Tuesday, September 2, 2014

New Balloon Fiesta bathrooms off-limits to public

ALBUQUERQUE (KRQE) – The city announced a big addition Tuesday to the Albuquerque’s biggest tourist destination, Balloon Fiesta Park. A new pavilion is going in with permanent bathrooms, but the public should not plan on using them during the fiesta. 

 The city says it’s hoping to start building the Sid Cutter Pilots Pavilion as early as this fall. During the Balloon Fiesta, it and its amenities will just be for pilots, their crews and volunteers.

“The tax payers own this…the tax payers will own this new pavilion but it’s actually a non-profit group of volunteers, for decades have put their time, talent and treasure in making the balloon fiesta what it is,” Mayor R.J. Berry said.

The $2.5 million pavilion will replace the big white pilot’s tent you see during fiesta, the spot where crews hold meetings.

Renderings show the new facility will be 12,000 square feet, with an indoor-outdoor connection and views of the park.

The park will also have some permanent bathrooms, a welcome addition for visitors who are forced to use port-a-potties. But the city says during Balloon Fiesta those bathrooms will be off-limits to the general public.

“For September and October, the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta has an agreement with the city of Albuquerque that they have exclusive use of the park – so they manage the park and the event at that time,” Barbara Baca, with the city of Albuquerque said.

The city says the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, the group that runs the event, also covers the cost for it so it will decide what to do with the pavilion during that time.

They also said the public will be able to use the facilities and the bathrooms, for other events, like Freedom Fourth or youth sports.

The city said the pavilion was paid for with bond money. They say construction of the new building will go out to bid in a few months.

Officials hope it will be in place by next year’s Balloon Fiesta.

Story, Video and Comments:  http://krqe.com

Carol Ann Schwarzenbach: Teen earns her private pilot license - Jacksonville, North Carolina

Carol Ann Schwarzenbach, 17, maps out her next flight plan at home in Jacksonville. Carol's years of aviation studies have paid off - she recently earned her private pilot's license.
Photo by Maria Sestito/The Daily News 



For many teenagers, getting a driver’s license is their ticket to freedom. For Carol Ann Schwarzenbach, it was getting her pilot’s license.

Schwarzenbach recently received her private pilot license, allowing her to fly nearly any single engine land airplane.

She credits her grandfather as being the motivating factor behind her success, which took two years of hard work.

When her grandfather learned that Schwarzenbach was interested in aviation, which had always been a passion of his, he offered to pay for the classes. At Tradewind Aviation, where Schwarzenbach completed part of her training, a complete private pilot training package costs around $7,000, but elsewhere it can cost a few thousand more, according to Tradewind Aviation Administrative Instructor Darrel Gilbertson. But before she could even get in the plane, Schwarzenbach had to learn some very technical and difficult material.

“I’ve gone through almost nervous breakdowns, crying because I just (could) not understand this,” said Schwarzenbach. But she said that later on, when she reviewed the material from weeks prior, what once was difficult now looked easy. The books that Schwarzenbach had to read through were lengthy, but Gilbertson said it’s all something that a high schooler should be able to eventually grasp.

“Basic freshman algebra is more difficult than the math required to do cross country flight planning,” said Gilbertson. Anyone over 16 who is willing to put in the time and money can get a private pilot license. The difficulty for students who pursue flight training comes from having to learn the material alongside regular school requirements and extra-curricular activities.

Ultimately, what got Schwarzenbach through the tough times was the support of her parents and the memory of her grandfather, who passed away during her training. She liked to remember the crazy stories he would tell her about flying, stories she doesn’t dare to repeat because they could have gotten him into trouble. Eventually, she finished ground school and was ready to start practicing flying. The first flight was absolutely terrifying.

 “I knew that I knew what I was doing, but in that moment, you start thinking about everything that could go wrong,” said Schwarzenbach. Landing, it turns out, was one of the easiest parts of the flight. The hard part of flying is learning on the ground, Schwarzenbach said. Once you take off, the material starts to make sense as you see it in action.

After 63 hours of flying, Schwarzenbach passed her Private Pilot Check Ride, the final test before receiving a private pilot license. For her next trip, she plans to take her dad flying around New Bern or Ellis Airport. And now that she can fly, traveling in familiar cities takes on a new meaning.

For the regular airline passenger, said Schwarzenbach, the destination is the highlight of the trip. But for a pilot, the flight can be as pleasant as the destination.

“We get to enjoy the scenery on the ground, and the freedom aspect of being able to take yourself from point A to point B in your own aircraft,” said Schwarzenbach. In the past, driving a route like the one from Jacksonville to Fayetteville was something Schwarzenbach dreaded. But in the air, she has a greater appreciation for hidden beauty of the area.

In the future, when she has more experience, Schwarzenbach plans on traveling outside of the state. She’d like to one day visit her siblings in Pennsylvania, Nevada and Washington.

- Source:  http://www.jdnews.com

Gear inspections 'not effective'

An aircraft accident that caused an airport shut down has led to crash investigators to call for safety checks.

Doncaster Sheffield Robin Hood airport was closed for several hours at the height of the holiday season last month after the left main landing gear of a BAE Systems Jetstream 31 plane collapsed after the aircraft landed.

With the left landing gear detached from its mounts, the aircraft slid along the runway at the Yorkshire airport and came to rest on the adjacent grass, with the single passenger and the two crew members able to get out unhurt.

In a special bulletin into the incident on the evening of August 15 2014, the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) said today that preliminary findings indicated that stress corrosion cracking at the top of the left landing gear leg had initiated the collapse.

