Friday, April 28, 2017

CoxHealth Adding Second Helicopter (with video)

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. --The growing demand for emergency air transport has CoxHealth adding to its fleet of helicopters.

The current helicopter at CoxHealth debut in 2007.  When a second chopper arrives in May, it will be the latest addition of CoxHealth's Air Care Program that began more than 20 years ago.

CoxHealth's two choppers along with the five that Mercy Hospital operates, means the Ozarks are now being served by seven medical helicopters.

"It will expand the footprint for Cox. It will expand the service area for our helicopter," explains Susan Crum , Cox Air Care Program Director.

She says the delivery of the new copter, will allow them to better serve the area.

"It has a great  value and it's an asset to the community."

Crews respond right now to more than 400 calls a year.

Andy Schmidt is a  Cox Air Care Pilot. He tells KOLR10," I think having a second aircraft is practical in a lot of ways. Sometimes we get to a helicopter scene of two or three helicopters at a scene."

Schmidt has been a pilot for more than 20 years.  He's flown more than 2,000 people to trauma centers.

"Some lives are alive today because of that."

One of those lives belongs to Chuck Mingus.

"If it hadn't been for them , I don't think I would've made it if hadn't been for the helicopter," explains Mingus.

Mingus was airlifted by a Mercy Hospital helicopter back in January, "It means everything, still being here." After being in a motorcycle crash.

"I just lost control of my motorcycle. It was straight stretch,it started going towards the center and I couldn't hold it."

The crash was so severe, Mingus had to have a leg amputated.

"It's different not having a leg. I mean sometimes I want to just  get up and take off you know, oh, can't do that."

But he's thankful to see another day.

"You can't describe how thankful you are. What would you do without them?"

Time and speed- crucial, but saving a life could come down to the up in the air critical care.

Dianne Mignus is Chuck's Wife and she tells KOLR10 ,"I just let him know that we we're there but it was really very frightening."

For Dianne everyday is a blessing.

"We were lucky that there's you know helicopters that can bring you from far away places to get help. We're very fortunate that he was airlifted in."

Mingus will receive his prosthetic leg at the end of July just in time for his birthday.

Cox  medical staff say the second chopper was formerly used by Dutch police in the Netherlands. And after it's stripped down to the frame and rebuilt , it will look completely brand new.

It should be in operation by May.

Story and video:  http://www.ozarksfirst.com

Incident occurred April 28, 2017 at Green Bay-Austin Straubel International Airport (KGRB), Ashwaubenon, Brown County, Wisconsin

ASHWAUBENON - A report of a mechanical problem on a commercial airliner brought firefighters racing to Green Bay Austin Straubel International Airport Friday. The jet landed safely.

The pilot of Delta flight 3682 from Minneapolis-St. Paul declared an emergency while on final approach to Austin Straubel and asked that emergency equipment be summoned "as a precaution," said Tom Miller, Brown County's airport director. Firefighters from several area departments were quickly ordered to the airport, though they ended up not being needed.

The flight, with 48 passengers and three crew members, landed without incident about 11:05 a.m. It was at the terminal a few minutes later. Passengers disembarked without incident.

"The pilot landed the aircraft and taxied (it) to the gate under its own power," Miller said.

The plane, a Canadair regional jet, experienced an unspecified mechanical problem.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com

Federal Aviation Administration Evaluating Ways to Detect and Prevent Drones from Flying Near Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (KDFW)

FORT WORTH  (WBAP/KLIF News) – The FAA conducted the latest in a series of drone-detection system evaluations at DFW Airport this week.

The agency said it has received 1800 reports of drones near airports last year and DFW International gets a few reports a month.

A private company offered to put up sensors to spot the drones on radar and intercept radio signals to pinpoint their location and warn pilots.

The FAA recently flew drones near a runway to learn how to use the information. The agency’s Michael O’Hara said they are able to learn more when it works out in the open.

“This is particularly valuable to us because some of the conditions around large airports are difficult to recreate in a simulation or laboratory environment,” he said.

O’Hara said some residents who own and operate drones may not realize the possible dangers that can occur while flying them.

“Some people don’t know what flying safely means. It’s our preference to use education but we won’t hesitate to use enforcement,” he said.

Fines for drones near an airport have increased from $11,000 to more than $27,000.

Original article can be found here: http://www.klif.com

IAI 1124 Westwind, Pilot Leasing Inc, N4WG: Incident occurred April 28, 2017 at Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport (KSRQ), Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa

Pilot Leasing Inc:http://registry.faa.gov/N4WG

Aircraft landed gear up and went off the runway at Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport,  after losing a wheel on departure from Belize. 

Date: 28-APR-17
Time: 20:58:00Z
Regis#: N4WG
Aircraft Make: ISRAEL INDUSTRIES
Aircraft Model: WW 1124
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SARASOTA
State: FLORIDA




Sarasota  -   A plane made an emergency landing at Sarasota Bradenton International Airport on Friday evening.

The IAI 1124 Westwind was missing a wheel, according to Mark Stuckey, the airport’s senior vice president and chief operating officer said, which complicated the landing. The call came in just before 5 p.m.

The plane circled over the Gulf of Mexico to burn fuel before landing at SRQ around 5:45 p.m. The idea, Stuckey said, is to burn fuel so if there is a fire when the plane lands, there is less fuel to burn.

When the plane landed, it touched down in the center of the runway. It began to drift to the left and sparks flew from the area of the missing left rear landing gear.

The plane drifted toward the left side of the runway into the turf. Emergency vehicles pulled up to the plane as four people, three men and one woman, could be seen running out of the plane’s door.

Stuckey said there was no fire but crews were on site. Firefighters could be seen in a helicopter video from WFLA checking out the plane.

Stuckey was unaware of any injuries as of approximately 6:30 p.m.

The plane was originally scheduled to land in Tampa after taking off from Belize, according to FlightAware.com.

The pilot did a flyby at SRQ to see what was wrong with the plane before landing .

