Monday, June 3, 2013

FedEx Sees $100 Million Cost to Park Jets as Economy Slows

By Mary Schlangenstein
June 03, 2013


FedEx Corp., operator of the world’s largest cargo airline, will “aggressively” park older, less fuel-efficient planes to cut spending as the economy grows more slowly than forecast.

The moves will mean a $100 million impairment charge in the quarter ended May 31 as the first of 86 aircraft and 308 engines are taken out of service, FedEx said in a statement today. Ten planes are being retired immediately, while Memphis, Tennessee-based FedEx speeds plans to permanently ground others.

FedEx’s aircraft retirements follow a $1.7 billion restructuring announced last year as customers shift to less-expensive shipping methods, and are in addition to 24 planes grounded a year ago. FedEx is seen as an economic bellwether because of the variety of goods it moves around the world.

“With the planned acquisition of new aircraft and projected slower economic growth than previously forecast, FedEx Express is lowering maintenance costs by aggressively parking and retiring aircraft,” David Bronczek, chief executive officer of FedEx Express, said in the statement.

FedEx in March said it would cut some cargo flights to Asia after posting fiscal third-quarter profit that missed analysts’ estimates and lowering its forecast for full-year earnings.

Employee Buyouts

The company is retiring jets and parking older vehicles as part of the cost-cutting initiative outlined last October. The program also includes voluntary employee buyouts at a cost of as much as $550 million. FedEx hasn’t disclosed how many workers accepted offers to leave.

“It’s a good time to do it,” Michel Merluzeau, a consultant at G2 Solutions, said in an interview, referring to the jet groundings. “The cargo market has been crossing a desert the past few years so here’s a time to shed some of those assets and take a charge,”

FedEx is adding new aircraft that have similar or larger payload capacity and burn less fuel, including Boeing Co. (BA) 767s that are 30 percent more fuel efficient than the Chicago-based company’s MD10 jets they will replace, the company said. FedEx spent $3.8 billion on jet fuel in the four quarters ended Feb. 28.

FedEx is pulling from its fleet two Airbus SAS A310-200s, three A310-300s and five MD10-10s, plus 21 related engines, the company said. It will accelerate by “several years” the retirements of another 76 planes, comprising 47 MD10-10s, 13 MD10-30s and 16 A310-200s, along with 287 more engines, the company said.


‘Really Problematic’


“These aircraft have served FedEx extremely well, but they are 20- to 25-plus-year-old aircraft and in terms of maintenance, parts replacement, avionics, it becomes really problematic to source those things,” said Merluzeau, who is based in Kirkland, Washington.

FedEx’s fleet totaled 660 aircraft as of Feb. 28. It will retire its last Boeing 727-200 as of July 1.

The company also raised its quarterly cash dividend by 1 cent a share to 15 cents. The dividend is payable on July 1 to shareholders of record at the close of business on June 17.

Shares of FedEx rose 1.4 percent to $97.70 at the close in New York today, before the company’s announcement. The stock has gained 6.5 percent this year, compared with the Standard & Poor’s 500 index which has advanced 15 percent. 


Source:  http://www.businessweek.com

Helicopter noise: Who is concerned? Hoboken, Hudson County, New Jersey

June 02, 2013

Dear Editor:

The current problem with helicopter noise facing the residents of Hoboken is unacceptable. During the weekdays, the constant drone of helicopters is unending. On a clear day, you will not be able to experience silence for more than a few minutes before your ears are affronted with the sound of helicopter rotors. I have spoke informally with Mayor Zimmer and was impressed that she was already on the issue. I am sure this is no easy task given the profits involved from air tourism for New York. Does the city have the option to take legal action against the New York City Economic Development Corporation? They clearly are reaping enormous profits from the tourism while dumping the associated problems of noise and potential danger on our communities in New Jersey.

I would like to know if our city council members are as concerned about this issue? Especially the waterfront districts most impacted by the noise. Where are Ms. Mason and Ms. Castellano on this issue? Could the city council members please clarify their actions regarding this matter to the citizens of Hoboken?

Thank you,
Cliff Tisdell


Source:   http://hudsonreporter.com

Garmin Pilot iPad App GDL39: LOOP TV

 
 We fly with the latest version of Garmin's App and the Garmin GDL-39, a portable GPS and ADS-B traffic and weather receiver.

Washington man killed in skydiving accident is ID'd: Harvey Field Airport (S43), Snohomish County

 
Photo courtesy of Facebook 


 SEATTLE — A 27-year-old man who died Friday in a skydiving accident at Harvey Field in Snohomish County has been identified as Glen Leland Hobbs Jr. of Kirkland. 

The Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s Office said that Hobbs died of “intracranial hemorrhage with pelvic and extremity fractures due to blunt impact to the head and extremities.”

Hobbs had been skydiving with a group of people about 4 p.m. Friday. Witnesses said that he deployed his parachute but came in too fast when he landed. Emergency crews arrived to the scene and Hobbs was pronounced dead at the scene a short time later.

Source: http://q13fox.com

Piper PA-28-181 Archer III. N327PA and Cessna 172SP Skyhawk, N2459K: Fatal accident occurred May 31, 2013 in Anthem, Arizona

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA254A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 31, 2013 in Anthem, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/06/2015
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28-181, registration: N327PA
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA254B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 31, 2013 in Anthem, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N2459K
Injuries: 4 Fatal.


NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

A Cessna 172 and a Piper PA-28 collided in midair; both airplanes were operating as instructional flights. Radar data showed the airplanes operating about 1 mile apart. The Cessna was operating to the west of the Piper at 2,500 ft mean sea level (msl) and 106 knots ground speed. The Piper was operating to the east of the Cessna at 2,600 ft msl and 92 knots. The Cessna was on a northerly heading and made a right turn to a southerly heading. The Piper was also on a northerly heading and made a left turn to a southwesterly heading. Both airplanes executed the turns simultaneously. Shortly after each airplane completed its turn, the track of both airplanes intersected. 

Calculations determined that the two airplanes collided at a 72-degree angle with a 116-knot closure rate. Propeller slashes on the Cessna’s left wing indicated that the Piper was slightly above the Cessna at the moment of collision. During the collision sequence, the right side of the Piper’s nose contacted the Cessna’s rudder and continued forward into its left wing, which allowed the propeller to slash the trailing edge. The wreckages of both airplanes were found in the immediate vicinity of the radar-depicted track intersection. It is likely that the pilots had an opportunity to see each other during the turns. However, as the flights converged and rolled out of their simultaneous turns, structure from both airplanes would have blocked the pilots’ visibility and prevented them from seeing the other airplane and avoiding the collision.

