Friday, August 31, 2018

First Boutique Air flyers land at Telluride Regional (KTEX): New commercial service celebrated by airline, airport board and Colorado Flights Alliance

Boutique Air Flight 732 receives sustenance on the tarmac of Telluride Regional Airport Wednesday, shortly after completing the airline’s inaugural Denver-to-Telluride route. 


Descending the airstair of a Pilatus PC-12 plane Wednesday, a Texas couple made one small step for man, one giant leap for continued commercial air service to Telluride Regional Airport (KTEX). 

Brad and Jill Renner, of Austin, joined five other passengers and two pilots on Boutique Air Flight 732, the airline’s inaugural flight from Denver International Airport to TEX.   

Although the service was only disclosed last week, Jill Renner “just happened to be on Instagram when it was announced, so I canceled our flight (from Denver) to Montrose, and booked these seats on Boutique to Telluride.”  

Said Brad Renner, “This is our 9th time here for Telluride Film Festival, and we’re happy to reach town so quickly. Everyone was all smiles on the flight. The weather was good. The views were good. The pilot was good.” 

Before the flight arrived, Matt Skinner, Colorado Flights Alliance COO, and Boutique welcomed about 20 interested parties to an airport reception, featuring a selection of cheeses and charcuterie from Over the Moon. The mood was light as attendees assembled in the upstairs observation deck to see the single-engine plane drop gracefully from a clear blue sky to the runway. 

Boutique’s planes certainly differ from those used to serve Telluride by Great Lakes Aviation before that airline dropped service in March. In contrast to Great Lake’s aging 19-seaters, Boutique is flying newish luxurious planes — Pilatus PC-12s and Beechcraft King Air 350s — that host eight passengers in wide, first-class-like leather seats that recline. A peek inside the PC-12 revealed plentiful legroom, easy-to-reach power outlets and elegant wood paneling. 

All Boutique Air flights will have two pilots onboard, although only one is required for the smaller planes. As Boutique Air CEO Shawn Simpson recently told the Aviation Tribune, “Two pilots give you peace of mind, and it is truly safer. And when things get complicated in the air, it’s really good to have another pilot there to help out.”

Shortly after landing Wednesday, copilot Chris Lawler described his first landing at TEX as “very exciting. It felt like flying a private plane. But it was very smooth, and memorable only for being the first. Pilots enjoy unmemorable flights like today’s.” 

Lawler added that he’d watched numerous videos to prepare for landing at TEX, but that the natural beauty was still astounding. “This (9,078 feet above sea level) runway is very high for us,” he said. 

Indeed it is, and mountain weather occasionally caused Great Lakes flights to divert to Montrose. Boutique, Lawler said, would likely divert flights to Cortez Municipal Airport, which has hosted Boutique since 2016. 

On Wednesday, two Boutique counters were operating within the terminal; one was manned by Jennifer Armstrong, Boutique’s interim team leader for the airport. Working on a laptop, Armstrong said she needed Centurylink to come by and iron out some internet service issues, but that operations were going smoothly so far. 

Armstrong acknowledged that summer flying in the mountains differed from winter flying. 

“As operations permit,” she said, “we’ll want to be year-round here. We do have to look at the demands of skiers, to see what their baggage compartment needs will be. We’ll probably have to use our King Air 350s in winter to accommodate bigger bags and skis.” 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.telluridenews.com

Cessna 140, N2167V: Accident occurred August 30, 2018 at Tehachapi Municipal Airport (KTSP), Kern County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N2167V

Location: TEHACHAPI, CA
Accident Number: WPR18LA246
Date & Time: 08/30/2018, 1902 PDT
Registration: N2167V
Aircraft: Cessna 140
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 30, 2018, at 1902 Pacific daylight time a Cessna 140, N2167V, lost engine power during takeoff at Tehachapi Municipal Airport, Tehachapi, California. The private pilot was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and forward fuselage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the local flight.

The pilot initially took off at 1837 and performed a series of touch-and-go takeoff and landings while remaining in the traffic pattern. At 1901, while on the fifth landing roll, the pilot decided to perform one more takeoff. Shortly after rotation, at an altitude of about 50 ft above ground level, the engine lost all power. With limited runway available, and hangars to the left and a busy highway to the right, she decided to attempt a 180° left turn back to the runway. During the turn the airplane struck the adjacent taxiway to the south. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N2167V
Model/Series: 140 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTSP, 4001 ft msl
Observation Time: 0215 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 7°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / 14 knots, 310°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: TEHACHAPI, CA (TSP)
Destination: TEHACHAPI, CA (TSP) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.137222, -118.444167

United Parcel Service, Boeing 757-24APF, N474UP: Accident occurred August 28, 2018 at The Eastern Iowa Airport (KCID), Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; UPS Certificate Management Office

Flight Number 634: Aircraft reported smoke in the cockpit and performed emergency landing. During flight crew evacuation, one (1) crewmember sustained a serious injury.

