Friday, May 27, 2022

When Amazon drones crashed, the company told the Federal Aviation Administration to go fly a kite

  • Amazon has tried to avoid federal investigations of some of its drone crashes, according to federal documents obtained by Business Insider.
  • At least eight Amazon drones have crashed during testing in the past year, Business Insider previously reported.
  • Amazon has been expanding its drone delivery tests and hopes to make an early version available to customers by mid-2024.





Amazon's Prime Air autonomous drone delivery program has tried to put off federal investigations into some of its drone crashes by claiming that the company has the authority to investigate its own crashes, according to federal documents obtained through a public records request. The company has also been slow to turn over data related to crashes, the documents show. 

On at least two occasions, inspectors for the Federal Aviation Administration, which regulates drone flights, were surprised to learn that Amazon had moved crash evidence, which an inspector said inhibited at least one of the investigations, according to the documents. During another investigation, Amazon told the FAA that the agency's involvement was unnecessary.

At least eight Amazon drones crashed during testing in the past year, Insider previously reported, including one that sparked a 20-acre brush fire in eastern Oregon last June after the drone's motors failed. 

Taken together, the documents suggest that Amazon has at times begrudged federal inspections of its experimental drone crashes. These findings come as the company seeks FAA approval to fly its drones in residential areas ahead of a potential mid-2024 customer debut.

Regulatory delays could "totally disrupt" that timeline, the company told FAA officials in a call with the agency earlier this year, according to the FAA's notes on that call. 

An Amazon spokesperson said that Insider's characterization of the FAA documents was "misleading and inaccurate." 

Prime Air "has complied with all incident reporting, investigation, and other applicable regulatory requirements," the spokesperson, Kelly Nantel, said. "Over the last seven years, the FAA has never taken an enforcement action against Prime Air, and has awarded us an air carrier certificate to enable commercial deliveries — showing that our comprehensive process has met the FAA's high bar."

Since launching in 2013, Prime Air has been beset by delays and missed deadlines. The division has been under recent pressure to deliver results. Executives earlier this year concluded the seven years the team had spent on R&D had failed to produce "a delivery service that could be safely operated over populated areas," Insider previously reported. 

Prime Air VP David Carbon, a former Boeing executive, has spent the past two years pushing the division to complete testing needed to obtain regulatory approval for its autonomous drones. But changing goals, frequent delays, and a shifting culture has led to low morale, employee burnout, and an attrition rate as high as 70% on the company's test team, Insider previously reported. Some employees have left amid concerns about Prime Air's safety culture, Bloomberg reported last month. 

Amazon has taken so long to unveil its drone delivery program because its engineers are "working to solve complicated problems and are committed to extensive testing to ensure our drone delivery service is safe and reliable. Doing so involves meeting very high internal, technical, and regulatory bars," Nantel said. 

An FAA inspector spars with Amazon

To adhere to its timeline of unveiling drone delivery by 2024, Amazon needs a suite of FAA approvals within the next two years. The approvals would allow the drones to fly beyond the sight-lines of Prime Air operators and observers, over cities and towns, and to take off and land in close proximity to people, according to internal company documents obtained by Insider.

Obtaining those approvals requires the FAA to sign off on the drones' safety. Amazon, however, has insisted the FAA did not need to be involved in investigating the cause of some of its drone crashes, according to public records.

Last July, Amazon told an FAA inspector who had been sent to investigate crashes at Amazon's drone test site in Pendleton, Oregon, that the agency's involvement was unnecessary because Amazon was conducting its own crash investigations, the inspector, Jim Holden, wrote in notes appended to two crash reports. 

An FAA spokesperson said the agency has the ultimate authority to investigate aircraft crashes when it decides it is necessary to do so. Amazon's spokesperson did not respond to questions about jurisdiction over crash investigations.

The company also seemed reluctant to release details about crashes, Holden wrote. In one report, he noted that he was still waiting for "photos and information" about a crash a month after it occurred. Holden wrote in the same report that Amazon's representative had tried to put off the crash inspection by saying he had a dentist appointment.

