Saturday, August 25, 2018

Solve mystery of oxygen system



Hazard is an inescapable part of being a military pilot. However, the “physiological episodes” pilots are experiencing in certain aircraft seem to be in a different category. They have all the signs of equipment malfunction.

In other words, systems that are meant to keep pilots safe instead cause disorientation or worse.

At least that’s the working theory. The problem: The military, as Express-News Staff Writer Sig Christenson recently wrote, hasn’t found the root problem with the suspected culprit, an oxygen delivery system called the Onboard Oxygen Generation System, or OBOGS.

As Christenson reported, pilots flying one of the Air Force’s principal training planes have reported 39 unexplained physiological episodes caused by a lack of oxygen since the fleet resumed operations early this year. The planes were grounded after a high number of incidents — 22 — were reported in January.

Christenson’s article primarily highlighted the troubled T-6A Texan II trainer used by the Air Force training command at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph. But Navy pilots flying the T-45 Goshawk at Naval Air Station Kingsville have also had these experiences.

This is a mystery that must be solved. It’s clear that the potential for death or serious injury is the threat here. So devoting the resources necessary to conclusively pinpoint the problem with OBOGS — or ruling it out — strikes us as the necessary step to eliminate these episodes, also described as hypoxia. This is a condition with symptoms ranging from fear, anxiety and confusion to giddiness and loss of consciousness.

Equipping these planes with an automatic backup oxygen system — which a study that will end this month could conclude — seems a plausible measure, but we wonder if the need to install a backup system points to the need to replace OBOGS altogether or fix it.

These episodes are not trivial. Imagine flying at high altitudes and suddenly getting confused about whether your plane is leading the formation. Or noting that although you — the guy who is supposed to land the plane — are experiencing symptoms, the person you’re training isn’t. Or flying when hypoxia hits and you, the instructor, and the trainee have to bail out, the plane crashing.

“When I explained it to my wife, it was all the wrong reasons,” an instructor pilot told Christenson. The pilot asked not to be identified, fearing retribution from commanders. “I’m fearful for second lieutenants that are flying a bad piece of machinery. I’m fearful for how this could be detrimental to my career with the airlines, and my wife is like, ‘You should be afraid for your life. You should be afraid that you’re going to crash an airplane and you’re going to die.’”

It is a legitimate fear.

Some Air Force pilots suspect hypoxia was involved in the death of one pilot in 2010, Capt. Jeff Haney. Since then, an automatic backup oxygen system was installed throughout the Air Force’s F-22A fleet.

Being a pilot — fighter or otherwise — is risky enough. Safety depends on being as sharp as possible while flying. Any equipment that compromises that must be fixed, backed up or eliminated. Determining which must be a priority.

There should be no half measures.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.mysanantonio.com

Cessna Citation Excel/XLS: Incident occurred August 25, 2018 at Dane County Regional Airport (KMSN), Madison, Wisconsin



MADISON, Wis. - The Dane County Regional Airport is back open after a small plane fire Saturday afternoon. 

The airport announced the reopening around 4:15 p.m., after crews were able to clear a runway after a small fire started in a private plane.

Just after 2:00 p.m., a private Cessna Citation aircraft had a catastrophic failure during takeoff and had to abort. The fire was quickly extinguished by firefighters at the airport, but crews had to inspect the runway and move the damaged aircraft. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.channel3000.com

Pooler, Georgia: Local group seeks to fill nationwide pilot shortage



SAVANNAH, GA (WTOC) -  Military helicopter pilots and maintenance workers learned about future career possibilities on Saturday in Pooler.

Rotary to Airline Group hosted around 700 people at the Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum to connect them with airlines and flight schools. Attendees received resume tips and even interviewed on the spot for open positions. Two veterans now working for American Airlines say regional and major airlines are recognizing helicopter pilots as an untapped resource. The group wants those pilots hired.

"When the two people meet, when the airlines and helicopter pilots meet, they have no idea how well-suited they are for each other," said Erik Sabiston, president of the Rotary to Airline Group. "The airlines don't really expect that much compared to what we've been used to delivering to the military, and the military pilots are so excited cause, helo pilots, we never thought we'd have this opportunity. So there's a ton of enthusiasm for this."

CBS reported in July, regional airlines expect a shortage of more than 14,000 pilots by 2026. This group hopes helicopter pilots can help fill those jobs.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wbrc.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, F-GTNV: Fatal accident occurred August 06, 2018 in Puy-de-Dome Mazoires, France

NTSB Identification: CEN18WA318
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Monday, August 06, 2018 in Puy-de-Dome Mazoires, France
Aircraft: Cessna 172, registration:
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On August 6, 2018, about 1045 coordinated universal time, a Cessna 172S airplane, French registration F-GTNV, lost radio and radar contact; the wreckage was located near Puy-de-Dôme Mazoires, France. The airplane was destroyed, and the three occupants received fatal injuries.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the French government. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the French government.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Aircraft Accident Investigation Bureau
Bureau d'Enquêtes et d'Analyses
Zone Sud - Batiment 153
10 rue de Paris
Aêroport du Bourget
93352 Le Bourget Cedex,  France




Un avion s'est écrasé ce lundi vers 12 h 30, non loin d'une ferme, sur la commune de Mazoires (Puy-de-Dôme). Les trois occupants du petit appareil de tourisme, un père et ses deux filles, sont morts.