A crane will be required to remove the plane from the runway, according to FOX 13.

The plane is owned by Pilot Leasing Inc., our of Carson City, Nev., according to FlightAware.com.

Story and video: http://www.bradenton.com



(WFLA) – A IAI 1124 Westwind plane made a dramatic emergency landing at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport on Friday afternoon.

Eagle 8 was over the scene when the plane landed and Eagle 8 photographer Paul Lamison explained what was happening, live as the plane approached the airport.

The IAI 1124 Westwind had taken off from Belize. Shortly after takeoff, the pilot was notified that a wheel had fallen off the plane.

According to an airport spokesperson, the pilot felt the plane was still safe to fly, so he continued to Florida.

The plane notified the control tower about a possible problem concerning a missing tire

The pilot conducted a flyby maneuver after arriving in Sarasota and the control tower confirmed a wheel was missing.

The IAI 1124 Westwind plane then began circling the airport to dump fuel. The plane landed and sparks could be seen from one of the back wheels.

The plane spun off the runway after making a complete landing. Occupants could be seen getting out of the plane and running to safety.

Fire engines were on standby for the emergency landing. No one was injured but the plane’s occupants were shaken.

Three men and one women were on board the IAI 1124 Westwind plane.

The plane is based out of Dolphin Aviation in Sarasota.

Story and video:  http://wfla.com





SARASOTA-BRADENTON (WWSB) - A plane has made an emergency landing at the Sarasota-Bradenton International airport, after officials say one of its wheels came off.

President and CEO of SRQ, Rick Piccolo, announced Friday around 6 p.m., that the pilot was circling the airport several times, trying to figure out how to land before attempting the descent.

The IAI 1124 Westwind plane landed on the runway before skidding off onto the grass, but other than a shaky landing it appears that there were no injuries.

Original article can be found here: http://www.mysuncoast.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, Opensky Airways, N796SP: Accident occurred April 28, 2017 at Jean Airport (0L7), Clark County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas

Opensky Airways: http://registry.faa.gov/N796SP

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA248
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, April 28, 2017 in Jean, NV
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N796SP

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft on landing, went off the end of the runway.  

Date: 28-APR-17
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N796SP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: JEAN
State: NEVADA




A small airplane carrying three people went off the runway after an emergency landing at the Jean Sport Aviation Center on Friday afternoon.

The incident happened around 1 p.m. at the airport at 23600 Las Vegas Blvd. South, just east of Interstate 15 in the community of Jean, about 30 miles southwest of Las Vegas, said Christine Crews, a spokeswoman for the Department of Aviation.

The Clark County Fire Department responded to the accident, Crews said.

A Cessna 172 aircraft carrying three people chose to land in Jean after someone suffered a medical emergency on board. Upon landing, the airplane went off of the runway, suffering serious damage, Crews said.

There were no injuries in result of the landing. One person was taken to a local hospital due to the medical emergency.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation and Safety Board will investigate the accident, FAA spokesman Allen Kenitzer said.

The aircraft cannot be flown and will have to be moved by a crane, forcing closure of two runways at the airport, Crews said.

The Jean Sport Aviation Center is not a highly trafficked airport and there won't be a huge impact, she said.

Original article can be found here: https://www.reviewjournal.com



JEAN, Nev. (KSNV News3LV) — A small plane making a medical emergency landing at Jean overshoot the runway and made a hard landing this afternoon. 

None of the three occupants was injured in the 1 p.m. incident at Jean Sport Aviation Center, but one was transported to a hospital for the medical emergency. The plane was headed for Henderson Executive Airport from Southern California, according to McCarran International Airport spokeswoman Christine Crews.

"A Cessna 172 overshot the runway and made a hard landing and was damaged," Crews said. "A parallel runway will be closed until a crane can be brought in to remove it. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been notified."

There is no projected time for the runway to re-open at the small airport, Crews said.

Original article can be found here: http://news3lv.com

A small airplane carrying three people went off the runway at the Jean Sport Aviation Center on Friday afternoon.

The incident happened around 1 p.m. at the airport at 23600 Las Vegas Blvd. South, just east of Interstate 15 in the community of Jean, about 30 miles southwest of Las Vegas, said Christine Crews, a spokeswoman for the Department of Aviation.

The Clark County Fire Department was responding to the accident, Crews said.

It was not immediately clear if the airplane was landing or taking off at the time of the accident or if anyone was injured.

Original article can be found here:  https://www.reviewjournal.com

JEAN, Nev. - The pilot of a Cessna 172 airplane made a hard landing at the Jean airport shortly after 1 p.m., according to a McCarran Airport official.

The plane, which was carrying three people, was landing in Jean due to one person suffering a medical issue. 

The official said the pilot overshot the runway and made a hard landing. There were no injuries due to the landing.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.lasvegasnow.com

The State of Missouri has one less airplane in its fleet: Beech King Air C90, N2MP



JEFFERSON CITY • Missouri has sold one of its state airplanes as part of a budget-cutting move championed by Gov. Eric Greitens.

In an online auction that ended Thursday afternoon, a bidder purchased the state’s 1999 Beechcraft King Air C90 for $627,500. The identity of the buyer was not revealed.

In addition to bankrolling money from the sale, budget documents released earlier note the maneuver will allow the state Department of Public Safety to save $37,000 in the next fiscal year on maintenance costs for the state’s fleet of aircraft.

The decision to sell the twin engine, six passenger plane came after Greitens, a Republican who took office on Jan. 9, said he is not planning to use the state plane.

“After evaluating the usage of the 1999 King Air C90, we determined it was no longer needed and selling it would be a smart budget decision,” said Capt. John Hotz, director of the Missouri State Highway Patrol public information and education division.

Greitens largely has flown commercially or on privately owned jets since taking office. In early March, the Post-Dispatch reported that the private plane that ferried Greitens from Jefferson City to Springfield to Las Vegas and to Washington for a variety of official and political events was owned by a company that operates newspapers and television stations from Missouri to California.

