Friday, May 5, 2017

Cessna 150L, N6622G; Fatal accident occurred June 27, 2016 in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan and accident occurred February 12, 2011 in Trenton, Michigan




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Belleville, Michigan 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Registered to Drake Aerial Enterprises LLC, and operated by Air America Aerial Ads: http://registry.faa.gov/N6622G

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA236 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 27, 2016 in Detroit, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N6622G
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was conducting a banner-tow flight. He reported that the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power after being airborne for at least 3 hours 9 minutes. He informed the tower controller of his emergency, released the banner, and conducted a forced landing to a nearby street. The airplane collided with a power line during the forced landing. The pilot reported that he had used a higher-than-normal engine power setting to maintain altitude throughout the accident flight.

A postaccident examination of the fuel system established that the left fuel tank was empty, that the right fuel tank contained residual fuel, and that the gascolator contained a few ounces of fuel. A subsequent test run established that there were no anomalies with the engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The operator had a policy that limited all banner-tow flights in the accident airplane to 3 hours or less to avoid fuel exhaustion. The operator also noted that environmental considerations, such as operating at a high-density altitude and/or in windy conditions, could require a higher-than-normal engine power setting and increased fuel consumption. Additionally, the operator told its pilots that banner-tow flights operating in such conditions should be reduced to between 2 hours 30 minutes and 2 hours 45 minutes. The pilot had received a verbal briefing within a month of the accident that covered the operator’s policy regarding the maximum allowable flight duration in the accident airplane while towing banners and acknowledged knowing these procedures.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s disregard of the banner-tow operator's policy regarding the maximum allowable flight duration, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

On June 27, 2016, about 2100 eastern daylight time, a Cessna model 150L single-engine airplane, N6622G, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Detroit, Michigan. The commercial pilot was not injured. An individual on the ground was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC, and operated by Air America Aerial Ads, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the banner-tow flight that departed from Coleman A. Young Municipal Airport (DET), Detroit, Michigan, about 1748.

The pilot reported that after takeoff he initially remained in the airport traffic pattern while he retrieved the banner to be towed. After retrieving the banner he proceeded to orbit the Detroit River until 2053 when he decided to return to the airport. While en route to the airport, about 2057, the engine began to run roughly. The pilot reported that he enriched the fuel mixture and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump following the loss of engine power. The engine ran for a few additional seconds before it experienced a total loss of power. The pilot informed the tower controller of his emergency, released the banner, and completed a forced landing to a nearby street. The airplane collided with a power line during the forced landing. An individual, who had been retrieving items from her parked vehicle, was seriously injured when she came in contact with the severed live power line and subsequently died, on July 6, 2016, while being treated at a local hospital.

The accident airplane was powered by a 180 horsepower Lycoming O-360-A4A engine, serial number RL-20646-36A. The engine had been installed in conformance with Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) No. SA4795SW. The airplane was also equipped with extended-range fuel tanks, installed in conformance with STC No. SA5733SW, that increased the fuel capacity to 40 gallons (37.2 gallons usable). The pilot reported that the airplane had a full fuel load when it departed on the accident flight.

According to the operator, a typical banner-tow flight in the Cessna 150 had an expected fuel consumption rate of 9.5-10.5 gallons per hour. Additionally, to avoid fuel exhaustion situations, it was company policy that all banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 be limited to 3 hours or less. However, the operator also noted that environmental considerations, such as operating at a high density altitude and/or in windy conditions, could require a higher-than-normal engine power setting and increased fuel consumption. Further, the operator told their pilots that banner-tow flights should be reduced to between 2 hours 30 minutes and 2 hours 45 minutes in those conditions that required increased fuel consumption. According to the operator, the accident pilot had received a verbal briefing, within a month of the accident, that covered the company's policy regarding the maximum allowable flight duration in the Cessna 150 airplane while towing banners.

According to the pilot's statement, the accident flight was at least 3 hours 9 minutes in duration. Additionally, the pilot reported that a higher-than-normal engine power setting had been used to maintain altitude throughout the accident flight. Further, when interviewed, the pilot acknowledged knowing the company's policy that limited banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 to 3 hours or less.

A postaccident examination was completed by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector before the wreckage was recovered from the accident site. The FAA examination of the fuel system established that the left fuel tank was empty, the right fuel tank contained residual fuel, and the gascolator contained a few ounces of fuel. A subsequent test run established that there were no anomalies with the engine that would have precluded its normal operation.

Federal regulation 14 CFR Part 91.151 stipulates that no person may begin a flight in an airplane, in day visual meteorological conditions, unless (after considering wind and forecast weather conditions) there is enough fuel to reach the intended destination, plus 30 minutes while at a normal cruising speed.