Operated by LinksAir, the aircraft had been on a scheduled flight from Belfast City Airport.

The AAIB said that on March 8 2012, the same aircraft, then operated by airline Manx2, had suffered a failure to its right main landing gear as it landed at Isle of Man airport. None of the 12 passengers nor two crew was hurt.

The AAIB said today that its investigation into the March 2012 had led to a safety recommendation to the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) concerning the identification of cracks on landing gears fitted to Jetstream 31 aircraft.

The AAIB report added that given the similarities of last month's incident to the one in 2012 "it is evident that the inspections of, and the modifications to, the left main landing gear of G-GAVA (the LinksAir Jetstream) were not effective in preventing this accident".

Today's report recommended the AAIB check Jetstream 31s of the kind involved in last month's incident.

- Source:  http://guernseypress.com

MD/Hughes 500D, PJ Helicopters, N516PJ: Accident occurred September 02, 2014 in Willows, California

NTSB Identification: WPR14CA363 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 02, 2014 in Willows, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/27/2014
Aircraft: HUGHES 369D, registration: N516PJ
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

While in cruise flight an unsecured jacket departed the helicopter through an open window. The tail rotor drive shaft sheared as a result of the jacket's contact with the tail rotors. The pilot subsequently initiated a forced landing to an orchard where during landing, the main rotors struck and separated the tailboom. The pilot reported no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to adequately secure cargo (a jacket), which resulted in the jacket exiting the cabin compartment and colliding with the tail rotor during cruise flight.

Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Sacramento FSDO-25


PJ HELICOPTERS INC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N516PJ 

According to the Glenn County Sheriff's Office a helicopter, operated by PJ's Helicopters Inc., out of Red Bluff crash landed in a field near Willows a little after 1 p.m. Tuesday.
 

The pilot, 67-year-old Ron Chaplin, a former Butte County Sheriff's Office pilot, was on his way to pick up two PG&E workers who were scheduled to do powerline work this afternoon while rappeling from the helicopter. Chaplin suffered moderate injuries and was transported to Enloe Medical Center, he is expected to survive.

The National Transportation Safety Board has given PJ's permission to begin clearing the scene and conductuing an internal investigation, and Sheriff Jones told Action News Now that Federal Aviation Administration officials will be on scene tomorrow conducting an investigation of their own.

Stay with Action News Now for updates on this developing story.



 

WILLOWS >> A former Butte County Sheriff's Office pilot was injured today when the private helicopter he was flying crashed near Willows. 

Ron Chaplin, 67, of Willows, was flying a Hughes D50 helicopter about 1:07 p.m., when the craft came down in an orchard west of Glenn County Road D, off Highway 162, according to Glenn County authorities.

He was found outside the wreckage, conscious and alert, and was taken by helicopter to an area hospital.

His injuries were described as moderate.

Chaplin was flying for PJ Helicopters out of Red Bluff, on a contract with PG&E. He was about to pick up a crew for transport at the time of the crash, authorities at the scene said.

Chaplin flew helicopters for the BCSO for many years before retiring.

- Source:  http://www.chicoer.com


Cessna 177B Cardinal, N34880: Accident occurred September 02, 2014 in Neihart, Montana

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA362 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 02, 2014 in Neihart, MT
Aircraft: CESSNA 177B, registration: N34880
Injuries: 1 Fatal,3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 2, 2014, about 1230 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 177B, N34880, impacted terrain about 5 miles southeast of Neihart, Montana. There were four soles on board; the private pilot and two passengers were seriously injured and one passenger was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence and subsequent post impact fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from Great Falls International Airport (GTF), Great Falls, Montana at about 1200.

The pilot reported to local law enforcement that he was flying in a valley when he observed rising terrain ahead. He attempted to climb over the ridge, but the airplane wouldn't climb. The pilot turned the airplane towards the valley when the airplane struck trees and descended to the ground.

The airplane has been recovered to a secure location for further examination.


AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, THERE WERE 4 PERSONS ON BOARD, 1 WAS FATALLY INJURED, 3 SUSTAINED SERIOUS INJURIES, WRECKAGE LOCATED NEAR THE SHOWDOWN SKI AREA 25 MILES FROM GREAT FALLS, MT 

CHRISTOPHER J. WILSEY: http://registry.faa.gov/N34880 

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov




GREAT FALLS - Rachel Lukasik, the 11-year-old girl who survived the crash of a small plane near Neihart last week, continues recovering in a burn unit in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The crash claimed the life of her grandmother, Susan Majerus, and seriously injured her grandfather, 68-year-old Robert Majerus, 68. A fourth passenger, Christopher Wilsey, 55, was also injured.

John Thurston has created a Go Fund Me web page to raise money to help Rachel - known as Ladybug - and her family.

Thurston writes:

Ladybug was burned horrifically in the crash and her grandma, Sue Majerus, gave her life saving Ladybug from the wreckage. Ladybug was flown from Great Falls, Montana to Salt Lake City almost immediately as a result of the severity of her burns.

Ladybug's father is in Salt Lake at the burn center with her while she goes through the process of healing. The course of mending will take a great deal of time, time Mr. Lukasik will be away from work.

While he is away there are bills that need to be paid and because he is the sole means of income for Ladybug and her brother, Mr. Lukasik should not have the worry of losing his home or having his power disconnected after just losing his mother, Sue, and while he is caring for his daughter Ladybug while she heals.

The friends and family of the Lukasiks have come together to help during this time but they are asking the community for help as well. Donations are appreciated and will insure Mr. Lukasik and Ladybug will have a comfortable home to return to when it is time.