The governor’s office and top officials with the St. Joseph-based News-Press & Gazette Co. said the plane was leased by a third party because the company was not using it at the time.

The online auction showed there were over 120 bids submitted for the plane over the course of nearly two weeks. In the final hour of the auction, the winning price jumped by $100,000.

The auction listing notes that the plane has an “airworthiness” certificate, but that some repairs may be needed.

“During ground operations, the right engine temperature increases at a greater rate than the left engine. Slowly increasing the power allows the engine to remain within normal parameters,” the listing notes.

The sale of the plane follows a similar aircraft liquidation in Illinois. Under orders first approved by former Gov. Pat Quinn and then carried out by current Gov. Bruce Rauner, the state sold four planes and one helicopter in 2015, netting $2.5 million and the reduction of an estimated $1 million in inspections and maintenance costs.

Officials say the remaining planes in Missouri’s fleet are not being eyed for grounding. The Department of Public Safety aircraft fleet consists of four helicopters, eight single-engine Cessnas and one remaining King Air.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.stltoday.com

Civil Air Patrol flew anti-sub patrols from Brownsville, San Benito, Texas



Steve Patti was a mechanic in the Civil Air Patrol during WWII. He was stationed at Marfa AAF Auxiliary Field #2 and flew as an observer on some border patrol missions. He was then sent to the CAP base at El Paso.

 After leaving El Paso, Patti transferred to Brownsville, Texas, where he operated with the Civil Air Patrol for about three months before moving about 15 miles northeast to San Benito.

Although Patti did not fly any missions as an observer while stationed at El Paso, he did fly one mission while at Brownsville.

“I flew as an observer. I only flew one mission out of Brownsville as an observer and that was on submarine patrol.”

Patti was also taking flying lessons on his own during this time in order to earn his pilot’s license.

“I was taking flying lessons at Les Mauldin’s there at the Brownsville Airport.”

Patti explained that there were three types of missions flown by CAP out of Brownsville and later San Benito -- submarine patrol, beach patrol and convoy escort.

“We were originally at Brownsville; there was so much heavy traffic of international flying coming in from South America and the United States – there was military there and there were civilian airlines there – we couldn’t operate. There was no hangar for us to do our maintenance.”

“We had anywhere from 12 to 18 aircraft at Brownsville, depending on how many we could put on the line. That’s why we had to leave. We had no hangars, no facilities for maintenance there.”

“Some of the [aircraft] owners left. They were there like three or four months and they’d leave and they’d take their aircraft with them and we’d have to get a replacement airplane for it.”

“Either the owner brought it and he flew his own aircraft or somebody left their airplane there and we would maintain it and the owner wouldn’t be there.”



A Coca-Cola advertisement from August 1943 stated, “The Civil Air Patrol has recruited more than a third of the nation’s 100,000 civilian pilots to fly for national defense. Coming from every walk of life, they are putting forth an extra something to do their trained part.”

Patti explained that some CAP pilots who owned aircraft and left them at Brownsville had to return home for a few months for business reasons; either he was working a job or owned a business. They would then return and pick up where they left off doing various patrols.

When asked why some of the CAP pilots were using their own private planes for patrol duties, Patti explained, “That’s absolutely right. Yeah. There were no trained personnel. The Army Air Corps had been caught flat-footed. The Navy had been caught flat-footed. All of our aircraft were lend-lease going to Europe for the war in Europe. The Navy was getting all their aircraft for their Pacific fighting. So there were no trained personnel to protect our shores. CAP was the only available way of getting these submarines in check, to put them in check at the very beginning.”

“Submarines left the area because Civil Air Patrol was there. They couldn’t operate close to our shores anymore. They had to go out beyond the range of our aircraft.”

Life at Brownsville Municipal Airport for Patti and his fellow CAP members was tough.

“We worked out in the hot sun where the temperature was about 98 to 100 degrees and then the humidity was in the 90s – 90 percent humidity.”

“We didn’t have a hangar. We didn’t have a place to park our airplanes. It was concrete runways, you know.”

“We were at Brownsville Municipal airport for about three months and then we moved to San Benito lock, stock and barrel.”

“The administration building that was there at Brownsville International, we had it moved to San Benito which was an empty airport.”

“We were the only function going on there. They sent an Army ordnance man over to our base and they dug a revetment and they put the bombs underground. He had the key to get into the bombs. He did all the stuff of putting the bombs on the bomb rack. We didn’t touch the bombs.”

“He was an ordnance man. He was sent to us on loan from the Army with the hundred-pound bombs and depth charges.”

As for the aircraft that they used, Patti explained, “If they had been on coastal patrol, they had the propellers painted out because the propellers were misconstrued as Japanese insignia.”

“We got our orders for the aircraft that were flying beach patrol and also submarine patrol and convoy: the red propellers had to be obliterated from the insignia. It was just a white diamond pyramid.”

When asked why the pilots and crews were instructed to remove the red propellers from the CAP’s white diamond pyramid so that they would not be confused with possible Japanese aircraft in the Gulf of Mexico, Patti replied, “That’s a good question. Nobody challenged the order. The order came from headquarters and you don’t challenge headquarters. If they told you to remove it, you removed it. If they tell you to stand on your head, you stood on your head.”

Given the enormous distance of San Benito, Texas, and the Gulf of Mexico from any Japanese air base in the Pacific, it would seem impossible that any Japanese aircraft could be anywhere near that combat zone.

“I understand what you’re saying and the idea is ridiculous, but that’s nevertheless; somebody in national headquarters passed the word down that all CAP aircraft on submarine patrol and convoy have the propeller removed.”

The threat of Japanese and German warplanes or German U-boats in the Gulf of Mexico was not as far-fetched a fear in 1942 as it might seem today after reviewing some of the war documentaries released then.