United Parcel Service Company

https://registry.faa.gov/N474UP

Date: 28-AUG-18
Time: 20:54:00Z
Regis#: N474UP
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 757
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: UPS
Flight Number: 634
City: CEDAR RAPIDS
State: IOWA

Experimental, amateur built Avid MK-4, N628X: Accident occurred August 30, 2018 in Harnett, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N628X

Location: Harnett, NC
Accident Number: ERA18LA239
Date & Time: 08/30/2018, 1600 EDT
Registration: N628X
Aircraft: Avid MK-4
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 30, 2018, about 1600 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur built Avid MK-4, N628X, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power near Harnett, North Carolina. The private pilot sustained minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from a private grass strip near Mount Olive, North Carolina, and was destined for Fuquay Angier Field Airport (78NC), Fuquay Varina, North Carolina.

The pilot reported that during preflight inspection he noted that the airplane had about 8 1/2 to 9 gallons of fuel, "which should have been sufficient" to fly to 78NC, about 35 miles away. En route he noticed the fuel level was just under 1/2 on the fuel tank level sight gauge. He intended to stop for fuel at Harnett Regional Jetport Airport (HRJ), Harnett, North Carolina; however, the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power. He turned on the auxiliary fuel pump but was unable to restart the engine, and subsequently performed a forced landing in a field. After touchdown, the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector examined the airplane where it came to rest and noted substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.

The two-seat, high-wing, fixed-gear equipped airplane was manufactured in 2016. It was powered by a Rotax 912, 150-horsepower engine.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on February 16, 2016. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 813 hours.

At 1600, the weather conditions reported at HRJ, about 2 miles northwest of the accident site included, wind from 160° at 3 knots, clear skies, temperature 34°C, dew point 21°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.05 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Avid
Registration: N628X
Model/Series: MK-4 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHRJ, 198 ft msl
Observation Time: 1600 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 160°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Mount Olive, NC (PVT)
Destination: Fuquay/Varina, NC (78NC)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  35.365556, -78.692778

Cessna 340, N34NY: Incident occurred August 30, 2018 at Cape May County Airport (KWWD), Wildwood, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Unknown

Aircraft experienced a brake failure and veered off taxiway onto the grass.

Air Hamptons Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N34NY

Date: 30-AUG-18
Time: 13:46:00Z
Regis#: N34NY
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 340
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 135
City: NEW JERSEY
State: WILDWOOD

Aer Lingus, Boeing 757, EI-LBT: Accident occurred August 24, 2018 at Philadelphia International Airport (KPHL), Pennsylvania

NTSB Identification: DCA18CA272
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 129: Foreign operation of Aer Lingus
Accident occurred Friday, August 24, 2018 in Philadelphia, PA
Aircraft: BOEING 757, registration: EI-LBT

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

------

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating an incident involving a ground crew worker who was badly injured at Philadelphia International Airport on Friday evening, during pushback for a departing Aer Lingus flight. Police identified the victim as a 60-year-old man, and said he was caught under an airplane moving tug and the wheel of the plane. The man was placed in critical condition at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, police said.

"The NTSB is investigating this accident," a spokesman for the safety board said. "We're still at the early stages."

The Aer Lingus flight, bound for Dublin, was being operated by a different airline, ASL Ireland. The injured worker was employed by a separate ground handling company, Dubai-based Dnata. According to ASL spokesman Andrew Kelly, the ground handling crew had control of the airplane during the incident, which ASL also reported to safety regulators in Ireland.

Dnata confirmed the injured worker is their employee. "We are providing him and his family with all possible support," a spokesman said. The company didn't comment on how the incident occurred, or the type of work the man was performing when it happened.

"A formal investigation is currently being undertaken to determine the facts and we will continue to work with the relevant authorities," the Dnata spokesman said.

Airlines routinely contract with service providers to handle the pushback from the gate before takeoff.

Philadelphia International Airport spokeswoman Mary Flannery said PHL reported the incident to federal authorities Friday night. "The NTSB has requested basic information about this incident and the airport responded."

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www2.philly.com

Cessna 210C, N4568C: Accident occurred August 25, 2018 in Prineville, Crook County, Oregon

https://registry.faa.gov/N4568C

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA509
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 25, 2018 in Prineville, OR
Aircraft: Cessna 210, registration: N4568C

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Cirrus SR20 G2, Aero-Beta Flight Training, D-EWTG and Dallach D.4B Fascination, D-MJEK: Fatal accident occurred April 15, 2018 near Schwäbisch Hall Airport (EDTY), Germany



NTSB Identification: CEN18WA141A
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Sunday, April 15, 2018 in Adolf Wurth Airport, Germany
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR20, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On April 15, 2018, at 1300 UTC, a Cirrus SR-20, D-EWTG, and a Dallach D4b Fascination, D-MJEK, encountered a midair collision under unknown circumstances near Adolf Würth Airport (EDTY), Schwäbisch Hall, Germany. Both aircraft were destroyed; and the pilots, the sole occupants in each airplane, were fatally injured. The Cirrus S-20 had departed from Stuttgart Airport (EDDS), Stuttgart, Germany with a destination of EDTY. The Dallach D4b Fascination departed from Regensburg, Germany also with a destination of EDTY.


This investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation (BFU). Under the provisions of Annex 13 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation as a State of Design, the United States has designated an accredited representative to participate in the investigation. Any further information may be obtained from:


BFU Germany:  Bundestelle für Flugunfalluntersuchung

Hermann-Blenk-Straße 16
38108 Braunschweig
Germany
Telephone: +49 531 35 48-0
E-mail: ops@bfu-web.de
Investigator-in-Charge: Mr. Klaus-Uwe Fuchs
Telephone: +49 531 35 48-0 
E-mail: Klaus-Uwe.Fuchs@bfu-web.de 

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the BFU Germany.


NTSB Identification: CEN18WA141B

14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Sunday, April 15, 2018 in Adolf Wurth Airport, Germany
Aircraft: DALLACH D4, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On April 15, 2018, at 1300 UTC, a Cirrus SR-20, D-EWTG, and a Dallach D4b Fascination, D-MJEK, encountered a midair collision under unknown circumstances near Adolf Würth Airport (EDTY), Schwäbisch Hall, Germany. Both aircraft were destroyed; and the pilots, the sole occupants in each airplane, were fatally injured. The Cirrus S-20 had departed from Stuttgart Airport (EDDS), Stuttgart, Germany with a destination of EDTY. The Dallach D4b Fascination departed from Regensburg, Germany also with a destination of EDTY.


This investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation (BFU). Under the provisions of Annex 13 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation as a State of Design, the United States has designated an accredited representative to participate in the investigation. Any further information may be obtained from:


BFU Germany:  Bundestelle für Flugunfalluntersuchung

Hermann-Blenk-Straße 16 
38108 Braunschweig
Germany
Telephone: +49 531 35 48-0
E-mail: ops@bfu-web.de
Investigator-in-Charge: Mr. Klaus-Uwe Fuchs
Telephone: +49 531 35 48-0 
E-mail: Klaus-Uwe.Fuchs@bfu-web.de 

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the BFU Germany.




Bei einem Unfall mit zwei Kleinflugzeugen sind mindestens zwei Menschen ums Leben gekommen. Die Polizei geht davon aus, dass es sich um die beiden Piloten handelt.

Schwäbisch Hall - Beim Zusammenprall zweier Kleinflugzeuge in der Nähe von Schwäbisch Hall im Nordosten Baden-Württembergs sind am Sonntag mindestens zwei Menschen ums Leben gekommen. Die Maschinen seien im Landeanflug gewesen, teilte die Polizei mit. Demnach handelt es sich um ein Sportflugzeug und um ein Ultraleichtflugzeug.

Die Rettungskräfte gehen davon aus, dass es sich bei den Toten mit großer Wahrscheinlichkeit um die beiden Piloten handelt. Zunächst konnten sie das verunglückte Sportflugzeug nicht näher untersuchen, weil von den Sicherungssystemen für Insassen eine Gefahr für die Retter ausging, wie der Sprecher am Abend sagte. Deshalb war lange unklar, ob weitere Menschen in dem Flugzeug saßen.

Erst spät am Abend hieß es von der Polizei: „In der Maschine befand sich sonst niemand mehr.“ Dennoch suchten die Einsatzkräfte weiter: „Es kann natürlich sein, dass jemand herausgeschleudert wurde.“ Ein Polizeisprecher hielt dies aber für wenig wahrscheinlich. In dem Sportflugzeug können bis zu vier Menschen Platz finden.

Bergung der Maschinen dauert bis weit in den Montag
Das Ultraleichtflugzeug brannte den Angaben nach aus und wurde von der Feuerwehr gelöscht. Die Bergung der Maschinen sollte bis weit in den Montag hinein andauern. Auf Bildern von der Unglücksstelle waren viele Trümmer zu sehen. Die Polizei wollte in der Nacht auch die Identität der beiden Toten klären.

Die Absturzstelle rund 6000 Meter von dem dortigen Flughafen Adolf Würth wurde weiträumig abgesperrt. Ein Polizeihubschrauber war vor Ort. Das Technische Hilfswerk sollte die Unglücksstelle ausleuchten. Experten der Bundesstelle für Flugunfalluntersuchung wurden eingeschaltet. Woher die Flugzeuge kamen, war am Abend unklar.

Die Kriminalpolizei Schwäbisch Hall bittet derweil dringend um Zeugenhinweise. Insbesondere suchen die Ermittler eine Gruppe Jugendlicher oder junger Erwachsener, die sich zum Unglückszeitpunkt in der Nähe der Absturzstelle aufgehalten haben.

Auch Personen, die zufällig Filmaufnahmen des Ungglücks aufgenommen haben, werden gebeten, sich zu melden. Zeugenhinweise werden unter der Telefonnummer 0791/400-0 entgegen genommen.

https://www.stuttgarter-nachrichten.de

Cessna 750 Citation X, N752TX: Accident occurred July 23, 2018 at Cork Airport (ORK), Ireland

CEN18WA324

Textron Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N752TX





An executive jet suffered a burst nose wheel before departure.