Click here to visit the Go Fund Me page.

Source:  http://www.kbzk.com


Susan Majerus

Sep 08, 1946 - Sep 02, 2014  


Susan Kay (Murray) Majerus, 67, of Great Falls/Monarch, died on Tuesday, September 2, 2014 in an airplane crash on Kings Hill.

A vigil service will be held at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 at Corpus Christi Catholic Church. A funeral liturgy will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 10, 2014 at Corpus Christi Catholic Church. Schnider Funeral Home is handling arrangements.

Sue was born on September 8, 1946 in Great Falls, Montana to James L. Murray and Dorothy (Lanning) Murray. She attended St. Thomas Grade School and graduated from Central Catholic High School in 1964. She married Leonard Lukasik in 1965; the marriage was later annulled.  Sue married Bob Majerus in 1992.

Sue had a ceramics business, taught classes, and won many awards for her creations. She was the manager’s secretary at the Great Falls International Airport, membership director at the Great Falls Area of Commerce and Job Service in the programs department. She wrote articles for the Consumer’s Press “Great Falls Positive” and had just started writing for the Judith Basin Press in Stanford. Sue was involved with the Monarch Neihart Historical Group in restoring the Monarch Railroad Depot and moving a caboose from Belt to Monarch. She also helped cook and advertise events at the Monarch Neihart Senior Center.

She was a devoted lifelong Catholic. Sue retired to become a full time caregiver for her grandchildren. In 2011, Sue and Bob bought a cabin near Monarch. She loved spending time in the mountains and making friends with all the people in the Belt Creek Valley.

Sue is survived by her husband, Robert Majerus; son Rodney Lukasik; siblings Mary Jo Lacher of Fairfield, Colleen Love of Fontana, CA, Michael Murray of San Jose, CA, Jackie Strosnider of Swan Lake, MT and Tim Murray of Great Falls; step-daughter Shonda (Steve) Cornell; grandchildren Rachel and Ryan; step-grandchildren Gabe, Levi and Faith; and former husband, Leonard Lukasik.

She was preceded in death by her mother, Dorothy (Lanning) Murray; father James L. Murray; sister Bettie Cornish; and two baby brothers.

She gave her life to save her granddaughter.

Memorials in Sue’s name may be made to the Rachel Lukasik Burn Account, C/O Wells Fargo, 1400 3rd St. NW, Great Falls, MT, 59404 to help her granddaughter in the Salt Lake Burn Center.


- See more at: http://www.schniderfuneralhome.com

 The Cascade County Sheriff's Office released the names of the passengers and they are all from Cascade County.

The woman who died was 67-year-old Susan Majerus.

Passengers 68-year-old Robert Majerus and 11-year-old Rachel Lukasik survived the crash along with the pilot 55-year-old Christopher Wilsey.

Rachel was flown to a Salt lake City Burn Facility and the other two were taken to Benefis Hospital.

The sheriff did not know the conditions of the survivors.

The NTSB and FAA are still investigating the crash.






  


  NBC Right Now/KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA |  



 An investigation continued Wednesday into the fatal crash of a light aircraft in the Little Belt Mountains near Showdown Ski Area on Tuesday afternoon. 

Cascade County Sheriff Bob Edwards said in a news release Wednesday that investigators from the National Transportation and Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration were on scene investigating the crash.

Four people were aboard the plane, Edwards said, three of whom survived with injuries including burns from a fire. Edwards said he didn’t know the survivors’ current condition, other then one was flown to a burn center in Salt Lake City. The remaining two survivors are hospitalized at Benefis in Great Falls.

Because not all family members had not yet been notified, Edwards declined to release the name of the deceased Wednesday afternoon.

The plane was based at the Holman Aviation facility at Great Falls International Airport, said Holman financial officer Roxann Tveter.

The single-engine Cessna Cardinal had taken off from Great Falls at about 1 p.m. Tuesday, airport authorities said previously. Minutes later, it crashed 30 miles southeast of Great Falls, at the edge of the King’s Hill Winter Recreation Area parking lot a quarter-mile off of Highway 89.

Edwards said Tuesday that it appeared at least one survivor was able to make it to the highway and flag down help. A private vehicle had met a Belt Volunteer Ambulance crew between the crash site and Great Falls.


GREAT FALLS -- One person is dead and three others were injured after a small plane went down near Kings Hill Pass in Cascade County on Tuesday afternoon. 

Cascade County Sheriff Bob Edwards confirms that one person was killed in the crash; the victim's identity has not yet been released.

The plane took off from the Great Falls International Airport at around 1 p.m. on Tuesday and crashed near the parking lot of the Silver Crest Ski Area minutes later.

According to our reporter at the scene, debris from the plane is scattered over an area roughly 100 yards long.

We're told survivors of the crash flagged down someone driving down Highway 89 and directed them to call 911 for help.

Belt Ambulance was dispatched to take some of the victims to Benefis hospital in Great Falls and a Mercy Flight helicopter was called in for additional support. The nature and extent of their injuries has not been disclosed at this point.

The National Transportation Safety Board is handling the crash investigation and an agent is on the way to the crash scene.

Great Falls International Airport director John Faulkner says the plane was a Cessna Cardinal.

We are working to determine where the plane was headed.

According to STORMTracker meteorologist Mike Rawlins, adverse weather conditions were not present at the time of the crash.

Rawlins says the plane was flying with unlimited visibility and no ceiling, meaning a layer of clouds was not present.