In Frank Capra’s series of wartime propaganda films entitled “Why We Fight,” the documentary named “War Comes to America” described how close the Japanese and German military threat was to the Panama Canal Zone.

The narrator stated that there were already over 1 million Germans in Brazil living exactly as they did in Germany. Their students were being taught in 1,200 German schools with Nazi teachers educating these pupils with Nazi textbooks. Nazi newspapers were being published there, as well. To train young German men the art of flying, Hermann Goering glider clubs had been created in South America, too.

German airlines were operating from airports in Ecuador, which were within easy bombing range of the Panama Canal. The German pilots there were reserve officers in the Luftwaffe and German transport planes already had bomb racks in place.

As for the Japanese threat, the narrator said that there were 260,000 Japanese living in Brazil who took their orders from Tokyo.

Fifth Column activity in South America was spurred on by German athletic clubs created in the same spirit as the Hitler Youth movement, the narrator finished.

Col. Patti continued, “We were looking for mostly submarines. We knew there wouldn’t be any Japanese submarines there, but we were looking for submarines (meaning German U-boats). We were looking for people that had their ships sunk by subs. We were looking for people on rafts; we were looking for debris; we were looking for oil slicks and anything tell-tale, you know, that was evident that there was some activity in the area.”

“We were flying anywhere from 40 to 60 miles out to sea and most of the pilots had never flown any further than the city that they were flying in.”

“They had no experience in bad weather. They had no experience in IFR weather to fly the aircraft. The aircraft weren’t equipped for instrument flying.”

Patti explained that IFR stood for Instrument Flying Regulations.

He said, however, that he never spotted a German U-boat, any wreckage or oil slicks, or anything else suspicious in the water while on patrol.

More about the history of Finney Field and the CAP will be discussed in the next article. Readers are asked to visit the Breedlove-CPTP website at www.breedlove-cptp.com for more details about the glider program of WWII.

Anyone with information about the Plainview Pre-Glider School at Finney Field should contact John McCullough email johnmc@breedlove-cptp.org.

Story and photo gallery:  http://www.myplainview.com

Cessna T210N Turbo Centurion, N6218Y: Accident occurred April 24, 2017 at Banning Municipal Airport (KBNG), California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

MVMT Consulting LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6218Y

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA090
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 24, 2017 in Banning, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA T210N, registration: N6218Y
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 24, 2017, about 1345 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna T-210N, N6218Y, was substantially damaged when it touched down short of the runway at Banning Municipal Airport (BNG), Banning, California, following an engine power loss. The private pilot received minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight.

According to the BNG airport attendant, he was in his office at BNG when he heard the pilot announce on the BNG common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) that he had experienced a "massive power failure" and that he "was coming in hot for runway 26" via a right traffic pattern. The attendant looked out his office window and saw the airplane on a right downwind leg of the traffic pattern for runway 26; he thought the airplane was appropriately situated to make a normal landing. The attendant was aware that a helicopter was planning to depart BNG at that time, and radioed an advisory to the airplane, but did not hear any response from the airplane.

From his office, the attendant then watched the airplane descend on the final approach leg for runway 26. The airplane's approach appeared normal until the attendant observed a large "cloud of dust," and the attendant realized that there was a problem with the landing. The attendant exited his office, and drove out to the airplane. The pilot emerged from the airplane with some facial injuries, and the attendant suggested that he take the pilot to the hospital, to which the pilot agreed. Enroute to the hospital in the attendant's truck, the pilot requested that he be dropped at a rental car facility instead; the attendant then drove them to a local car rental facility, where the pilot obtained a rental car. The pilot told the attendant that he had left some personal items in the airplane, and needed to retrieve them prior to obtaining medical care. He then followed the attendant back to BNG.

The two vehicles arrived back at BNG about 1420, where they were stopped by Banning Police Department officers. The officers prevented the airport attendant from returning to the airplane, but allowed the pilot to drive to the airplane. Shortly after that, the pilot was detained by personnel from other law enforcement agencies who had responded to the scene, for reasons unrelated to the accident.

Sometime thereafter, a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector from the Riverside Flight Standards District Office arrived on scene. He was allowed a brief opportunity by the law enforcement personnel to question the pilot, and to examine the airplane. The airplane was moved to a hangar, and examined in more detail a few weeks later.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

FAA records indicated that the pilot obtained his private pilot certificate in July 2011, and that his most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued in September 2015. FAA records indicated that the pilot had purchased the airplane in March 2017, and that he also owned a Mooney M20 series airplane, N231GV.

A partially-completed "Pilot Logbook" was recovered from the airplane. Although it did not bear any ownership or identification information, the airplane registration numbers in the entries matched the two airplanes registered to the pilot. No endorsements were present in the logbook.

The first logbook entry was dated 12/14/16, and the first page of the logbook indicated that the pilot had 1,183 hours of flight experience. The final, partially completed page of the logbook indicated that the pilot had about 1,458 hours of flight experience.

The first 39 logbook entries were for the pilot's Mooney. The accident Cessna was first noted in this logbook on 1/25/17. With the exception of two flights in the Mooney, the remaining 76 flights were in the Cessna, for a total flight time in the Cessna of about 185 hours.

The logbook contained two entries for 4/23/17, the day prior to the accident. The first entry indicated a flight from ALN (St. Louis Regional Airport, Alton/St Louis, Illinois) to HQZ (Mesquite Metro Airport, Mesquite, Texas), with a flight duration of 2.5 hours. The second flight was from HQZ to SGR (Sugar Land Regional Airport, Houston, Texas), with a duration of 1.2 hours.

The final entries in the logbook were dated 4/24/17, the day of the accident. The first leg for that day was listed as being from SGR (to DMN, with a duration of 4.3 hours. The second and final entry indicated a departure airport of DMN, but no destination or flight duration.