"Cela a fait une sacrée déflagration !" Témoin de la scène, un agriculteur de la commune de Mazoires (Puy-de-Dôme) a vu un avion de tourisme s'écraser, ce lundi 6 août, aux alentours de 12 h 30, dans un pré de ce village .

"On parlait avec un collègue et on l'a vu arriver au-dessus d'Aubignat (lieu-dit de la commune de Mazoires). Il a commencé à beaucoup bouger avant de faire un petit virage, puis une toupie et il est tombé net. Pourtant, le moteur tournait."

Les trois personnes qui se trouvaient dans l'appareil, un père et ses deux filles mineures originaires de la région parisienne, sont morts sur le coup. 

L’avion de tourisme, un Cessna 172, avait décollé de Saint-Cyr-l’École (Yvelines), dimanche 5 août au matin, et avait fait une halte à Issoudun (Indre). Il devait se rendre dans l’Aveyron, à Cassagnes-Bégognès.

Un important dispositif a été déployé pour réaliser les constatations et sécuriser le périmètre de l'accident.

La Gendarmerie des transports aériens (GTA) d'Aulnat et Lyon ainsi que les techniciens en identification criminelle de la gendarmerie ont notamment été dépêchés sur place. 

La section de recherche de la GTA de Paris et le Bureau d'enquêtes et d'analyses (BEA) pour la Sécurité de l'Aviation civile se sont également rendus sur les lieux pour déterminer les circonstances du crash.


https://www.lamontagne.fr

Piper PA-22-150, N6936B: Fatal accident occurred August 25, 2018 at John H. Boylan Airport (5B1), Island Pond, Essex County, Vermont and Accident occurred July 05, 2017 at Mount Washington Regional Airport (KHIE), Whitefield, Coos County, New Hampshire

Lt. Col. Mark C. Biron 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N6936B

Location: Island Pond, VT
Accident Number: ERA18FA232
Date & Time: 08/25/2018, 1540 EDT
Registration: N6936B
Aircraft: Piper PA22
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 25, 2018, about 1540 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-22-150 airplane, N6936B, was destroyed when it collided with terrain while attempting to land at the John H. Boylan State Airport (5B1), Island Pond, Vermont. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The local flight originated at 5B1 about 1500.

A witness, who was also a pilot, was at his home when he heard the airplane depart and then later return to land at 5B1. When he heard the airplane returning, he used his binoculars and confirmed the airplane was owned by a pilot, who had the hangar next to him at the airport. The witness said the airplane was on the left-downwind leg for runway 32 and was at an altitude about 1,000 ft above ground level (agl). The airplane was in level flight and the engine "sounded great." There was no smoke trailing the airplane. The witness lost sight of the airplane while it was still on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern and it was not until later in the afternoon that he learned the airplane had crashed. The pilot told the witness two days before the accident that that the airplane had been flying "great." The witness described the wind conditions on the day of the accident as a southerly crosswind that was shifting about 10° left and right and were such that the pilot could have landed on either runway.

The airplane came to rest upright on airport property on a heading of 070° and was mostly consumed by post-impact fire. The initial impact was a ground scar located about 10 ft forward and to the left of where the airplane came to rest. Several pieces of broken Plexiglas were found in the ground scar. Another ground scar extended about 13 ft to the right of the initial impact scar. Imbedded in the ground at the end of the scar was an unburned section of the airplane's right-wing tip. All major flight controls were accounted for at the site and flight control continuity was established to the cockpit area. The left and right flaps were consumed by fire. The left and right-wing fuel tanks were breached and partially consumed by fire. The engine sustained impact and fire damage and remained partially attached to the airplane. The propeller spinner was crushed up and inward, and the engine was pushed into the firewall and cockpit area. The two-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land, and instrument airplane. His last Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third class medical was issued on June 21, 2018. A review of copies of the pilot's logbook revealed he had accrued about 1,289 hours of total flight time, of which, about 362 hours were in the accident airplane.

Weather reported at Caledonia Airport (CDA), Caledonia, Vermont, about 16 miles southwest of the accident site, at 1535, was reported as wind 120° at 8 knots, visibility 10 miles, and clear skies. Temperature was 79° F and the dewpoint was 57° F, with an altimeter setting of 30.23 inHg.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N6936B
Model/Series: PA22 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCDA, 1188 ft msl
Observation Time: 1535 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 120°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Island Pond, VT (5B1)
Destination: Island Pond, VT (5B1)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  44.790000, -71.826389 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

ISLAND POND — There was no apparent reason for a single-engine aircraft to crash and kill a popular local pilot at the John H. Boylan State Airport in Island Pond last month, according to the preliminary accident report from the National Transportation Safety Board.

Mark C. Biron, 60, of Island Pond, who died in the fiery crash at 3:40 p.m. Aug. 25, devoted his life to serving the country and community through his service in the military, with U.S. Customs and in local positions.

