Thursday, January 26, 2017

Exec Air offers scheduled service to Keys at Naples Municipal Airport (KAPF)

John Swasey, president of Exec Air of Naples, poses for a portrait at the Naples Municipal Airport in Naples, Florida, on January 23, 2017.



Exec Air is spreading its wings at Naples Municipal Airport.

The airline, which has operated a charter service at the city's airport for about 20 years, recently added scheduled flights to Marathon and Key West.

Over the years Exec Air's owner John Swasey said he often got calls asking about departure times for the Keys, so he decided to start offering regular service, in addition to his on-demand charters.

The scheduled service started Jan. 1, with no fanfare. It has been slow to take off, with no advertising.

"We've had some flights, but the general public has not received the word that we are doing it yet," Swasey said.

Scheduled flights are offered daily on a six-passenger Cessna 207 or a three-passenger Cessna 182.

Round-trip flights from Naples to Key West run $400 per passenger. A one-way ticket is $275.

In comparison, a charter flight from Naples to Key West would cost more than $1,100 on the three-passenger plane and almost double that on the six-passenger one, Swasey said.

"A charter is like a taxi," he said. "You are renting the whole airplane if you want it or not. So it's much more expensive, whereas with a scheduled service you are buying a seat, one seat on an aircraft."

For the past five years, Exec Air has offered scheduled service between Naples and Miami. It's available four days a week. Though the service hasn't done as well as expected, Swasey said "it's not where I would pull the plug on it."

"We're not getting rich off of it," he said. "Part of it is people don't know it's available. The other part is there are those people who won't fly on a single-engine airplane. I don't understand it because it's a lot safer than twin-engine jets or driving."



As a commercial operator, Exec Air is held to high standards when it comes to the condition of its planes, Swasey said. "There's a higher level of safety."

With the start of scheduled service to the Keys, the airline has introduced a coupon book for passengers, who use it often, which will give them discounts on flights.

"We have a lot of business people here in Naples that do business in Key West or have a business in Key West, and that is part of the reason we did what I call a frequent flier coupon book," Swasey said.

The airline will soon add a third plane to its fleet, a Cessna 310 twin-engine aircraft that can seat five passengers, which will help support its expanded service. Swasey also plans to hire more pilots. There are three pilots, including himself, and he hopes to have as many as eight.

At Southwest Florida International Airport, several airlines offer flights to Key West, but Swasey said there are benefits to using his service, including no airport parking fees and faster check-ins. Security delays are "almost nonexistent," he said.

"It's one of the few scheduled services where you can actually meet the pilot," Swasey said.



While there are several charter flight operators based at the Naples airport, there's only one other commercial airline offering scheduled flights.

Elite Airways offers direct flights to and from Portland, Maine, and Melbourne, Florida. After a stop in Melbourne, passengers can continue on to Long Island, New York.

Chris Rozansky, Naples Airport's executive director, said he expects Exec Air's scheduled service to the Keys to be successful.

"Clearly any time we can facilitate better air transportation around the region it's beneficial for the community," he said.

Rozansky said he hopes Exec Air and other airlines will add more scheduled service at the airport to more destinations.

Swasey isn't ready to think about that yet. He's said he's focused on growing the demand for the regular flights he already offers to and from the Keys and Miami.

Source:   http://www.naplesnews.com

Investigators arrest federal agent accused of soliciting 13-year-old girl for sex



Investigators arrested a special agent with the Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday, when he attempted to meet a 13-year-old girl for sex at Sunrise Mall in Brownsville, according to the federal criminal complaint against him.

Agents with Homeland Security Investigations — a division of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement — and the Rio Grande Valley Child Exploitation Investigations Task Force arrested Jeremy David McCauley on Wednesday during a sting operation at Sunrise Mall. McCauley is a special agent assigned to the FAA Office of Security and Hazardous Materials in Fort Worth.

"We are aware of the allegations and are taking the appropriate actions," said FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford, who declined to comment further.

McCauley spent a week sending messages to undercover agents posing as a mother and her 13-year-old daughter, according to the criminal complaint.

"During the communications, McCauley arranged to meet the 13 year old minor female to have sex," according to the criminal complaint. After the arrest, McCauley confessed.

McCauley is charged with soliciting a minor for sex.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Ignacio Torteya III ordered McCauley held without bond until a detention hearing on Jan. 31.

Court records don't list an attorney for McCauley, who couldn't be reached for comment.

Source:   http://valleycentral.com

Beech F35 Bonanza, N4213B: Accident occurred January 26, 2017 near Gimlin Airport (18MO), Ozark, Christian County, Missouri

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.govN4213B 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: MCI FSDO


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA097 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 26, 2017 in Ozark, MO
Aircraft: BEECH BE35, registration: N4213B
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 26, 2017, about 1525 central standard time, a Beech BE35 single engine airplane, N4213B, registered to a private individual, sustained substantial damage when it impacted the ground after a collision with power lines while on VFR approach to the Gimlin Airport (18MO), Ozark, Missouri. The private pilot sustained minor injuries and one pilot-rated passenger sustained serious injuries. The personal local flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from 18MO about 1430. 