Within a few hours of the accident, for reasons unrelated to the accident, the pilot was incarcerated by law enforcement agents, and thereby rendered unavailable for any further NTSB or FAA communications regarding this accident investigation.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was manufactured in 1981, and was equipped with a Continental Motors TSIO-520 series engine. According to the FAA inspector, the airplane hour meter indicated that it had a total time in service of about 2,635 hours. No maintenance records were able to be obtained for the investigation.

Fuel System

The airplane was equipped with two wing (main) fuel tanks, for a total usable fuel capacity of 89 gallons. Two small reservoir tanks, one per side, were situated between their respective main fuel tanks and the fuel selector valve (FSV). Each of the four tanks was equipped with its own sump drain valve. The FSV had three settings, LEFT, OFF, and RIGHT.

An electric auxiliary fuel pump was located just downstream of the FSV. Beyond the auxiliary fuel pump, in the direction of fuel flow, were the fuel strainer and then the engine driven fuel pump (EDP). The EDP fed fuel to the fuel/air control unit, which in turn provided metered, pressurized fuel to the fuel manifold valve.

The fuel manifold valve was mounted on top of the engine, and its installation included one inlet line and six outlet lines, one per cylinder. Normal valve function closes off flow to the cylinders when the inlet fuel pressure falls below a value of about 4 pounds per square inch (psi). When the valve closes, fuel will typically be retained in the valve body.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The airport was equipped with an automated weather observation system (AWOS), but the AWOS data was not obtained by the investigation. The National Weather Service weather observations for the city of Cabazon, located about 2 miles east of BNG, indicated that the winds were from the west to west-northwest at 17 mph, with gusts to 28 mph. Sky condition was clear, and the temperature was about 15° C, with a dew point of 9° C.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The airport was equipped with a single paved runway, designated 8/26. The runway measured 4,955 feet by 100 feet, and airport elevation was 2,222 feet msl. Runway 26 had a displaced threshold of about 300 feet, and was equipped with a two-light pulsating precision approach path indicator (PAPI). It was not equipped with an air traffic control tower; BNG air traffic communications and coordination were accomplished via the CTAF. The CTAF communications were not recorded.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Ground scars indicated that the airplane touched down about 180 feet short of the paved beginning of runway 26. The airplane came to rest a few feet beyond the beginning of the pavement, after it penetrated a wire fence just east of the runway. The nose gear had collapsed sometime during the event, and the tailcone, right wing, right horizontal stabilizer, and right elevator exhibited crumpling, crush, and tearing damage.

As a result of his examination on the day of the accident, the FAA inspector reported that the left fuel tank was devoid of fuel, and that the right fuel tank was between one-eighth and one-quarter full. Neither wing fuel tank was breached. The FAA inspector found the fuel selector valve in the "OFF" position, but was unable to determine when it was placed in that position, or by whom. The airplane was placed in a secure hangar for further, examination at a later date.

The airplane was examined in greater detail about a month after the accident by an NTSB investigator and a certificated mechanic with an Inspection Authorization rating. The examination and results are described in the sequence that the examination was conducted. The airplane was resting on its main gear, in an approximately level pitch attitude, its nose supported by hangar equipment. The engine remained attached to the airframe, and the propeller remained attached to the engine. The three propeller blades displayed limited but varying amounts of aft bending. 

The FSV handle was found in the OFF position. Actuation of the fuel strainer drain handle in the engine compartment did not result in any liquid being drained from the fuel strainer. The fuel line from the fuel/air control unit to the fuel manifold valve was then disconnected at the fuel manifold valve; no fuel was present in that line.

The left fuel tank was visually observed to be empty, and no fuel was obtained from the left wing sump drain when it was activated. The FSV handle was placed in the LEFT wing tank position, and less than an ounce of clear fuel was obtained from the open end of the line that was previously disconnected at the fuel manifold valve. The auxiliary fuel pump was then turned on, and about 12 ounces of fuel were collected from that disconnected line end before the flow ceased.

The right tank fuel depth measured about 4.5 inches. The tank was then drained, which yielded a total of about 27 gallons of fuel. Fuel was obtained from the left and right reservoir tank sump drains.

The fuel manifold valve was partly disassembled, and fuel was present in the valve body. The diaphragm was pliable and intact, and the screen was clean. The spark plug electrodes appeared normal, and the engine was able to be rotated easily by hand. Thumb compressions and magneto-produced sparks were observed at all cylinders, in proper firing order sequence.

No evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction was noted during the examination of the recovered airframe and engine.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Previous Fuel Purchases

According to an airport attendant at Deming Municipal Airport (DMN), Deming, New Mexico, the airplane was fueled with 74.9 gallons about 1000 local time on the morning of the accident. No records of any other fuel purchases were obtained.

Investigation Uncertainties or Unknowns

Several details of the flight and accident events were unable to be determined with certainty, as noted below.

The pilot's recounts of the sequence of events varied, but most information indicated that he had departed DMN earlier that day, and was destined for Corona Municipal Airport (AJO), Corona, California. However, it was unclear whether he made any interim stops after he departed DMN.

According to verbal reports from the US Customs and Border Patrol Air and Marine Operations Center (AMOC), shortly before the accident, the AMOC radar tracked the airplane departing from Jacquelin Cochran Airport (TRM), Thermal, California. However, multiple NTSB requests to the AMOC for more specific or comprehensive tracking or flight data did not result in the provision of any additional information. For reference and orientation purposes, TRM is situated between the pilot's stated departure and destination airports (DMN and AJO), and also between the departure airport and the accident airport (DMN and BNG). TRM is about 433 nm west of DMN, and about 39 nm east of BNG. AJO is about 34 nm west of BNG.

The pilot did not specify his altitude or location when he experienced the power loss, or any details regarding his flight path, altitude, or configuration as he maneuvered towards BNG. The pilot provided unclear and conflicting reports about whether the power loss was partial, complete, or initially a partial power loss that subsequently degraded to a complete power loss. Finally, he did not provide any information regarding his post power loss or post accident actions. Investigation attempts to communicate with the pilot after the day of the accident were unsuccessful.