The area where the accident occurred is commonly used by local flight schools to practice ground reference maneuvers, which are normally performed at 1,000 ft above ground level (about 2,700 ft msl); therefore, the pilots should have been aware that other aircraft were operating in the area and should have been monitoring the environment. Further, the training area had an associated radio frequency to coordinate training activities between aircraft, and the pilots of both airplanes were making position reports and other radio transmissions on the established frequency and should have been listening for other traffic.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the pilots in both aircraft to maintain adequate visual lookout in a known training area where multiple aircraft frequently operated, which resulted in a midair collision.

HISTORY OF THE FLIGHT

On May 31, 2013, at 1003 mountain standard time, a Piper PA-28-181, N327PA, and a Cessna 172S, N2459K, collided in-flight about 3 miles west of Anthem, Arizona. Both certified flight instructors (CFI's) occupying the Piper were fatally injured; the CFI and student pilot occupying the Cessna were also fatally injured. Both airplanes impacted desert terrain in the vicinity of the collision; the Piper was substantially damaged and the Cessna was destroyed. The Piper was registered to Bird Acquisition LLC and operated by TransPac Academy; the Cessna was registered to Westwind Leasing LLC and operated as a rental airplane. Both airplanes were operated as instructional flights under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and both airplanes had company flight plans. The Cessna departed Phoenix Deer Valley Airport, Phoenix, Arizona, at 0930, and the Piper departed the same airport at 0917.

Radar data shows two tracks operating VFR (visual flight rules) about 1 mile apart. The western track was operating at 2,500 msl and 106 knots ground speed, as recorded by the radar playback. The eastern track was operating at 2,600 feet msl and 92 knots ground speed as recorded by the radar playback. The western track was on a northerly heading and made a 180-degree right turn to a southerly heading. The eastern track was also on a northerly heading and made a left turn to a southwesterly heading. Both airplanes executed their turn simultaneously. Shortly after each target completed its turn the paths of both targets intersected.

The wreckages of both airplanes were in the immediate vicinity of the radar depicted target intersection. The Piper had impacted the flat desert terrain in a flat and upright attitude. All essential components of the airplane were at the accident site. The Cessna wreckage was located 468 feet southwest of the Piper wreckage. The Cessna impacted the desert terrain vertically, imbedding the engine and propeller in to the ground and the wings were crushed accordion style from the leading edges aft. The entire Cessna wreckage was consumed by a post impact fire. The vertical stabilizer and left elevator of the Cessna was located 1,152 feet north of the wreckage.

According to CFI's from TransPac the area of the accident is commonly used to practice ground reference maneuvers because of the prominence and relatively linear aspect of New River Road. Ground reference maneuvers are normally performed at 1,000 feet above ground level (approximately 2,700 feet msl).

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The two CFI's flying in the Piper were on a training flight. The CFI in the left seat was TransPac's CFI Standardization Instructor, who was responsible for the ensuring that TransPac's flight instructors teach the training flight maneuvers following standard guidelines. The CFI in the right seat was a newly hired CFI who was undergoing TansPac's standardization training before beginning to instruct students. The Standardization training is normally 3 weeks long, and the new CFI had completed about 2 weeks of the 3-week instructional period.

The TransPac Standardization Instructor, age 37, held a commercial certificate with ratings for single-engine land, multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine, and instrument airplane, which was issued on February 22, 2012. He held a first-class medical certificate issued May 8, 2012, with the limitation that he wear corrective lenses. Examination of the pilot's logbook revealed that he had 2,924.4 total flight hours, 2,229.2 single engine hours, 695.2 multiengine hours, and 2,694.2 instructor pilot hours. His most recent proficiency check was a recurrent instructor flight proficiency check on November 29, 2012, conducted under the guidance of FAR 141.79(d)(2); all maneuvers were graded as "satisfactory" (S).

The newly hired TransPac Instructor Pilot, age 26, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a certified flight instructor certificate with a rating for single and multiengine airplane. He held a first-class medical certificate dated May 15, 2012, with the limitation that he wear corrective lenses. He had been a student pilot at TransPac where he received the majority of his flight training. TransPac training and flight records showed that he had 289.9 hours of total flight time, 237.1 hours of airplane single engine time, and zero hours of instruction given. His most recent flight check was on May 17, 2013, when he received his CFI airplane single-engine land (ASL) rating.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, low-wing, fixed-gear airplane, serial number 2843511, was manufactured in 2002. It was powered by a Lycoming O-360-A4M, 180-hp engine, and equipped with a Sensenich model 76EM8S14-0-62 fixed pitch propeller. Review of the maintenance logbook records showed that the airframe had 12,616.4 total flight hours (TT) at the time of the accident, and the most recent inspection was a Phase 4 inspection completed on May 28, 2013, at TT 12,595.0 hours. The most recent engine inspection was the Phase 4 inspection on May 28, 2013, at 659 hours since major overhaul (TSMO), 6,529.0 hours time since new (TSN). The engine TSMO at the time of the accident was 680 hours.

WRECKAGE & IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was located on flat desert terrain populated by barrel cactus, saguaro cactus, and scrub brush. The wreckage was upright on flat ground in a near level attitude. There were no ground scars leading up to the wreckage, however, paint transfer on to nearby rocks and fuel blight on a nearby cactus showed evidence that the wreckage recoiled aft approximately 10 feet from the point of initial ground contact. The wreckage was orientated on a 215-degree magnetic bearing measured from tail to nose. The wreckage of the Cessna 172 was 468 feet away on a bearing of 100 degrees magnetic.

Both left and right wings remained attached to the fuselage, both wings exhibited leading edge damage, and fuel tank hydraulic deformation. Both main landing gear mounts protruded up through the upper wing skin. Both ailerons were attached to the wings; control and balance cables were attached to both aileron bell crank assemblies. The tail section remained attached to the empennage, and all control surfaces remained attached. Control cables to the stabilator and rudder were attached to the rudder horn and stabilator arm assembly, respectively. Stabilator trim drum had two exposed threads indicating slight nose down trim. The cabin area remained mostly intact. The cabin floor deck had been displaced upwards into the rudder pedals of both pilots. On the right side of fuselage aft of the firewall a hole was present, which exhibited aircraft skin and plastic interior panel portions pushed in towards the cabin. Within this hole were pieces of Cessna 172 rudder skin, navigation light, and VOR antenna fragments. The Cessna 172's rudder balance weight and portions of the VOR antenna were located in the right cockpit interior floor near the rudder pedals. Examination of the Cessna 172 balance weight showed a divot that corresponds in length and shape to a witness mark on a propeller blade. The engine oil sump was cracked with oil observed draining from the sump. The propeller remained attached to the engine and was pulled through by hand. Compression was verified on all four cylinders and power train continuity. Both propeller blades were nearly straight, one blade exhibited forward bending of the last 6 inches of blade, and a semicircular 1.5-inch divot observed near the blade tip. No leading edge polishing or chordwise scratches were observed.