This evening the airport says operations have returned to normal.

Passengers are being advised to check with their airlines on the status of their flight.

Earlier: Flights delayed at Cork Airport after private jet suffers burst wheel on main runway

There are flight delays at Cork Airport after the nose wheel of an executive jet burst on the runway.

A crane is being sent to remove the aircraft.

No injuries have been reported - but a number of flights have already been cancelled.

Passengers in the airport have reportedly been told all flights will be delayed by at least two hours.

Passengers are advised to check the status of their flights with the airline.

https://www.irishexaminer.com

Cessna 510 Citation Mustang, N62WM: Incident occurred August 29, 2018 at Delaware Coastal Airport (KGED), Georgetown, Sussex County, Delaware

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Went off the runway and struck a sign.

H & M Bay Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N62WM

Date: 29-AUG-18
Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N62WM
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 510
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: GEORGETOWN
State: DELAWARE

Cessna 421B, N421WD: Incident occurred August 28, 2018 at Dubuque Regional Airport (KDBQ), Iowa

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Veered off taxiway into the grass, struck a taxiway light.

B & E Leasing LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N421WD

Date: 28-AUG-18
Time: 13:20:00Z
Regis#: N421WD
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 421B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: DUBUQUE
State: IOWA

Beech A36 Bonanza 36, N348T: Incident occurred August 29, 2018 in Manhattan, Kansas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Landed in a field.

Drew Jensen Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N348T

Date: 29-AUG-18
Time: 13:40:00Z
Regis#: N348T
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: A36
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MANHATTAN
State: KANSAS

Piper PA-32RT-300T, N2148B: Incident occurred August 29, 2018 at Lebanon Springfield Airport (6I2), Washington County, Kentucky

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Landed hard and gear collapsed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N2148B

Date: 30-AUG-18
Time: 02:30:00Z
Regis#: N2148B
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 32RT 300T
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SPRINGFIELD
State: KENTUCKY

Grumman G-164A Ag Cat, registered to and operated by Acadian Dusters LLC, N956X: Accident occurred August 29, 2018 in Lawtell, St. Landry Parish, Louisiana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N956X

Location: Opelousas, LA
Accident Number: CEN18LA357
Date & Time: 08/29/2018, 1130 CDT
Registration: N956X
Aircraft: Grumman G164
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 29, 2018, about 1130 central daylight time, a Grumman G-164A, N956X, was substantially damaged when it impacted a rice field 2.2 miles northwest of Lawtell, Louisiana. The commercial pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Acadian Dusters LLC, Church Point, Louisiana, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed for the personal training flight. The local flight originated from Church Point Flyers Airport (6LA5), Church Point, Louisiana.

Preliminary information indicates the pilot took off and flew north to practice agriculture flying. The engine lost power and the pilot made a forced landing in a wet rice field. During the rollout, the airplane bogged down in the mud and nosed over, crushing the vertical stabilizer and rudder.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Grumman
Registration: N956X
Model/Series: G164 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Acadian Dusters LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code: 3ZKG

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOPL, 75 ft msl
Observation Time: 1135 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2800 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 240°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Church Point, LA (6LA5)
Destination: Church Point, LA (6LA5)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  30.540833, -92.203611

Cessna 177 Cardinal, N3484T: Incident occurred August 29, 2018 in Ponca City, Oklahoma

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Landed on a road, hit a traffic sign and stopped on a ditch.

https://registry.faa.gov/N3484T

Date: 29-AUG-18
Time: 22:50:00Z
Regis#: N3484T
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 177
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PONCA CITY
State: OKLAHOMA

American General AG5B Tiger, N1196J: Incident occurred August 29, 2018 at McNary Field Airport (KSLE), Salem, Marion County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Blew tire on landing and went off the runway into the grass.

Salem Pilots Association

https://registry.faa.gov/N1196J

Date: 29-AUG-18
Time: 19:08:00Z
Regis#: N1196J
Aircraft Make: AMERICAN GENERAL
Aircraft Model: AG5B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SALEM
State: OREGON

Cessna 152, N48804: Incident occurred August 29, 2018 at Auburn Municipal Airport (S50), King County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Struck runway edge light resulting in prop strike.

G & M Flying LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N48804

Date: 30-AUG-18
Time: 00:20:00Z
Regis#: N48804
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: AUBURN
State: WASHINGTON

Cessna R182 Skylane RG, N7303Y: Incident occurred August 28, 2018 at Boeing Field-King County International Airport (KBFI), Seattle, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Prop strike.

Cedar River Flyers

https://registry.faa.gov/N7303Y

Date: 28-AUG-18
Time: 21:16:00Z
Regis#: N7303Y
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: R182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: SEATTLE
State: WASHINGTON

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Ayres S2R-T34 Turbo Thrush, HC-CKS: Fatal accident occurred January 09, 2018 in Jaramillo, Ecuador



NTSB Identification: ERA18WA093
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 09, 2018 in Jaramillo, Ecuador
Aircraft: AYRES S2R, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


The government of Ecuador has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a AYRES S2R airplane that occurred on January 9, 2018. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Ecuador's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.