The investigation was unable to determine when, or by whom, the fuel selector valve was placed in the OFF position. The investigation was unable to determine whether that occurred inadvertently in flight, intentionally in flight in preparation for the emergency landing, or after the accident by either the pilot or first responders.

No air traffic control communications or radar tracking data regarding the flight were able to be obtained, and no airport communications were recorded.


Precautionary & Forced Landings

Due to the lack of information provided by the pilot, the investigation was unable to determine the pilot's options, or his decisions and actions, after he detected the engine problem. According to the Airplane Flying Handbook ("AFH", FAA-H-8083), two types of emergency landings are 'Forced landings' and 'Precautionary landings.' A forced landing is defined as an "immediate landing, on or off an airport, necessitated by the inability to continue further flight," and the typical initiator is a complete loss of engine power in a single engine airplane. A precautionary landing is a "premeditated landing, on or off an airport, when further flight is possible but inadvisable." The AFH continued with "A precautionary landing, generally, is less hazardous than a forced landing because the pilot has more time for terrain selection and the planning of the approach. In addition, the pilot can use power to compensate for errors in judgment or technique."

The AFH then stated that "When the pilot has time to maneuver, the planning of the approach should be governed by" wind direction and velocity, dimensions and slope of the selected landing area, and obstacles in the final approach path. The AFH continued with "when compromises have to be made, the pilot should aim for a wind/obstacle/terrain combination that permits a final approach with some margin for error in judgment or technique."

Neither the AFH nor any other FAA guidance elaborated on principles or techniques to provide the "margin" advocated above. However, an internet search yielded multiple relevant articles from sources including AOPA (Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association), Aviation Safety magazine, and Skybrary. These articles concerned the topic of "energy management" as it related to powered and unpowered flight.

Energy is a primary parameter for the alteration of a flight path. With limited or no engine power, the primary energy sources are airplane speed and altitude; a pilot's manipulation of these will determine the rate of energy loss. The control of energy dissipation, referred to as "energy management," determines the range capability of the unpowered (gliding) airplane. During a low-powered or unpowered approach, selection of the ground track towards the intended landing location is a key component of energy management. Appropriate track selection and energy management will help ensure that sufficient altitude and/or airspeed is available to provide the corrective-action "margin" advocated above by the AFH. Generally, the most direct path to a point close to the landing area threshold, conducted at best glide speed, and combined with delayed deployment of flaps and landing gear, will be the most conservative energy management strategy.

Finally, the AFH noted that "experience shows that a collision with obstacles at the end of a ground roll…is much less hazardous than striking an obstacle at flying speed before the touchdown point is reached."

Alex Michael Furman, 24, was charged with multiple drug counts after marijuana oil and cash were found on his plane (Courtesy of the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department). 




Corona, California,  man whose plane made a hard landing at Banning Municipal Airport last week had about a half-million dollars in cash and 32 jars of concentrated cannabis oil on board, according to court documents.

Alex Michael Furman, 24, is charged with a felony count of possessing more than $100,000 worth of money obtained from the sale, transportation or manufacture of a controlled substance. He also is charged with two misdemeanors: possessing and transporting marijuana for sale, according to a complaint filed by the Riverside County District Attorney’s Office. He has pleaded not guilty.

Furman’s bail was initially set at $1 million, but because authorities said they don’t know how much money he may have, they asked a judge to order him held without bail until his case is transferred; the U.S. Attorney’s Office will be taking over prosecution of the case from the Riverside County District Attorney’s Office.

Riverside County Superior Court Judge Steven G. Counelis approved the no-bail request, court documents show. Another bail-review hearing is scheduled for Friday and a preliminary hearing could be held next week, records show.

On the afternoon of April 24, Furman’s Cessna 210 landed hard. It hit a fence and tipped up on its nose, but Furman was not seriously injured, said Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor.

A declaration filed for the bail-review hearing says that after Furman “crashed his airplane,” he was found to be carrying both the $500,000 in cash and “honey oil.” Local sheriff’s investigators and the federal Drug Enforcement Administration were summoned and Furman was arrested. He declined to make a statement at the time, the declaration says.

Cannabis oil, sometimes called honey oil, wax or other nicknames, is an extract of marijuana that concentrates the plant’s high-inducing chemical compounds.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.pe.com The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


MVMT Consulting LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6218Y

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA090 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 24, 2017 in Banning, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA T210N, registration: N6218Y
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 24, 2017, about 1345 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna T-210N, N6218Y, was substantially damaged when it landed short of the runway during a precautionary landing attempt at Banning Municipal Airport (BNG), Banning, California. The private pilot received minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. 

According to the BNG airport attendant, he was in his office at BNG when he heard the pilot announce on the BNG common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) that he had experienced a "massive power failure" and that he "was coming in hot for runway 26" via a right traffic pattern. The attendant looked out his office window and saw the airplane on a right downwind for runway 26; he thought the airplane appeared to be appropriately situated to make a normal landing. The attendant was aware that a helicopter was planning to depart BNG at that time, and radioed an advisory to the Cessna pilot, but the pilot never responded. 

Still from his office, the attendant then watched the airplane descend on final for landing; again it appeared normal. However, he then observed a large "cloud of dust" and realized that the airplane did not make the runway. He hurried to his truck and drove out to the airplane. The pilot emerged with a profusely bleeding nose or face, and the attendant suggested that he take the pilot to the hospital, to which the pilot agreed. Enroute to the hospital in the attendant's truck, the pilot requested that he be dropped at a rental car facility instead; the attendant then drove them to a local car rental facility, where the pilot successfully obtained a rental car. The pilot told the attendant that he had left some personal items in the airplane, and needed to retrieve them prior to obtaining medical care. He then followed the attendant back to BNG.