In a separate report, Holden noted that he was prompted to make an in-person visit to the crash site in order to "remedy" Amazon's "slow and cautious release of details about incidents." 

Amazon was "confused as to why we are looking into" drone crashes "in so much detail," Holden wrote, speculating that "Amazon legal is likely communicating their concerns of our elevated involvement directly to FAA Headquarters personnel." An FAA spokesperson declined to comment on the agency's communications with Amazon. Reached by phone, Holden declined to respond to questions.

Amazon at least twice removed drone wreckage before the FAA could investigate, according to the documents. Last July, during an inspection related to a drone that had dropped 120 feet out of the sky, Holden asked to see the remains of the drone's motor and propeller, central and sensitive parts of the machine. He reported that the "motor and propeller had been removed by the engineers and sent to Seattle for THEM TO INVESTIGATE," the all-caps a departure from the style of the rest of his reports. 

Two months earlier, Amazon had also removed wreckage of a drone that had crashed due to a propeller failure. Investigation of that crash site "was not possible," the inspector noted in that instance, and reminded Amazon that crash debris "should not be disturbed or moved until after release of wreckage" by federal regulators. 

An Amazon spokesperson said it is now the company's practice to notify the FAA before moving crash wreckage. 

Motor and propeller failures have been the cause of many of Amazon's recent drone crashes, according to seven federal crash reports reviewed by Insider, as well as two former Prime Air employees. 

In the fiery crash last June, Amazon's 89-pound drone plummeted 160 feet to the ground "in uncontrolled free fall," according to an FAA crash report. An "intense lithium battery fire quickly consumed the aircraft," and the fire spread to the field where the drone had crash-landed, the report added. The municipal fire department contained the blaze, according to a fire report from the incident.

Companies and regulators expect some experimental aircraft to crash during testing, where the machines are pushed to their limits. "With rigorous testing like this, we expect incidents like these to occur, and we apply the learnings from each flight towards improving safety overall," Nantel said. Amazon tests its drones "over a controlled, unpopulated area," Nantel said, and "no people or property were harmed in the process." 

Internally, Prime Air recognizes that in order for autonomous drone delivery to catch on, customers must perceive it to be safe. "Safety is paramount" is the first of Prime Air's seven organizational tenets. 

Prime Air's first major public-facing test of its capabilities comes this fall, when the company expects to begin dropping Amazon packages to 1,300 test customers in Texas and California. Prime Air has previously only delivered packages to a handful of customers in a small-scale pilot program, largely in Oregon.

Cessna 172B, N7533X: Incident occurred May 27, 2022 in Wing, Burleigh County, North Dakota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fargo, North Dakota 

Aircraft experienced engine issues and made an emergency landing on a highway. 


Date: 27-MAY-22
Time: 14:16:00Z
Regis#: N7533X
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: WING
State: NORTH DAKOTA

WING, North Dakota - At approximately 9:20 a.m. Friday, a private, single-engine fixed-wing aircraft reported engine failure while in flight. The pilot conducted an emergency landing of the aircraft and landed on Highway 14 near mile marker 27, about six miles north of Wing, North Dakota.

The aircraft was moved off the highway and no injuries were reported.

The pilot was identified as 32-year-old Garhett Langer of Bismarck, North Dakota. Passengers in the aircraft were identified as 34-year-old Raymond Martinez of Bismarck, North Dakota and 31-year-old Jacob Wutzke of Bismarck, North Dakota.

Wing is a small town in Burleigh County about 45 miles northeast of Bismarck.

Aeronca 7AC Champion: Accident occurred May 27, 2022 near Rostraver Airport (KFWQ), Belle Vernon, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania




A small plane that left Rostraver Airport early Friday evening crashed in a wooded section of Elizabeth Township, officials said.

The plane was enroute to the Finleyville Airport in northern Washington County, said Gabe Monzo, executive director of the Westmoreland County Airport Authority, which operates Rostraver Airport. The airport is less than a mile from Elizabeth Township.

The crash was reported in a wooded area along Skillet Hill Road, off Route 136, around 6:52 p.m., Westmoreland County Department of Public Safety supervisor said.