In response to the accident, in order to enhance the safety of future banner-tow operations and to ensure future compliance with regulation 91.151, the operator updated their company policy to limit banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 airplane to 2 hours 45 minutes or less. Additionally, the operator agreed to install cockpit placards, in each Cessna 150 airplane used for banner-tow operations, which will reinforce the updated company policy limiting banner-tow flights to 2 hour 45 minutes or less. Finally, the operator committed to install fuel flow/totalizers in all of their banner-tow airplanes and provide training on their proper use.







NTSB Identification: CEN16LA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 27, 2016 in Detroit, MI
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N6622G
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 27, 2016, about 2100 eastern daylight time, a Cessna model 150L single-engine airplane, N6622G, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Detroit, Michigan. The commercial pilot was not injured. An individual on the ground sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the banner-tow flight that departed from Coleman A. Young Municipal Airport (DET), Detroit, Michigan, about 1748.

The pilot reported that after takeoff he initially remained in the airport traffic pattern while he retrieved the banner to be towed. After retrieving the banner he proceeded to orbit the Detroit River until 2053 when he decided to return to the airport. While en route to the airport, about 2057, the engine began to run roughly. The pilot reported that he enriched the fuel mixture and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump following the loss of engine power. The engine ran for a few additional seconds before it experienced a total loss of power. The pilot informed the tower controller of his emergency, released the banner, and completed a forced landing to a nearby street. The airplane collided with a power line during the forced landing. An individual, who had been retrieving items from her parked vehicle, was seriously injured when she came in contact with the severed live power line.

The accident airplane was powered by a 180 horsepower Lycoming O-360-A4A engine. The engine had been installed in conformance with Supplemental Type Certificate No. SA4795SW. The airplane was also equipped with extended-range fuel tanks that increased the fuel capacity to 40 gallons (37 gallons usable). The pilot reported that the airplane had a full fuel load when it departed on the accident flight.

According to the operator, a typical banner-tow flight in the Cessna 150 had an expected fuel consumption rate of 9.5-10.5 gallons per hour. Additionally, to avoid fuel exhaustion situations, it was company policy that all banner-tow flights in the Cessna 150 be limited to 2 hours 45 minutes. According to the pilot's statement, the accident flight was at least 3 hours 9 minutes in duration. Further, the pilot reported that a higher-than-normal engine power setting had been used throughout the accident flight.

A postaccident examination was completed by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector before the wreckage was recovered from the accident site. The FAA examination of the fuel system established that the left fuel tank was empty, the right fuel tank contained residual fuel, and the gascolator contained a few ounces of fuel.



NTSB Identification: CEN11LA182
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, February 12, 2011 in Trenton, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/18/2013
Aircraft: CESSNA 150L, registration: N6622G
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot had been conducting a banner towing operation for about 55 minutes when he felt a heavy vibration and heard a “loud bang.” The airplane's engine subsequently lost power, and the pilot executed a forced landing. 

During the forced landing, the nose landing gear collapsed when it contacted "heavy snow and unimproved terrain," resulting in substantial damage to the firewall. A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that one of the connecting rods had separated from the crankshaft. Metallurgical examination determined that one of the two connecting rod bolts had failed in overstress. The second connecting rod bolt was deformed but otherwise intact; its associated nut had separated from the bolt and was undamaged. The lack of damage to one of the connecting rod nuts in conjunction with the overstress failure of the opposing bolt was consistent with a loss of installation torque on the intact nut. The engine had accumulated 2,836 hours since overhaul. The operator did not supply engine overhaul maintenance records but provided a statement indicating that the installed bolts and nuts were new at the engine cylinder's last maintenance (an engine manufacturer service bulletin instructs that connecting rod bolts and nuts be replaced any time they are removed). However, due to the lack of maintenance records and the number of hours since last overhaul, the investigation could not conclusively attribute the loss of preload torque to the overhaul operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The loss of preload torque on a connecting rod nut and bolt, which precipitated a separation of the connecting rod from the engine's crankshaft and resulted in the total loss of engine power.

On February 12, 2011, about 1150, eastern standard time, a Cessna 150L airplane, N6622G, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Trenton, Michigan, following an in-flight loss of engine power. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant on board the airplane, reported no injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Drake Aerial Enterprises, LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a banner towing flight. Visual flight rules (VFR) conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operating on a flight plan. The local flight departed from the Oakland/Troy Airport, near Troy, Michigan, about 1100, and was destined for the Grosse Ile Municipal Airport, near Grosse Ile, Michigan.