At the time of the crash, wind speeds near Kings Hill Pass at and near ground level were around 10-15 mph, with gusts near 30 mph.

Rawlins says wind speeds weren't unusually strong in the area at the time, even at 10,000 feet above the surface. He says top wind speeds at that altitude were near 30-40 mph.

Stay with KRTV for continuous coverage of this breaking news.


GREAT FALLS - One person is dead and three others were injured when a small plane went down near Kings Hill Pass in Cascade County on Tuesday afternoon.

Cascade County Sheriff Bob Edwards confirmed one person died in the crash.

The plane took off from the Great Falls International Airport around 1 p.m. on Tuesday and crashed near the parking lot of the Silver Crest Ski Area minutes later.

Debris from the plane is scattered over an area roughly 100 yards long.

Survivors of the crash flagged down someone driving down Highway 89 and directed them to call 911 for help.

Belt ambulance was dispatched to transport some of the victims to Benefis Hospital in Great Falls and Mercy Flight was called for additional support.

The National Transportation Safety Board is handling the crash investigation and an agent is on the way to the crash scene.

Great Falls International Airport director John Faulkner said the plane was a single-engine Cardinal Cessna.

___________________________________

GREAT FALLS - A small plane with four people on board crashed Tuesday afternoon about 30 miles southeast of Great Falls.

The crash happened at about 1:20 p.m. in the vicinity of mile marker 30 on US Highway 89.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

There was no immediate information on whether those on board the plane were seriously injured.

Check back for details as they become available.


One person was confirmed dead in a plane crash Tuesday in the Little Belts Mountains near Showdown Ski Area, after a light aircraft went down at the edge of the King's Hill Winter Recreation Area parking lot. 

It's unclear how many people were on board, but Cascade County Sheriff Bob Edwards said it appears a survivor made it to Highway 89 nearby to find help. A private vehicle had rendezvoused with a Belt Volunteer Ambulance crew between the crash site and Great Falls, he said.

John Faulkner with the Great Falls International Airport Authority said that the plane was a light single-engine Cessna Cardinal, and that it had departed from Great Falls about 1 p.m.

Airport crews thought that there were four people on board, he said. At least one person was being transported to a hospital in Salt Lake by Mercy Flight, he added.

Mercy Flight, Cascade County and several local agencies responded after the crash was reported around 1:20 p.m. Other responders included the U.S. Forest Service and Niehart Volunteer Fire Department. The crash occurred off mile marker 30 on Highway 89.

Faulkner said that investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board were en route to the scene Tuesday evening to determine the cause of the crash.


- Source:  http://www.greatfallstribune.com

 





Letter: Airport needs to be in good repair

Opinion

Published on September 02, 2014

Two days ago I had occasion to land my aircraft at the Liverpool/Southern Regional Airport, a facility listed in the Canadian Flight supplement as an active airport with instrument approaches making it accessible in adverse weather conditions. What I found was wide tarmac runway almost 1200 meters long in excellent condition suitable for corporate aircraft. But otherwise the facility appeared to be in disrepair and converted to a drag strip!

Upon making inquiries I learned that the Municipal Council of Queens had decided to abandon the facility and has declined to appropriate any funds whatsoever to maintain this part of the regional infrastructure, which undoubtedly cost millions of dollars to construct and would no doubt cost many more millions of dollars to replace. I would respectfully suggest that this is a “penny wise, pound foolish” decision if there ever was one.

Your Council website has an entire section devoted to recruiting new businesses to the county. I gather that the closing of the Bowater plant has had a devastating effect on the Liverpool economy and that the council is actively looking for another major corporation to take over the site. What company of that magnitude is going to want to settle in a community that is exactly two hours from the nearest airport in either Halifax or Yarmouth? What impression will they get when they learn that the local council has made a conscious decision to abandon a perfectly good regional airport near Liverpool.

I would urge you and the council to reconsider and at least appropriate the funds necessary to keep the tarmac runway and taxiways in good repair. As your department of public works will no doubt confirm, if tarmac is not kept in good repair by sealing cracks to prevent freeze/thaw damage, it will quickly turn to rubble and have to be replaced. At some point in the future, particularly if corporations want to use the airport, you may want to think about fixing the lighting so that it can be used at night, but, for now, please do your community a favor and preserve this important component of your infrastructure for the future. An airport may not be a magic charm, but having one will certainly set off Liverpool as a progressive community in a region which otherwise has no facilities for aviation.

Hoping that you will do this for the benefit of the County of Queens and Liverpool. I am.

Geoffrey E. Clark

Portsmouth, NH


- Source:  http://www.theadvance.ca/Opinion

Piper PA-32-300 Cherokee Six, N33411: Incident occurred August 29, 2014 near Grimes Field Airport (I74) Urbana, Ohio

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, 5 MILES FROM URBANA GRIMES AIRPORT, CLARK COUNTY, OH  

Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office: FAA Columbus FSDO-07

 
PUMPELLY THOMAS H: http://registry.faa.gov/N33411

 

 

MOOREFIELD TWP., Clark County — A plane made an emergency landing this afternoon in Moorefield Twp. shortly after takeoff from Urbana's Grimes Field airport. 

 The pilot, identified as 50-year-old Thomas Pumpelly of Dayton, called 911 on his cellphone reporting engine trouble. Pumpelly and his passenger, 78-year-old Ernest Grant of Ellijay, Ga., were not injured, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol Springfield Post.