Firefighters from the Rostraver Central, Suterville and Collinsburg fire departments were dispatched to the scene to assist in the rescue, a fire department spokeswoman said.

Bob Usnick, manager of the Finleyville Airport, could not be reached for comment.





The pilot of a small airplane was hospitalized with multiple injuries Friday after his aircraft crashed into a heavily wooded area in Elizabeth Township, witnesses and emergency management officials said.

The pilot’s identity was not immediately released, and his destination was unclear, but the plane came down less than a mile from the Rostraver Airport in Belle Vernon.

Logan Persichetti and his father, Robert, were attending a wedding rehearsal about 6:30 p.m. when they noticed a small, yellow plane flying low in the area. They said it suddenly arced upward before it abruptly changed course and went straight down into the woods.

They heard a thud and hiked to the crash scene, where they found the man trapped in the airplane. They said they kept him talking until medics arrived.

An Elizabeth Township fire department official said the man was freed from the wreckage, transported out of the woods in an off-road vehicle, then taken by ambulance to a hospital.

Cessna 525B, N28DM: Incident occurred May 26, 2022 at Zamperini Field Airport (KTOA), Torrance, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Long Beach, California

Aircraft while taxiing, the right wingtip struck a hangar. 

Machavia Inc


Date: 26-MAY-22
Time: 15:05:00Z
Regis#: N28DM
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 525
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: TORRANCE
State: CALIFORNIA

Cessna 182L Skylane, N42693: Incident occurred May 26, 2022 at New Braunfels National Airport (KBAZ), Guadalupe County, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aircraft aborted takeoff and went off the departure end of the runway into the grass.  


Date:  26-MAY-22
Time: 18:20:00Z
Regis#: N42693
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type:  INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: NEW BRAUNFELS
State:  TEXAS

Boeing 737-800, N8696E: Incident occurred May 26, 2022 in Houston, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aircraft struck a bird. 

Southwest Airlines Co


Date: 26-MAY-22
Time: 05:00:00Z
Regis#: N8696E
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: SOUTHWEST AIRLINES
Flight Number: SWA2734
City: HOUSTON
State: TEXAS

Aero Adventure Aventura II, N658AV: Incident occurred May 26, 2022 in Gloucester County, Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances.  


Date: 26-MAY-22
Time: 21:19:00Z
Regis#: N658AV
Aircraft Make: AERO ADVENTURE
Aircraft Model: AVENTURA II
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: GLOUCESTER
State: VIRGINIA

Cessna 152, N4978B: Fatal accident occurred May 26, 2022 near Lawrence J. Timmerman Airport (KMWC), Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Lycoming; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Spring City Aviation East LLC


Location: Wauwatosa, Wisconsin
Accident Number: CEN22FA214
Date and Time: May 26, 2022, 14:56 Local
Registration: N4978B
Aircraft: Cessna 152 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On May 26, 2022, at 1456 central daylight time, a Cessna 152, N4978B, sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident near Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

Witnesses reported that the airplane touched down long on the runway surface, then took off again. When the airplane lifted off the ground, the flaps remained down, and the airplane appeared to be laboring. The airplane climbed just above tree height in a nose high attitude. Shortly thereafter, the wing dropped, and the airplane descended out of view.

ADS-B data indicated that the pilot took off from runway 22R and conducted a left traffic pattern. On initial climb, the airplane had a groundspeed between 55-60 mph. The airplane continued to climb on the crosswind and downwind legs, then started its descent about ¼ mile beyond the runway threshold. The airplane turned to base, then started to climb. It turned to final while about 825 ft above ground level (agl) and crossed the runway threshold about 50 ft agl at 61 mph. The airplane touched down and slowed to about 50 mph. Shortly thereafter, its speed increased, and the airplane started to gain altitude. About 100 ft agl, the groundspeed was about 42 mph, and it decreased to 29 mph at 175 ft agl. The airplane remained about 175 ft agl for 5 seconds during which the groundspeed slowly increased to 36 mph. The airplane suddenly entered a rapid descent to the ground.

After the pilot’s second takeoff, he reported to air traffic control that he had an engine failure. Shortly thereafter, he reported that he did not have his flaps up.