The two vehicles arrived back at BNG about 1420, where they were stopped by Banning Police officers. The police prevented the airport attendant from returning to the airplane, but did allow the pilot to drive to the airplane. Shortly after that, the pilot was detained by law enforcement personnel, for reasons unrelated to the accident. 

Sometime thereafter, a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector from the Riverside Flight Standards District Office arrived at the scene. He was given a brief opportunity to question the pilot, and to examine the airplane. The pilot's recitation of the sequence of events varied, but it was eventually determined that he had departed Deming Municipal Airport (DMN), Deming, New Mexico, and was destined for Corona Municipal Airport (AJO), Corona, California. Somewhere near BNG, he experienced a partial power loss. Air traffic controllers advised the pilot that BNG was the nearest airport, and he diverted there for a precautionary landing. 

Ground scars indicated that the airplane touched down about 180 feet short of the threshold of runway 26. The airplane came to rest a few feet beyond the beginning of the runway, and its nose gear had collapsed sometime during the rollout. The FAA inspector reported that the left fuel tank was completely empty, and the right fuel tank was between one eighth and one quarter full. Neither tank was breached. The FAA inspector found the fuel selector valve in the "OFF" position, but was unable to determine when it was placed in that position, or by whom. The airplane was placed in a secure hangar for further, subsequent examination.

According to the airport attendant at DMN, the airplane was fueled with 74.9 gallons about 1000 local time on the day of the accident. Radar tracking data indicated that prior to the accident at BNG, the airplane had landed at Jacquelin Cochran Airport (TRM), Thermal, California. TRM is about 433 nm west of DMN, and about 39 nm east of BNG. AJO is about 34 nm west of BNG. 

Alex Michael Furman, 24, was arrested on multiple drug related counts after a plane crash at the Banning Municipal Airport on Monday.
 (Courtesy of the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department). 


 


FAA records indicated that the pilot obtained his private pilot certificate in July 2011, and that he owned a Mooney M20 series airplane. Information provided by the FAA inspector indicated that the pilot had purchased the Cessna within a few weeks of the accident. The airplane was manufactured in 1981, and was equipped with a Continental Motors TSIO-520 series engine.

A plane’s hard landing at the Banning Municipal Airport on Monday, April 24, was only the beginning.

The case eventually involved federal agents and ended with the arrest of a 24-year-old Corona man who authorities say had drugs and a large amount of currency derived from drug sales.

After the hard landing at 1:40 p.m. Monday, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department’s Special Investigations Unit were called to the Banning Municipal Airport and a 24-year-old Corona man was arrested.

Alex Michael Furman was arrested at 2:30 p.m. Monday on suspicion of several drug-related counts that included possessing more than $100,000-worth of sales-related currency and possessing, selling and transporting marijuana, according to online jail records.

He was taken into custody on Hathaway Street near the airport, jail records show and later booked at Larry D. Smith Correctional Facility in Banning with bail set at $1 million; he remained there Thursday, according to the records.

On Monday afternoon, a Cessna 210, tail number N6218Y, had a hard landing at the airport, said Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor.

The plane hit a fence and tipped up on its nose, Gregor said. The pilot was not seriously injured, he added.

It was not immediately clear whether the drugs or currency Furman was arrested in connection with were on the plane itself. No other information about the incident was available.


Original article can be found here: http://www.pe.com






BANNING, CA - An investigation into a small plane crash at Banning Municipal Airport resulted in the arrest of a Corona man for alleged marijuana possession and transportation for sale, sheriff's deputies said Thursday.

Alex Furman, 24, was arrested following the Monday crash, in which a Cessna 210 struck into a small fence at the airport at about 1:40 p.m. The plane also tipped onto its nose during the hard landing, but the pilot was not seriously hurt during the incident, according to the FAA.

According to Lt. Paul Bennett, the sheriff's department, along with the Drug Enforcement Administration and Banning Police Department began looking into the crash, though investigators did not specify what exactly led to the drug charges. Deputies also did not confirm if Furman was the Cessna's pilot.

Prosecutors charged Furman Wednesday with possession of more than $100,000 obtained from a transaction involving a controlled substance, possession of marijuana for sale, and transportation of marijuana for sale.

Furman pleaded not guilty to all charges and will return to court in Banning Monday for a felony settlement conference, according to court records.

He was being held in lieu of $1 million bail.

Original article can be found here: https://patch.com

Banning police and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating a plane crash at Banning Municipal Airport on Monday, April 24, a city spokesman said.

A Cessna 210, tail number N6218Y, landed hard at Banning Municipal Airport about 1:40 p.m., said Ian Gregor, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration.

The plane hit a fence and tipped up on its nose, Gregor said. The pilot was not seriously injured, he added.

In an emailed statement, city spokesman Philip Southard said the incident was reported to Banning police as a distress call and possible plane crash.

Southard did not answer why police were involved. He said the FAA and other agencies are assisting with the investigation.

Airport attendant Michael Lopez said the pilot of a Cessna had a hard landing when the nose gear collapsed. There were no passengers, Lopez said.

Law enforcement was on scene at the east end of the runway, Lopez said.


Original article can be found here: http://www.pe.com

Banning police and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating a plane crash at Banning Municipal Airport on Monday, April 24, a city spokesman said.

A Cessna 210, tail number N6218Y, landed hard at Banning Municipal Airport about 1:40 p.m., said Ian Gregor, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration.


The plane hit a fence and tipped up on its nose, Gregor said. The pilot was not seriously injured, he added.


Banning police officers responded to a report of a distress call and possible plane crash at the airport, said city spokesman Philip Southard.


In an emailed statement, Southard said the incident was reported to Banning police as a distress call and possible plane crash.


Southard did not answer why police were involved. He said the FAA and other agencies are assisting with the investigation.


Airport attendant Michael Lopez said the pilot of a Cessna had a hard landing when the nose gear collapsed. There were no passengers, Lopez said.


Law enforcement was on scene at the east end of the runway, Lopez said.


