976 single-engine Cessna, and no injuries were reported. 

http://helenair.com

Titan T-51 Mustang, N5103: Accident occurred July 23, 2016 (and) Incident occurred April 18, 2016 - General William J. Fox Airfield (KWJF), Lancaster, Los Angeles County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA149
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 23, 2016 in Lancaster, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: SWARTZ GENE TITAN T 51 MUSTANG, registration: N5103
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot reported that, while flying the experimental, amateur-built airplane in the airport traffic pattern, the engine experienced a total loss of power. He quickly attempted an engine restart, but was unsuccessful and decided to land on a nearby road. The airplane landed hard and the right main landing gear collapsed. The airplane subsequently veered to the right and impacted a sign.
        
Postaccident examination of the engine revealed that a loose magnet in the flywheel struck the attachment bracket for the primary and secondary ignition, which disrupted the timing of the ignition system and rendered it inoperative; the engine subsequently experienced a total loss of power. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power due to the separation of a flywheel magnet, which impacted the attachment bracket for the primary and secondary ignition and disrupted the timing of the ignition system, rendering it inoperative. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N5103

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA149 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 23, 2016 in Lancaster, CA
Aircraft: SWARTZ GENE TITAN T 51 MUSTANG, registration: N5103
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 23, 2016, about 1113 Pacific daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Swartz Gene, Titan T-51 Mustang, N5103, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a reported loss of engine power while on downwind at the General William J Fox Airfield (WJF) Lancaster, California. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight departed WJF about 1040.

According to the pilot, the airplane was about 1,000 ft above ground level, initiating the base turn to final, when the engine lost power. He quickly attempted an engine restart but was unsuccessful and decided to land on a nearby road. He selected full flaps over the road and landed hard. Subsequently during the landing roll, the airplane's right main landing gear collapsed, causing the airplane to veer to the right and strike a highway traffic sign, which resulted in substantial damage to the right wing.

Postaccident examination of the airplane's engine, under the supervision of a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, revealed that while accessing the engine, a loose portion of a bolt was observed at the bottom of the cowling. It was determined that the loose bolt portion came from the timing pickup bracket that secures the primary and secondary electronic ignition pickups to the engine.

The magnetic flywheel, a part of the ignition system, consisted of four magnets. One magnet became loose and backed out and then struck the secondary timing pickup. Markings were consistent with the impact. The impact force on the secondary timing pickup caused one of the two bolts on the support bracket to separate and break off. Subsequently, the bracket moved about 2 inches, to the right and aft, which effected the primary and secondary ignition system's timing and rendered them inoperative.

The broken bolt was replaced and the attachment bracket was secured back into it's support. The engine started and ran on the primary ignition system with no anomalies noted. However, on the secondary ignition system, the engine could not be started due to the damage sustained to the secondary system.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA149
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 23, 2016 in Lancaster, CA
Aircraft: SWARTZ GENE TITAN T 51 MUSTANG, registration: N5103
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 23, 2016, about 1313 Pacific daylight time, an experimental amateur built Swartz Titan T-51 Mustang, N5103, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a reported loss of engine power while on downwind at the General William J Fox Airfield (WJF) Lancaster, California. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The local flight departed WJF about 1228

According to the pilot, the airplane was about 1000 feet, above ground level, when the engine failed. He quickly attempted an engine restart but was unsuccessful and decided to land on a nearby road. During the landing roll, the airplane's right gear collapsed, causing the airplane to veer and strike a highway traffic sign, which resulted in substantial damage to the right wing.

The airplane was recovered to a secure storage facility for further examination.

Aircraft on landing rollout, nosed over.

Date:  18-APR-16
Time:  00:22:00Z
Regis#:  N5103
Aircraft Make:  TITAN
Aircraft Model:  T51
Event Type:  Incident
Highest Injury:  None
Damage:  Minor
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City:  LANCASTER
State:  California

Piper PA-11, N4707M, Agri-Flight Inc: Fatal accident occurred August 05, 2016 near Laverty Field Airport (IA41), Indianola, Warren County, Iowa

Alex Michael Winter

Neil C. Jackson



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA310 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 05, 2016 in Indianola, IA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/26/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA-11, registration: N4707M
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was using a company airplane to accumulate flight time and experience. Two witnesses reported seeing the airplane climbing after takeoff and noted that the airplane was flying slowly and that it had a “hard time getting any lift.” The airplane finally started to climb; however, the wings started rocking and the airplane subsequently descended into terrain. The witness statements were consistent with the prestall motions of the airplane. 