The airplane impacted the ground in a residential neighborhood about ¼ mile from the departure end of the runway. The airplane came to rest nose down with the engine in a deep impact crater. The cabin area extended upward, and the aft fuselage was fractured just aft of the baggage area. Both wings remained partially attached to the fuselage and their leading edges sustained aft crush damage. The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N4978B
Model/Series: 152 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MWC,745 ft msl 
Observation Time: 15:03 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C /15°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3100 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 180°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 29.75 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Wauwatosa, WI
Destination: Wauwatosa, WI

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 43.1025,-88.040278 (est)

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances into a residential neighborhood.  

Date: 26-MAY-22
Time: 19:55:00Z
Regis#: N4978B
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: Fatal
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: INITIAL CLIMB (ICL)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
City: MILWAUKEE
State: WISCONSIN 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.



Daniel Andrew Perelman



MILWAUKEE - A Brookfield family is mourning the loss of a young man who died following a Wauwatosa plane crash Thursday, May 26. 

Daniel Perelman was 18. The Northwestern University student got his pilot's license last fall. Family said he'd only flown solo a couple of times.

On Thursday, the plane he was flying out of Timmerman Airport crashed in a nearby neighborhood.

Now in mourning, his family is asking for positivity in his memory.

Medical examiner reports say Perelman took off in a Cessna 152 Thursday afternoon, did a pass at Timmerman Airport and then a touch-and-go-landing. Then there was trouble. The report says he radioed in that he had engine problems and "didn't know what to do."

Perelman was the only one aboard the two-seater when it crashed in the backyard of a home just south of Timmerman. Perelman went to the hospital with multiple injuries and died Saturday.

Perelman was finishing up his freshman year at Northwestern University, studying physics. He was a member of the university's Aviation Club. The Brookfield Academy graduate received academic awards and got a perfect score on the ACT, but more importantly, is remembered as a kind and caring person.

With his passing, Chabad of Waukesha has set up a website, asking for you to take on a positive deed of goodness and kindness to commemorate Perelman's life and his positivity.

Perelman's father said even in his son's passing, he saved several lives as an organ donor. 

The FAA and NTSB are investigating what caused the crash.

Statement from Rabbi Levi and Mrs. Fraidy Brook, Chabad Jewish Center of Waukesha County

It is with many tears, and heavy hearts, that we inform you of the tragic passing of Daniel Andrew Perelman of Brookfield. 

Daniel was full of energy and curiosity, a gentle soul, and beloved by all who knew him. He leaves behind his parents, sister, grandparents, aunts uncles, classmates, friends and all those who knew him and loved him. 

In the Jewish tradition, remembering a loved one or friend is not a passive endeavor. 

Instead, to truly remember is to incorporate a behavior, a positive trait or action into our lives, thereby memorializing the life and contributions of the one we loved. 

In consultation with Daniel’s parents, Chabad of Waukesha has established the Deeds for Daniel Memorial Drive. Please join and take on a positive deed of goodness and kindness in commemoration of the life and positivity of Daniel. Visit deedsfordaniel.com to share what you have committed to do in his memory. 

Statement from Brookfield Academy

We were deeply saddened to hear the news of the passing of Daniel Perelman, an alumnus and valued member of the BA community, in a tragic airplane crash. 

Daniel attended Brookfield Academy from first grade through his graduation with the Class of 2021. 

Dr. Dan Davis, Head of the Upper School added, "Daniel Perelman was an insatiable student. He loved academic challenges and routinely took our most difficult courses and excelled. He was also well-liked, a true gentleman, courteous and caring in his interactions with others."