The Garmin 430 was removed from the airplane and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory for examination. The laboratory was able to apply power to the unit and determine the radio frequency that was active at the time of the accident was 122.750 Mhz. This frequency is the locally published training coordination frequency used between training aircraft operating north of Phoenix.

A collision angle and closure rate was calculated utilizing the radar ground speeds of each airplane, 106 knots and 92 knots, and the midpoints of the propeller slashes on the upper left wing of the Cessna 172 created an equivalent scratch mark of 60 degrees from the longitudinal axis. The two airplanes collided at a 72-degree angle with a closure rate of 116 knots. Propeller slashes on the left wing of the Cessna and the fact that the Cessna's rudder balance weight was located in the wreckage of the Piper would indicate that the Piper was above the Cessna at the moment of collision.

MEDICAL & PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the CFI Standardization Instructor on June 4, 2013, by the Maricopa County Medical Examiner, Phoenix. The stated cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries. The FAA Forensic Toxicology Research Team, Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on the specimens from the CFI with negative results for carbon monoxide, cyanide, ethanol, and listed drugs.

An autopsy was performed on the CFI who was receiving instruction on June 4, 2013, by the Maricopa County Medical Examiner, Phoenix. The stated cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries. The FAA Forensic Toxicology Research Team, Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Oklahoma City, performed forensic toxicology on the specimens from the CFI receiving instruction with negative results for carbon monoxide, cyanide, ethanol, and listed drugs.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Arizona Flight Training Workgroup (AFTW) is an organization of pilots and certified flight instructors who are dedicated to improving pilot judgment and decision-making to reduce accidents, incidents, and pilot deviations in Arizona. The AFTW in coordination with the FAA has established a Phoenix Terminal Area chart overlay that depicts common flight training airspace areas, standardized nomenclature, and training coordination frequencies. A copy of the AFTW Phoenix Terminal Area Chart overlay is included in the docket of this investigation. According to the AFTW chart the area that both airplanes were operating in was referred to as the "prison," and the associated frequency to coordinate training activities between aircraft was 122.75 Mhz.

Witness statements from the pilots who were airborne in the area were inconsistent regarding the amount of radio communication traffic that was occurring during the period prior to the accident. Some pilots reported heavy radio traffic requiring them to wait for a break in the transmissions in order to make their transmission, and other pilots reported light radio traffic. However, one pilot did recall hearing the student of the Cessna 172 make position reports, and another pilot did hear the pilots of the PA-28 make a radio announcement asking if anyone was working GRM? (ground reference maneuvers).

http://registry.faa.gov/N327PA

http://registry.faa.gov/N2459K

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA254A 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 31, 2013 in Anthem, AZ
Aircraft: PIPER PA-28-181, registration: N327PA
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

NTSB Identification: WPR13FA254B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 31, 2013 in Anthem, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N2459K
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 31, 2013, at 1003 mountain standard time, a Piper PA-28-181, N327PA, while airborne at 900 feet above ground level (agl) collided with a Cessna 172S, N2459K, that was also operating at 900 feet agl, 3 miles west of Anthem, Arizona. Both certified flight instructors (CFI’s) occupying the Piper were fatally injured, the CFI and student pilot occupying the Cessna were also fatally injured. Both airplanes impacted desert terrain in the vicinity of the collision and were destroyed. The Piper was registered to Bird Acquisitions LLC and operated by TransPac Academy, the Cessna was registered to Westwind Leasing LLC and operated as a rental airplane. Both airplanes were operated as instructional flights under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and both airplanes had company flight plans. The Cessna departed Deer Valley Airport, Phoenix, AZ at 0917 and the Piper departed the same airport at 0930.

Radar data shows two targets operating VFR (visual flight rules) about 1 mile apart. The western target was operating at 2,500 msl and 106 knots ground speed, as recorded by the radar playback. The eastern target was operating at 2,600 feet msl and 92 knots as recorded by the radar playback. The western target was on a northerly heading and made a 180 degree right turn to a southerly heading. The eastern target was also on a northerly heading and made a left turn to a southwesterly heading. Both airplanes executed their turn simultaneously. Shortly after each target completed its turn the paths of both targets intersected.

The wreckages of both airplanes were in the immediate vicinity of the radar depicted target intersection. The Piper had impacted the flat desert terrain in a flat and upright attitude. All essential components of the airplane were at the accident site. The Cessna wreckage was located 468 feet southwest of the Piper wreckage. The Cessna impacted the desert terrain vertically, imbedding the engine and propeller into the ground and the wings were crushed accordion style from the leading edges aft. The entire Cessna wreckage was consumed by a post impact fire. The vertical stabilizer and left elevator of the Cessna was located 1,152 feet north of the wreckage.


 
Officials have identified two of the four people who died Friday from a midair plane collision in a remote area of northwest Phoenix.


Two flight instructors, Paul Brownell, 37, and Basil Onuferko, 26, were killed, according to officals from TransPac Aviation Academy, a local flight school that trains U.S. and international pilots.

Local authorities have not released the names of the other two victims, in part because some family members have not yet been notified.

Officials from the National Transportation Safety Board said they will review the crash site and look at evidence, such as aircraft positioning on the ground, the debris field and any on-board electronic devices, including cellphones and GPS systems.

Investigators will look at maintenance and air traffic records for each aircraft as well as medical records for each individual involved in the collision.

The planes collided Friday, at approximately 10 a.m., when fire crews responded to a remote desert area east of Lake Pleasant and found two planes. One, believed to be a Cessna, caught fire upon impact and was “unrecognizable,” according to Capt. Dave Wilson of the Daisy Mountain Fire Department.

The other plane, a Piper Archer III, looked like it attempted to make a hard landing.

“I thought possibly we might have survivors,” said battalion Chief Gary Bernard of the Peoria Fire Department.

The NTSB preliminary report is expected to be posted on the agency’s website, ntsb.gov, within a week or two, according to an NTSB official. He said it typically takes NTSB months to come up with a probable cause for the collision.

The Cessna is part of Westwind School of Aeronautics at Deer Valley Airport, Steve Martos, a spokesman for the Phoenix Police Department said.

The Piper is owned by Bird Acquisition LLC, which operates TransPac Aviation Academy. Bird Acquisition is a Massachusetts company with an office location at the Deer Valley Airport.

TransPac said it has a fleet of 60 Piper planes, which are maintained by FAA-certified pilots. At least two additional TransPac planes have been involved in fatal crashes in recent years.

Frequent plane crashes raise aviation security concerns in Nepal

08:23, June 04, 2013
 
KATHMANDU, June 3 (Xinhua) -- Three plane crashes occurred in Nepal during the last two weeks, raising serious questions about the country's civil aviation security and the safety of passengers, most of whom are foreign tourists.

The main reasons, according to experts and government officials, are increasing "unhealthy competition" among private airlines operating in the mountainous terrain and lack of effective regulatory mechanism.