According to the pilot, the flight was intended to gain some experience in his recently purchased airplane. After completing about 10 touch and go landings at a nearby airport, the flight was returning to 18MO for a full stop landing. The pilot announced the he was entering a left downwind to runway 36, reduced speed, and lowered the landing gear. Upon turning to final approach, the pilot lowered the flaps and was concentrating on lining up the airplane on runway centerline. The pilot stated that he did not see the power lines and the last thing he remembered is "something exploding in his face," and opening his eyes inside the wreckage. 

The pilot-rated passenger stated that the airplane was lined up with the runway on final and he felt that the airplane was a little low, but thought that the pilot was making a flat, power-on approach, due to the crosswinds. Upon passing over a tree line, he stated that the pilot surprised him by pulling back the power instead of adding power. The airplane seem to sink into the power lines.

After colliding with the power lines, the airplane impacted the ground and tumbled inverted, resulting in substantial damage. The power lines were located about 1/4 mile from the airport. Evidence at the accident site showed that the airplane had collided with the top 2 lines of a 4-line power line. The propeller struck the top line and the nose gear hit the second line down. The airplane hit the ground with the right wing, tumbled, and came to rest inverted.






The National Transportation Safety Board has released its preliminary aviation accident report on the Jan. 26 plane crash that occurred at Gimlin Airport just outside Ozark and injured two.

The report says the Beech BE35 single-engine airplane collided with power lines while on approach to Gimlin Airport at 2:25 p.m. Jan. 26. The airport is located off W Highway in Ozark. The accident occurred just south of Galena Road and east of W Highway.

The plane is owned by Texas resident Nick R. Gilley, who was also the pilot that day. The passenger is not named in the NTSB report, but local officials on scene said he was an Ozark resident.

“The private pilot sustained minor injuries and one pilot-rated passenger sustained serious injuries,” the report says.

The accident occurred when the plane collided with power lines, located about a quarter-mile from the airport, causing it to crash into the ground.

“Evidence at the accident site showed that the airplane had collided with the top two lines of a four-line power line,” the report says. “The propeller struck the top line and the nose gear hit the second line down. The airplane hit the ground with the right wing, tumbled and came to rest inverted.”

According to the report, Gilley told investigators the flight “was intended to gain some experience in his recently purchased airplane.”

“After completing about 10 touch-and-go landings at a nearby airport, the flight was returning to 18MO for a full-stop landing,” the report says. “The pilot announced that he was entering a left downwind to runway 36, reduced speed and lowered the landing gear. Upon returning to final approach, the pilot lowered the flaps and was concentrating on lining up the airplane on runway centerline. The pilot stated that he did not see the power lines and the last thing he remembered is something exploding in his face, and opening his eyes inside the wreckage.”

The passenger, who has a pilot’s license, said that the plane was lined up with the runway “a little low.”

“...But (he) thought that the pilot was making a flat, power-on approach, due to the crosswinds,” the report says. “Upon passing over a tree line, he stated that the pilot surprised him by pulling back the power instead of adding power. The airplane seemed to sink into the power lines.”

The crash knocked out power to nearly 500 White River Valley Electric members, but crews had power back up later that evening.

NTSB investigator Alexander Lemishko investigated the crash along with Federal Aviation Administration investigator James Seabolt. The NTSB and FAA are agencies responsible for investigating aircraft crashes. The report, which says this is preliminary information and subject to change, notes that the NTSB did not travel to the scene of the accident.


Source:  http://ccheadliner.com




Delbert Sinor of Ozark is shown in this recent photo with his wife, Ozark County native Shirley Luna Sinor. Sinor suffered injuries and was hospitalized after the Jan. 26 crash of a private plane south of Ozark. The other person in the plane has not been publicly identified.







Editor’s note: This story by reporter Mike Landis and videographer Robin Foster, with Scott Brady and Sean Barnhill also contributing, is reprinted from KY3.com. It describes a Jan. 26 plane crash that, the Times has learned, involved Ozark resident Delbert Sinor, husband of Ozark County native Shirley Luna Sinor and son-in-law of Gainesville resident Bonnie Luna. After being treated for his injuries at a Springfield hospital, Sinor is now recovering at home, family members say. The other person in the plane, who was at the controls at the time of the crash, has not been publicly identified.

A small plane hit some power lines and crashed near a rural air strip between Ozark and Chadwick on Thursday afternoon. Christian County Sheriff Brad Cole said two people in the plane have moderate to severe injuries.

The Gimlin asphalt airstrip is next to Highway W south of Missouri 14 between Ozark and Chadwick. The crash occurred shortly before 2:30 p.m.

Stan Smith, a freelance photographer, said the plane was a Beechcraft Bonanza. He was in the airport office when it took off about 45 minutes before the crash. He said the two people in the plane were a flight instructor and the new owner of the plane.

Smith said the two planned to fly all afternoon for insurance purposes, but something happened and they had to make an emergency landing, which is when the plane hit power lines 200 to 300 yards from the runway.

Christian County Sheriff’s deputies, state troopers, Ozark firefighters and paramedics rushed to the scene. A battalion chief says there was no fire and no one was trapped in the wreckage. The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.