Much of the plane, including the left and right flaps, was destroyed by the post-impact fire about 100 yards off the grass runway. The plane landed upright, but the left and right wing fuel tanks were breached and were partially consumed by flames, according to the preliminary report obtained by The Caledonian-Record.

A witness, who also is a pilot, said he heard the plane approaching the rural airport and checked to see if it was Biron returning from a 3 p.m. takeoff, the NTSB report said. The witness used his binoculars to confirm it was Biron and indicated the plane was about 1,000 feet above ground.

The witness said the plane “sounded great” and was on a level flight with no smoke showing, according to the report.

The witness, who was at his home, said he eventually lost sight of the plane, but learned later in the afternoon it had crashed. The witness, who is not identified by name in the NTSB report, recounted that two days earlier Biron had indicated the airplane had been flying “great,” the report noted. The two pilots had adjoining hangars at the airport, the NTSB said.

The plane had been built in 1956, according to Essex County State’s Attorney Vince Illuzzi, who said he had had several conversations with Biron about the aircraft. Illuzzi said Biron had said he bought the plane in Alaska. Biron indicated it took four days to fly from Anchorage to Vermont, Illuzzi said.

Illuzzi, who was called to the crash site on Vermont 105 by state police, said Sunday it looks like it will be many months before a cause might be known and provided in the final investigation report.

“We look forward to hearing the final conclusion. This preliminary report there is no apparent conclusion,” said Illuzzi when reached by phone.

Family and friends were aware the evening of the crash that it was Biron, whose truck was parked at the airport. Officials also contacted Biron’s family, but it took state police three days to issue a preliminary identification, pending verification by the medical examiner.

The day after the crash the remains of the plane were cut up and hauled away to an undisclosed site to allow federal investigators to continue their examination.

The two-page NTSB report said Biron’s logbook showed he had accrued about 1,289 hours of flight time, including about 362 hours in the plane, which was described as a Piper PA-22-150.

The witness said the low wind speed would have allowed the plane to land on either runway, the report said.

The report noted the weather at the nearby Caledonia Airport, about 16 miles southwest of the accident, showed the wind at about 9 miles per hour and visibility at 10 miles with clear skies.

The Brighton Volunteer Fire Department responded to the crash.

Biron served as president of the Island Pond Historical Society for 12 years and was a former commander of the local American Legion Post 80.

The Norwich University graduate had a distinguished military career for 31 years, including with the 2nd Armored Division in Germany as a tank commander and as an army photographer in Macedonia. He later completed two tours, one in Iraq and one in Afghanistan where he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement and heroic service.

Among Biron’s various citations and awards the Legion of Merit medal for outstanding services and achievements.

He also worked as a U.S. Customs Officer in Vermont and later as a Public Relations advisor at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. He also served as an editor for an army base newspaper in Alaska.

Northeast Kingdom historian Scott Wheeler said Biron was the one of the keepers of Island Pond history and made it his mission to ensure the history was preserved. Biron and his wife helped with the purchase of the former Ted’s Market so the Island Pond Historical Society could move from second story of the former train station.

Biron often performed Taps at most local military funerals.

Biron and his wife lost their residence to a fire last year and had moved into a new home earlier this year.

A Mass of Christian burial for Biron was held at St. James Catholic Church in Island Pond followed by full military honors. Interment was planned for later at Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia.


https://www.caledonianrecord.com


Lt. Col. Mark C. Biron 

Lt. Col. Mark C. Biron, 60, of Island Pond died on August 25th, 2018 in Island Pond, Vt. He was born on July 21, 1958 in Newport, Vt. to Clifford F. Biron and the late Pauline (Henry) Biron. On May 12, 2007 he married his wife, Sharon, at Fort Meyer, in Arlington, Virginia.

Mark was a graduate of Norwich University Military College. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree. Mark had a long, exemplary, and distinguished military career. He served with the 2nd Armored Division in Germany as a tank commander, as an army photographer in Macedonia, and later completed two tours, one in Iraq and one in Afghanistan where he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for heroic achievement and heroic service. Among the many citations and awards Mark received was the Legion of Merit medal for outstanding services and achievements.

Mark also served as a US Customs Officer in Vermont and later as a Public Relations advisor at the Pentagon in Washington, DC. where he was involved with Strategic Plans and Policy making. Mark later became editor of the base newspaper on Fort Wainwright, Fairbanks, Alaska. where he also qualified as an aviation mechanic and volunteered with the Alaska Civil Air Patrol.

Besides serving his country for 31 years Mark was president of the Island Pond Historical Society for 12 years, had recently become the IPHS museum curator, and had been IPHS Newsletter editor for more than 20 years. Mark was a past commander of American Legion Brighton Post 80, and a member of the Vt. and NH civil air patrol where he taught air cadets.

Mark was a gifted musician and photographer, woodsman, and an aviation and outdoors enthusiast who loved flying and working on his planes, keeping fit, and walking his beloved dogs, Theo and Ellie. Mark was loyal, devoted to his wife and family, hard-working, and a beloved husband, brother, and son. Mark is survived by his grieving wife Sharon Biron of Island Pond, Vt.. by his father Clifford F. Biron of Island Pond, Vt., by his siblings: Alexander Biron of Valencia, Calif., Cynthia Biron of Brookline, Mass. by his parents-in-law Terence and Frances Chin, by his cousins and aunts and uncles, and flying buddy Dr. Manfried H. Rieder.