The pilot and passenger were employed as company ground personnel. According to company policy, the pilot was not allowed to fly with passengers, and the passenger was only allowed to fly with a company flight instructor. The pilot was not a flight instructor. Examination of the airplane revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. A postaccident estimation of the airplane's weight and balance showed that the airplane exceeded its maximum gross weight at the time of the takeoff. It is likely that the pilot’s inadequate preflight planning led to the airplane being operated above its maximum gross weight and degraded its climb performance and led to an aerodynamic stall.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inadequate preflight planning, which resulted in the airplane being operated above its maximum gross weight, degraded its climb performance, and led to an aerodynamic stall during the initial climb.

On August 5, 2016, about 1113 central daylight time, a Piper PA-11; N4707M, impacted a field while maneuvering near Indianola, Iowa. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The commercial pilot and a student pilot rated passenger sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Agri-Flite Inc under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 for the personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Laverty Field Airport, Indianola, Iowa at 1045.

According to the president of Agri-Flight Inc, the pilot and the passenger were employed by Agri-Flite Inc as ground crew personnel and not as a pilots. The pilot was not a company flight instructor, was not allowed to fly with passengers, and was only allowed to fly with company flight instructors. The passenger was only allowed to fly with company flight instructors and not with any other pilots. The president said that ground personnel were allowed to fly company airplanes in order to accumulate flight time, but it was not a method in which ground personnel would transition from their ground personnel positions to pilot positions within the company. The president said there were no upcoming company pilot positions available for the pilot or passenger and that ground personnel are allowed to fly company airplane as a benefit.

On the day of the accident, the president saw the pilot perform at least two stop and go's in N4707M. The president said that the passenger was sitting outside of the company office using his phone and later speculated that the passenger was communicating with the pilot. The president said the pilot landed N4707M, and the student pilot got on board without the airplane being shut down. According to the company security video, they both departed in the N4707M toward the west.

According to local law enforcement, two witnesses stated that they saw the airplane takeoff toward the east, and it appeared to be moving "very sluggishly." The said that appeared as if there was something wrong with the airplane because it was it was having difficulty in attaining enough speed to takeoff and "more trouble" climbing after it lifted off the runway. The airplane flew to the east, then circled to the west, continued to be flying "very slowly," and "a hard time getting any lift." The airplane finally started to climb but then the left wing "dipped down" toward the ground. The airplane seemed to wobble back and forth three or four times, first the left wing followed by the right wing dipping down toward the ground. The airplane then "dropped out of the air."

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. He held a second class medical certificate dated November 6, 2015. The medical certificate was issued without any limitations. According to the operator's accident report, the pilot had accumulated about 260 hours of total flight time of which about 2.5 hours was in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Principal Airworthiness Inspector from the Des Moines Flight Standards District Office stated that the wreckage was oriented facing east on a 090-degree heading The airplane's left wing rested flat on the ground. The right wing root was up off the ground slightly due to how the fuselage was twisted and laying on its left side. The post-crash fire consumed all fabric from the left and right wings and fuselage. Small pieces of fabric were still attached to parts of the fuselage frame tubing. Flight control continuity was confirmed. The Continental A-65-8, serial number 33822-5-8, engine magnetos were broken out of the back of the engine but were on the accessory case. The propeller was still bolted to the flange. The left blade was splintered several inches from the hub. The separated portion was located on the ground, under the engine. Approximately 30 percent of the right blade was missing. The instrument panel and all instruments were badly damaged by the fire. The only recognizable instrument was the turn and slip indicator. The positions of the throttle, carburetor heat, and fuel selector could not be determined due to the condition of the wreckage.

The FAA final Forensic Toxicology Fatal Accident Report for the pilot stated: no carbon monoxide detected in blood, cyanide testing not performed, no ethanol detected in urine, and no listed drugs detected in urine.