The plane was a  Piper  PA-32-300 Cherokee Six. Pumpelly, the pilot and owner of the plane, said he was forced to land after mechanical problems stopped the engine midflight, at about 250 p.m., while en route from Champaign County to the Moraine Airport in Montgomery County. The plane landed in a soybean field near Prairie Road and County Line Road in Clark County. The plane sustained no visible damage, troopers said.

The highway patrol, in cooperation with the Federal Aviation Administration, is investigating the incident. The FAA will be investigating the cause of the engine failure and forced landing, according to troopers.

Also responding to the scene were the Moorefield Twp. Fire and EMS, Clark County Sheriff's Office and Champaign County Sheriff's Office.

FIRST TAKE

A plane made an emergency landing this afternoon in Moorefield Twp. shortly after takeoff from Urbana's Grimes Field Airport.

The pilot called 911 on his cellphone reporting engine trouble. The plane, with two middle-aged men aboard, safely set down in a soybean field around 2:50 p.m. near East County Line Road west of Prairie Road in Moorefield Twp. in Clark County.

The Piper PA-32-300 Cherokee Six was headed to Atlanta, Ga. There were no injuries.

- Source: http://www.whio.com






Cirrus SR-22, N224BR, Bobnruth Services LLC: Accident occurred August 29, 2014 in Granby, Colorado

NTSB Identification: CEN14CA469 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 29, 2014 in Granby, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/09/2014
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N224BR
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported he was not comfortable with his altitude and airspeed while landing on runway 9, so he elected to perform a go-around. When he added power for the go-around, the airplane rolled to the left. The pilot attempted to recover from the roll, but the airplane contacted an eight foot tall airport perimeter fence and a road on the north side of the runway. The airplane came to rest inverted in a field adjacent to the road. The fuselage and wings of the airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot reported the local wind was from 210 degrees at 5 knots. Precision approach indicator lights (PAPI) were installed and operating on runway 9 at the time of the accident. The fence that was contacted by the airplane was measured to be 214 feet from the edge of the runway.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: The pilot did not maintain control of the airplane during the go-around. 

The pilot reported his was not comfortable with his altitude and airspeed while landing on runway 9, so he elected to perform a go-around. When he added power for the go-around, the airplane rolled to the left. The pilot attempted to recover from the roll, but the airplane contacted an eight foot tall airport perimeter fence and a road on the north side of the runway. The airplane came to rest inverted in a field adjacent to the road. The fuselage and wings of the airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot reported the local wind was from 210 degrees at 5 knots. Precision approach indicator lights (PAPI) were installed and operating on runway 9 at the time of the accident. The fence that was contacted by the airplane was measured to be 214 feet from the edge of the runway.

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, STRUCK A FENCE AND CRASHED OFF THE AIRPORT ONTO A ROAD, GRANBY, CO

Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

 
BOBNRUTH SERVICES LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N224BR

Twisted wreckage and shaken nerves marked the aftermath of a single-engine prop plane crash at the Granby Airport on Friday, Aug. 29, between 12:30 and 12:45 p.m. 

The crash resulted in minor injuries for the two people onboard: Robert Weaver and his wife Ruth Weaver, both of Las Vegas, Nev.

Both individuals extricated themselves from the crash and were able to walk into the Middle Park Medical Center-Granby under their own power after an ambulance ride.

The crash occurred as pilot Robert Weaver was coming into the Granby Airport for a landing. Weaver approached from the west and was attempting to land on Runway No. 9.

As he made his final approach, Weaver explained, he decided to “Go-around,” aborting his initial landing attempt and circling the airfield for another approach on the runway.

In interviews with local law-enforcement investigators Weaver explained he was not able to “Go-around” because as he throttled forward the plane stalled and pulled to the left.

The 2006 Cirrus aircraft then struck the airport fence, bounced off County Road 608, just north of the airport runway, before rolling an unknown number of times and coming to rest in an empty field north of County Road 608.

Bits of the planes wreckage were strewn about the field.

Bill Hanson had recently left work at the Grand Lake Log Homes shop in the area and was traveling with his brother Brian Hanson down County Road 608 moments after the crash occurred.

The two brothers watched as Robert and Ruth climbed out of the wreckage and then helped the dazed couple up onto the County Road.

“Fuel was pouring out of the plane,” Brian Hanson said.

A press release from the Grand County Sheriff’s Office later in the day said “some leakage occurred, and the plane did sustain heavy damage.”

Robert Weaver told investigators he has 10 years of flying experience and estimated a total of about 1,000 flying hours. He has not previously landed at the Granby Airport but has experience landing at other high elevation airports.

Both Robert and Ruth were wearing full harnesses at the time of the crash.

Granby Fire Department, Grand County EMS, Granby Police, and the Grand County Sheriff Office responded.

- Source:  http://www.skyhidailynews.com




















Arab CEOs will use private jets as personal taxis, says consultancy: Private Jet Charter says 10% of Arab CEOs use private jets for leisure travel

Use of corporate jets is making a comeback globally and more particularly in the Middle East, a trend that is different from the one prevailing five years ago when most corporations had curtailed such expenditure due to the global financial crisis, says Private Jet Charter (PJC), a private jet charter consultant with offices in London, Nice, Moscow, Florida, Dubai and Jeddah.

It said nearly 10% of CEOs in the Arab world use private jets for leisure travel, compared to 30% in the United States, which demonstrates the high potential of the industry in the near future.

The trend among Arab CEOs to opt for private jets for vacations is expected to pick up further momentum, driven by the growing awareness of the benefits offered by private jets in terms of convenience, luxury, comfort, customization and costs when flying in a group.

PJC attributed the higher international use of private jet in business to the fact that most CEOs in Europe or United States are in charge of larger geographical areas than CEOs of the Middle East.