On Tuesday, Aug. 28, Mark was posthumously awarded the title of President Emeritus of the Island Pond Historical Society, alongside fellow President Emeritus, the late John Carbonneau.

Mark was predeceased by his mother Pauline Biron, his sister Lona Biron, his brother Christopher Biron, and his brother-in-law Paul Chin.

Friends may call from 6-8 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018 at the Curtis-Britch-Converse-Rushford Funeral Home, 1199 Railroad Street, Island Pond, Vt.. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 31, 2018 at St. James Catholic Church in Island Pond where a mass of Christian burial will be celebrated. Full military honors will follow at the Church.

Interment will take place at a later date at Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia.

Online condolences at curtis-britch.com. Arrangements are entrusted to the care of Curtis-Britch-Converse-Rushford Funeral Home, locally family-owned and operated.


https://www.caledonianrecord.com


The pilot killed in an Essex County, Vermont, airplane crash Saturday has been identified.

Dead is Mark Biron, 60, of Brighton, Vermont, state police said Tuesday.

The Caledonian Record reported Biron was a former commander of an American Legion post. He was also secretary of the Island Pond Historical Society.

Biron's single-engine aircraft went down at about 3:45 p.m. Saturday near John H. Boylan Airport in Island Pond. A caller to E-911 reported a large fire about a football field's distance from the airport runway.

The Chief Medical Examiner's Office in Burlington conducted an autopsy Monday.

Both the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have sent investigators to Island Pond, the Northeast Kingdom community where the crash occurred.


https://www.burlingtonfreepress.com

ISLAND POND, Vt. —  Officials are investigating a fatal airplane crash.

Emergency officials were notified around 3:45 p.m. Saturday of a large fire about 100 yards from the John H. Boylan Airport runway.


Emergency crews found a small single-engine aircraft had been badly burned.


The sole occupant of the plane was found dead, Vermont State Police said.


Officials are working to confirm the individual's identity.


National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration officials are expected to be at the scene Sunday. 


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.mynbc5.com

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Location: Berlin, NH
Accident Number: GAA17CA392 
Date & Time: 07/05/2017, 1255 EDT
Registration: N6936B
Aircraft: PIPER PA22
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during the landing roll, the airplane veered to the left off the runway. He added that he applied full power and "managed to maneuver the plane out of the ground loop but started taking out runway lights" as he maneuvered the airplane back toward the runway. The airplane impacted a runway light and two taxiway signs, damaging the main landing gear. The airplane then "flew over the runway," landed, and the main landing gear collapsed.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and left wing lift struts.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Runway/taxi/approach light - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)

Landing-landing roll
Runway excursion
Attempted remediation/recovery
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Landing gear collapse

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Waiver Time Limited Special
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/06/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/13/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1239 hours (Total, all aircraft), 346 hours (Total, this make and model), 1212 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N6936B
Model/Series: PA22 150
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1957
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 22-4215
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/01/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2660 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBML, 1158 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1652 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 215°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.22 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point:  26°C / 6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: ISLAND POND, VT (5B1)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Berlin, NH (BML)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1155 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: BERLIN RGNL (BML)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1161 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5200 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  44.577500, -71.177500 (est)

Preventing Similar Accidents  

Stay Centered: Preventing Loss of Control During Landing

Loss of control during landing is one of the leading causes of general aviation accidents and is often attributed to operational issues. Although most loss of control during landing accidents do not result in serious injuries, they typically require extensive airplane repairs and may involve potential damage to nearby objects such as fences, signs, and lighting.

Often, wind plays a role in these accidents. Landing in a crosswind presents challenges for pilots of all experience levels. Other wind conditions, such as gusting wind, tailwind, variable wind, or wind shifts, can also interfere with pilots’ abilities to land the airplane and maintain directional control.

What can pilots do?

Evaluate your mental and physical fitness before each flight using the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) “I'M SAFE Checklist." Being emotionally and physically ready will help you stay alert and potentially avoid common and preventable loss of control during landing accidents.

Check wind conditions and forecasts often. Take time during every approach briefing to fully understand the wind conditions. Use simple rules of thumb to help (for example, if the wind direction is 30 degrees off the runway heading, the crosswind component will be half of the total wind velocity).

Know your limitations and those of the airplane you are flying. Stay current and practice landings on different runways and during various wind conditions. If possible, practice with a flight instructor on board who can provide useful feedback and techniques for maintaining and improving your landing procedures.

Prepare early to perform a go around if the approach is not stabilized and does not go as planned or if you do not feel comfortable with the landing. Once you are airborne and stable again, you can decide to attempt to land again, reassess your landing runway, or land at an alternate airport. Incorporate go-around procedures into your recurrent training.

During landing, stay aligned with the centerline. Any misalignment reduces the time available to react if an unexpected event such as a wind gust or a tire blowout occurs.