The president of Agri-Flite Inc.said that based on a pilot's weight of approximately 225 pounds and a passenger's weight of approximately 285 pounds, N4707M had a weight above the maximum certified weight of the airplane. The calculated takeoff weight of the airplane for the accident flight was about 1,338 lbs and the maximum certified weight was 1,220 lbs.

Van's RV-4, N9214: Accident occurred July 28, 2017 at Hudson Valley Regional Airport (KPOU), Wappingers Falls, Dutchess County, New York

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA480
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 28, 2017 in Poughkeepsie, NY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/14/2017
Aircraft: THOMAS J HANKAMP VAN'S AIRCRAFT RV4, registration: N9214
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during a “taxi test” in crosswind conditions, he overcorrected, and the airplane ground looped. Subsequently, the airplane exited the runway to the right and came to rest nose down. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system on the accident airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 320° at 5 knots. The pilot was departing from runway 06.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector reported that, throughout many conversations with the pilot, the initial statement was that the pilot lost control during takeoff and did have intent for flight. The FAA inspector verified this after talking with the local tower, who had cleared the airplane for takeoff.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during takeoff.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N9214

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA480
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 28, 2017 in Poughkeepsie, NY
Aircraft: THOMAS J HANKAMP VAN'S AIRCRAFT RV4, registration: N9214
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during a "taxi test" in crosswind conditions, he over corrected and ground looped. Subsequently, the airplane exited the runway to the right and came to rest nose down.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system on the accident airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 320° at 5 knots. The pilot was departing on runway 06.

The Federal Aviation Administration Inspector reported that, throughout many conversations with the pilot, the initial statement was that the pilot lost control during takeoff and did have intent for flight. The FAA Inspector verified this after talking with the local tower, who had cleared the airplane for takeoff.
=========

No one was injured after a small home-built plane carrying one person left a runway at Hudson Valley Regional Airport in Wappingers Falls Friday, according to state police spokesperson Melissa McMorris.

The accident was reported at around 12:17 p.m. The plane, an RV4, had been “taxiing" when it left the runway, though McMorris said she didn’t know whether the incident occurred after a landing or before a planned takeoff.

Only a pilot was inside the plane, she said, and the accident appears to be accidental at this time.

The Federal Aviation Administration will conduct an investigation.

http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com

Navy base security concerns force feds to close St. Marys Airport (4J6), Camden County, Georgia




ST. MARYS, Ga. -- An airport with blank runways and almost no traffic are at the top the list for safety and security concerns at Kings Bay Naval Base.

"The airport, in its current location, we look at it as a threat, a safety and security threat," said base Public Affairs Officer Scott Bassett.

He says proximity between the St. Marys airport and the base is to blame.

It’s so close that the airport has to warn pilots of restricted airspace. On at least 10 different occasions, a skydiver has landed on the base or a misguided plane has flown into restricted airspace.

"I'm at a bit of a disadvantage because I'm not going to tell you specifically what those threats are," Bassett said.

On September 14, the FAA is formally closing the airport, something the Navy has been requesting since 9/11.

"It's very complicated," Bassett said. "You may be accusing the government of moving at a snail's pace."

The city of St. Marys will have to hire a contractor to paint massive yellow Xs every couple hundred feet over the runways to formally close them.

"The decision by the city was how do we make the best adaptive re-use of the land?" said City Manager John Holman.

Holman said the city has been in limbo waiting on the feds to decide if the airport would remain open or closed.

"It's just hard to develop a program for something when you're not sure," Holman said.

The airport property is the highest ground in the city, making the 280 acres marketable.

"The airport costs money for the city to operate," Holman said. "It is not what you would call a revenue generator."

http://www.firstcoastnews.com

Avianca Halts Flights From Venezuela: Colombia-based carrier suspends service amid deadly civil unrest in Caracas



The Wall Street Journal
By Kejal Vyas
July 28, 2017 5:24 p.m. ET


BOGOTÁ—Frequent airport power outages, rampant luggage theft and fears of having their planes impounded led Avianca Holdings SA to abruptly withdraw from Venezuela this week, people familiar with company’s decision said Friday.