The operator's accident report stated that the pilot was flying the airplane with a banner in tow for about 55 minutes when the pilot felt a heavy vibration and heard a loud bang. The airplane "instantly" lost power and the pilot was unable to "keep the engine running." He released the banner over an area away from people and structures and performed a forced landing. During the forced landing the nose landing gear collapsed when it contacted "heavy snow and unimproved terrain." Substantial damage occurred when the collapsed nose landing gear bent the firewall.

The airplane was a 1970 Cessna 150L, serial number 15072122, was an all-metal, high-wing, semimonocoque design airplane. The airplane was powered by a Lycoming O-360-A4A, serial number L-28947-35A, installed under supplemental type certificate SA4795SW. The installation was documented on a major repair and alteration form, dated December 8, 2003. The airplane was maintained under an annual inspection program and the operator reported that the airplane’s most recent annual inspection was conducted on February 7, 2010. The airplane reportedly accumulated 8,201 hours of total time and the engine accumulated 2,836 hours since overhaul

A postaccident examination of the engine revealed that the no. four connecting rod had separated from its crankshaft. One of the two corresponding connecting rod bolts was deformed. However, the associated nut had separated from the bolt and appeared undamaged. The second connecting rod bolt was fractured near the midpoint of the shank. Metallurgical examination of the fracture surface revealed features consistent with overstress separation.

The Lycoming Service Bulletin No. 240W, Mandatory Parts Replacement at Overhaul and During Repair or Maintenance, in part, stated:

AT OVERHAUL OR UPON REMOVAL: ... Any time the following parts are removed from any Lycoming reciprocating engine, it is mandatory that the following parts be replaced regardless of their apparent condition: ... Stressed bolts and fasteners, such as: ... Connecting rod bolts and nuts

The operator indicated that the installed connecting rod bolts and nuts were new when the last maintenance was performed on this cylinder.

Robinson R44 Raven II, N141TM: Accident occurred June 17, 2016 in Chatham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA216
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 17, 2016 in Chatham, MA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R44, registration: N141TM
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot reported that, during an aerial photography flight, the helicopter was about 300 ft above a pond when it experienced an engine overspeed, followed by a loss of engine power. The pilot subsequently entered an autorotation to shallow water. 

Examination of the engine revealed that the No. 2 cylinder head rocker shaft bosses, the No. 2 intake valve upper spring, and the No. 3 intake valve spring seat were fractured, consistent with an engine overspeed. Examination of the airframe revealed that the engine cooling fan shaft had separated. Without the resistance of the fan shaft, the engine oversped, which resulted in sufficient engine damage for the engine to lose total power. The aft face of the fan shaft’s lower sheave exhibited caked-on grease, consistent with grease leaking beyond the lower forward clutch actuator bearing seal for a prolonged period of time. Metallurgical examination of the bearing revealed that its rollers were seized, and no grease was recovered, consistent with a lack of lubrication.

The helicopter manufacturer’s maintenance manual required that the entire airframe be overhauled every 2,200 hours, which would include an overhaul of the engine cooling fan driveshaft lower bearing and seal. Review of maintenance records revealed that, due to a maintenance logbook entry error (time since overhaul) that occurred about 9 years before the accident and was carried forward, the helicopter had been operated about 52 hours beyond the mandatory airframe overhaul time limit. The manual also required that the lower clutch actuator bearings be lubricated every 300 hours or 3 years, whichever occurred first. Although the failed bearing had been lubricated with grease both about 1 year and 2 years preceding the accident, there was no record indicating that the bearing had been lubricated with grease during the preceding 4 years 11 months and 685.1 hours of operation, which likely damaged or degraded the bearing and led to its failure during the accident flight.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The inadequate maintenance of the lower forward clutch actuator bearing for a prolonged period of time, which resulted in a bearing failure. Contributing to the accident was an erroneous maintenance entry, which resulted in the helicopter being operated beyond its mandatory airframe overhaul time.

 


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Boston, Massachusetts 
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Robinson Helicopter Company; Torrance, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Ryan Rotors Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N141TM 

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA216
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 17, 2016 in Chatham, MA
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R44, registration: N141TM
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 17, 2016, about 1245 eastern daylight time, a Robinson R44, N141TM, operated by Ryan Rotors, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a pond, following a total loss of engine power while maneuvering near Chatham, Massachusetts. The commercial pilot and passenger were seriously injured. The local aerial photography flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated Plymouth Municipal Airport (PYM), Plymouth, Massachusetts, about 1026.