Due to tough competition, private airlines sometimes force their pilots to fly even during bad weather or under unfavorable conditions.

Some airline operators also have used unscrupulous methods by ordering their pilots to land at secluded airports where other airlines could not land due to safety reasons. In some instances, according to officials who do not want to be named, even planes with technical problems are given clearance for take-off.

Experts pointed out that lack of sufficient resources and facilities, problematic geographical locations, and bad weather are the main causes of plane crashes.

Most of the plane crashes happened in hilly or mountainous areas where weather is often unpredictable and where there are no effective mechanisms to monitor weather conditions.

On June 1, one passenger was injured when a Dornier plane of Sita Air crashed while landing at Simikot Airport of Humla, 700 km northwest of capital city Kathmandu.At the same airport, on May 27, a 9N AJU Cessna Grand Caravan aircraft of Goma Air skidded off the runway while landing.

On May 16, an airplane of Nepal Airlines, a government-owned airline, skidded off and fell into the Kaligandaki River near the Jomson Airport of Mustang District, injuring 21 people on board.

Luckily, there were no casualties in these plane mishaps but it sparked a debate about the security of passengers on board, who are mostly foreign tourists.

An official of the Civil Aviation Authority of Nepal (CAAN) told Xinhua that there is a lack of effective weather forecasting system and other facilities at most airports in the rural areas of Nepal.

"If effective mechanism is installed to forecast and evaluate the weather and the density of the clouds, we can somehow reduce plane crashes in the coming days," Rameshwor Thapa, a senior pilot and civil aviation expert, told Xinhua.

"Repeated crashes should give us a message that pilots should maintain utmost caution and aviation officials should not allow planes to take off without first evaluating the weather and other conditions," he said.

A report prepared by CAAN in 2012 showed that only 11 out of 54 airports in the country have been operating at a profit during the last five years. The government is covering the operating cost of airports losing money and that could be the reason why these airports lack necessary safety facilities.

Besides, some airports in rural areas are located in difficult terrain where the runways are very narrow. Some domestic airports are being run without black-top runways.

Aviation experts are saying that landing a plane at such airports during the monsoon season is risky. "Landing a plane in the rural airports of Nepal is really a challenging task because of the lack of proper infrastructure there," said Hemanta Arjyal, a civil aviation expert who writes a regular column on aviation issues in a local newspaper.

"Most of the domestic airports lack proper facilities and equipment and runways are not paved. Bad weather and the location of airports are the other problems," he said.

Since 1949, when the first aircraft landed in Nepal, there have been about 80 different crashes involving both airplanes and helicopters.

The first major plane mishap in Nepal occurred on March 3, 1955, when a DC-3 belonging to Kalinga Air crashed in Simara, killing two people.

After every crash the government forms an investigation team but the report submitted by those teams have never been publicized. Annex 13 of the International Civil Aviation Organization, to which Nepal is a party, explicitly states that "the sole objective of the investigation shall be to prevent accidents and incidents" and "it is not the purpose of this activity to apportion blame or liability."

But the Nepal government seems unwilling to conduct objective investigation and correct the mistakes that have led to plane crashes. 


Source:  http://english.peopledaily.com

Rock Valley College to tackle aviation mechanic shortage: School announcing program expansion Wednesday

Posted Jun 03, 2013 @ 05:18 PM 
Last update Jun 03, 2013 @ 06:22 PM 

SCOTT MORGAN | RRSTAR.COM

ROCKFORD —

Rock Valley College President Jack Becherer will announce plans to expand the school’s aviation maintenance program Wednesday to support a potentially far-reaching economic development project at the Chicago Rockford International Airport.

The airport has long sought a Maintenance Repair and Overhaul operation, essentially a jumbo hangar to accommodate jet service and repairs. Such a facility could create hundreds of jobs and make the airport attractive as an international cargo hub.

Dunn said Monday he did not know any specifics regarding Rock Valley College’s expansion plans.

"News to me," said Dunn, the airport’s executive director. "I don't know where they're expanding, but they're not going into any facility on the airport that I know of.”

College, airport and economic development leaders have strategized behind the scenes for more than a year on landing an MRO operator.

Tens of millions of dollars of taxpayer investment from the airport, RVC, the state and federal government may be necessary to close the deal. The return on that investment could invigorate the regional economy, which for more than four years suffered double-digit unemployment. The jobless rate finally fell below 10 percent in April.

Job creation is central to the economic agenda of the region, and for aerospace it means seeking new training opportunities.

There’s a shortage of qualified aviation mechanics around the country so local officials have been looking for ways to fill that gap with local and outside training programs where graduates earn Federal Aviation Administration certificates to work on aircraft.

For more than a year the region courted Florida-based Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, which said it wanted to establish a four-year college in either Rockford or Houston. Instead, Embry-Riddle expanded programs in Rockford to provide advanced degrees for workers at companies such as United Technologies Aerospace Systems, Woodward and other manufacturers.

Embry-Riddle Worldwide will officially open its new classrooms at 7479 Walton St., on Rockford’s east side later Wednesday.

Read more later at rrstar.com or in Tuesday's newspaper.

Read more: http://www.rrstar.com

Achiever: Honorable Russell C. Fagg - Billings, Montana

Judge Russell Fagg
Russell C. Fagg, a judge in the 13th Judicial District for Yellowstone County, earned his commercial pilot’s license on May 18. He is also working towards his commercial helicopter certificate. Rocky Mountain College Flight Instructor Mike Damrow has been instructing Fagg. 

Source: http://billingsgazette.com

Colomban Cri-Cri, N2SZ: Fatal accident occurred June 01, 2013 near Doylestown Airport (KDYL), Bucks County, Pennsylvania

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items / National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N2SZ 

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA263
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 01, 2013 in Doylestown, PA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/02/2014
Aircraft: WILSON WILLIAM M CRICKET MC12, registration: N2SZ
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Although the gross weight at takeoff could not be determined, the airplane was a minimum of 30 pounds above the design gross weight (375 pounds), but 15 pounds under the builder-designated gross weight. Because the airplane was an experimental amateur built airplane, the builder can waiver from the design criteria, including gross weight; however, decreased performance will likely occur.

After rotation, the airplane flew several feet above the runway until about 2,100 feet down the 3,004-foot-long runway. The airplane then began a shallow climb and proceeded about ½ nautical mile west-northwest from the departure end of the runway flying at a low altitude. Two witnesses reported hearing sounds consistent with an engine(s) malfunction, while another witness located less than 200 feet from the accident site did not hear sputtering sounds. As the airplane approached a road for a forced landing with traffic ahead, it pitched up, rolled to the left, and collided with power lines then the ground. While two explosions were noted, the first likely occurred when the airplane collided with the power lines and would not have likely caused any burn injury to the pilot, while the second occurred at ground contact and was likely the result of rupture of the fuel tank, which resulted in the pilot’s burn injuries. The drugs detected in the toxicology testing were consistent with those administered by medical personnel.

No evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction was noted to the flight controls, and examination of the heat-damaged engines revealed good compression in each cylinder. Both propeller blades of the right propeller were fractured, consistent with the engine developing power at impact, while both propeller blades of the left propeller were not fractured, which was consistent with the engine not developing power at impact. The reason for the lack of power from the left engine could not be determined during the postaccident examination of the engine.

Though it could not be determined whether the pilot intentionally remained close to the runway for more than 2/3’s of its length, this would have been different from his past practices. Further, a prudent pilot would have initiated a normal climb after rotation for safety purposes. Therefore, the lack of climb performance should have been a clear indicator to the pilot to abort the takeoff, which he could have safely performed within the remaining runway distance.

Accounting for environmental conditions but excluding any issue related to inefficiency of the accident airplane’s engines, propellers, or airframe, the single-engine and both-engine rate-of-climb at design gross weight would have been about 160- and 960 feet per minute, respectively. No determination could be made as to the actual values for the accident airplane. The operation of the airplane above the design gross weight would have further decreased the single-engine climb performance, although the exact decrease in performance could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to abort the takeoff after detecting the airplane’s degraded performance. Contributing to the accident were the likely loss of power from the left engine for reasons that could not be determined during the postaccident examination of the engine, and the operation of the airplane above the design gross weight, which resulted in decreased single-engine performance.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 1, 2013, about 1144 eastern daylight time, a twin engine single seat experimental, amateur built Wilson Cricket MC12 airplane, N2SZ, registered to and operated by a private individual, collided with power lines then the ground shortly after takeoff from Doylestown Airport (DYL), Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 local, personal flight. The airplane sustained substantial damage and the airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The flight originated about 1 minute earlier from DYL.

The manager of DYL who was familiar with the pilot and his airplane reported that the pilot trailered the airplane to DYL that day, arriving there before 1000. After arrival, the airplane was part of a static display of aircraft; the accident flight was the first flight of the day for the pilot from DYL. The manager did not witness the engine start but did witness the airplane being taxied to runway 23, and reported that the airplane rolled past midfield before becoming airborne. After becoming airborne he noticed it was in a shallow climb. Concerned that the airplane would not clear trees past the departure end of the runway he continued to watch the airplane and after it cleared trees, he diverted his attention. He also stated that the pilot usually flies off the ground quick, and confirmed the pilot did not make any distress call.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector-in-charge (FAA-IIC), witnesses reported that shortly after becoming airborne, the wings were noted to be rocking back and forth.

A witness who was traveling southeast bound on Swamp Road (Route 313) reported seeing a small airplane flying very low swerving side to side flying in a northwesterly direction over Route 313. The witness who was located southeast of the accident site observed the airplane in the vehicle's rear view mirror flying lower and still swerving side to side but not as much as first. The individual reported thinking the airplane was going to impact at a nearby car dealership, and suddenly, observed the, "[airplane] veered sharply to the left and all I saw was a fireball." The witness also reported, "My son, who was with me heard the engine revving as if the pilot was trying to gain altitude."

Another witness who was driving southeast bound on Route 313 over the bypass reported the airplane was approaching his position flying in a westerly direction over Route 313. The witness reported to law enforcement seeing the wings rocking from side to side and descending. Another witness who was also driving southeast along Route 313 reported seeing the airplane flying at a low level. The witness thought the airplane would hit his vehicle as it "swooped down" towards him. The witness believed the airplane was low enough to pass under nearby traffic lights, and could not tell if the engines were operating but thought the propellers were spinning. The witness also believed the airplane may have been inverted when it passed his position.

Another individual reported to law enforcement seeing the airplane flying parallel to Route 313, and heard a sputtering sound. The witness continued to observe the airplane from his rear view mirror and noticed the airplane banked left. He then observed a fireball and proceeded to the scene in an effort to render assistance.

Yet another witness who was less than 200 feet southwest from the accident site reported to law enforcement hearing the airplane flying which he described as being very low. The witness reported the airplane flew in front of his position and as it passed him, it banked to the left and impacted the power lines. The witness also reported he did not hear any sputtering or see any smoke trailing the airplane.

One individual who was driving southeast bound on Route 313 reported that approaching the bridge over Route 611, he noted the accident airplane and made a comment to his daughter who was with him about the pilot doing stunts over the road. It then became apparent to him that the pilot was looking for a safe place to land. They approached the bridge and he noticed the airplane was descending while flying towards their vehicle. While on the bridge he parked his car as far to the right as possible and reported the airplane was flying towards them at a 45 degree angle and was floundering. During that time he heard full roar and then no sound from the engines, and reported the pilot was flying over Route 313 as if the pilot was attempting to perform an emergency landing. The individual noticed the nose pitch up straight in the air, followed by an immediate 90 degree roll to the left. He could see the bottom of the airplane and the wing barely missed their vehicle. The airplane then collided with the power lines causing sparks and an explosion. A portion of the airplane remained suspended, and the airplane then impacted the ground followed by a second explosion. The witness parked his vehicle, and went to the site to render assistance.

Bystanders, police and fire rescue personnel responded to the scene to render assistance.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 69, held an airline transport pilot (ATP) certificate with airplane multi-engine land and rotorcraft helicopter ratings. At the ATP level he was type rated in a Sikorsky SK-76 helicopter, Beech BE-300 and Fairchild Swearingen SA-227 airplanes. He held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single engine land rating, and was issued a first class medical certificate with no limitations on May 13, 2013. On the application for the last medical certificate he listed a total time of 16,900 hours, and 100 hours in the last 6 months.

According to FAA Civil Aeromedical Division personnel, at the last medical examination the pilot was 71 inches tall and weighed 185 pounds.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The twin-engine, single seat, "T tail", tricycle gear airplane was built by a private individual from a kit in 1992 as model Cricket MC12 (Cri Cri), and according to FAA records was designated serial number 210013. It was certificated as an experimental amateur built airplane, and was powered by two 15 horsepower single cylinder 2-cycle PUL 212 engines and equipped with two wooden fixed pitch MC/AS 695200103 propellers. The airplane was also equipped with full span flaperons. The airplane's fuel tank is located in the cockpit forward of the seat, requiring placement of both legs directly over the fuel tank while seated.

Since the beginning of 1982 until about 1988, a company called Zenair sold kits for Cricket MC12. Personnel from Zenair reported they having no historical data concerning the Cricket MC12; therefore, no determination could be made whether the kit was provided by Zenair, or the original designer.

A document from Zenair (kit seller) indicates that the gross weight of the Cricket MC12 airplane with the PUL engines is 380 pounds (design weight is actually 170 kg or approximately 375 pounds). The document also indicates that the single engine rate of climb is 200 feet-per-minute (FPM), and at 420 pounds gross weight, the climb rate with the PUL engines is 1,000 FPM with both engines operating.