“This trend is gaining greater momentum in the Middle East because of the upgraded civil aviation infrastructure with improved services for private jets,” said Ross Kelly, Managing Director for Middle East, PJC. “We expect private jet travel to gain acceleration over the next five years as a result of an economic rebound in the region and greater interconnectivity amongst GCC countries.”

A review of Federal Aviation Administration flight records revealed that dozens of jets operated by publicly-traded corporations made over 30 percent of their trips to or from resort destinations.

“Some CEOs in other parts of the world use private planes like personal taxis and this trend is coming to the Middle East in a dramatic fashion,” Kelly said.

“In the Middle East, nearly 10 percent of trips of CEOs are personal, while the rest are of business nature,” says Kelly.

He added: “We see huge potential for the private jet industry in the Middle East, as it is increasingly becoming a vibrant destination for tourism and investment. High net worth individuals who fall in this category need to devise a more prudent travel strategy involving the use of private jets, instead of commercial flights.”

As far as safety is concerned, PJC said that since 2005 there have been no fatal accidents in the U.S. involving company-owned business jets flown by professional pilots, according to the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, a Frederick, Maryland-based trade group.


-Source: http://www.emirates247.com

Yemenia Airbus A310-300, 7O-ADJ, Flight IY-626: Fatal accident occurred June 29, 2009 in Moroni, Comoros

Courthouse News Service 
By ROBERT KAHN  


LOS ANGELES (CN) - A Yemenia Airlines crash that killed 152 of 153 people on board was caused by a plane so dilapidated it was not allowed to fly in France, part of the airline's "incompetent, unfit, inexperienced ... reckless ... notorious history of poor maintenance on an epic scale," relatives of the dead claim in court.

Lead plaintiff Mohammed Youssouf Abdallah et al. sued International Lease Finance Corp. on Friday in Federal Court. The list of plaintiffs is 33 pages long. International Lease Finance is the only defendant.

The defendant owned the Airbus A310-300 aircraft and leased it to Yemenia Airlines. It crashed on June 30, 2009, on a flight from Sana'a, Yemen to Moroni, Comoros Islands. The flight originated in Paris on a different plane, because the "accident aircraft was barred from entering French air space due to serious and long-standing maintenance deficiencies," the plaintiffs say.

The only person who survived the crash into the ocean was a 14-year-old girl, plaintiff Bahia Bakari, who was found clinging to wreckage.

The families claim that International Lease Finance knew or should have known "that Yemenia Airlines was incompetent, unfit, inexperienced and/or reckless in its operation as an air carrier as evidenced by a long and notorious history of poor maintenance on an epic scale; poor pilot training; and total lack of compliance with minimum standards of safety at every level of the company, all of which did or should have constituted default of the lease".

The lawsuit lists a slew of Yemenia air-safety violations, including a plane that "landed on the proper runway, but in the wrong direction."

"Yemenia Flight IY 749 first flew from Paris to Marseille Southern France with approximately 67 passengers onboard," the complaint states. "The flight stopped in Marseille, where it took on additional passengers, then totaling approximately 100, before continuing to Sana'a, Yemen.

"After arriving in Sana'a, the passengers were caused to deplane and board another Yemeni aircraft, the accident aircraft, an older Airbus model A310-300, registered 70-ADJ. The change of planes was required because the accident aircraft was barred from entering French air space due to serious and longstanding maintenance deficiencies. To avoid the prohibition, Yemenia Airlines brought French and other passengers out of France on an aircraft permitted to fly in French airspace, to be then transferred in Sana'a, unbeknownst to them, onto the accident aircraft, an aircraft that was barred from traveling in their home countries."

The flight crashed into the Indian Ocean 8 miles short of the airport.

"The crash of Flight IY 626 was caused by the poor training, testing, and experience of its pilots, who literally got 'lost' over waters of the Indian Ocean, flew below recommended minimums for the approach path they were attempting to follow, became overwhelmed by their situation, and failed to respond to numerous automatic warnings generated by the aircraft, including, unfortunately, a warning that the aircraft was moving too slowly for its angle of attack and about to enter an aerodynamic stall," according to the complaint.

Plaintiffs seek damages for negligence, negligent entrustment, pain and suffering, lost earnings and loss of consortium.

They are represented by David Fiol with Brent, Fiol & Pratt.


- Source:  http://www.courthousenews.com

 NTSB Identification: DCA09WA063
Accident occurred Monday, June 29, 2009 in Moroni, Comoros
Aircraft: AIRBUS A310, registration:
Injuries: 152 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On June 29, 2009, about 2251 UTC, an Airbus A310-300, 7O-ADJ, operated as Yemenia flight 626, collided with the waters of the Indian Ocean, during an approach to land at Moroni, Comoros. Of the 153 aboard, one passenger was the sole survivor and the aircraft was destroyed. The weather was reported as windy. The last departure point was Sana'a, Yemen.

The investigation is under the responsibility of the Comoros Ministry of Transport. The US NTSB has designated an Accredited Representative to support the investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All inquiries on this accident should be directed to:

Direction Générale de l’Aviation Civile et de la Météorologie
B.P. 72
Moroni
Comores

Vans RV-6A, N419B: Fatal accident occurred March 01, 2016 near Elmdale Airpark (82TS), Abilene, Taylor County, Texas and accident occurred September 01, 2014 in Marshalltown, Iowa

http://registry.faa.gov/N419B

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA114
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 01, 2016 in Abilene, TX
Aircraft: OHLGREN RV 6A, registration: N419B
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 1, 2016, about 0830 central standard time, an experimental amateur-built Ohlgren RV 6A airplane, N419B, impacted terrain during takeoff from runway 35 at the Elmdale Airpark (82TS), near Abilene, Texas. The airline transport pilot and his passenger were fatally injured. The impact with terrain destroyed the airplane. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed in area of the accident site about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on flight plan. The flight was destined for Henderson, Nevada, and was originating from 82TS at the time of the accident.