The pilot reported that the passenger hired him so that she could take aerial photographs of real estate. The helicopter was over a saltwater pond, about 300 feet above ground level, approaching homes near the shoreline. At that time, the pilot felt a lateral shudder followed by the clutch light illuminating. The helicopter then began a violent yaw and the low oil pressure light illuminated. The pilot subsequently performed an autorotation to shallow water near the shoreline.

Review of data downloaded and plotted from a handheld GPS revealed that the helicopter proceeded along the north shore of Cape Cod after departing PYM, then transitioned to the south shore near Dennis, Massachusetts. The helicopter continued along the south shore and in the Chatham, Massachusetts area, completing many circuits, consistent with aerial photography. The last two data points recorded indicated a GPS altitude of 402 feet and 268 feet, respectively.

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the helicopter came to rest on its left side at the edge of a pond. The inspector observed substantial damage to the airframe and also noted that a rocker arm was protruding from the engine crankcase. The wreckage was examined again at a recovery facility. Examination of the engine revealed that the No. 2 and No. 3 cylinders exhibited damage consistent with engine overspeed. Specifically, the No. 2 cylinder head rocker shaft bosses were fractured and the No. 2 intake valve upper spring was fractured. The No. 3 intake valve spring seat was also fractured.

Examination of the airframe revealed that the engine cooling fan shaft had separated. Examination of the aft face of lower sheave revealed caked on grease, consistent with grease leaking beyond the lower forward clutch actuator bearing seal over a period of time. Metallurgical examination of the bearing revealed that its rollers were seized and no grease was recovered, consistent with a lack of lubrication (For more information, see Material Laboratory Factual Report in the NTSB Public Docket). The seal and bearing housing were severely damaged during the accident, which precluded determination of the exact point on the seal that was compromised.

Review of maintenance records that the helicopter's most recent 100-hour inspection was completed on April 23, 2016. At that time, the helicopter's total time airframe (TTAF) was noted as 2,192.4 hours and time since the airframe was overhauled (TSOH) was noted as 1,637.4 hours. Review of the helicopter's hour meter after the accident revealed that it had flown an additional 59.5 hours since that inspection, resulting in a TTAF of 2,251.9 and TSOH of 1,696.9 hours. Further review of the aircraft logbook revealed that a 100-hour inspection was completed on August 3, 2007, shortly after an engine overhaul. At that time, the TTAF was recorded as 559.2 hours and the TSOH was recorded as 4.2 hours; however, although the engine had been overhauled, the airframe had not been overhauled and the erroneous TSOH recording carried forward throughout the aircraft logbook. At the time of the accident, the TTAF and TSOH for the airframe were both 2,251.9 hours. The helicopter manufacturer required the airframe to be overhauled by the manufacturer every 2,200 hours, during which, the engine cooling fan driveshaft lower bearing and seal would have been overhauled.

Review of Robinson Helicopter Company Service Bulletin (SB)-42 revealed a requirement to service the lower clutch actuator bearings with grease every 300 hours or annually, whichever occurred first, to prevent failure due to lack of lubrication. The SB was superseded by an addition to the maintenance manual that required a similar procedure of every 300 hours or every 3 years, whichever occurred first. Review of the maintenance records revealed that the lower clutch actuator bearings were most recently serviced on December 17, 2015, at a TTAF of 2,095.1 hours. They were previously serviced on September 17, 2014 at a TTAF of 1,885.4 hours; however, prior to that, the last recorded servicing was on June 13, 2006 at a TTAF 559.2 hours, resulting in no recorded servicing during a period of 8 years and 1,326.2 hours of operation. Further, the maintenance manual also contained instructions to check the condition of the lower clutch actuator bearing seals at every 100-hour or annual inspection. The was no record of the failed seal having ever been replaced.




NTSB Identification: ERA16LA216
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, June 17, 2016 in Chatham, MA
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER R44, registration: N141TM
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 17, 2016, about 1245 eastern daylight time, a Robinson R44, N141TM, operated by Ryan Rotors, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a pond, following a total loss of engine power while maneuvering near Chatham, Massachusetts. The commercial pilot and passenger were seriously injured. The local aerial photography flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that originated at Plymouth Municipal Airport (PYM), Plymouth, Massachusetts, about 1200.

Two witnesses reported that the helicopter had been flying low for several minutes, just above trees over select properties. Both witnesses then heard a sputtering or lack of engine noise, followed by a landing that looked like "a controlled crash."