Documents submitted to the FAA by the builder indicated that the empty weight was 195 pounds, and using a pilot weight of 180 pounds, the airplane without fuel weighed 375 pounds, which corresponded to the maximum design gross weight. The builder stipulated the gross weight to be 420 pounds.

According to FAA records, the pilot purchased the airplane on December 6, 2002; no maintenance records were located.

A weight and balance document dated July 20, 2008, indicates the combined weights on each main and nose landing gears, plus subtractions and additions for equipment and 3.0 pounds of "nose weight." The airplane empty weight with the additions and subtractions was approximately 220 pounds.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A surface observation weather report taken at DYL at 1154, or approximately 10 minutes after the accident indicates the wind was variable at 4 knots, the visibility was 10 statute miles, and the cloud condition was not reported. The temperature and dew point were 29 and 21 degrees Celsius, respectively, and the altimeter setting was 30.00 inches of Mercury.

Based on the altimeter setting of 30.00 inches of Mercury, the pressure altitude was approximately 314 feet.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The DYL Airport is a public-use airport located in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, owned by Bucks County Airport Authority. It is an uncontrolled field equipped with a single 3,004 foot long by 60 foot wide asphalt runway designated 5/23. The common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) is 122.975 MHz, and is not recorded.

On the date of the accident, the Bucks County Airport Authority, Doylestown Pilot Association, and Leading Edge Aviation sponsored an open house (Tenth Annual) at DYL showing antique, experimental and other airplane static displays. The event was open from 1000 to 1500 hours.

The DYL airport has a security camera that is mounted about 12 feet above ground level on the middle of the terminal building, and at the time was pointed to the southwest. The security camera recorded approximately 8 seconds of the accident flight at DYL; the video did not depict the point of rotation or the accident sequence. Review of the recorded video segment revealed the airplane first came into view while airborne several feet off the runway. The video depicted the airplane flying just above the runway about the same altitude as first viewed until reaching a taxiway located about 2,100 feet down the runway. At that point the video depicts the airplane beginning to climb with the wings rocking to the right and then back to wings level while continuing in a climb and then disappearing from view. No smoke is noted trailing the airplane.

Automotive fuel is not available for purchase at DYL; the airport only sells 100 low lead and Jet A type fuels. The pilot did not purchase fuel from DYL that day.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane crashed at the intersection of PA Route 611 Bypass (Easton Road) and Route 313 in Doylestown, PA. The wreckage was located on the southeast portion of the intersection in the foliage on the shoulder of Route 611. The approximate coordinates of the main wreckage were 40 degrees 19.85 minutes North latitude and 075 degrees 08.12 minutes West longitude. That location when plotted was located about 2,788 feet and 278 degrees straight line distance and direction from the departure end of runway 23.

Examination of the accident site by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector-in-charge revealed the "T-tail" was suspended among electrical wires above the resting position of the wreckage. The wings and pilot seat were on the ground in an upright position directly below the suspended "T-tail". The nose containing both engines with attached propellers was located on the ground inverted on a storm drain approximately 10 feet southwest of the wing section, and the fuel tank was separated and located on the ground in an upright position approximately 12 feet north of the wing section. The section of fuselage between the pilot's seat and the "T-tail" section suspended in the wires was not present and was consumed by the postcrash fire. The foliage on which the pieces landed had been burned but the tall reed grasses between the three aircraft pieces were intact with no evidence of burning. The left wing and leading edge of the vertical stabilizer had witness marks from striking electric wires, but the right wing had no damage. The rest of the wreckage had burned with evidence of fire on the tail hanging from the wire.

Further examination of the airplane following recovery revealed the separated fuel tank was ruptured and did not contain any fuel. Rudder and stabilator control cables and push rods were broken as a result of the separation of the "T-tail"; however, there was no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction. Flaperon and flaps control authority was confirmed. Evidence of wire strikes were noted on the left wing and leading edge of the vertical stabilizer.

Examination of the cockpit revealed both throttle levers were in the retarded position; however control cable continuity from each throttle lever to the carburetor of each engine could not be determined due to melted control cables associated with the postcrash fire. The throttle mechanism at each carburetor was noted to operate satisfactory. Each engine master switch was in the off position.

Examination of both engines which remained attached to the engine pylons revealed fire damage to both, though rotation of each propeller by hand revealed both engine powertrains rotated freely with good compression noted in each cylinder. Fire damage to the spark plugs wires was noted. Both propellers exhibited heat damage; the left propeller was not fractured, while both blades of the right propeller were fractured.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot was transported by ambulance from the accident site to the Doylestown Hospital for transport via helicopter to Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; however, the life flight helicopter was at the DYL Airport taking part in a static display. The pilot was redirected by ambulance to the DYL Airport where he was airlifted by helicopter to Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for treatment of his injuries. The family withdrew care and placed him on do not resuscitate (DNR) status; he died while hospitalized on June 2, 2013.

The NTSB provided a subpoena to Temple University Hospital personnel to obtain admission blood and urine specimens. Those specimens were submitted as directed by the subpoena to the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory (FAA CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma for testing. Additionally, specimens obtained during autopsy were also submitted to the FAA Bioaeronatical Sciences Research Laboratory for testing.

A postmortem examination of the pilot was performed by the City of Philadelphia Office of the Medical Examiner. The autopsy report indicated the cause of death was "Thermal Burns and Inhalation Injuries", with 2nd and 3rd degree burns to 90 percent of his body. The report also indicated that he sustained fractures of 4 right ribs, and comminuted fractures of the left humerus. No other fractures were reported.

Forensic toxicology testing was performed on admittance specimens from Temple University Hospital and also of specimens from the postmortem examination by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Forensic toxicology testing was also performed by the City of Philadelphia Office of the Medical Examiner.

The toxicology report by FAA CAMI indicated that cyanide testing was not performed, and the results were negative for carbon monoxide and volatiles. Unquantified amounts of etomidate, midazolam, and morphine were detected in the submitted blood specimens, while midazolam and morphine were detected in the submitted liver specimen.

The toxicology report by the City of Philadelphia Office of the Medical Examiner revealed the result was negative for cocaine, volatiles, and carbon monoxide, while unquantified amounts of lidocaine and midazolam were detected in the cardiac blood specimen. Additionally, 340 ug/L of morphine was detected in the cardiac blood.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Postaccident weight and balance calculations were performed using the empty weight of 220 pounds and the weight of the pilot at his last medical less than 3 weeks earlier (185 pounds). The zero fuel weight was calculated to be approximately 405 pounds, and because the fuel amount at takeoff could not be determined, no determination could be made as to the gross weight at engine start. At the calculated zero fuel weight, the airplane was 30 pounds over the design gross weight, but was 15 pounds under the builder designated gross weight.