The crash knocked out electric service to some people in the area. White River Electric Cooperative’s website reported 484 outages. ... White River restored power to all of its members by about 7:30 p.m.

KY3 editor’s note: An earlier version of this report said Stan Smith heard at the airport that the plane had engine trouble. Smith said later that he went to the hospital and talked to the injured men, and they said the plane did not have engine trouble. They described the problem as pilot error.


Source:   http://www.ozarkcountytimes.com





OZARK, Mo. (KY3) - A small plane hit some power lines and crashed near a rural air strip between Ozark and Chadwick on Thursday afternoon. Sheriff Brad Cole said two people in the plane have moderate to severe injuries.

The Gimlin grass airstrip is next to Highway W, south of Missouri 14. The crash was between 2:30 and 3:00.

Stan Smith, a freelance photographer, said the plane is a Beechcraft Bonanza. He said he was in the airport office when it took off about 45 minutes before the crash. He said the people in the plane are a flight instructor and the new owner of the plane.

Smith said the owner and the instructor planned to fly all afternoon for insurance purposes but something happened and they had to make an emergency landing, which is when it hit power lines near the airport.

Christian County sheriff's deputies, state troopers, Ozark firefighters and paramedics rushed to the scene. A battalion chief says there was no fire and no one was trapped in the wreckage. The chief said the National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.

The crash knocked out electric service to some people in the area. White River Electric Cooperative's website reported 484 outages shortly before 4 p.m.

Source:   http://www.ky3.com









CHRISTIAN COUNTY, Mo. -- Two people have been injured in a plane crash in Christian County this afternoon.

Christian County Sheriff Lieutenant Jeff Lofton confirms that a private single-engine fixed wing plane crashed at a small airport near Route W and Galena Road.

No fatalities were reported but both passenger and pilot suffered moderate injuries. Both were transported by ground to a healthcare facility.

A cause of the crash has not been determined at this time. The investigation is ongoing.

Source:   http://www.ozarksfirst.com

Iowa State University details plane trips for president's doctor visits

Iowa State University, Cirrus SR22, N176CF: http://registry.faa.gov/N176CF




AMES, Iowa (AP) — Iowa State University is detailing trips in which a university airplane flew President Steven Leath to and from Minnesota so that he could attend personal medical appointments.

Leath announced last month he was reimbursing $3,800 for costs of flying to doctors' visits at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, a three-hour drive from Ames.

Leath said that he believed that the plane use was appropriate "because I had to get back to Ames for important university commitments." But after an audit questioned those flights, he said he'd feel "more comfortable" paying himself.

Leath didn't specify which of his numerous Rochester trips the reimbursement covered.

ISU spokeswoman Megan Landolt said Thursday the reimbursements covered flights in which university pilots dropped Leath off in October 2015 and picked him up days later and a same-day March 2016 roundtrip.

Landolt said the reimbursement didn't include multiple flights Leath made to Rochester in July 2015, days after he made a hard landing in the university's smaller airplane. She says those were fundraising trips.

A spokesman says the Division of Criminal Investigation is still investigating Iowa State's flights. State law prohibits the use of public assets for private purposes.

Source:  http://www.postbulletin.com

Cessna U206F Stationair, N61276: Incident occurred January 25, 2017 at Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Florida

FAA Flight Standards District Office: South Florida

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WHEEL COLLAPSED, TAMIAMI AIRPORT, MIAMI, FLORIDA 

Date: 25-JAN-17
Time: 14:00:00Z
Regis#: N61276
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C206
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

Piper PA-34-220T, Bluffs Charter, N4327N: Accident occurred January 18, 2017 in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa

BLUFFS CHARTER LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N4327N

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  Des Moines  

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING STRUCK THE PROPELLER, COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA 

Date: 18-JAN-17
Time: 05:30:00Z
Regis#: N4327N
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA34
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: COUNCIL BLUFFS
State: IOWA

Cessna 172P, Ground Imaging, N5496K: Incident occurred January 23, 2017 in New Orleans, Louisiana

GROUND IMAGING INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5496K 

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  Baton Rouge 

AIRCRAFT MADE A PRECAUTIONARY LANDING, NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 

Date: 23-JAN-17
Time: 16:08:00Z
Regis#: N5496K
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: NEW ORLEANS
State: LOUISIANA

Cessna 172 Skyhawk, Mexico Medical Missions, N5639A: Fatal accident occurred January 25, 2017 in Jay, Oklahoma

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Oklahoma City,  Oklahoma
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Mexico Medical Missions: http://registry.faa.gov/N5639A 

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA085
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, January 25, 2017 in Jay, OK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/16/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N5639A
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was conducting a personal cross-country flight. Fuel records indicated that the pilot had purchased 9.56 gallons of fuel the day before the accident. A witness reported observing the pilot use fuel cans to add fuel to both airplane's fuel tanks. The witness saw the pilot taxi up and down the runway multiple times and subsequently depart; he then drove to the nearby airport (the pilot's intended destination) to pick up the pilot. When the pilot did not arrive, he reported the airplane missing. Responders tracked the emergency locator transmitter signal, and a helicopter pilot spotted the airplane in a field near a tree line.