All investigative information will be released by the government of Ecuador.





La Dirección General de Aviación Civil, DGAC, informó que aproximadamente a las 11:00 de este martes 09 de enero de 2018, una aeronave tipo THRUSH S2R, de matrícula HC-CKS de la compañía "Agroaéreo", se accidentó al realizar trabajos de fumigación, en el cantón Valencia (provincia de Los Ríos).

Producto de este accidente el piloto, Capitán Jorge León, falleció. Su cuerpo fue trasladado a la morgue.

La Junta Investigadora de Accidentes (JIA) se activó de manera inmediata para realizar las investigaciones pertinentes con el objetivo de determinar sus causas, según indica la Dirección de Aviación Civil en un comunicado. 

"La Dirección General de Aviación Civil lamenta la pérdida irreparable del Capitán Jorge León y expresa la más sincera nota de pesar a la compañía AGROAÉREO y a sus familiares", sostienen en este documento. 

http://www.vistazo.com





La avioneta cumplía su rutina: fumigar por las haciendas de plátano en el recinto San Pablo 2 de Valencia, en Quevedo. Minutos después de comenzada su operación, la estructura se precipitó al suelo.

El piloto, capitán Jorge León, falleció enseguida. La avioneta quedó con su parte frontal destruida y en medio de un canal.

La nave siniestrada es de color amarilla y pertenece a la compañía Agro aéreo de placa HCCKS.

https://www.extra.ec

Piper PA-28R-180 Arrow, CC-PVR: Fatal accident occurred July 14, 2018 near Tobalaba Airport, Chile


NTSB Identification: ERA18WA196
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Saturday, July 14, 2018 in Santiago, Chile
Aircraft: PIPER PA28R, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 2 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


The government of Chile has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a PIPER PA28R airplane that occurred on July 14, 2018. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Chile's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.


All investigative information will be released by the government of Chile.




Una avioneta particular capotó en la intersección de las calles Sánchez Fontecilla con Volcán Antuco en la comuna de Peñalolén.

La nave que iba dirección al aeródromo Victoria-Chacabuco en la comuna de Colina, por razones que se están investigando, el piloto habría perdido el dominio de la nave y tuvo que hacer un aterrizaje de emergencia y cayó hacia el sur de aeródromo de Tobalaba, dejando al piloto y tres pasajeros con lesiones de diversa gravedad.

El comandante Sergio Sánchez del cuerpo de Bomberos de Ñuñoa detalló a 24 horas que habrían cuatro lesionados, siendo una mujer de 45 años quién está herida de gravedad. 

Los heridos son trasladados por un helicóptero de la Fach y equipo aeropolicial hasta el Hospital Militar. 

Además las autoridades han ordenado la evacuación del lugar para evitar una nueva emergencia, debido al derrame de combustible.

Voluntarios de bomberos y personal policial trabaja en la emergencia.

https://www.latercera.com


SANTIAGO.- En horas de la tarde de este sábado, una avioneta PA-28 se estrelló en un sitio eriazo en las cercanías del aeródromo de Tobalaba, entre las calles Sánchez Fontecilla y Volcán Antuco. Carabineros informó que "una avioneta de propiedad particular, por causas que se investigan, efectuó un aterrizaje de emergencia". 

El hecho dejó a cuatro personas lesionadas, tres mujeres y un hombre, según los primeros reportes. Los uniformados también consignaron que los heridos fueron "rescatados en helicóptero de la FACh. El piloto fue llevado a la Clínica Las Condes y las tres pasajeras al Hospital Militar".

Ante la emergencia, Bomberos de diversas comunas llegaron a la comuna de Peñalolén y ya tiene controlado el accidente. 

La alcaldesa de la comuna, Carolina Leitao, pidió en redes sociales apurar la construcción del nuevo aeródromo, "por el riesgo para los vecinos". 

El persecutor de turno Jorge García Sepúlveda de la Fiscalía Metropolitana Oriente instruyó diligencias periciales e investigativas a personal LABOCAR, quedando el piloto de la aeronave apercibido al Artículo 26 en calidad de imputado.

http://www.emol.com

Schweizer SGS 2-32, operated by Stowe Soaring, N17970: Fatal accident occurred August 29, 2018 in Morrisville, Lamoille County, Vermont

Suzanne and Frank Moroz, 56 and 58 respectively, of Hamden, Connecticut. The husband and wife, married in 1994, were the passengers in a glider that crashed into Sterling Mountain on August 29th, 2018.