The Koch Chart in the FAA safety publication FAA-P-8740-2, titled density altitude, provides increases in takeoff distance and decreases in rate of climb performance for airplanes that do not have an airplane flight manual or Pilot's Operating Handbook. Based on the temperature and pressure altitude about the time of the accident, 84 degrees and 314 feet respectively, the expected increase in takeoff distance would be approximately 25 percent, and the expected decrease in rate of climb performance would be 20 percent. Using data from the previous pilot's account of takeoff roll distance of 415 feet, and climb rate of 1,200 FPM, the takeoff roll distance would have increased approximately 104 feet, and the climb rate would have decreased 240 FPM. Using the same chart and reported single engine climb rate at gross weight as depicted by the kit builder revealed a decrease of 40 FPM. No determination could be made as to the amount of decrease in single engine climb rate for any weight above the maximum design gross weight.

ADDITIONAL DATA

Information Concerning Flight Evaluation of the Cricket

"Zenair Cricket News" newsletter No. 5, from fall of 1982, which contains an account from a pilot who had flown the Cricket, indicates that at 25 pounds less than the design gross weight, or 350 pounds, the PUL engine equipped Cricket was airborne in 415 feet and climbing at 1,200 FPM. The pilot also indicated that by remaining within the allowable gross weight, the airplane was, "…a remarkable performer on single engine. At 340 pounds, I have climbed the bird from 2,000 to 3,000 [feet] at 250 [feet-per-minute, and maintained 85 mph level at 3000 feet using full power on the good engine."

Previous NTSB Investigations Involving Cricket Airplanes

A review of NTSB's data base from 1982 revealed a total of 5 previous accidents involving Cricket airplanes dating back to 1982. Of the five accidents, four involve a MC12 and the last involves a MC15. A review of the accidents involving the MC12 airplanes revealed one (identified as NTSB investigation CHI83FA370), in which the pilot wrote an article reporting the circumstances of his accident. The pilot indicated in the article that after takeoff and the having achieved the climb angle, the left engine quit with a resulting yaw to the left. He lowered the nose, however the airspeed deteriorated to stall and the wing dropped. He retarded the right engine and applied forward control resulting in an immediate ground contact. He also relayed that, "…for ten seconds a vulnerability exists. If an engine fails, your options are very limited…."

Review of the three other accidents involving a MC12 identified by NTSB Case #'s (DEN84FTE01, FTW92LA140, and CHI06LA164) revealed one of the accidents (FTW92LA140) occurred during a forced landing following total loss of power from the left engine while on approach; the airplane had the same horsepower engines as the accident airplane. The report did not indicate the airplane weight at the time of the accident; therefore, no determination could be made whether the airplane was being operated above the design gross weight at the time of the accident.

One accident involving a MC15 (LAX95LA309) occurred during a forced landing because the pilot was unable to maintain single engine flight following total loss of power from the left engine. The MC-15 contains the same wing span, wing area, and wing aspect ratio as the MC12, and the MC15 had the same horsepower engines as the accident airplane. The report did not indicate the airplane weight at the time of the accident; therefore, no determination could be made whether the airplane was being operated above the design gross weight at the time of the accident.

NTSB Identification: ERA13LA263
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 01, 2013 in Doylestown, PA
Aircraft: WILSON WILLIAM M WILSON CRI CRI, registration: N2SZ
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 1, 2013, about 1215 eastern daylight time, a twin engine single seat experimental amateur built Wilson Cri Cri, N2SZ, registered to and operated by a private individual, collided with power lines after takeoff from Doylestown Airport (DYL), Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 local, personal flight. The airplane sustained substantial damage and the airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The flight was originating about 1 minute earlier from DYL.

The airport manager who was familiar with the pilot and the airplane reported that the pilot trailered the airplane to DYL that day, arriving there before 1000. After arrival, the airplane was part of a static display of aircraft and the accident flight was the first flight of the day from DYL. The manager did not witness the engine start but did witness the airplane being taxied to runway 23. The manager reported that the airplane rolled about 2,000 feet before becoming airborne and after becoming airborne noticed it was in a shallow climb. Concerned that the airplane would not clear trees past the departure end of the runway he continued to watch the airplane and after it cleared trees, he diverted his attention. The manager went to the site and provided the location which was later determined to be located about 2,800 feet and 280 degrees from the departure end of runway 23.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector-in-charge, the airplane collided with power lines; a portion of the airplane remained suspended in the power lines and the main wreckage descended and impacted the ground


John Szabo 
 Buckingham resident Ed Wolfe said this photo, taken Saturday, June 1, 2013, shows John Szabo with his plane at the Doylestown Airport.


Today John Mariner Szabo croaked.

Truth be told, he actually passed on Sunday June 2, 2013, but if you knew him you see him now in this - his requested obituary opening line.


John Szabo passed at Temple University Hospital from injuries sustained in an accident that occurred June 1, while piloting his twin engine Wilson Cri Cri (Cricket) airplane out of Doylestown Airport. A tragic end to a life lived to the fullest; some comfort may be found in that he died doing what he loved.


Although 69 in years, the twinkle in his eye, the sharpness of his mind, and his enthusiasm for life were wonderfully and contagiously childlike.


Born in Rahway, N.J., in 1944, to Aline Rothen and John Szabo, he later moved to Florida where he graduated from Lake Worth High School, then he packed up his Corvette and traveled across the country in search of new adventures.


From 1966 to 1968, he served with distinction and valor as a member of the U.S. Army Aviation Branch. Serving two combat tours in Vietnam, he earned the coveted title of Aircraft Commander, piloting a UH1H/Huey helicopter. He was twice wounded in action, earning numerous awards and distinctions, including the Purple Heart.


John continued his passion for flight and became a career pilot, employed most recently for more than 20 years with Merck in New Jersey.


He built and flew his own aircraft, restored classic cars and found joy in nature. There was nothing he couldn't fix, and no question from his children or grandchildren that he couldn't answer. He was a jack of all trades and master of every one of them. John is survived by daughter Cristine Hahm, her husband Kyung, and their sons, Alex and Max of Seattle, Wash., his son, Robert Szabo of Allentown, Pa.; and his sisters, Aline Humphrey of Pueblo, Colo., Carol Szabo of El Granada, Calif. and Nancy Raynor of Montgomery, Ala. His longtime girlfriend, Heather Kimak, who died June 7, 2012, and her children held a special place in his heart, as did friends, Jim and Andrea Mehling, Tim Lelie, George Scholl, and Jack Gardner.


Relatives and friends are invited to attend his graveside service at 2:30 p.m., Monday, June 24, at Washington Crossing National Cemetery, 830 Highland Road, Newtown. The funeral procession will leave at 1:15 p.m. from Reed and Steinbach Funeral Home, 2335 Lower State Road, Doylestown. Please note the cemetery is in Pennsylvania and will not admit latecomers. A reception will follow in the main hanger at Princeton Airport.