Upon examination, the propeller blades did not exhibit any chordwise abrasions or leading edge nicks, consistent with the engine not producing power at the time of impact. The fuel system was found intact except for a separated line near the left fuel tank. About 6 gallons of a blue-colored liquid consistent with the smell and color of aviation gasoline (avgas) was recovered from the right fuel tank. About 2 gallons of liquid consistent with avgas was recovered from the left fuel tank. Each fuel tank could hold 21 gallons of fuel, of which 2.5 gallons was unusable. There was some liquid consistent with avgas found in the carburetor bowl and in the firewall-mounted strainer bowl. All found and recovered liquid samples were tested for water contamination, and no water contamination was observed. Observed airplane damage was consistent with impact with trees and inverted impact with terrain.

The fuel valve selector handle was found in the "right tank" position. However, no securing pin was installed in the selector handle, and during postaccident examination, pressurized air applied to the main fuel line at the firewall was observed discharging from the left tank's fuel line, which showed the selector valve fed the engine from the left tank. The engine operated normally during postaccident engine test runs. Based on the evidence, it is likely that the engine was starved of fuel when the fuel selector handle did not move the fuel selector valve to the desired position because the necessary securing pin was missing. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed about 8.5 years before the accident. The lack of routine maintenance on the airplane likely eliminated the necessary opportunities for the missing securing pin to be corrected.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's negligent maintenance of the airplane, which resulted in improper fuel management, fuel starvation, and a loss of engine power during takeoff due to a missing securing pin in the fuel selector handle, and a subsequent forced landing on unsuitable terrain.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 25, 2017, about 1730 central standard time, a Cessna 172 airplane, N5639A, impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing near Jay, Oklahoma, following an in-flight loss of engine power. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was owned by Mexico Medical Missions and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from a private airstrip near Jay, Oklahoma, and was destined for the Grove Municipal Airport (GMJ), Grove, Oklahoma.

According to fueling records from GMJ, the pilot purchased 9.56 gallons of 100 low lead aviation gasoline (avgas) at 1019 on January 24, 2017.

According to a witness at the departure airstrip, the pilot intended to fly the airplane to GMJ. He saw the pilot service both of the airplane's fuel tanks with fuel from fuel cans. He saw the pilot taxi up and down the runway multiple times. The airplane subsequently departed and the witness drove to GMJ to pick up the pilot. When the pilot did not arrive, he reported the airplane as missing. The emergency locator transmitter signal was detected and a helicopter pilot spotted the airplane in a field near a tree line about .75 nautical miles east of the departure airstrip.


PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 61-year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land rating. He also held an FAA third-class medical certificate that was issued on August 23, 2016, with no limitations. The pilot reported on his application for his medical certificate that he accumulated 450 hours of total flight time with 1 hour in the 6 months preceding his medical.


AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane, serial number 28239, was an externally braced high-wing, propeller-driven, fixed landing gear, semi-monocoque design, four-seat airplane manufactured in 1956. A 145-horsepower Continental O-300 engine, marked with serial number 11594-D-6-B, drove a two-bladed, all-metal, fixed pitch, McCauley model 1A170/DM765 propeller, with serial number 62885. Airplane logbooks revealed that the last recorded annual inspection was completed on July 3, 2008. An endorsement for that inspection showed that the airplane tachometer indicated 2,817.4 hours and that the airplane had accumulated 5,739.4 hours of total time.

The airplane flight manual found in the airplane, in part, stated:

FUEL SYSTEM
Fuel is supplied to the engine from two 21 gallon aluminum tanks, (of which 18.5 gallons in each tank are useable in all flight conditions) one located in each wing. From these tanks fuel flows by means of gravity through a fuel selector and fuel strainer to the engine carburetor.

...

Fuel Selector Valve. A rotary type fuel selector valve is located at the aft end of the cabin floor tunnel between the front seats. The valve has four positions labeled "BOTH OFF", "LEFT TANK", "RIGHT TANK", and "BOTH ON". The "BOTH OFF" position seals both wing tanks off from the rest of the fuel system and allows no fuel to pass beyond the selector valve. The "LEFT TANK" position allows fuel to flow from the left wing tank to the engine. The "RIGHT TANK" position permits fuel to flow from the right wing tank to the engine. The "BOTH ON" position provides fuel flow from both tanks simultaneously to provide maximum safety. Important – The fuel valve handle indicates the setting of the valve by its position above the valve dial.

...

Fuel Quantity Indicators. A direct reading, dampened, float-type fuel quantity indicator is mounted in each tank at the wing root inside the cabin. Each gage indicates the amount of fuel remaining in its respective tank. A red arc is painted on the face of each indicator to warn the pilot that the respective fuel tank is almost empty. Do not take off if the pointer is in the red arc.

The fuel selector handle connects to the fuel selector valve and is retained in place by means of a securing pin.


METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1735, the recorded weather at GMJ was wind 290° at 7 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, sky condition clear, temperature 6° C, dew point -2° C, and altimeter 29.96 inches of mercury.


WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane was found inverted on about a 40° heading about 7 miles and 214° from GMJ in an open field with hay rolls scattered throughout the field. The airplane came to rest near a tree line that bounded the western edge of the field. The first found tree with a broken branch was observed about 125 feet and 267° from the wreckage. Broken and separated branches with signs of recent breaks were observed aloft in trees and on the ground from that first found tree towards the wreckage. Sections of clear plastic consistent with the landing light lens and chips of paint consistent with the color of the airplane were found along that same path to the wreckage. The left wing had a semicircular depression in its leading edge between its landing light and its wing tip. The size of a separated tree branch was consistent with the size of the shape of the semicircular depression.

All of the airplane's control surfaces remained attached to the airplane. Flight control cables were traced and fight control cable continuity was established. No cable separations were observed. The elevator trim control cable was continuous from the trim wheel chain to the trim actuator and its trim tab arm was attached to the trim tab. The flap system's control cables were continuous from its flap actuator bar to the flaps' bellcranks. The bellcranks' push/pull rods were connected to their respective flap. The extent of flap deployment could not be determined due to post impact damage. The elevator trim was about 1.3 inches, which equates to a position of about 5° tab trailing edge down. The elevator trim indicator was observed in the take-off range.

The engine was found displaced rearward into the firewall. The propeller blades did not exhibit any chordwise abrasions or leading edge nicks. One propeller blade was bent rearward. The carburetor was found separated from its mounting flange.

The fuel system was found intact except for a separated line near the left fuel tank. About 6 gallons of a blue-colored liquid consistent with the smell and color of avgas was recovered from the right fuel tank. About 2 gallons of liquid consistent with avgas was recovered from the left fuel tank. Some liquid consistent with avgas was found in the carburetor bowl and in the firewall-mounted strainer bowl. All found and recovered liquid samples were tested for water contamination using water paste and no water contamination indication was observed. The fuel valve selector handle was found in the right tank position. No securing pin was installed in the selector handle. Pressurized air was applied to the main fuel line at the firewall and air discharged from the left tank's fuel line. Both fuel tank caps were removed. The right tank cap was a vented cap. A vacuum was applied to the cap's vent and no obstructions were noted. The left tank cap was a non-vented cap. The left tank vent was observed and no obstruction was present on its intake screen. The airplane was righted and the fuel quantity indications changed as fuel migrated within the fuel tanks when the wings were rocked by hand.

The tachometer indicated 2,848.03 hours and the Hobbs meter indicated 1,137.8 hours. The ignition switch key was broken and a section of key was retained within the switch. The ignition switch was found in the "both" position. The master switch was found in the "on" position. The primer was found in a forward position. However, it was not in its locked position. The mixture and throttle were in their forward positions. The carburetor heat was found in its off position.

The engine and separated carburetor were shipped to the engine manufacturer for a detailed examination.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The State of Oklahoma, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The autopsy listed multiple blunt force injuries as the cause of death and accident as the manner of death.

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute conducted toxicology testing of specimens from the pilot. The report was negative for all tests performed.

SURVIVAL ASPECTS

The Cessna 172 did not have shoulder harnesses installed and was not required to have them installed at the time it was certified.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

On March 7, 2016, the engine was examined at Continental Motors in Mobile, Alabama. The main portion of the carburetor was in the shipping crate with the engine. The separated sections of the carburetor were not shipped with the engine. However, they were located at the recovery company's facilities and were subsequently shipped for the examination.

The engine was removed from the shipping crate and prepared for examination. Both rear engine mounts were damaged and replaced with exemplar mounts. Both sparkplug harnesses were damaged and replaced with exemplar harnesses. The oil drain was damaged and an exemplar plug was installed. The carburetor was damaged and an exemplar carburetor was mounted to the intake. Magneto timing and cylinder compression were checked. The No. 4 rocker cover was damaged and an exemplar cover was installed. An adapter plate and test club were mounted on the propeller flange. The engine was mounted in an engine run cell and was test run with the exemplar carburetor, and the engine was operational when it produced rated power.

The original carburetor body and bowl cover assembly mounting flange was separated into sections and the throttle shaft and its throttle valve was liberated from the assembly. Due to the extent of damage to the original body and bowl cover assembly, an exemplar assembly was used with the original carburetor's mixture metering valve assembly, float valve and seat assembly, and float bracket. The exemplar cover with original components was mated to the original carburetor body and bowl assembly and this carburetor was mounted to the intake and the engine was test run a second time. The engine was operational when it produced rated power and responded to rapid throttle accelerations/decelerations throughout its full range using the original carburetor with exemplar body and bowl cover assembly.

Both removed sparkplug harnesses were mounted to a test bench. Spark was observed at the ends of all leads when the test bench equipment was operated.


ADDITIONAL DATA/INFORMATION

FAA Advisory Circular 91-65, Use of Shoulder Harness in Passenger Seats, in part, stated, "The [National Transportation Safety Board] found that 20 percent of the fatally injured occupants in these accidents could have survived with shoulder harnesses (assuming the seat belt fastened) and 88 percent of the seriously injured could have had significantly less severe injuries with the use of shoulder harnesses. Energy absorbing seats could have benefited 34 percent of the seriously injuries. The safety board concluded that shoulder harness use is the most effective way of reducing fatalities and serious injuries in general aviation accidents."