Do not allow the airplane to touch down in a drift or in a crab. For airplanes with tricycle landing gear, do not allow the nosewheel to touch down first.
Maintain positive control of the airplane throughout the landing and be alert for directional control difficulties immediately upon and after touchdown. A loss of directional control can lead to a nose-over or ground loop, which can cause the airplane to tip or lean enough for the wing tip to contact the ground.
Stay mentally focused throughout the landing roll and taxi. During landing, avoid distractions, such as conversations with passengers or setting radio frequencies.

Interested in More Information?

The FAA’s “Airplane Flying Handbook” (FAA-H-8083-3B), chapter 8, “Approaches and Landings,” provides guidance about how to conduct crosswind approaches and landings and discusses maximum safe crosswind velocities. The handbook can be accessed from the FAA’s website (www.faa.gov).

The FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) provides access to online training courses, seminars, and webinars as part of the FAA’s “WINGS—Pilot Proficiency Program.” This program includes targeted flight training designed to help pilots develop the knowledge and skills needed to achieve flight proficiency and to assess and mitigate the risks associated with the most common causes of accidents, including loss of directional control. The courses listed below can be accessed from the FAASTeam website (www.faasafety.gov).

Avoiding Loss of Control
Maneuvering: Approach and Landing
Normal Approach and Landing
Takeoffs, Landings, and Aircraft Control

The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Air Safety Institute offers several interactive courses, presentations, publications, and other safety resources that can be accessed from its website (www.aopa.org/asf/).

The NTSB’s Aviation Information Resources web page, www.ntsb.gov/air, provides convenient access to NTSB aviation safety products.

The NTSB presents this information to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Note that this should not be considered guidance from the regulator, nor does this supersede existing FAA Regulations (FARs).

Beechcraft G58 Baron, PH-CJX: Fatal accident occurred August 09, 2018 in Munster, Germany

NTSB Identification: CEN18WA325
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Thursday, August 09, 2018 in Munster, Germany
Aircraft: BEECH 58, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On August 9, 2018, about 1000 UTC, a Beechcraft Baron 58 airplane, Hungarian registration PH-CJX, impacted terrain under unknown circumstances near Münster, Germany. The two occupants inside the airplane sustained fatal injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the German government. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation (BFU). The National Transportation Safety Board has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the BFU investigation under the provisions of International Civil Aviation Organization Annex 13 as the State of Manufacturer of the airplane and the engine.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

BFU Germany
Bundestelle für Flugunfalluntersuchung
Hermann-Blenk-Straße 16
38108 Braunschweig
Germany
Telephone: +49 531 35 48-0
Website: http://www.bfu-web.de



Die Unglücksmaschine kam aus Lelystad in den Niederlanden. Wie Flughafensprecher Andrés Heinemann erklärte, handelt es sich bei dem Flugzeug um eine zweimotorige Beech G 58 Baron, die mit einem Piloten und einem Flugschüler besetzt war.

Beide sind nach Angaben der Bezirksregierung bei dem Unfall ums Leben gekommen. Bei den Toten handelt es sich nach Angaben der Polizei um einen 59 Jahre alten Mann aus Recklinghausen und einen 64-Jährigen aus den Niederlanden.

Die Maschine habe sogenannte Checkflüge absolviert, sagte die Sprecherin der Bezirksregierung. Bei solchen Flügen müssen Piloten regelmäßig bestimmte Manöver absolvieren, damit ihre Fluglizenz verlängert wird.

Die Maschine vom Typ Beech G58 habe mehrere Starts und Landungen am Flughafen Münster/Osnabrück für den Nachmittag geplant gehabt, sagte Andrés Heinemann. „Das ist bei uns nicht unüblich“, erklärt der FMO-Sprecher. Schon beim ersten Landeversuch kam es zum Unfall. Die Maschine rutschte hinten von der Landebahn, überschlug sich und blieb auf dem Kopf liegen. Immerhin hatte die Maschine nach dem Absturz nicht gebrannt.

Eine Lufthansa-Maschine aus München wurde zum Flughafen Paderborn/Lippstadt umgeleitet, insgesamt mussten 13 Flüge annulliert werden. Die Startbahn war noch bis in die Abendstunden gesperrt. Von 12 Uhr bis 19.30 Uhr habe die Unterbrechung des Flugbetriebs gedauert, sagte ein Sprecher des Flughafens. 

Am Nachmittag trafen am Unfallort Experten der Bundesstelle für Flugunfalluntersuchung am FMO ein. Unklar ist derzeit noch, ob es sich um einen technischen Defekt oder einen Pilotenfehler gehandelt hat. Dies wird Gegenstand der Ermittlungen sein, die die Staatsanwaltschaft Münster übernommen hat.