A witness at 82TS witnessed the takeoff. The witness picked the pilot and passenger up at a local hotel and brought them to 82TS. The pilot checked weather and preflighted the aircraft. According to the witness, the airplane taxied to the threshold of runway 35 and the pilot performed an engine run-up, which sounded normal. The airport windsock indicated winds from the north-northwest. After takeoff the airplane drifted slightly right (east) in a wings level climbing attitude. A turn to the west with a bank angle of more than 30 degrees began and the aircraft nose pitched up followed by an immediate nose down spin to the left. The aircraft then was out of sight due to a rise in terrain. The witness and another airport tenant drove to the site and observed that the accident airplane impacted terrain. A witness subsequently called 911.

The 63-year old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airline transport pilot certificate with a multi-engine rating. He held commercial pilot privileges for single-engine land airplanes. He held an FAA second-class medical certificate dated February 16, 2016. The medical certificate had a limitation that the pilot must have glasses available for near vision.

N419B was an amateur-built experimental airplane constructed from a Van's Aircraft Inc. RV 6A kit, which was completed in 2001 and it had its special airworthiness certificate issued on August 4, 2001. The airplane was a single engine, low-wing monoplane, configured to seat two occupants in a side-by-side seating arrangement. It employed a tricycle landing gear arrangement and was constructed primarily from aluminum alloy materials. The airplane was powered by a 180-horsepower Lycoming O-360-C1G engine with serial number L-31710-36A. The airplane was equipped with a forward opening, tip-up canopy.

The airplane was equipped with a Dynon SkyView SV-D700 display unit. According to the Dynon user's guide, the display can act as a primary flight display with synthetic vision, an engine monitoring system, and a moving map in a variety of customizable screen layouts.

At 0752, the recorded weather at the Abilene Regional Airport, near Abilene, Texas, was: Wind 340 degrees at 12 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 11 degrees C; dew point 2 degrees C; altimeter 30.10 inches of mercury.

The accident airport, 82TS, was a privately owned, private-use airport. Two runways, 18/36 and 17 /35 served the airport. Runway 17/35 was a 2,950 by 30 foot asphalt runway. The airport had 100 low lead fuel service.

The airplane came to rest upright about 189 feet and 330 degrees from the departure end of runway 36. The airplanes resting heading was about 360 degrees magnetic. The airplane's propeller and propeller flange separated from its crankshaft. The propeller was found imbedded in the ground about one foot below the surface. When removed the propeller blades exhibited chordwise abrasions and leading edge nicks. The engine mounts and engine cowling were deformed rearward and crushed consistent with the nose of the airplane impacting terrain. The leading edge of both wings exhibited aftward deformation consistent with a nose low impact with terrain. The cockpit canopy was found separated from the fuselage. The canopy's latch was found in the latched position and the latching assembly was deformed consistent with impact damage. The canopy handle was missing from its canopy handle block. The center section of the canopy handle block, which holds the canopy handle, exhibited a vertical tear where the canopy handle was housed. The empennage was attached to the fuselage and wrinkle deformation was observed at the juncture of the two. The left aileron separated from its wing.

An on-scene examination of the wreckage revealed that a liquid consistent with fuel was found in the fuel line routed to the engine driven fuel pump and in the line to the carburetor. The control stick was moved and the attached aileron and elevators moved accordingly. The rod end to the left aileron moved when the control stick was moved. The control cables at the rudder pedals were manipulated by hand and the rudder moved. Flight control continuity was established.

The right magneto was found separated from its accessory pad. Both of the engine's magnetos were removed from the wreckage and their ignition leads cut near their towers. Both magnetos were rotated by hand and sparks were observed at all ignition leads. The engine driven fuel pump sustained impact damage and its base was separated from its body. The engine driven fuel pump produced a suction when its slotted shaft was manipulated with a flat-bladed screwdriver. A liquid consistent with the smell of aviation gasoline subsequently exited the engine driven fuel pump fitting. Sparkplugs were removed. One spark plug was oil fouled and the remaining plugs exhibited a brown color consistent with normal combustion. The carburetor was removed from the intake. The carburetor's mounting base was fractured. The carburetor finger screen was removed and no debris was observed in the screen. The mixture and throttle cables were pulled in the cockpit and motion on the carburetor linkages was accordingly observed. The propeller control in the cockpit was pulled and motion on the governor linkage was accordingly observed. Engine control continuity was established.

The cover over the vacuum accessory pad was removed and a splined adapter tool was inserted in the pump drive base to turn the engine accessory gears. All cylinder rocker covers were removed. The engine produced a thumb compression at all cylinders when the adapter tool was rotated by hand. No rocker or valve movement anomalies were observed when the adapter tool was rotated. Crankshaft and camshaft continuity was established.

The Dynon display was removed from the wreckage and was retained and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board Recorder Laboratory to see if it contains recorded data in reference to the accident flight.

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Lubbock FSDO-13

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.






ABILENE, Texas -   Authorities have identified two men who died in a plane crash at Elmdale Airpark earlier this week.