Memorial contributions may be made to EAA Young Eagles, P.O. Box 3086, Oshkosh, WI 54903 or to the Space Foundation, Attention: Development, Space Foundation, 4425 Arrowswest Drive, Colorado Springs, CO 80907 or via the Web site www.spacefoundation.org/donate.

Thank you to all who touched his life. He misses us, is glad he was so loved, is delighted to once again have a full head of hair, and is happy he does not need to pay taxes.


Followed dreams, tinkered, adventured, learned, laughed, loved... 

Smoketown Airport (S37), Pennsylvania: Annual fly-in set for Saturday, June 8 -- Will include pancake breakfast, cruise-in

Updated Jun 03, 2013 14:29
Originally Published Jun 03, 2013 13:35

By JOHN JASCOLL



Flying enthusiasts from all over the mid-Atlantic will be piloting their small planes to Smoketown Airport on Saturday, June 8, for the annual fly-in and pancake breakfast.

World War II craft and vintage biplanes will vie for space with single-seater homebuilts, along with more conventional craft including the latest ultra-light sport planes.

The event at Smoketown, on the Old Philadelphia Pike (Route 340), is sponsored by the local chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association, a flying club with more than 200,000 members worldwide.

The "experimental" in its name refers to the many EAA members who've designed and built their own planes.

Club president Jack Henderson says it will be a day of fun for the whole family, starting with the traditional pancake breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m.

There will be a daredevil parachute jump at 10, followed by free rides for youngsters ages 8-17 who have a hankering to fly with experienced pilots in regular small planes.

Music will be provided by the band "Forgiven."

Along with the fly-in, there will be a cruise-in for car enthusiasts to show off their vintage, muscle and classic models, along with Corvettes, street rods and low-rider trucks, as well as an assortment of custom-built and classic motorcycles.

There is no entry fee for the fly-in or the cruise-in, said organizer Ped Abreu, who will be bringing his 1931 Chevy Coupe with a 350-cubic-inch engine, which he calls a "Restrod" (restored hot rod).

For more information about the fly-in, call Henderson at 872-5297. For more about the cruise-in, call Abreu at 598-5420.

Rain date is Sunday June 9.

Read more: http://lancasteronline.com

Loaded firearm found in carry-on at Tri-Cities Regional Airport (KTRI), Bristol/Johnson/Kingsport, Tennessee

 
(Photo courtesy Transportation Security Administration)
Passenger brought loaded .357 to Tri-Cities Regional Airport  (KTRI) checkpoint.




 
Gun found at Tri-Cities Regional Airport(KTRI) on Sunday. 
(Contributed/Transportation Security Administration)


June 3rd, 2013 1:55 pm by Wes Bunch 

BLOUNTVILLE — A loaded firearm was discovered at a security checkpoint at Tri-Cities Regional Airport Sunday morning, Transportation Safety Administration officials said.

The loaded .357 revolver was discovered in a passenger's carry-on bag, TSA Public Affairs Officer Jon Allen said Monday afternoon.

Lee R. Osborne, 61, of Castlewood, Va.,  was brought to the Sullivan County Jail by airport police Sunday morning. He has been released on a $3,000 bond and he is charged with prohibited possession of a handgun.

Weapons, including guns, are not permitted in carry-on baggage. Passengers found bringing loaded firearms to a checkpoint face a civil penalty between $3,000 to $7,500 and referral for possible criminal charges.

Allen said Sunday's discovery was the first weapon found at TRI in 2013. Two firearms were found in 2012 at checkpoints at TRI, Allen said. Last year, a total of 1,549 firearms were discovered nationwide at security checkpoints, according to the TSA.

Nationwide more than $1.8 million in civil penalties were assessed in 2012 as a result of those discoveries.

Allen said airline passengers are allowed to travel with firearms in checked baggage if they are properly packed and declared. The firearm must be unloaded, packed in a hard-sided case and locked and packed away from ammunition.

Because passengers are responsible for the content of their baggage, Allen said they should check bags thoroughly before coming to the airport.


Weapons—included guns—are not permitted in carry-on baggage. Passengers are responsible for the contents of bags they bring to the security checkpoint, and TSA’s advice to passengers is to look through bags thoroughly before coming to the airport to make sure there are no illegal or prohibited items.

Passengers who bring firearms to a checkpoint face a civil penalty from TSA (see page 7 of the following document for additional information):

http://www.tsa.gov/sites/default/files/assets/pdf/enforcement_sanction_guidance_policy.pdf

Last year TSA assessed more than $1.8 million in civil penalties for firearms discovered in passenger carry-on bags.

Passengers are permitted to travel with firearms in checked baggage if they are properly packaged and declared. Firearms must be unloaded, packed in a hard-side case, locked, and packed separately from ammunition. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. Information about the proper transport of firearms is available on our web site:

http://www.tsa.gov/traveler-information/firearms-and-ammunition

Airlines may have additional requirements for traveling with firearms and ammunition. The said TSA travelers should also contact the airline regarding firearm and ammunition carriage policies.

Source:  http://www.timesnews.net

Analysis: Michigan State coaches use state-owned planes for recruiting trips

 

1:56 PM, June 3, 2013

By Kristen M. Daum

Lansing State Journal


Recruiting Michigan State’s future basketball and football stars often puts head coaches Tom Izzo and Mark Dantonio on the road — and one of their travel options are state-owned planes.

As employees of one of the state’s 15 four-year universities, Izzo and Dantonio have access to the four passenger planes managed by the Michigan Department of Transportation.

A Lansing State Journal analysis of MDOT’s aircraft logs for the past five years show that the two MSU coaches are among the most frequent fliers on the state planes. Izzo has traveled at least 55 times in the five-year period analyzed by the State Journal — or nearly once a month. Dantonio has used the state planes slightly less, with at least 47 trips in five years.

MSU’s athletic department pays the state for use of the planes and “no state funds nor tuition dollars are used to pay for the charter,” MSU associate athletic director John Lewandowski said.

“Sometimes trips are scheduled on short notice or a larger group needs to travel together,” Lewandowski said. “The coaches must determine the most cost-effective way to travel as well as weigh the benefit of time saved by traveling in this manner versus a commercial flight.”

While all 15 four-year universities in Michigan have access to the planes, MSU uses them almost exclusively among the higher education community. Part of that could be attributed to the fact that most of the passenger planes are based at Lansing’s Capital Region International Airport.

MSU employees and guests used the state planes at least 150 times during the five-year period reviewed by the State Journal. By comparison, in that same time, Michigan Tech employees used the planes five times, and one Michigan employee used a plane last fall.

Story, Videos, Photo, Comments/Reaction:  http://www.freep.com