Die Unglücksmaschine ist eine „Beechcraft Baron BE58“,  eine zweimotoriges Privat- und Geschäftsreiseflugzeug aus den Vereinigte Staaten. Neben dem Piloten bietet sie fünf Passagieren Platz, heißt es bei Wikipedia. Seit 1961 wird das Flugzeug von Hawker Beechcraft für etwa 1,2 Millionen  US-Dollar vertrieben. Es gibt zwei Varianten: Die Baron 55 (kurzer Rumpf) und die Baron 58 (langer Rumpf). Derzeit wird ausschließlich die Baron 58 gebaut. Auch die Lufthansa setzte die Baron 55 zur Ausbildung von Nachwuchspiloten ein.

http://www.wn.de

Cessna 182A Skylane, operated by The Jumping Place Skydiving Center, N4785D: Fatal accident occurred August 25, 2018 at East Georgia Regional Airport (KSBO), Emanuel County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N4785D

Location: Swainsboro, GA
Accident Number: ERA18FA231
Date & Time: 08/25/2018, 1400 EDT
Registration: N4785D
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Injuries: 4 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Skydiving 

On August 25, 2018, about 1400 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182A, N4785D, was destroyed after a collision with terrain at East Georgia Regional Airport (SBO), Swainsboro, Georgia. The commercial pilot and three passengers were fatally injured, while one passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was operated by The Jumping Place Skydiving Center as a skydiving flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the parachute rigger, on the day of the accident there were five successful flights prior to the accident flight. The parachute rigger flew on the first and second flights of the day and stated that it was a "coaching flight" by the company owner with the pilot. The parachute rigger stated that the owner was pleased with the pilot's flying skills.

On the next three flights the parachute rigger stayed on the ground packing parachutes and attending to the jumpers that arrived. He recalled that after the fourth flight, while the pilot was refueling the airplane, he realized that the right wing fuel cap was missing. The pilot asked the parachute rigger to get in contact with the maintenance facility on the airport to see if they had an extra fuel cap. The parachute rigger told the mechanic that they were missing a fuel cap and the maintenance facility sent someone over. The parachute rigger saw the mechanic and the pilot working on the airplane, and later told the parachute rigger that they decided to use "fuel cell tape" over the fuel filler port. The flight then departed with a group of skydivers, and the parachute rigger returned to the hangar to repack parachutes. When the flight returned, the skydivers entered the hangar and prepared for the sixth flight. When the jump airplane returned the final group of skydivers boarded the airplane for departure. While in the hangar the parachute rigger saw the airplane taxi for takeoff but did not see the airplane depart. Shortly after that he saw a police car heading towards the end of runway 14. The parachute rigger exited the hangar and saw a huge fire at the end of the runway.

A witness that was in a park outside the airport watched as the airplane climbed after takeoff on the accident flight. The witness said that the airplane was about 150 ft over the runway when the engine stopped. They watched as the wings of the airplane "rocked" left and right before the airplane pitched down and collided with the ground. The airplane then burst into flames and was consumed by fire. The fire department arrived on site and rendered emergency services.

The 23-year-old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, multi engine land, and instrument airplane. On his most recent FAA first-class medical certificate application, dated August 23, 2018, he reported a total flight experience of 300 hours, including 60 hours during the last 6 months. The medical certificate indicated no restrictions.

The airplane was manufactured in 1958. It was powered by a 230-horsepower Lycoming O-470-50 engine equipped with a McCauley two-blade constant-speed propeller. The most recent 100-hour inspection was completed on August 10, 2018.

The recorded weather at SBO, at 1430, included wind from 90° at 4 kts, 10 statute miles visibility, scattered clouds at 3,900 ft, and an altimeter setting of 30.18 inches of mercury. The temperature was 31°Celisus (C) and the dew point was 21° C.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane came to rest 2,000 ft off the departure end of runway 14. The 35-ft-long wreckage path extended from the first ground scar on a magnetic heading 014° and ended at the main wreckage. The left wing came to rest on left side forward of the fuselage. The left fuel tank and left flap were consumed by the postimpact fire. The right wing came to rest upright on the right side of the fuselage. The right wing remained loosely attached by the right lift strut. The cabin and the instrument panel were consumed by the postimpact fire. All flight control surfaces were accounted for at the accident site. Flight control cables was found within the airplane and flight control continuity was established. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N4785D
Model/Series: 182 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: The Jumping Place Skydiving Center
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSBO, 327 ft msl
Observation Time: 1430 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3900 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 90°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Swainsboro, GA (SBO)
Destination: Swainsboro, GA (SBO)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal, 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  32.609167, -82.370000 (est)

 Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Justin Dereck Duff, age 39, passed away Saturday, August 25, 2018, from injuries sustained in an airplane accident in Swainsboro, Georgia.

Justin was a born in Cleveland, Tennessee, and graduated from Bradley Central High School in 1997, where he was a standout on the baseball field. He received a full scholarship to play baseball at Lee University in Cleveland and from there, he went on to attend The Morning Star School of Ministry in Charlotte, North Carolina, where he received his ministerial degree and met his wife, Monika.

Wanting to further his education, Justin began nursing school at Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte, North Carolina, transferring to the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, where he graduated with honors with his Bachelor of Science in nursing. After completing nursing school, he began working in the Neuro ICU at Forsyth Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C.