Don Post, 70, of Stowe died in a glider accident on August 29th, 2018.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N17970

Location: Morrisville, VT
Accident Number: ERA18FA238
Date & Time: 08/29/2018, 1200 EDT
Registration: N17970
Aircraft: Schweizer SGS 2 32
Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Aerial Observation - Sightseeing 

On August 29, 2018, about 1200 eastern daylight time, a Schweizer SGS 2-32 glider, N17970, operated by Stowe Soaring, was substantially damaged during collision with trees and terrain while maneuvering over Sterling Mountain, Morristown, Vermont. The commercial pilot and two passengers were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the aerial sightseeing flight which departed Morrisville-Stowe State Airport (MVL) about 1140 and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the tow pilot, the purpose of the flight was to provide a 30-minute sightseeing tour to two passengers in the 3-place glider. After takeoff, he climbed his airplane to 4,500 feet, where he released the glider from the tow. The glider turned westbound toward Spruce Creek and Sterling Pond, Morristown, Vermont. The tow pilot returned to MVL, and he did not visually monitor the flight of the glider.

A witness who was hiking near Sterling Pond observed the tow plane and glider above the pond. He photographed both airplanes while the glider was on tow, and the glider after its release. The witness provided an interview to local police along with copies of his photographs. According to the summary, the witness watched as the tow plane made a "slingshot" turn and released the glider from the tow. He watched the glider fly away and "disappear" into the clouds.

The tow pilot stated that when the glider had not returned after 45 minutes, an attempt was made to reach the pilot by radio, without success. After numerous attempts over multiple radios and by cellular telephone, MVL personnel notified the local 911 operator of the missing glider, and an ALNOT was subsequently issued. The tow pilot and another local pilot began an aerial search, and at 1756, the glider was identified from the air near the summit of Sterling Mountain. At 2135, search and rescue crews reached the accident site about 40 feet below the summit, at 3,673 feet elevation. The accident site was 7 miles from MVL, on a 297-degree ground track.

The pilot/owner/operator held a commercial pilot certificate with a rating for gliders. He held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, single engine sea, and instrument airplane. His Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 3rd class medical certificate was issued June 30, 2018. A review of the pilot's logbooks revealed he had accrued 3,103 total hours of flight experience, 1,214 hours of which were in gliders. He had accrued 406 hours of flight experience in the accident glider make and model.

According to FAA records, the glider was manufactured in 1973. Airframe logbooks revealed its most recent annual inspection was completed July 3, 2018 at 3,589 total aircraft hours. Records of the glider's most recent weight and balance were not immediately discovered.

At 1154, the weather recorded at MVL included clear skies, 10 miles visibility, and winds from 190 at 9 knots. The temperature was 29°C, and the dew point was 22°C. The altimeter setting was 29.90 inches of mercury.

When asked about weather conditions at the time of departure, during the climb, and before and after the glider release, the tow pilot said, "the air was really smooth" but that he had to "weave around the clouds." There was "plenty of room" between the clouds. According to the tow pilot, "Some of the mountaintops were partially obscured."

The wreckage was examined at the site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The glider came to rest in a near-vertical, nose-down attitude. The nose and leading edge of the left wing rested on the ground. The left wing was torn about 9 feet inboard of the tip but remained attached by sheet metal and control tubes. The right wing was attached and bowed slightly between the aileron attach points.

The empennage was wrinkled on the left side just aft of the wing, and the tail section, vertical fin, rudder, horizontal stabilizer, and elevator were intact.

The nose enclosure, rudder controls, instrument panel, and front cockpit were destroyed by impact. The passenger compartment appeared largely intact. The front seat belt was released by rescue personnel. The rear seatbelt was secured at the buckle, but the right-side seat belt mount bracket was fractured. The bracket section attached at the belt was not recovered. The fracture surfaces on the bracket section attached to the airframe exhibited fracture features consistent with overstress.

Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to all flight control surfaces.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Schweizer
Registration: N17970
Model/Series: SGS 2 32 No Series
Aircraft Category: Glider
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMVL, 732 ft msl
Observation Time: 1554 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 190°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.9 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Morrisville, VT (MVL)
Destination: Morrisville, VT (MVL)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  44.592778, -72.745833 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should emailassistance@ntsb.gov.

Don Post

The family of Don “Postie” Post is profoundly sad to share the news that our husband, father and grandfather died in a glider accident on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018.

The loss of this vibrant man is a blow to our family, his huge circle of friends, and the community of Stowe where he lived for close to 50 years. His impact on the town and community will be felt for generations to come. Everybody knew and loved Postie.

Born to Marguerite and Robert Post on Feb. 10, 1948, Postie grew up in Madison, N.J., with his sister, Dot. He went on to excel in engineering at Clarkson University, graduating in 1970.

Postie moved to Stowe following graduation, where he joined the ranks of elite skiers, rock climbers and hang gliders. These activities gave him firsthand knowledge of every square inch of the Green Mountains and Worcester Range — knowledge he would employ years later as an observer for the Vermont Audubon Society and Vermont Center for Ecostudies to ensure the well-being of peregrine falcons and Bicknell thrush.

He brought his boundless energy to a wide array of business and community activities. After several years of competing on the freestyle skiing circuit, Postie ran the Mansfield Touring Center and is credited with reinvigorating the Stowe Derby. He was a hands-on entrepreneur who founded Black Magic Chimney Sweeps and Stowe Sky School (for hang-gliding instruction) with longtime friend and business partner Chris Curtis. These pursuits were followed by several business ventures in the fields of energy management and conservation.