The operational difficulties faced by the Colombia-based carrier—one of Latin America’s largest—add to a litany of security and financial woes that have pushed around 10 international airlines in recent years to halt services to Caracas. The latest airline’s decision further disconnects a nation mired in deadly civil unrest as countries around the region increase pressure on its authoritarian government.

“Every day we’re more and more isolated,” said travel agent Nelly Corral, frustrated that prices for tickets to the U.S. with the few remaining carriers servicing Venezuela—among them Panama’s Copa Holdings SA —have nearly quadrupled since Avianca’s departure Thursday. “It’s total chaos,” she said.

An internal company memo seen by The Wall Street Journal said Avianca faced chronic problems with power outages that limit the use of Simón Bolívar International Airport’s runway as well as “poor-quality fuel” and inadequate jet refueling equipment. The company several months ago had stopped refueling in Venezuela or leaving aircraft there overnight, a person familiar with the company’s operations said, citing security risks.

The memo also noted concerns over airport technicians with expired licenses that are needed to handle plane equipment. Flights, it said, are often delayed for hours due to arbitrary inspections by the Venezuelan National Guard, which maintains security there.

“This is reflected in the highest level of theft and irregular intervention into travelers’ luggage,” the memo said, adding that Avianca’s crew has also been subjected to robbery and assault on a number of occasions in the crime-ridden capital.

A spokeswoman for Venezuela’s aviation authority couldn’t immediately be reached for comment.

The suspension by Avianca, which according to FlightGlobal had the second-highest seat capacity among international carriers flying to Venezuela, sent the company scrambling to accommodate or reimburse thousands of passengers who had bought tickets through mid-August, when the company had initially planned to stop flights before accelerating its pullout.

The lack of flights has also left Venezuelans stranded abroad and disrupted exit plans for the many looking to flee the country’s collapsing economy and street violence fueled by daily demonstrations against President Nicolás Maduro’s autocratic rule.

Other carriers are also eyeing the exit. Delta Air Lines this week notified Venezuelan travel agencies that they would stop their once-weekly flight to the country on Sept. 16. The company didn’t return calls seeking comment.

On Thursday, the U.S. State Department said it had ordered the evacuation of family members of embassy workers ahead of a vote organized by Mr. Maduro for Sunday to redraw the country’s constitution. The controversial measure has heightened the risk of violent clashes in the polarized nation and has drawn swift condemnation from human-rights organizations and governments around the region. Mexico and Colombia this week followed the Trump administration’s move to blacklist 13 Venezuelan government officials accused of corruption and rights abuses.

Immigration authorities in Colombia and Peru on Friday announced plans to review visa statuses for hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans in their countries to allow for longer stays on humanitarian grounds.

“The moment I saw the U.S. workers and the airlines leaving, that’s when I really started worrying that it may be too late to get out,” said 31-year-old Caracas political consultant Marcela Zaro who lost tickets for a planned trip to the U.S.

Rigid currency controls in Venezuela haven’t only made it hard for individuals like Ms. Zaro to access dollars to travel, but they have also prevented airlines from repatriating $3.8 billion in ticket sale revenues they have trapped in Venezuela, according to the International Air Transport Association. The industry group says carriers are further squeezed because Venezuela’s government forces them to pay for jet fuel in dollars, leaving them with few ways to spend the holdings they have locked in the local bolivar currency, whose value is in free fall.

“It’s a tragedy what’s happening in Venezuela,” said IATA spokesman Jason Sinclair. “Global economies need aviation and connectivity to run. If you disconnect, that hurts everyone.”

Ms. Zaro and her husband had saved up for three years to fly to New York in September to attend a Bruno Mars concert until their Avianca flight was canceled. “The trip was supposed to be oxygen for us,” she said, now unsure how she will make it.

“We still have hope,” she said. “If I have to get there by bus, I don’t care. I’m going to get there.”

—Anatoly Kurmanaev in Caracas contributed to this article.

https://www.wsj.com

Cessna 172N, N6163F, Vagabond Flying Association: Incident occurred July 27, 2017 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Vagabond Flying Association: http://registry.faa.gov/N6163F

Aircraft on landing, went off the runway into a ditch.