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the helicopter came to rest on its left side at the edge of a pond. The inspector observed substantial damage to the airframe and also noted that a rocker arm was protruding from the engine crankcase.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Beech C23 Sundowner, N3724Y: Accident occurred May 14, 2016 near Delano Municipal Airport (KDLO), Kern County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:  

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California 

http://registry.faa.gov/N3724Y



NTSB Identification: WPR16LA113 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 14, 2016 in Delano, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: BEECH C23, registration: N3724Y
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot was on a multi-leg, solo, cross-country flight. He stated that, while in cruise on the last leg of the flight, the engine began to sputter, so he switched the fuel selector from the right tank position to the left tank position.  Shortly after switching fuel tanks, the engine experienced a total loss of power and the student performed a forced landing to an orange orchard. First responders reported that there was no fuel leaking from the airplane, and no fuel was observed in the airplane’s fuel tanks.

The student stated that, before the flight, he had filled the fuel tanks to the filler tabs, which equated to 37.4 total gallons of useable fuel. Review of performance information for the airplane revealed that the airplane would have used about 35.4 gallons of fuel at the time of the accident. However, variations in wind or engine power settings may have resulted in a higher fuel consumption on the accident flight. 

In a subsequent interview, the student pilot stated that he had exhausted the fuel in the right tank and could not restart the engine before the forced landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot’s inadequate preflight and inflight fuel planning, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

On May 14, 2016, about 1100 Pacific daylight time, a Beechcraft C23 "Sundowner" airplane, N3724Y, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing, following a loss of engine power, in an orange orchard near Delano, California. The student pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was owned by a private individual and operated by the student pilot as a personal, cross-country flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight.

The student pilot stated that he departed from the Bakersfield Municipal Airport (L45), Bakersfield, California, and flew to the west side of the valley practicing maneuvers before flying to Porterville Airport (PTV), Porterville, California, for a quick stop. The pilot then departed PTV, destined to Shafter Airport – Minter Field (MIT), Shafter, California. While en route, in the vicinity of Delano, the pilot stated that the airplane engine began to sputter. He switched the fuel selector from the right tank position to the left tank position. Shortly after he switched fuel tanks, the engine lost total power and he could not get it restarted, so he initiated a forced landing to an orange orchard. During the forced landing the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. 

The pilot stated that he had filled the fuel tanks to the filler tabs, which equates to 37.4 gallons of useable fuel. Review of performance information for the make and model airplane revealed that, based on the reported fuel onboard the airplane at the beginning of the day, the airplane would have used about 35.4 gallons of fuel at the time of the accident.

First responders to the accident scene reported that there was no fuel leaking from the airplane, and no fuel was observed in the airplane fuel tanks.

In a later telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot stated that he had run the right fuel tank out of fuel and couldn't get the engine primed before the forced landing occurred.



NTSB Identification: WPR16LA113
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 14, 2016 in Delano, CA
Aircraft: BEECH C23, registration: N3724Y
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 14, 2016, about 1100 Pacific daylight time, a Beechcraft C23 "Sundowner" airplane, N3724Y, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing, following a loss of engine power, in an orange orchard near Delano, California. The student pilot sustained minor injuries. The airplane was owned by a private individual and operated by the student pilot as a personal, cross-country flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight.

In a telephone conversation with a National Transportation Safety Board investigator, the pilot stated that he departed from the Bakersfield Municipal Airport (L45), Bakersfield, California, and flew to the west side of the valley practicing maneuvers before flying to Porterville Airport (PTV), Porterville, California, for a quick stop. The pilot then departed PTV, destined to Shafter Airport – Minter Field (MIT), Shafter, California. While en route, in the vicinity of Delano, the pilot stated that he switched the fuel selector from the right tank position to the left tank position. Shortly after he switched fuel tanks, the engine lost power and he could not get it restarted, so he initiated a forced landing to an orange orchard. During the forced landing the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. The pilot estimated that he had 22 gallons of fuel per fuel tank prior to departure. 

A detailed examination of the airframe and engine are pending.

Big Panda - Antonov 2R, N2AN: Accident occurred May 06, 2016 in San Bernardino, California




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California
Confederate Air Force; Dallas, Texas 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

American Airpower Heritage Flying Museum: http://registry.faa.gov/N2AN 



NTSB Identification: WPR16LA101
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 06, 2016 in San Bernardino, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: ANTONOV AN2, registration: N2AN
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was entering the airport traffic pattern for landing during a familiarization flight. He reported that he turned on the carburetor heat, switched the fuel tank selector to the right fuel tank, and shortly thereafter, the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot attempted numerous times to restart the engine but was unsuccessful. After realizing that he would not be able to reach the runway, he decided to make a forced landing to a small field. During the landing approach, the airplane contacted a power line, nosed over, and came to rest inverted, resulting in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. 