His glider instruction and riding business, Stowe Soaring, continued his passion for flying and introduced thousands of customers to the joy of pure flight. The experience was best described by a friend who wrote, “The beautiful void encompassed the glider and there was nothing but soaring and silence, and it was magnificent.”

In recent years, Postie served as a consultant for the Freeman Foundation in preserving and enhancing public libraries in Vermont. He took pride in personally visiting each and every one of those libraries.

Postie dedicated himself to the Stowe community. He served from 1991 to 2014 as the longest-standing member of the Stowe School Board. Through constant transition in Vermont’s educational climate, Postie remained a steady force and tireless advocate for quality education for Stowe students.

Complementing his school board work was his service for the Stowe Education Fund and the Starr Foundation Scholarship Fund. Few things made him happier than hearing of the accomplishments of children who went through the Stowe school system.

In addition to education, he was committed to youth athletics. Stowe’s perennially successful soccer and hockey teams have Postie to thank for co-founding Stowe Youth Soccer with neighbor Alan Thorndike, and championing the new town hockey rink and sports arena.

Postie was a man for all seasons. He loved windsurfing, kite boarding, scuba diving, hockey and excelled in all forms of skiing and cycling. Obsessed with road biking, Postie set out at age 53 to ride from Seattle to Cape Cod, a journey he accomplished in 30 days.

His passion for exercise was matched only by his love of food, especially Ben and Jerry’s, “the best ice cream in the world.” Coffee, however, could not be offered without his infamous reply, “It’s unbelievable how something that smells so good can taste SO bad.”

He will always be remembered as the first person on the dance floor, especially when “Start Me Up” came on. As an avid Rolling Stones fan, he frequently attended their concerts, the most recent being this past June in Edinburgh.

Neighbors and friends will miss Postie dearly. He was always there with a helping hand when a truck got hung up on a rock, a tree was down, or a meadow needed brush-hogging. His wealth of knowledge meant that if you were willing to endure a lengthy discourse, any question could be answered.

Overarching all of his activities and accomplishments was his love for his family. He was taken far too soon from his beloved wife Linda and children Tyler, Alexi and Graham. He was known as “Po” to his grandchildren Greyson, Isla and newly arrived Evie, all of whom he adored. He loved his sister Dot Gordon, niece Casey, nephew Cole, daughter-in-law Stacie Post, and son-in-law Ryan Perryman.

A celebration of Postie’s life will be held Thursday, Sept. 6, at 2 p.m. at Stowe Community Church. In lieu of flowers, the family will appreciate donations to Stowe Mountain Rescue, P.O. Box 291, Stowe, VT 05672.


https://www.stowetoday.com


Obituary of Frank and Suzanne Moroz

HAMDEN – Francis “Frank” “Gus” Moroz III, 58, and Suzanne J. Moroz, 56, passed away Wednesday, August 29, 2018, at Sterling Mountain in Vermont.

Frank was born June 21, 1960 in New Haven, the son of the late Francis and Marilyn (MacAurthur) Moroz Jr. and Suzanne was born September 28, 1961 in Paterson, NJ, the daughter of the late John R. Loder and Jane (Wasmer) C. Loder of Cheshire.  They married in 1994 and made their home in Hamden.  Frank was employed as a mechanic for Sikorsky Aircraft and Suzanne was employed as an Independent Broker providing Health Insurance.  Frank enjoyed biking and airplanes, while Suzanne enjoyed working outdoors in her garden and spending time with friends and family. The couple had a love for animals especially their cats and dogs. 

In addition to her mother, Frank and Suzanne are survived by Suzanne’s sisters Janine L. Koukos and her husband John of Cheshire and Cheryl A. Miller and her husband Ray of Bradenton, FL; Frank’s brother Scott S. Moroz and his wife Tricia of Hamden; their nieces and nephews, Theodore and Alexandria Koukos, Sarah and Alison Miller and Zachary Moroz; as well as their pets Noel, Dante, Rocky and Bella.  In addition to Frank’s parents and Suzanne’s father, they are predeceased by their nephew Ryan C. Miller. 

Arrangements – Visitation will be held on Friday, September 7th, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Alderson-Ford Funeral Home of Cheshire, 615 S. Main St. with a service at 7 p.m.  Burial will be private and held at the convenience of the family in St. Peter’s Cemetery.  Memorial contributions in lieu of flowers may be made to the Connecticut Humane Society, 701 Russell Rd., Newington, CT 06111. 

https://aldersonfuneralhomes.com


Three persons died Wednesday afternoon in a Stowe Soaring glider crash on Sterling Mountain in Vermont's Green Mountains.

The glider, an aircraft without an engine that's towed aloft by an airplane, was reported missing shortly before 2 p.m. by Morrisville-Stowe State Airport personnel when it became clear it hadn't returned from its flight.

After 3 1/2 hours of searching, an aerial crew spotted the downed glider late in the afternoon about 1,000 feet below the Sterling Mountain summit, not far from the Long Trail.

Search and rescue crews made their way up the Morrisvlle side of the mountain into the densely wooded remote area.