Date: 27-JUL-17
Time: 17:50:00Z
Regis#: N6163F
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: OSHKOSH
State: WISCONSIN

Cessna 414A, N3247M, Gran-Aire Inc: Incident occurred July 26, 2017 at Waukesha County Airport (KUES), Wisconsin

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Gran Aire Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N3247M

Aircraft landed and went off the runway.

Date: 26-JUL-17
Time: 23:45:00Z
Regis#: N3247M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C414
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WAUKESHA
State: WISCONSIN

Aerofab Inc. Lake LA-4-250, N1400P: Fatal accident occurred July 27, 2017 in Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional participating entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N1400P


NTSB Identification: CEN17FA287 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 27, 2017 in Oshkosh, WI
Aircraft: AEROFAB INC LAKE LA 4 250, registration: N1400P
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 27, 2017, at 1943 central daylight time, an Aerofab INC. Lake LA-4-250 amphibious airplane, N1400P, impacted water during takeoff. The pilot and one passenger were fatally injured, and the pilot rated passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to, and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site about the time of the accident, and the flight was operated without a flight plan. The flight was originating from Vette/Blust Seaplane Base (96WI), Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and its destination was Southwest Regional Airport (MML), Marshall, Minnesota.

The airplane arrived at 96WI about 1230 on the day of the accident. The airplane landed on Lake Winnebago to the south of the seaplane base and the pilot requested assistance during taxi because the airplane was taking on water in the left wing sponson. Boats were utilized to assist the airplane to the dock area. The left wing sponson was subsequently drained of water and the sponson fuel tank, which was a separate tank isolated inside the sponson, was also emptied. The airplane was subsequently moored and the airplane appeared to sit normally in the water. No additional issues were noted with the airplane or sponson taking on water prior to the airplane departing for the accident flight.

Personnel present at 96WI expressed concern to the pilot regarding the rough water conditions later in the afternoon. At one point the pilot was taken out on the lake by boat to observe the conditions on the lake. A witness onboard the boat described the waves being 1 ½ to 2 ft at that time. The pilot then asked to be taken back to the dock and to have the airplane fueled. The airplane was refueled, but no fuel was put into either sponson tank. 

The pilot later approached the sea base staff and indicated he was ready for departure. The harbor master towed the seaplane from the dock, through a narrow gap from the base to the bay referred to as "the cut", and into the bay outside the sea base. The pilot told the harbor master he was going to start the engine as the plane was being towed through the cut, and the harbor master held up a finger to indicated not yet and to wait a minute. The pilot reportedly asked him to start the engines several more times as the airplane was still under tow before the tow rope had been disconnected, and the harbor master indicted to him to wait each time. Once the tow ropes were disconnected and the harbor master moved out of the way to the side, the pilot started the airplane engine and the airplane "went to full power within two seconds."

The airplane began its takeoff run immediately from the bay and departed to the northwest. Video of the takeoff showed the airplane porpoised two to three times, the nose rose steeply out of the water, and the airplane rolled to the left and the left wing struck the water. The airplane subsequently spun to the left and the airplane settled back to the right as it turned approximately 180 degrees, and the right wing was driven into the water. The nose of the airplane entered the water and the airplane subsequently started to submerge. The pilot-rated passenger was able to extricate himself from the airplane and the other two occupants were extracted by first responders. Swells in the lake were described as 1 to 1 ½ feet high at the time of the accident. 

Review of video and photo evidence documenting the takeoff revealed the airplane's wing flaps were in the up position during takeoff. The flaps and flap lever were found in the "up" position during examination of the wreckage. The takeoff trim tab was in a position close to, or at, maximum up. The takeoff trim position indicator was within the green band range for takeoff near the neutral position. No preimpact anomalies preventing normal operation of the airplane were noted during the examination of the airframe and engine.


Above photo of the accident aircraft taken right before they headed out on the accident flight. 













Above photo of the accident aircraft taken right before they headed out on the accident flight. 
Diane M. Linker
March 13, 1946 – July 28, 2017

Memorial services celebrating the life of Diane M. Linker, 71, of Sauk Rapids will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, August 7, 2017 at the Daniel Funeral Home Chapel in St. Cloud. Diane passed away unexpectedly on Friday, July 28, 2017.