During the postaccident examination of the airplane, about 16 ounces of water were removed from the fuel system.  Water was present in the lower gascolator, the fine fuel filter (upper gascolator), and subsequent fuel line to the carburetor inlet.  A brass screen at the carburetor inlet and 2 carburetor fuel bowl thumb screens also contained corrosion, water, and rust.  

The approved aircraft inspection checklist called for washing the carburetor and main fuel filter every 50 hours and cleaning and/or replacing the fine fuel filter every 100 hours.  The fine fuel filter is not easily accessible and not able to be drained during a preflight inspection. The mechanic who completed the most recent inspection stated that he did not drain or check the fine fuel filter. The last logbook entry that specifically stated the fuel filters were cleaned was about 4 years before the accident.  

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The mechanic’s failure to inspect the fine fuel filter gascolator as required during the most recent inspection, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel contamination.

On May 06, 2016, about 1200 Pacific daylight time, an ANTONOV AN2 airplane, N2AN, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing, following a reported loss of engine power during approach to the San Bernardino International Airport, San Bernardino, California. The airplane was owned by the American Airpower Heritage Flying Museum, and was being operated by the pilot as a familiarization flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot and sole passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the flight. The airplane departed the Cable Airport, Upland, California, about 1145. 

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot stated that the flight was a familiarization flight for a new member of their chapter of the Commemorative Air Force. The flight departed the Cable airport and flew east along the mountains, headed to San Bernardino. They contacted the San Bernardino tower and were instructed to enter the crosswind for runway 24. As part of the before landing checklist, the pilot turned on the carburetor heat and switched the fuel tank selector to the right fuel tank. Shortly thereafter, the engine lost all power. The pilot attempted numerous times to restart the engine, but was unsuccessful. 

The pilot realized that he would not be able to reach the airport, and decided to make a forced landing to a small field in a residential area. During the landing approach, the airplane contacted a power line. After touching down in the field the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted, which resulted in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. 

During the NTSB examination of the airplane, about 16 ounces of water was removed from the fuel system. Water was present in the lower gascolator, the fine fuel filter (upper gascolator), and subsequent fuel line to the carburetor inlet. A brass screen at the carburetor inlet and 2 carburetor fuel bowl thumb screens also contained corrosion, water and rust. 

The approved aircraft inspection checklist called for washing the carburetor and main fuel filter every 50 hours and cleaning and/or replacing the fine fuel filter every 100 hours. The fine fuel filter located halfway up the firewall on the left side of the aircraft is not easily accessible and not in a position to be drained prior to flight. The mechanic that completed the most recent inspection stated that he did not drain or check the fine fuel filter. The last logbook entry that specifically stated the fuel filters were cleaned was in September 2012.













NTSB Identification: WPR16LA101
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, May 06, 2016 in San Bernardino, CA
Aircraft: ANTONOV AN2, registration: N2AN
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 06, 2016, about 1200 Pacific daylight time, an ANTONOV AN2 airplane, N2AN, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing, following a reported loss of engine power during approach to the San Bernardino International Airport, San Bernardino, California. The airplane was owned by the American Airpower Heritage Flying Museum, and was being operated by the pilot as a familiarization flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot and sole passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration flight plan had been filed for the flight. The airplane departed the Cable Airport, Upland, California, about 1145. 

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the pilot stated that the flight was a familiarization flight for a new member of their chapter of the Commemorative Air Force. The flight departed the Cable airport and flew east along the mountains, headed to San Bernardino. They contacted the San Bernardino tower and were instructed to enter the crosswind for runway 24. As part of the before landing checklist, the pilot turned on the carburetor heat and switched the fuel tank selector to the right fuel tank. Shortly thereafter, the engine lost all power. The pilot attempted numerous times to restart the engine, but was unsuccessful. 

The pilot realized that he would not be able to reach the airport, and decided to make a forced landing to a small field in a residential area. During the landing approach, the airplane contacted a power line. After touching down in the field the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted, which resulted in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. 

A detailed examination of the airframe and engine are pending. 