At about 9:35 p.m., they came upon the wreckage and found all three occupants of the glider dead, Vermont State Police Lt. Shawn Loan said in a 10:30 p.m. news conference at the search's command post at the airport located just south of Morrisville.

"It was pretty rough terrain, and it took several hours to get out there," Loan said.

The identities of the three persons -- a pilot and two passengers -- were not released Wednesday night pending notification of next of kin.

Family members were present at the airport command center. They asked news reporters to leave them alone as they left following the discovery of the bodies and before the deaths were announced.

Stowe Soaring has long offered glider rides from Morrisville-Stowe State Airport. A sign standing not far from the search command center Wednesday night read "Glider Rides Today!"

What's next after glider crash

* Thursday morning, rescue crews will bring the bodies down from the remote site, which is about one mile from and 1,500 feet in elevation above the nearest trailhead, state police said.

* This effort is expected to take several hours.

* Later, the bodies will be taken to the Vermont Chief Medical Examiner's Office in Burlington, where autopsies will be performed.

* Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will come to Vermont to investigate the cause of the glider crash.

Chronology of the glider accident

* 11:30 a.m.: The glider heads into the skies, towed by a plane that takes off from Morrisville-Stowe State Airport. A pilot and two passengers are on board the glider.

* 11:50 a.m.: The tow plane disconnects from the glider.

* 1:56 p.m.: Morrisville-Stowe State Airport personnel call 911 and report the Stowe Soaring glider missing. Quickly, Vermont State Police and other local authorities set up a search command center inside the Stowe Aviation building at the airport.

* 5:35 p.m: Following a 3 1/2 hour search, an airborne crew spots the glider about 1,000 feet from the top of Sterling Mountain. Rescue crews set out to the site in the densely wooded mountainous area.

* 9:35 p.m.: Search and rescue crews reach the downed glider and find all three persons aboard dead. Representatives of Vermont State Police, Stowe Mountain Rescue, Morrisville Police, Stowe Police, local fire departments and the Vermont Agency of Transportation all contribute to the search effort.

* 10:30 p.m.: State police announce the three bodies have been found.

Stowe Soaring accident occurred in 1994

National Transportation Safety Board records available online show one previous accident involving a Stowe Soaring glider.

That occurred June 3, 1994, when a pilot released his glider too soon from the tow plane.

"The glider pilot thought he could make Mt. Elmore so he released from the tow plane," an NTSB investigator wrote in the accident report. "He was unable to make it to Mt. Elmore, and the glider started to sink."

The pilot sought to land in a field. The glider struck tree tops and spun to the ground, with the pilot escaping injury.

The NTSB investigation determined the probable cause to be the premature release from the tow plane, a lack of lift and a downdraft.


Story and video ➤ https://www.burlingtonfreepress.com



Vermont State Police Lt. Shawn Loan speaks outside the Morrisville-Stowe State Airport about a glider crash that left three people dead. 


MORRISVILLE – Vermont State Police say a pilot and two passengers died Wednesday after a glider they were in went down in a heavily wooded area near the summit of Sterling Mountain outside Stowe.

Police said late Wednesday night they were not releasing the names of those who died pending notification of next of kin.

Crews are expected to begin work Thursday morning to recover the bodies and take them down from the remote crash site, which is about a mile from the nearest trailhead and 1,500 feet higher in elevation, police said.

Once the bodies are recovered, according to police, they will be taken to the Vermont Chief Medical Examiner’s Office in Burlington for autopsies.

The glider, belonging to the company Stowe Soaring, had left the Morrisville-Stowe State Airport late Wednesday morning, police said.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation and police said it’s too early to say what factors may have played in role.

“Unfortunately, sad news tonight,” State Police Lt. Shawn Loan said at a press briefing shortly before 11 p.m. Wednesday outside the airport in Morrisville.

“At about 9:35, search and rescue located a glider that had gone missing on Sterling Mountain,” he added. “The search and rescue crews located the glider and there were three deceased people.”

According to police, a tow plane with the glider attached left the airport at about 11:30 a.m. Wednesday. Police said the glider detached from the tow plane over Spruce Peak about 20 minutes later.

At 1:56 p.m., the Morrisville Police Department received a report that the glider was missing, according to police.

Emergency crews from Morrisville and Stowe police departments, along with the Vermont State Police, went to the airport, establishing a command post for the search, police said.

At about 5:35 p.m., police said, the crew of an aircraft launched from the airport saw what appeared to be the glider about 1,000 feet from the summit of Sterling Mountain.

“It was pretty rough terrain and it took several hours to get out there,” Loan said late Wednesday night after rescue crews reached the downed glider. “It’s a remote area, just off the Long Trail.”

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are expected to join the investigation, Loan said.

He said he wasn’t aware of any safety problems with the glider company, but added the FAA was in better position to answer that question.

Stowe Soaring bills itself as the “premier soaring site in New England,” according the company’s website. The company says it offers glider tours of the Stowe region as well as instruction on how to fly the aircraft.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://vtdigger.org