Visitation will begin at 4:00 p.m. on Monday at the Daniel Funeral Home in St. Cloud.

Diane was born on March 13, 1946 in Tyler, Minnesota to Leslie and Phyllis (Bornitz) Williams. She married Earle Stelling in 1964 and they moved to California where they resided for over twenty years. She returned to Minnesota in 1997. Diane was employed at DBL Labs until retirement.

Diane was an avid flower gardener and mirror collector. She also enjoyed casino trips, playing cards and board games, spending time outdoors and above all treasured time with family and friends; most recently spending time with her companion, Allen on many excursions. She will be remembered for her adventurous spirit, fun sense of humor, love of the color red and of Elvis Presley.

Diane is survived by her children; Kevin (Kris) Stelling of St. Cloud; Lisa Stelling (Meridith Grosse and her son Mathew) of Mounds View; loving companion, Allen Stanlake of St. Martin; brother and sister, Darrell (Linda) Williams of Balaton, Pam Quilici of Bloomington; and niece, Dawn Hutson of Maryland.

She was preceded in death by her parents; former husband, Earle; sister, Delores Williams.

Ray Johnson
December 28, 1932 - July 31, 2017


MARSHALL — Ray Johnson, 84, of Marshall passed away on Monday, July 31, 2017, in Wisconsin, as the result of an aviation accident. Since Ray loved a good fly-in breakfast, funeral services are 10 a.m. Saturday at the Southwest Minnesota Regional Airport – Ryan Field Marshall (KMML) in Marshall with a pancake breakfast to follow. Burial will be in the Marshall Cemetery, Marshall. Fellow pilots are invited to fly in to celebrate Ray’s life — airplane parking will be available.

Visitation will be from 4-8 p.m. today at Living Word Lutheran Church in Marshall. A prayer service is scheduled for 7 p.m. Visitation will continue one hour prior to the service Saturday at the Airport. Military honors are by Marshall American Legion, Post 113.

Raymond Carlton Johnson, Jr. was born Dec 28, 1932, in New Ulm to Raymond and Ruth (Habberstad) Johnson. He was baptized and confirmed at the Brighton Methodist Church and grew in faith to a young man on the family farm, “Home Acres” near Klossner.

Eager to follow his older brothers in service to their country, Ray joined the Minnesota National Guard in 1949, even before graduating from New Ulm High School in 1950. He was activated in January 1951, and served during the Korean war in Korea.

Ray was honorably discharged from the army in March of 1953. He headed to Minneapolis with a buddy to get a job and worked as an office machine repairman for several months. Growing weary of the city, he decided to rejoin his brothers and father in operation of the family farm. Shortly thereafter, he met the love of his life, Marlys Minnie Thormodson. They were united in marriage on June 23, 1956. Five children were born to them: Melanie, Melissa, Ross, Paul, and Peter. The couple shared over 61 years of marriage together.

Ray initially farmed for six years and during that time he developed a passion for aviation, taking his first flying lesson in 1958. He bought his first airplane in 1958 and, in 1962, he moved his young and growing family to Tracy, where he established Tracy Air Service. While there, Ray and Marlys were active at Tracy Lutheran Church, raising their children in the faith and Ray served on the church council and other church capacities. In 1974, Ray and Marlys purchased the aviation business in Marshall and established their life in Marshall where they currently resided. It was in Marshall that their aviation business, Midwest Aviation, flourished and evolved into larger operations.

Ray’s business encompassed multiple areas of aviation: flight instruction – wherein he shared his passion and dedication to fledgling pilots, air charter, crop spraying, scheduled flight service, maintenance shop, airport base operator, and aircraft sales were all aspects of his business. Additionally, Ray was a designated FAA pilot examiner for over 46 years, certifying nearly 3,000 pilots. Ray personally logged over 42,000 hours of flight time. After successfully operating and promoting aviation for 50-plus years, Ray was honored by being inducted into the Minnesota Aviation Hall of Fame in 2013.

Ray and Marlys belonged to, and are charter members of Living Word Lutheran Church in Marshall. Ray was a member of the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Minnesota Trades Association, Minnesota Aerial Applicators Association, Minnesota Seaplane Pilots, Lake Amphibious Flyers Club, Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, and Experimental Aircraft Association.