Maule M-7-235B Super Rocket, N367FS: Accident occurred April 24, 2016 in Littleton, Halifax County, North Carolina


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina 

Cashmere Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N367FS



NTSB Identification: ERA16LA181 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 24, 2016 in Littleton, NC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: MAULE M 7-235B, registration: N367FS
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot had owned the amphibious airplane for 3 weeks, and had performed about 30 water landings in the airplane. The pilot stated that, during takeoff on the accident flight, the airplane was veering "severely" to the left; however, he continued the takeoff. The flight was unremarkable, and the pilot returned to the lake to land the airplane. Upon touchdown, the airplane veered to the left, nosed over, and came to rest inverted. The passenger stated that the airplane bounced during the landing, and a witness stated that the airplane landed "hard" on the water, bounced about 10 ft into the air, then impacted the water again. Examination of the left float skin revealed signatures consistent with overstress failure. It is likely that the pilot’s hard, bounced landing resulted in the failure of the left float skin.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing and subsequent damage to the left float.

On April 24, 2016, about 1500 eastern daylight time, an amphibious Maule M7 235-B, N367FS, was substantially damaged while attempting to land on a lake near Littleton, North Carolina. The private pilot and two passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which departed the lake around 1445. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot/owner and the flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he owned the airplane for three weeks, and had performed about 30 water landings. He performed a preflight inspection, noted the tiedown ropes were tight, but did not find any other anomalies with the airplane. During the takeoff, the pilot noticed that the airplane was veering "severely" to the left; however, he continued the takeoff. The flight was unremarkable, and the pilot returned to the lake to land the airplane. The pilot performed a "normal" landing; however, when the airplane touched down, it veered to the left, nosed over, and came to rest in the water. The pilot and passengers egressed without incident.

According to a passenger, the airplane departed the lake and it was a "smooth" flight. When they returned to the lake to land, the "rear of the floats touched [the water] followed by a small hop."

According to a witness who was on the lake at the time of the accident, the airplane approached the lake "hot" and "hit the water hard." He watched the airplane bounce about 10 feet into the air and then impact the water again. Then, the wing tip struck the water and the airplane nosed over.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was manufactured in 2005, was registered to the pilot in April 2016. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-540 series engine. According to airplane maintenance logbooks, the most recent annual inspection was completed on March 2, 2016, and at that time, the airplane had accumulated 1,090.8 hours of total time.

According to the pilot, he held a private pilot certificate for airplane single-engine land and single-engine sea. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on April 20, 2016. He reported 1,900 hours of flight experience, of which, 25 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

A postaccident examination of the airframe, by an FAA inspector, revealed that the bottom of the left float skin was partially separated along a rivet line. In addition, the left float was bent in a positive direction, about 20 degrees. The wings, rudder, and fuselage were substantially damaged in the accident sequence. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to all control surfaces and the four landing gear tires were in the retracted position.

Sections of the left float skin were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for further examination. The fracture surfaces were examined visually and exhibited a rough texture with a dull luster. No evidence was noted of corrosion on the fracture surfaces. Overall, the fracture surfaces were consistent with failure from overstress on a thin-walled structure.






NTSB Identification: ERA16LA181
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 24, 2016 in Littleton, NC
Aircraft: MAULE M 7-235B, registration: N367FS
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 24, 2016, about 1500 eastern daylight time, an amphibious Maule M7 235-B, N367FS, was substantially damaged while attempting to land on a lake near Littleton, North Carolina. The private pilot and two passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which departed the lake around 1445. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot/owner and the flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he owned the airplane for three weeks, and had performed about 30 water landings. He performed a preflight inspection, noted the tiedown ropes were tight, but did not find any other anomalies with the airplane. During the takeoff, the pilot noticed that the airplane was veering "severely" to the left; however, he continued the takeoff. The flight was unremarkable, and the pilot returned to the lake to land the airplane. The pilot performed a "normal" landing; however, when the airplane touched down, it veered to the left, nosed over, and came to rest in the water. The pilot and passengers egressed without incident.

According to a passenger, the airplane departed the lake and it was a "smooth" flight. When they returned to the lake to land, the "rear of the floats touched [the water] followed by a small hop."

According to a witness who was on the lake at the time of the accident, the airplane approached the lake "hot" and "hit the water hard." He watched the airplane bounce about 10 feet into the air and then impact the water again. Then, the wing tip struck the water and the airplane nosed over.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the airplane was manufactured in 2005, was registered to the pilot in April 2016. It was equipped with a Lycoming O-540 series engine. According to airplane maintenance logbooks, the most recent annual inspection was completed on March 2, 2016, and at that time, the airplane had accumulated 1,090.8 hours of total time.

According to the pilot, he held a private pilot certificate for airplane single-engine land and single-engine sea. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on April 20, 2016. He reported 1,900 hours of flight experience, of which, 25 hours were in the same make and model as the accident airplane.

A postaccident examination of the airframe, by an FAA inspector, revealed that the bottom of the left float skin was partially separated along a rivet line. In addition, the left float was bent in a positive direction, about 20 degrees. The wings, rudder, and fuselage were substantially damaged in the accident sequence. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to all control surfaces and the four landing gear tires were in the retracted position.