 

 

Cessna 172F Skyhawk, N5532R: Fatal accident occurred May 25, 2022 near Show Low Regional Airport (KSOW), Navajo County, Arizona

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board travelled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 

Location: Show Low, Arizona
Accident Number: WPR22FA188
Date and Time: May 25, 2022, 17:50 Local
Registration: N5532R
Aircraft: Cessna 172F
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On May 25, 2022, about 1750 mountain standard time, a Cessna C-172F airplane, N5532P, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Show Low, Arizona. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was as operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

Witnesses at Show Low Regional Airport (SOW) observed the airplane attempt a takeoff from runway 25. They stated the airplane became airborne two or three times but did not climb out of ground effect. The airplane touched down as it approached the end of the runway and was observed as “getting squirrely” and sliding sideways. The pilot then taxied back to the approach end of runway 25 and performed a run-up before attempting a second takeoff. Two of the witnesses stated the engine was “sputtering” and did not sound right on the first takeoff and when it taxied back to the run-up area. The pilot then attempted a second takeoff. A pilot witness said the pilot “milked it off the runway, set it back down, and milked it off the runway again.” The airplane remained at a low altitude and began a left turn towards downwind. When the airplane reached a downwind heading, the airplane sank out of sight behind terrain. The pilot witness said the engine “sounded rich, like it was bogged down,” during the second takeoff. The airplane impacted a stream in an open field about 1 mile southwest of the departure end of runway 25. The airplane was substantially damaged.

A postaccident examination of the airplane’s engine revealed that the No. 4 cylinder exhaust valve was seized, in the open position. The engine and No. 4 cylinder were retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5532R
Model/Series: 172F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSOW, 6411 ft msl 
Observation Time: 17:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C /-10°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / 17 knots, 360°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Show Low, AZ 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 34.247904,-110.02313 (est)

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances just after departure.  

Date: 25-MAY-22
Time: 00:50:00Z
Regis#: N5532R
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 2 fatal 
Flight Crew: 1 fatal 
Pax: 1 fatal 
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
City: SHOW LOW
State: ARIZONA

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.


Anthony Joseph Greco


 Derek Michael Deutscher 




SHOW LOW, Arizona — "He loved work, he loved people. He loved his newfound hobby of flying,” says Kyle Walburn. “It's just a shame.”

Walburn now talks in the past tense about his friend and coworker, Anthony Greco. The 53-year-old recently moved with his wife to Maricopa from Chicago’s suburbs. Walburn will never forget the phone call he got about his friend.

"I was shocked. You definitely don't expect something like that. Especially somebody you know so well,” Walburn says.

Greco and his passenger, Derek Deutscher were killed in a small plane crash near Show Low Lake. According to the Navajo County Sheriff’s Office, the crash happened around 6 p.m. in a meadow May 26.

Greco was a father of four boys who had a passion for life.

"If anybody had a love for life it was him. He just loved anything to do with outdoors people and having fun,” says Walburn.

"He loved the freedom that flying provided. You know, in Arizona, he told me he'd hop in the plane and bring Becky and you know, go out somewhere for breakfast.”

Greco’s wife, Becky, tells ABC15 he was larger than life. Becky says he was by her side during her cancer battle.

For Walburn, he will miss Anthony’s voice on the phone.

Officials not releasing details on what caused the crash; however it is being investigated by the NTSB and Show Low Police.

Ted Smith Aerostar 601P, N66CG: Fatal accident occurred May 23, 2022 in Ceballos, Durango, Mexico

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards International Field Office; Dallas, Texas

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances and destroyed by fire. 


Date: 23-MAY-22
Time: 18:29:00Z
Regis#: N66CG
Aircraft Make: SMITH
Aircraft Model: AEROSTAR 601P
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 2
Flight Crew: 1 fatal
Pax: 1 fatal 
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
City: CEBALLOS
State: DURANGO
Country: MEXICO





Beech 60, N33LB: Incident occurred May 25, 2022 at Spruce Creek Airport (7FL6), Volusia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft landed and gear collapsed. 

Ron Anderson Enterprises 


Date: 25-MAY-22
Time: 23:12:00Z
Regis#: N33LB
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 60
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DAYTONA BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Maule M-7-235C, N227YZ: Incident occurred May 25, 2022 at Orange Municipal Airport (KORE), Franklin County, Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Bradley

Aircraft struck the taxiway sign while taxiing to the ramp. 

Turtle Partners II LLC


Date: 25-MAY-22
Time: 16:10:00Z
Regis#: N227YZ
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: M7
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: ORANGE
State: MASSACHUSETTS