Ray lived a faith-filled life with devotion to God and his family. He will be deeply missed by family and the large flying community he helped to foster.

He is survived by his beloved wife, Marlys Johnson of Marshall; five children, Melanie Johnson (Ken Sporre) of St. James, Melissa (and Dave) Werpy of Miltona, Ross Johnson of Stillwater, Paul (and Jenell) Johnson of Dayton, Pete (and Lynne) Johnson of Lynd; 10 grandchildren, Tiffany (Lucus) Sandbo of St. James, Ashley (and Bob “Rob”) Gohr of Mountain Lake, Seth Werpy of Miltona, Jonas (and Betsy) Werpy of Lino Lakes, Andrea (and Adam) Walstrom of St. Louis Park, Antonio Delfino of St. Paul, Jennifer Johnson of Dayton, Eric (and Lauren Stafne) Johnson of New Hope, Abby Johnson of Lynd, Natalie Johnson of Lynd; nine great-grandchildren; brother, Merton Johnson of Mankato; nieces, nephews, other relatives, and many friends.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Raymond and Ruth Johnson; and four siblings: Ruthie Johnson, Dorothy Gifford, Calvin Johnson, and Karen Gagen.

He flies with angels now … Blessed be his memory.

In lieu of flowers, Memorials preferred to: First Responders – City of Oshkosh Fire Department; Mercy Medical Center – Oshkosh, Wis.; and Living Word Lutheran Church – Marshall. Memorials received by the family will be directed similarly. Arrangements by Hamilton Funeral Home Marshall, Minnesota.




















OSHKOSH, Wis. (WBAY) - Update: Officials have identified the woman who died on Thursday in the seaplane crash on Lake Winnebago.

The Winnebago County Sheriff's office says 71-year-old Diane M. Linker of Sauk Rapids Minnesota died in the crash.

Officials did not provide any new information about the other two occupants injured in the plane crash.

Authorities say three people from Minnesota were on the Lake Renegade seaplane, leaving to return to Minnesota. Winnebago County Sheriff's Office responded to the incident at 7:45 p.m. on Thursday.

Witnesses tell Action 2 News the plane was taking off but barely left the water when it tipped over near seaplane base. Winnebago County Sheriff's Lt. David Roth said the water was choppy and the plane was possibly taken over by a bigger wave and ended up flipping over.

Two people were trapped on the plane. The third was able to get out when the door opened in the crash. Two suffered critical injuries; the third person's injuries are described as "not life-threatening."

One of the first responders -- a diver, we're told -- suffered a cut to the hand and a burn from fuel in the water.

The sheriff's office estimate the plane was going about 70 knots (80 miles per hour) when it crashed.

Photos during the rescue show the plane almost completely submerged. Authorities say the plane will remain in the water until Friday morning.

EAA spokesman Dick Knapinski said the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash.

He also said flights are still going in and out of the seabase and no delays due to the crash. Knapinski said the last incident on the lake in relation to the EAA AirVenture was July 2011, when a plane traveling from event had engine issues over the lake and ended up crashing into Lake Winnebago. It killed the two people on board.

Police have blocked off the road to the seaplane base, which is off Highway 45 south of Wittman Regional Airport. The base is used by pilots attending EAA AirVenture.

The U.S. Coast Guard, Oshkosh Fire Department and people from the seaplane base assisted.

NTSB is doing a water investigation. They will be pulling the plane out of the water when they are done and take it to a secure hangar to continue investigating. 





OSHKOSH (WLUK) -- A seaplane has been removed from Lake Winnebago four days after it crashed during EAA AirVenture.

The crash last Thursday fatally injured 71-year-old Diane Linker of Sauk Rapids, Minnesota. The pilot and the other passenger were also injured.

EAA officials said the plane had taken off from the convention's seaplane base when it hit a wave and crashed into the lake.


The crash itself happened off EAA grounds.


Divers worked to pull the seaplane from the muddy depths of Lake Winnebago Monday.


"It made it a little trickier, how they handled the aircraft with the extra weight, the water and mud seeped into the aircraft," said Dan Baker, Investigator, with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).