Additionally, the FAA issued policy statement, ACE-00-23.561-01. The purpose of this statement is to address methods of approval for retrofit shoulder harness installations in small airplanes.

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA085
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, January 25, 2017 in Jay, OK
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N5639A
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 25, 2017, about 1730 central standard time, a Cessna 172 airplane, N5639A, impacted trees and terrain during a forced landing following an inflight loss of engine power near Jay, Oklahoma. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was owned by Mexico Medical Missions and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from a private airstrip near Jay, Oklahoma, and was destined for the Grove Municipal Airport (GMJ), Grove, Oklahoma.

According to initial information from a manager at GMJ, the pilot purchased 9.56 gallons of 100 low lead aviation gasoline (avgas) at 1019 on January 24, 2017.

According to a witness at the departure airstrip, the pilot intended to fly the airplane to GMJ. He saw the pilot service the airplane with fuel from fuel cans. He saw the pilot put fuel into both of the airplane's fuel tanks. He saw the pilot taxi up and down the runway multiple times. He saw the airplane subsequently depart and he drove to GMJ to pick up the pilot. When the pilot did not arrive, he reported the airplane as missing. Law enforcement conducted a search for the airplane. The emergency locator transmitter signal was detected and a helicopter spotted the airplane in a field near a tree line.

The 61-year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land rating. He also held a FAA third-class medical certificate that was issued on August 23, 2016, with no limitations. The pilot reported on his application for his medical certificate that he accumulated 450 hours of total flight time with 1 hour in the six months preceding his medical.

N5639A, a 1956 model Cessna 172, Skyhawk, serial number 28239, was an externally braced high-wing, propeller-driven, fixed landing gear, semi-monocoque design, four-seat airplane. A 145-horsepower, six-cylinder, air cooled, horizontally opposed, carbureted, Continental O-300 engine, marked with serial number 11594-D-6-B, powered the airplane. The propeller was a two-bladed, all-metal, fixed pitch, McCauley model 1A170/DM765, with serial number 62885. Airplane logbooks revealed the last recorded annual inspection was completed on July 3, 2008. An endorsement for that inspection indicated that the airplane tachometer indicated 2,817.4 hours and the airplane had accumulated 5,739.4 hours of total time. The airplane was not equipped with a shoulder harness and was not required to have one installed.

At 1735, the recorded weather at GMJ was: Wind 290 degrees at 7 knots; visibility 10 statute miles, sky condition clear; temperature 6 degrees C; dew point -2 degrees C; altimeter 29.96 inches of mercury.

The airplane was found inverted on approximately a 40 degree heading about 7 miles and 214 degrees from GMJ in an open field with hay rolls scattered throughout the field. The airplane came to rest near a tree line that bounded the western edge of the field. The first found tree with a broken branch was observed about 125 feet and 267 degrees from the wreckage. There were broken and separated branches with signs of recent breaks observed aloft in trees and on the ground from that first found tree towards the wreckage. Sections of clear plastic consistent with the landing light lens were found along that same path to the wreckage along with chips of paint consistent with the color of the airplane. The left wing had a semicircular depression in its leading edge between its landing light and its wing tip. The size of a separated tree branch was consistent with the size of the shape of the semicircular depression.

All of the airplane's control surfaces remained attached to the airplane. Flight control cables were traced and fight control cable continuity was established. No cable separations were observed. The elevator trim control cable was continuous from the trim wheel chain to the trim actuator and its trim tab arm was attached to the trim tab. The flap system's control cables were continuous from its flap actuator bar to the flaps' bellcranks. The bellcranks' push/pull rods were connected to their respective flap. The extent of flap deployment could not be determined due to the post impact damage. The elevator trim was about 1.3 inches, which equates to a position of about five degrees tab trailing edge down. The elevator trim indicator was observed in the take-off range.

The engine was found displaced rearward into the firewall. The propeller blades did not exhibit any chordwise abrasions or leading edge nicks. One propeller blade was bent rearward. The carburetor was found separated from its mounting flange.

Fuel system was found intact except for a separated line near the left fuel tank. About six gallons of a blue colored liquid consistent with the smell and color of avgas was recovered from the right fuel tank. About two gallons of liquid consistent with avgas was recovered from the left fuel tank. There was some liquid consistent with avgas found in the carburetor bowl and in the firewall mounted strainer bowl. All found and recovered liquid samples were tested for water contamination using water paste and no water contamination indication was observed. The fuel valve selector handle was found in the right tank position. There was no securing pin installed in the selector handle. Pressurized air was applied to the main fuel line at the firewall and air discharged from the left tank's fuel line. Fuel tank caps were removed. The right tank cap was a vented cap. A vacuum was applied to the cap's vent and no obstructions were noted. The left tank cap was a non-vented cap. The left tank vent was observed and no obstruction were present on its intake screen.