Original article can be found here: http://www.pe.com
Alex Michael Furman, 24, was arrested on multiple drug related counts after a plane crash at the Banning Municipal Airport on Monday.
 (Courtesy of the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department). 


Press Release: Assist other Agency; Drug Investigation

Agency: Special Investigations Bureau

Station Area: Riverside County

Written Date: April 27, 2017 Time: 12:30 PM

Incident Date: April 25, 2017 Time: 3:30PM

Incident Location: Banning, CA. Municipal Airport

Reporting Officer: Lieutenant Paul Bennett

File Number(s): R170421140004

Details:

On April 25, 2017, the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department’s Special Investigations Bureau (SIB) and the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) assisted the Banning Police Department with an investigation of a small airplane crash at the Banning Municipal Airport. The investigation resulted in the arrest of Alex Furman, 24, of Corona. Furman was arrested for drug related charges and booked into the Robert Presley Detention Center.  This is an ongoing investigation. There will be additional details made available as the investigation unfolds.

Original article can be found here: http://www.riversidesheriff.org



A plane’s hard landing at the Banning Municipal Airport on Monday, April 24, was only the beginning.

The case eventually involved federal agents and ended with the arrest of a 24-year-old Corona man who authorities say had drugs and a large amount of currency derived from drug sales.

After the hard landing at 1:40 p.m. Monday, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department’s Special Investigations Unit were called to the Banning Municipal Airport and a 24-year-old Corona man was arrested.

Alex Michael Furman was arrested at 2:30 p.m. Monday on suspicion of several drug-related counts that included possessing more than $100,000-worth of sales-related currency and possessing, selling and transporting marijuana, according to online jail records.

He was taken into custody on Hathaway Street near the airport, jail records show and later booked at Larry D. Smith Correctional Facility in Banning with bail set at $1 million; he remained there Thursday, according to the records.

On Monday afternoon, a Cessna 210, tail number N6218Y, had a hard landing at the airport, said Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor.

The plane hit a fence and tipped up on its nose, Gregor said. The pilot was not seriously injured, he added.

It was not immediately clear whether the drugs or currency Furman was arrested in connection with were on the plane itself. No other information about the incident was available.

Original article can be found here: http://www.pe.com

BANNING, CA - An investigation into a small plane crash at Banning Municipal Airport resulted in the arrest of a Corona man for alleged marijuana possession and transportation for sale, sheriff's deputies said Thursday.

Alex Furman, 24, was arrested following the Monday crash, in which a Cessna 210 struck into a small fence at the airport at about 1:40 p.m. The plane also tipped onto its nose during the hard landing, but the pilot was not seriously hurt during the incident, according to the FAA.

According to Lt. Paul Bennett, the sheriff's department, along with the Drug Enforcement Administration and Banning Police Department began looking into the crash, though investigators did not specify what exactly led to the drug charges. Deputies also did not confirm if Furman was the Cessna's pilot.

Prosecutors charged Furman Wednesday with possession of more than $100,000 obtained from a transaction involving a controlled substance, possession of marijuana for sale, and transportation of marijuana for sale.

Furman pleaded not guilty to all charges and will return to court in Banning Monday for a felony settlement conference, according to court records.

He was being held in lieu of $1 million bail.

Original article can be found here: https://patch.com

Banning police and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating a plane crash at Banning Municipal Airport on Monday, April 24, a city spokesman said.

A Cessna 210, tail number N6218Y, landed hard at Banning Municipal Airport about 1:40 p.m., said Ian Gregor, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration.

The plane hit a fence and tipped up on its nose, Gregor said. The pilot was not seriously injured, he added.

In an emailed statement, city spokesman Philip Southard said the incident was reported to Banning police as a distress call and possible plane crash.

Southard did not answer why police were involved. He said the FAA and other agencies are assisting with the investigation.

Airport attendant Michael Lopez said the pilot of a Cessna had a hard landing when the nose gear collapsed. There were no passengers, Lopez said.

Law enforcement was on scene at the east end of the runway, Lopez said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.pe.com

An investigation into a small plane crash at Banning Municipal Airport resulted in the arrest of a Corona man for alleged marijuana possession and transportation for sale, sheriff’s deputies said.

Alex Furman, 24, was arrested following the Monday crash, in which a Cessna 210 struck into a small fence at the airport at about 1:40 p.m.

The plane also tipped onto its nose during the hard landing, but the pilot was not seriously hurt during the incident, according to the FAA.

According to Lt. Paul Bennett, the sheriff’s department, along with the Drug Enforcement Administration and Banning Police Department began looking into the crash, though investigators did not specify what exactly led to the drug charges. Deputies also did not confirm if Furman was the Cessna’s pilot.

Prosecutors charged Furman Wednesday with possession of more than $100,000 obtained from a transaction involving a controlled substance, possession of marijuana for sale, and transportation of marijuana for sale.

Furman pleaded not guilty to all charges and will return to court in Banning Monday for a felony settlement conference, according to court records.

He was being held in lieu of $1 million bail.

Original article can be found here:   http://mynewsla.com

Banning police and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating a plane crash at Banning Municipal Airport on Monday, April 24, a city spokesman said.

A Cessna 210, tail number N6218Y, landed hard at Banning Municipal Airport about 1:40 p.m., said Ian Gregor, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration.


The plane hit a fence and tipped up on its nose, Gregor said. The pilot was not seriously injured, he added.


Banning police officers responded to a report of a distress call and possible plane crash at the airport, said city spokesman Philip Southard.


In an emailed statement, Southard said the incident was reported to Banning police as a distress call and possible plane crash.


Southard did not answer why police were involved. He said the FAA and other agencies are assisting with the investigation.


Airport attendant Michael Lopez said the pilot of a Cessna had a hard landing when the nose gear collapsed. There were no passengers, Lopez said.


Law enforcement was on scene at the east end of the runway, Lopez said.


Original article can be found here: http://www.pe.com