Sections of the left float skin were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for further examination. The fracture surfaces were examined visually and exhibited a rough texture with a dull luster. No evidence was noted of corrosion on the fracture surfaces. Overall, the fracture surfaces were consistent with failure from overstress on a thin-walled structure.

Bell 47G-2A, N64702: Accident occurred April 21, 2016 in Los Fresnos, Texas




Additional Participating Entity:  

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Hendrickson Flying Service Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N64702

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA161 
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Thursday, April 21, 2016 in Los Fresnos, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: BELL 47G-2A, registration: N64702
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the operator, the commercial pilot of the helicopter was performing an aerial application flight when the helicopter struck a set of power lines that ran perpendicular to the field being sprayed. The operator stated that the lines were obscured due to trees.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inability to see and avoid the power lines because of trees obscuring his view.

On April 21, 2016, about 1112 central daylight time, a Bell 47G-2A, N64702, collided with power lines, impacted terrain, and caught fire near Los Fresnos, Texas. The pilot, the sole occupant on board, was seriously injured. The helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to and operated by Hendrickson Flying Service, Inc, Rochelle, Illinois, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 as an aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight originated from Weslaco, Texas, at an undetermined time.

The following account of the accident is based up a report submitted by the operator because the pilot was seriously injured and was in the hospital: The pilot was spraying a cotton field between two sets of power lines that ran parallel to his flight path. The helicopter struck a third set of power lines that ran perpendicular to the field being sprayed. The power lines were obscured by trees. A ground fire erupted after the accident, resulting in the helicopter being destroyed.




Brantly B2B, N2266U: Accident occurred March 25, 2016 in Galena, Stone County, Missouri




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration; Kansas City, Kansas
Federal Aviation Administration;   Kansas City, Missouri
TSI; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Skyview AG Imaging LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2266U

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA135
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, March 25, 2016 in Galena, MO
Aircraft: BRANTLY B 2B, registration: N2266U
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 25, 2016, about 1730 central daylight time, a Brantly B-2B helicopter, N2266U, collided with trees and terrain following a loss of control in Galena, Missouri. The pilot received serious injuries. The helicopter was substantially damaged. The helicopter was owned and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from private property in Cape Fair, Missouri about 1715.

The pilot flew the helicopter to a restaurant located about 4 miles from the accident site, where he ate. A witness reported the pilot then started the helicopter and as it was warming up, the engine backfired. The witness reported the engine did not sound "right" to him as the helicopter took off and he thought it was going to contact the trees prior to it gaining sufficient altitude.

The pilot flew about 4 miles southeast where another witness, located across the street from the accident site, saw the helicopter. This witness stated the helicopter circled his property three times, in a clockwise direction. The second pass was about 40 to 60 ft above the trees, during which, he waved to the pilot and the pilot waved back. The helicopter looked as if it was going to land on the third pass as it was about 20 ft above the ground before it climbed out. As the helicopter climbed, the engine power sounded like it was fluctuating. He then saw the tail "dip" and the helicopter began to spin. He lost sight of the helicopter behind the trees, then heard the impact. He stated the engine of the helicopter continued to run for several minutes after the impact. This witness took several photographs of the helicopter as it circled his residence.

Another witness heard the helicopter from inside her house. She stated she went outside and saw the helicopter circle the area three times at an "unusually" low altitude. She stated the helicopter was about 20 ft above the trees in a level attitude when it started spinning to the left and descending. She also stated the engine continued to run after the impact.

The helicopter came to rest in a heavily wooded area. First responders reported the helicopter was leaking fuel when they arrived. A postaccident examination of the wreckage was conducted by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector. The tailboom was separated from the fuselage which came to rest in a nose down attitude. The red blade was separated from the mast, and the outboard sections of all three main rotor blades were fractured and separated from the inboard sections. The main rotor shaft and planet gear assembly sustained impact damage. Continuity of the rudder control system was established and all separations appeared to be overload. No anomalies were noted that would have resulted in a loss of control or loss of engine power.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. He did not hold a helicopter rating. A review of the pilot's logbook indicated he had 191.8 hours of helicopter flight time, 119.6 hours of which were logged as pilot-in-command. The pilot logged 122.6 hours in the accident make and model helicopter.

At 1850, the reported wind conditions at the Branson Airport, located 18 miles southeast of the accident site, were 110 degrees at 12 knots.

The National Transportation Safety Board was subsequently notified that the pilot passed away on June 9, 2016.