The tachometer indicated 2,848.03 hours and the Hobbs meter indicated 1,137.8 hours. The ignition switch key was broken and a section of key was retained within the switch. The switch was in the "Both" position. The master switch was found in the "On" position. The primer was found in a forward position; however, it was not locked. The mixture and throttle were in their forward positions. The carburetor heat was found in its off position.

The Delaware County Coroner was asked to arrange for an autopsy to be performed on the pilot and to take toxicological samples.


The engine and separated carburetor will be shipped to the engine manufacturer for a detailed examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov





GROVE — Bob Hudson would travel for miles, sometimes on foot, to take medical supplies and the gospel to the Tarahumara Indians in Mexico's Copper Canyon.

Bob and Pam Hudson spent the past five years as medical missionaries to Mexico, flying in supplies from their home on Grand Lake.

On Wednesday, Bob Hudson, 61, died when the Cessna 172 he was piloting crashed into a field near Zena in Delaware County, minutes after taking off from a grassy runway. The plane lost power, and Hudson was trying to make an emergency landing when the plane struck a tree, according to the Oklahoma Highway Patrol.


Bob and Pam Hudson


Hudson had just left his friend Alvin Lee; they had been talking about missionary work.

The Cessna had recently been donated to the Hudsons' Mexico Medical Missions, Lee said.

“I waved at him and watched him take off,” Lee said. “I was going to drive into Grove and pick him up at the airport.”

It was a 10-minute flight from Lee's airstrip to the Grove Regional Airport. When Hudson failed to arrive, friends began searching on their four-wheelers. An OHP aircraft spotted the wreckage in a field between Lee's home and State Highway 127, Lee said.

Hudson had been a pilot for seven years. He retired as a land surveyor from Rose & McCrary, a Grove engineering and land surveying business.

Mexico Medical Missions provided health care, food, shelter, clean water and educational aid, according to a brochure. The Hudsons lived in Mexico and were planning to return in about two weeks, Lee said.

The father of four and grandfather of eight was described as a former pastor, a loving husband, a great missionary and a good friend by messages posted on social media sites.

The Tarahumara Indians live at an altitude of about 8,000 feet, Lee said. The roads are poor. The airplanes make it easier to visit the villagers and to take the sick among them to the hospital.

Hudson had several aircraft based at the Grove airport over the years, said Lisa Jewett, airport manager.

"His heart was always about medical missions and his faith in Jesus was important to him. He shared his faith with everyone," Jewett said.

“He retired just so he could do medical missions. He was such a great and honorable man. He will be missed by so many," Jewett said.

“How do you come to grips with such a tragic and sudden loss of a man who, along with his lovely wife Pam, gave so much to help desperately poor people in the far interior of Mexico,” said Doug Anderson, a friend.

"Those he selflessly helped, those he left behind and all the many lives he influenced in such a positive way, will feel his death," Anderson said.

The OHP said the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Board are investigating the crash.

Source:  http://newsok.com



ZENA — One person has been pronounced dead after a private plane was found crashed on Oklahoma 127 near Grand Lake on Wednesday night, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported.

Grand River Dam Authority police officers received a report about 6 p.m. Wednesday that a private plane heading from the Zena area to the Grove area did not arrive at its destination, said Brian Edwards, GRDA police chief.
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Delaware County sheriff's deputies assisted police in searching Grand Lake and nearby area for the plane Wednesday night. The plane was located a few hours later by OHP troopers on Oklahoma 127 about three miles west of U.S. 59, said Dwight Durant, OHP spokesman.

One person was found in the plane and was pronounced dead, Durant said.

Joplin, Mo., resident Callie Hudson said a Cessna 172 flown by her father, Bob Hudson, had been missing since around 5:15 p.m. Wednesday. He had taken off from a grass strip in the Zena area and was en route to the Grove Municipal Airport, she said.

Source:  http://www.tulsaworld.com



GROVE, Oklahoma --    KJRH 2 in Tulsa reports that the Oklahoma Highway Patrol has confirmed that the pilot of a missing plane, who was flying from Zena, Okla., to Grove has been found dead in a crash three miles west of Highway 59 and Highway 127.

OHP says he was only one on board.

Family tell us the search was for Bob Hudson and that he took off from a small field in Zena, Oklahoma around 5 Wednesday evening. He was headed towards the Grove Municipal Airport, which should have been only a 10 to 15 minute commute by air.

Source:   http://www.fourstateshomepage.com

ZENA, Okla. - UPDATE - The Oklahoma Highway Patrol has confirmed that the pilot of a missing plane, who was flying from Zena, Okla., to Grove has been found dead in a crash three miles west of Highway 59 and Highway 127.

The Grove Sun reports Robert "Bob" Hudson, a local pilot and medical missionary, died in the crash.

OHP says he was only one on board.

GRDA Police report the plane was long overdue to land in Grove on Wednesday night; OHP and Delaware County authorities helping with search Grand Lake area.

Witnesses told investigators a plane was seen on a tree-line traveling away from Grand Lake and appeared to be having trouble gaining altitude.

The witnesses also said the plane was moving away from the lake.

The GRDA, OHP and Delaware County Sheriff's Office were looking for the lost plane on land and in the water in the area but darkness was making the task difficult.