After working in nursing for several years, Justin decided to follow is life-long dream of becoming a skydiver and this is what brought him to Statesboro just over a year ago. It was this dream that led him to become a tandem instructor, a parachute rigger, an AFF instructor and to be a member of the United States Parachute Association. His work as the manager of The Jumping Place let him share his passion with others.

Justin was an avid outdoorsman, who loved adventure. In addition to being a skydiver, he was an avid rock climber, snowboarder and loved to mountain bike and hike.
Justin was a loving and devoted husband and father, who loved the Lord and lived to honor Him with his life!

Justin is survived by his wife of 11 years, Monika Anne Duff of Statesboro; children, Kian Duff, Noah Duff and Emma Duff, all of Statesboro; mother, Danette Headrick; and father and stepmother, Dereck and Jeannie Duff, all of Cleveland, Tennessee; brothers, David Duff and Judd Dawson, both of Cleveland, Tennessee; sisters, Alexcia Duff and Zoey Duff, both of Cleveland, Tennessee; Jill Wernke of Oxford, Alabama; and Melinda Dawson of Nashville, Tennessee; niece, Glorie Medina of Oxford, Alabama; and many aunts, uncles, cousins and extended family members and friends.

The family will receive friends from 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, September 1, 2018, at Statesboro New Covenant Church immediately followed by the funeral service with Pastor David McLendon officiating. Burial will follow in Eastside Cemetery.

Please visit our online memorial at www.hodgesmoore.com to sign the guestbook and share fond memories with the Duff family.  Hodges-Moore Funeral Home is in charge of funeral arrangements.




EMANUEL COUNTY, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) – The survivor of the skydiving plane crash over the weekend continues to recover.

News 12 was told Tuesday morning that William Middlebrooks' condition has been upgraded to fair from serious.

EMANUEL COUNTY, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) – At last check, investigators are telling News 12 the crash seems to have been caused by mechanical problems. But it’s still unclear what ultimately brought the small plane down

Scorched earth is all that remains at the crash site Monday as crews have cleared the wreckage. There are three categories that factor into what led to the crash – human, machine and environment.

“Human” refers to any human error that could have been made. “Machine” would mean a maintenance and mechanical problem. Finally, anything related to climate, wind or weather falls under “environment”. The federal investigation will look into all those options.

Based on beginning observations by law enforcement, the plane was trying to make an emergency landing because of engine issues. People nearby also say they heard the engine sputter.

The Coroner’s Office says they're working too.

“From our standpoint, once the individuals are identified we can then move forward from having them moved from Savannah to where they can be taken care of,” explained coroner Jeffrey Peebles.

All the passengers on the plane have been identified, but those identities have not all been matched up to a body yet.

Looking through pictures of these five men you see them hanging from airplanes and jumping from planes. Family members are commenting, saying their loved ones died doing what they loved to do.

For some, it was a hobby, and for others, it was a job they loved.

Andrew Swenson was 23-year-old from South Daytona Beach.

Justin Duff was the senior rigger and skydiving instructor at The Jumping Place skydiving center. He leaves behind a wife and three kids in Statesboro.

Chris Eldridge was a 42-year-old from Rincon, Georgia.

Alex Bahrtsevich was a longtime U.S. Army Golden Knight who skydived all the time. He's originally from Belarus.

The one person who survived the crash, William Middlebrook, is an Augusta native. He's a Hephzibah High School grad.

News 12 spoke to his childhood friend, who is shocked and grateful, that his friend survived this crash.

“I don't know what I would've done if I were to lose my best friend. I feel really sorry for the families who lost people who died in the plane crash,” said Tavon Banks.

Banks says his friend just started jumping in the past couple of years, even convincing him to try once. This was the latest of hundreds of flights for Middlebrook.

“I know it's a dangerous sport, but he loves it. I don't know what this means for him when he gets better. If he would consider jumping again.”

Middlebrook is currently in serious condition at the hospital.


http://www.wrdw.com




SWAINSBORO, GA (WFXG) -  The lone survivor in the plane crash at the East Georgia Regional Airport is in 'critical condition' at the Augusta University Medical Center's Trauma Unit. He went from 'serious condition' to 'critical' in a matter of hours on Sunday afternoon. He has been identified as William Middlebrooks, of Statesboro. He was skydiving with a class when witnesses say the engine sputtered, and the plane went down. He is one of two people identified from the crash so far. One of the victims, SSG Aliaksandr “Alex” Bahrytsevich, was identified by the U.S. Army in a Facebook post. 

FOX 54 reporter Lex Juarez spoke with Emanuel County Coroner, W. Jeffrey Peebles, who said the four victims bodies are being transferred to the crime lab for investigation. Peebles said two of the bodies are unidentifiable. At the scene of the accident, there is a small memorial set up. 

Joan Nasworthy, who was across the street during the accident, saw the whole incident. She said she knew something was wrong immediately after the plane took off. She said, "The plane was really low, and we knew he should not be flying that low." Moments later, she and her friends heard the engine sputter before watching it go down. "He jerked hard, and then it was just straight down," she added. 

Nasworthy said she believes the pilot was trying to turn around and make it back to the runway. If the plane would not have turned around, she said the outcome would have been even worse. She said, "He saved each and every one of us out here."