Baker says recovering the plane took around two hours,"This one was intact, so all they had to do was hook on it, and pull it out."


He continued to explain, that a full crash investigation will now be conducted, "Right now, the plan is to take the aircraft back to a secure storage location on the airfield."


Baker says the agency will be looking at a number of potential causes, including mechanics, experience of the pilot, and environmental conditions, "We take all that, put it together, after we gather all that information, that will give us a pretty clear picture of what happened."


As the wreckage was hauled away, Baker says the quick removal process, will help expedite the investigation,"This was very efficient equipment to do the job, it didn't take very long at all."


NTSB says it will have an update later this week, but the full report could take up to a year to finish.


Story and video ► http://fox11online.com





OSHKOSH - One person has died after the amphibious airplane she was in crashed the night before on Lake Winnebago, authorities confirmed.

A female passenger died Friday as a result of the crash, Winnebago County Chief Deputy Coroner Chris Shea said. Authorities are not releasing the woman's name, pending notification of her family.

The six-seat Lake Renegade carrying three people from Minnesota was going about 80 mph when it hit a “large wave” and overturned, just before 8 p.m. Thursday near the Experimental Aircraft Association's Seaplane Base, just south of Oshkosh, EAA spokesman Dick Knapinski said.

One passenger was able to escape the wreck, while two others were trapped inside, according to the Winnebago County Sheriff's Office. 

Four people were hurt in the incident, including the three Minnesota residents on board the plane and a member of the Winnebago County sheriff's dive team.

One of the people on board was expected to be released from the hospital Friday morning, Knapinski said. The two other victims were in critical condition Thursday night. 

A spokesman for ThedaCare said Friday morning that a ThedaStar helicopter flew one person from the crash to University of Wisconsin Hospital in Madison. 

The identities of the plane's pilot and passengers were unknown Friday morning.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash. Keith Holloway, a media relations specialist with the NTSB, said Friday that a preliminary report will likely be released within 10 days.

“At this point, we don’t determine the cause of the crash,” Holloway said. 




OSHKOSH, Wis. (WLUK/AP) -- A federal investigator says one person from Minnesota has died and another remains in critical condition after a seaplane accident near EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh.

Investigator Dan Baker of the National Transportation Safety Board says the victim died Friday. Winnebago County Chief Deputy Coroner Chris Shea says the woman was a passenger. Her name was not released.

Baker says a third injured person is out of the hospital.

The seaplane hit a wave upon takeoff before it crashed into Lake Winnebago Thursday night, according to a spokesman for the Experimental Aircraft Association.

The plane was taking off from the seaplane base at EAA, which is holding its annual AirVenture fly-in convention this week in Oshkosh.


The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.



http://fox11online.com 



WINNEBAGO COUNTY, Wis. (WLUK) - Three people suffered injuries after a seaplane crashed near EAA AirVenture.

Two people are in critical condition and a third received minor injuries.

The crash happened Thursday evening near the seaplane base in Black Wolf. That's just outside Oshkosh.

Emergency vehicles blocked off the road into EAA's seaplane base Thursday. Authorities told FOX 11 News one of the planes flipped over into Lake Winnebago.

"I do know the plane was attempting to take off. Lake Winnebago is rough at this point in time," explained Winnebago County Sheriff's Lt. David Roth.

Video and photos we have show some of the first responders, but do not appear to show the seaplane that went down. That happened farther offshore.

Roth said it's unclear what exactly caused the crash. He told us, however, three people were inside when it went down.

"Two of the occupants were trapped in the plane. One of the occupants was able to get out when the door opened when it crashed. The other two had to be taken out of the plane," Roth explained.

Roth told FOX 11 News a first responder was also hurt.

"He received a cut on the hand and he was burned by the fuel in the water," said the lieutenant.

According to Roth, the people on the plane are all from Minnesota. They were attempting to head back that way when the crash happened.

We're told the FAA and the NTSB are investigating this crash.

Authorities said the plane will likely be removed from the water some time Friday .

Local first responders and the Coast Guard helped with rescue efforts. Divers did get in the water to make sure no one else was in the plane.