A helicopter located the plane in a hay field to the east of the airport, according to the Grove Sun.

Hudson's body has been taken to the Oklahoma State medical examiner's office in Tulsa. 

The plane took off from the airport in Zena, Okla., just a short hop from Grove.


Source:   http://www.kjrh.com

The Bahamas: Family Island Airports Require $106m By 2022

Family Island airports need an immediate investment of $87 million to make them all compliant with international safety and regulatory standards, and help reverse economic stagnation and depopulation.

A study submitted to the Government and Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) in June 2016 said that besides bringing the 28 airports into compliance with International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) requirements, a further $54 million in capital investments are required between 2017 and 2041.

The report by ALG Transportation Infrastructure and Logistics, which has been obtained by Tribune Business, reveals that a total $141 million investment is required for the Bahamas to upgrade key Family Island tourism and commercial infrastructure to world standards.

Out of that, the $54 million is needed to enable the Family Island airports to expand and meet anticipated increases in passenger traffic over the next 25 years.

And with some $19 million in capital expenditure required immediately, the study said $106 million needed to be found over the next five years between 2017-2022, once the $87 million required for ICAO compliance was factored in.

ALG said the $106 million figure represented a 43 per cent decline on the $187 million estimate produced two years previously by another consultancy firm, Stantec.

It explained that the reduced estimate had been produced because the new San Salvador airport terminal was already under construction at a cost of $13.5 million.

ALG added that a further $37 million in construction costs would be saved via its proposal to relocate the North Eleuthera airport terminal rather than build a new runway, while that building - and the new terminal planned for Exuma - would be less grandiose, saving some $5.5 million and $8.5 million, respectively.

But, while disagreeing on cost estimates, both the ALG and Stantec reports were united in warning of the dire consequences for Bahamian and Family Island tourism, and their economies, if this nation failed to act on the needed infrastructure upgrades.

Explaining the consequences of not investing in Family Island airports, Stantec said: “Tourism growth has been stagnant for the past 12 years and this could actually see a decline of the product, and that includes the Family Islands airports, if [they’re] not invested in to provide the aviation community with a safe and well managed airport environment.

“Additionally, it only takes one incident to create an international reaction and impose tremendous liability on the Bahamas as well as reputational damage.”

The reports are part of a $53.8 million joint venture by the Government and IDB that aims to bring the main Family Island airports - Marsh Harbour, Exuma and North Eleuthera - into compliance with ICAO standards, and enable them to cope with increased visitor volumes.

“The conditions of the Family Island main entry ports are limitations for the regional and global integration of the Bahamas,” an IDB document obtained by Tribune Business concludes.

“The main ports of entry for the Family Islands - Exuma, North Eleuthera and Marsh Harbour/Treasure Cay - are in need of investment and require a wide range of aviation and infrastructure upgrades.

“Security deficiencies like visual aids, lighting and marking, mobile equipment, the layout of the runaway, apron and taxiways, impose a risk to the operation and compromises new traffic demand.”

As an example of these deficiencies, the IDB paper said North Eleuthera’s airport had a “separation” between the aircraft parking area and runway, which forced planes to park “within 75 metres” of the centre of the runway.

“Other improvements would be adequate visual aids and improved conditions of the runway,” the IDB document added.

“The airports face challenges to meet the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) safety and security standards, and to respond to events related to climate change. The required investment to meet ICAO standards focuses on the non-compliance related to airfield physical characteristics, maintenance and firefighting and security.

“Such events require action in order to maintain certification by the Bahamian Civil Aviation Authority, to guarantee safety for passengers and crew, and keep the operation of this transport mode. Delayed implementation of these measures could also have an adverse impact on future traffic flows, and the economy.

“For the country, to have a strong market presence in the competitive Caribbean tourism industry, it is crucial that the island gateway airports offer the highest possible level of safety and quality of aviation infrastructure and services.”

The aviation industry, and the airports, are essential to Family Island tourism and their wider economies, and their commercial integration with the wider world. Deficiencies in airport safety, operating standards and opening hours thus present a major impediment to a better distribution of economic benefits.

The IDB added: “Increased capital expenditures to bring the airports up to ICAO standards, improve the operating procedures, safety management system, emergency response plans, and internal capabilities in the Bahamian Airports Authority are recommended.

“Enhancing of local capacities within the Ministry of Transport and Aviation and the Airports Authority will be needed to put in place a management framework to ensure the sustainability of the upgraded assets, and a proper airport operation. “

The IDB paper suggested that the Bahamas adopt the ‘NAD model’, and outsource the management - and some of the risk - associated with Family Island airport upgrades to the private sector via a public-private partnership (PPP).

ALG estimated that the 28 Family Island airports would require a further $65 million investment between 2023-2028, and another $82 million in the period 2029-2041.

Much of that sum, some $111 million, will be needed for maintenance, ALG added, taking the total spend between now and 2041 to $254 million.

Still, stripping out the maintenance expenditure, ALG said its long-term projections (ICAO compliance) and airport expansion were some 38 per cent lower than Stantec’s estimates of two years previously, standing at $141 million compared to $227 million.

Story and comments:   http://www.tribune242.com