The National Transportation and Safety Board took the plane this afternoon, and is investigating what caused the crash. As we learn more, we will update you.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wtvm.com

SSG Aliaksandr “Alex” Bahrytsevich

A U.S. Army soldier was among four people killed when a plane carrying a group of skydivers crashed at a Georgia airport on Saturday, officials said.

The crash happened around 2 p.m. at the East Georgia Regional Airport in Swainsboro, located about 90 miles southeast of Macon, FOX54 reported.

The Emanuel County Coroner's Office told FOX5 there were five people in the plane at the time. The lone survivor was taken to a trauma center in Augusta.

The soldier who was killed was a member of U.S. Army Parachute Team, The Golden Knights, the Army announced in a Facebook post on Sunday. 

Aliaksandr "Slex" Bahrytsevich, 31, was off-duty when he died, but served most recently as a demonstrator on the Golden Knights Black Demonstration Team, the post said. He is survived by his mother, Nattallia, and father, Mikhail.

"Alex was extremely passionate about the sport of skydiving and always sought opportunities to coach and mentor other members of the team," the Army wrote. "Originally from Belarus, Alex served the US Army with distinction and pride."

The plane crashed at the end of the runway as it was taking off, according to officials.

The owner of the plane, The Jumping Place Skydiving Center, called the crash an "enormous loss" in a Facebook post.

"Today we have suffered an enormous loss. NTSB will be investigating the crash. We've lost loved ones. Please be respectful of loved ones," the company said.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Emanuel County Sheriff's Office are investigating the crash, according to FOX5.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.foxnews.com




Four people were killed when a single-engine plane crashed at an airport in Georgia, officials said.

The pilot and three of the four passengers in the Cessna 182A died when the plane, owned by The Jumping Place Skydiving Center in Statesboro, crashed at the Emanuel County Municipal, about 70 miles south of Augusta, according to Randy Love, the deputy coroner for Emanuel County.

The surviving passenger was airlifted to a trauma center, Love said. All of the passengers were wearing parachutes that had not been deployed, he said.

The Jumping Place Skydiving Center posted a statement on its Facebook page lamenting the crash.

“Today we have suffered an enormous loss,” the statement says. “ … We've lost loved ones. Please be respectful of loved ones … We've all lost parts of our family.”

The Federal Aviation Authority said the plane crashed around 2pm Saturday, just after takeoff. The agency said it will investigate the crash and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the “probable cause of the accident.” 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://abcnews.go.com




SWAINSBORO, GA (WTOC) -  Four people are dead after a small plane carrying an undisclosed number of passengers has crashed at the Swainsboro Airport on Saturday afternoon. At least one person is in the hospital in critical condition. 

Fire and emergency crews are on scene working to identify the plane and the people on board. Officials say that the plane was from a skydiving school in Statesboro. 

The wreckage sat just hundreds of yards from the Swainsboro airport runway. Macie Gay was nearby and took a picture of it taking off and eager to watch skydivers practice. Then she heard the engine sputter and stall.

"I just kept watching and it kind of floated for a minute," said Gay. "Next thing I knew it was turning left and nosediving to the ground. Then I heard a huge crash."

Emanuel County Sheriff Tyson Stephens says that five people were aboard the 1988 single-engine Cessna. 

Sheriff Stephens called it one of the worst tragedies he'd seen in this community in his nearly four decades as sheriff.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wtoc.com



SWAINSBORO, Ga. —  (WJCL) - Federal investigators will be back on the scene of a plane crash that killed four people and injured one more Saturday afternoon in Swainsboro.

The plane, a Cessna 182A took off shortly after 2 p.m., according to FAA officials before crashing not long after takeoff.

Published reports say that the plane was from The Jumping Place Skydiving Center in Statesboro. A post on the company's Facebook page Saturday said, "Today we have suffered an enormous loss. NTSB will be investigating the crash. We've lost loved ones. please be respectful of loved ones. We've all lost parts of our family."

A post earlier in the day said he company was closed for the weekend.

The identity of the victims has not been released. The FAA will investigate the crash. The NTSB will determine the cause.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wjcl.com



SWAINSBORO, GA (WFXG) -  UPDATE: Four people have died and one survivor is in critical condition after a small plane crashed at the East Georgia Regional Airport in Swainsboro.

The plane was carrying passengers for The Jumping Place Skydiving Center from Statesboro.

Fox 54 is at the airport now speaking with Emanuel County and Swainsboro officials to get more information. The NTSB will be investigating the crash. 


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wtvm.com




SWAINSBORO, GA (WTOC) -  Four people are dead after a small plane carrying an undisclosed number of passengers has crashed at the Swainsboro Airport on Saturday afternoon. At least one person is in the hospital in critical condition. 

Fire and emergency crews are on scene working to identify the plane and the people on board. Officials say that the plane was from a skydiving school in Statesboro. 

The Jumping Place Skydiving Center posted about the crash on their Facebook earlier. 

Today we have suffered an enormous loss. NTSB will be investigating the crash. We've lost loved ones. Please be respectful of loved ones.  We've all lost parts of our family.


Story and video ➤ http://www.kfvs12.com