Killed were pilot James Estol Hathcock, 63, of Eureka Springs, Arkansas, and passenger  Aaron T. Taylor,  33, also of Eureka Springs.

According to the Department of Public Safety, the single-engine, Vans RV-6 experimental aircraft crashed while departing from Elmdale Airpark about 8:50 a.m. Tuesday.

"After (the) plane took off, it banked  towards the west and went down near the end of the runway," a DPS news release said Thursday.

The National Transportation Safety Board is in charge of the investigation. DPS referred any additional questions to the NTSB and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Previous story:

Two people were killed in a plane crash Tuesday morning at Elmdale Airpark in Taylor County, Sheriff Ricky Bishop said.

The crash occurred about 8:50 a.m., according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The two victims aren't from Abilene or the Big Country, Bishop said.

“The aircraft exploded on impact,” FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford said, referring to preliminary reports.

According to the last time it was registered with the FAA, the plane was owned by Floyd Halderman Jr. of Eldon, Missouri. The same plane was involved in a September 2014 crash in Iowa.

Witnesses told Elmdale Airpark officials that it appeared the plane stalled during takeoff from the airport and went down on the north end of the runway.

“Preliminary information indicates a single engine Vans RV-6 Experimental aircraft with two people on board crashed … while departing from Elmdale Airpark in Abilene,” Lunsford said.

“FAA investigators are on their way, and the NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) has been notified.”

The NTSB will be in charge of the investigation, Lunsford said.

Clyde, Baird and Eula fire departments were immediately called to the scene.
















http://registry.faa.gov/N419B 


NTSB Identification: CEN14LA472
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 01, 2014 in Marshalltown, IA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/11/2015
Aircraft: OHLGREN BRENT E RV-6A, registration: N419B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot said he visually checked and verified that the right wing fuel tank was just under half full and that the left wing fuel tank was just over half full prior to takeoff. As the airplane approached the destination, about 190 nm from the departure airport, the pilot decided to conduct a practice visual approach. Shortly after turning onto final approach, the engine lost power. After employing emergency procedures, the pilot was able to restore power and climbed the airplane to 3,100 feet. He then checked the fuel gauges, which both indicated one-eighth full. The engine then lost power a second time. The pilot made a forced landing in a bean field, and the airplane nosed over. During postaccident examination, no fuel sloshing could be heard when the wings were rocked; both wing fuel caps were then removed from the inverted airplane and no fuel leaked out. The airplane was righted, and when the master switch was turned on, the left fuel gauge was one needle-width above empty and the right fuel gauge indicated empty. The integrity of the fuel tanks appeared to be intact, and no fuel leaked from the tanks. No fuel was visible in either fuel tank. No fuel was recovered when the left and right wing fuel sump drains were removed. After adding fuel, the engine was started and ran at idle power until it was shut down.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion as a result of the pilot's misjudgment of the amount of fuel onboard prior to flight.

On September 1, 2014, about 1740 central standard time, the pilot of an Ohlgren Vans RV-6A, N419B, made a forced landing in a bean field after the engine lost power 5 miles south of the Marshalltown Municipal Airport (MIW), Marshalltown, Iowa,. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, was not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot as a personal flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from Marv Skie-Lincoln County Airport (Y14), Tea, South Dakota, about 1615.

The pilot said that prior to departing Y14, he visually checked and verified that the right wing fuel tank was "just under" half full and the left wing fuel tank was "just over" half full (a half-full tank contains 19 useable gallons). En route, the pilot switched tanks "multiple times." Approaching KMIW, the pilot decided he would practice a visual approach using the RNAV (GPS) RWY 31 instrument approach procedure. Shortly after turning onto final approach at VUNDY IAF (initial approach fix), the engine lost power. After employing emergency procedures, the pilot was able to restore power and climbed to 3,100 feet. He said he checked the fuel gauges and they both indicated 1/8-full. The engine lost power a second time. The pilot made a forced landing in a bean field and the airplane nose over.

On September 2, two airworthiness inspectors and an operations inspector from the Des Moines Flight Standards District Office went to the accident site. They reported the airplane was inverted and the vertical stabilizer and rudder were crushed. The right wing outboard leading edge and tip were crushed. The nose gear was bent. The inspectors rocked the wings rocked back and forth and could not hear any fuel sloshing. Both wing fuel caps were removed and no fuel leaked out.

On September 18, 2014, FAA inspectors returned to the accident site. A recovery crew was at the site and turned the aircraft over so that it was resting on its landing gear. With the master switch on, the left fuel gage was one needle-width above empty and the right fuel gage indicated empty. There was no dead or discolored vegetation around the airplane, and the integrity of the fuel tanks appeared intact. No fuel leaked from the tanks. No fuel was visible in either fuel tank. No fuel was recovered when the left and right wing fuel sump drains were removed.

Fuel was added to the right tank and the engine was started. It ran at an idle power for about 30 seconds before being shut down.

Flight Standards District Office: FAA Des Moines FSDO-61


MARSHALL COUNTY, Iowa —A small aircraft flipped over onto its top during an emergency landing near Marshalltown Monday evening. 

The Marshall County Sheriff’s Office said 31-year-old Jason Stone was en route from Sioux Falls, South Dakota to the Marshalltown Municipal Airport when he experienced engine problems and was forced to land in a soybean field.

Officials were called to the scene around 5:45 p.m.

During the landing, mud from the field caused the front wheel and nose of the single-engine airplane to get stuck in the field. The plane then flipped over.

Stone was the only occupant of the 2001 Vans RV6A plane and was not injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to make a follow-up investigation.