Sunday, September 18, 2016

Lions Fly-in: Le Sueur Airport praised for its continuing benefit to community

That dream of flying lured Alycia Favolise of Le Sueur to the cockpit of a 1943 Boeing Stearman, one of over 30 planes which landed at the Le Sueur Airport for the fourth annual Lions Fly-In and breakfast. 


Ray Johnson of Buffalo, who restored this 1943 Boeing Stearman biplane, exits the cockpit after landing Sunday at the Le Sueur Airport as part of the Lions Fly-In.



Bruce Hoegger of Hanover co-piloted the 1943 Boeing Stearman into the Le Sueur Airport for Sunday's Lions Fly-In.





The fourth annual Lions Fly-In at the Le Sueur Airport was treated with light winds and bright, blue skies. And a 1943 Boeing Stearman biplane.

As community residents enjoyed the pancake breakfast, along with the sights and sounds of the smaller aircraft coming and going at the Le Sueur Airport, the bright orange double-winged Stearman caught the eyes of young and old.

Pilots Ray Johnson, of Buffalo, and Bruce Hoegger, of Hanover, brought the World War II relic into the airport, hitting the tarmac from the west, into the easterly wind. And as the two taxied near the row of aircraft assembled for the fly-in, youngster Alycia Favolise was among those running to the aircraft.

As Johnson and Hoegger climbed out of the cockpit, she hopped up on the wing, gazing into the cockpit, dreaming of one day flying herself.

Le Sueur Lions Club President Bill Ingersoll says the organization's fundraising event is a good way to bring the community out to the airport on the city's south side.

But for fly-in organizers Jeff Parker, of Bloomington, and Dave Skogland, of Jordan, it's about an airport which draws them and others back to Le Sueur. Both praised the quality of the small airport and its potential.

"It's in really good shape," Skogland said. "They've put a lot of dollars into it. And it's a nice community."

Skogland used to own a hangar at the Rosemount Airport before it closed. The Le Sueur Airport surfaced as the next best alternative and it's become his flying home.

It's Parker's home airport facility, as well. He likes the location just south of the Twin Cities and "it's not really busy, but busy enough." It's an "uncontrolled airport," Skogland said. There's no airport tower, as planes navigate in visually. But on Sunday, Skogland was manning the radio control if needed.

Parker and Skogland originally contacted the Le Sueur Lions Club to get a fly-in event at the local airport. While Sunday's fly-in numbers didn't rival the first year, when 100 small planes participated, both were pleased with the morning event.

"And it's an excuse to fly," smiled Parker, who said some pilots were also getting ready to head off to another fly-in at the Hector Airport. And there's usually such an event throughout the summer and fall, he added.

Former Le Sueur resident Lowell Christiansen also praised the quality of the Le Sueur Airport and Sunday's event. And while the question sometimes surfaces as to why the community of Le Sueur might even need an airport, Christiansen didn't flinch.

"The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) wants as many smaller airports as possible," he noted, and provides substantial funding to keep them in good shape.

Christiansen also said there's an economic benefit to having a small airport available to the community, noting pilots often spend good money in town. At a recent Brainerd fly-in, Christiansen said he spent about $2,000 over the weekend.

Skogland also said the work of Scott Churchill and his maintenance crew is a great benefit to pilots and their planes should any repairs be necessary. Churchill owns and operates Scott's Helicopter Service at the Le Sueur Airport, but his mechanics also are capable of doing plane maintenance, as well, stressed Skogland.

The fly-in and breakfast, said Skogland, is a great opportunity for Le Sueur residents to be reminded of a community asset. And for youngsters to dream.

Story and photo gallery: http://www.southernminn.com

Grumman G-164A, N75EP: Accident occurred September 18th, 2016 in Chestertown, Kent County, Maryland

http://registry.faa.gov/N75EP

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA493
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 18, 2016 in Chestertown, MD
Aircraft: GRUMMAN ACFT ENG COR-SCHWEIZER G 164A, registration: N75EP

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.




CHESTERTOWN, Md. —Just a day after performing an emergency landing, a pilot suffered no major injuries Sunday when his crop duster caught fire during a failed takeoff attempt at a farm in Kent County.

Officials said the pilot, identified as Martin Stoken, 30, had safely performed the emergency landing at the farm Saturday.

On Sunday, after a mechanic worked on the plane, Stoken, of Felton, lost power shortly after take off, hitting a car trailer and a piece of farm equipment before landing upright.

Stoken got out of the plane on his own.

Fire officials said Stoken may have some possible minor injuries but did not need to go to a hospital after the incident, which was reported around 2:30 p.m. No other injuries were reported on the ground in the rural area.

When Maryland State Police arrived to the 10000 block of Flatland Road in Chestertown, the troopers found the plane fully engulfed in flames. It was significantly damaged in the fire.

The fire was put out by local fire personnel.

The farm's owners did not witness the crash.

State police notified the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board. FAA officials said they would be responding to the scene on Monday.


Source:   http://www.wbaltv.com




CHESTERTOWN, Md. — Police say a pilot suffered minor injuries when his crop dusting plane crash landed after a failed takeoff.

Maryland State Police said the pilot, 30-year-old Martin Stoken of Felton, Delaware, had performed an emergency landing Saturday at a farm field in Kent county near Chestertown.

After undergoing repairs, police say the pilot tried to take off Sunday at 2:30 p.m., but the plane lost power and hit a car trailer before landing upright.

Police say the pilot got out of the plane, which then caught fire.

The plane, a Grumman Ag Cat crop dusting plane, is owned by Delmarva Aerial Crop Service in Marydel.

Source:   https://www.washingtonpost.com





CHESTERTOWN, Md. - A pilot in Chestertown, Md., walked away with no injuries Sunday after his crop plane went down in a fiery crash. 

The single-engine aircraft went down sometime before 2:39 p.m. in the 10,000 block of Flatland Road. 

Chestertown Volunteer Engine 6 arrived on scene and immediately used firefighting foam to suppress the flames. There was no fuel spill or other hazard, and no emergency personnel or crews were injured. 

Officials worked at the scene for a little over an hour and, as per protocol, the Federal Aviation Administration was notified and will be conducting an investigation. 

Source:  http://www.fox5dc.com

Cessna 182P Skylane, registered to and operated by P & T Aerial Services LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91, N20844: Accident occurred September 17, 2016 near Chandler Municipal Airport (KCHD), Maricopa County, Arizona

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N20844

Location: Gilbert, AZ
Accident Number: WPR16FA183
Date & Time: 09/17/2016, 1918 MST
Registration: N20844
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Explosion (non-impact)
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Skydiving 

On September 17, 2016, about 1918 mountain standard time, a Cessna 182P airplane, N20844, was destroyed when it impacted a residential structure, following an inflight fire near Gilbert, Arizona. The commercial pilot was seriously injured, and the four passengers were not injured. One of the two occupants of the house sustained a minor injury. The airplane was registered to and operated by P & T Aerial Services LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local skydiving flight that departed Chandler Municipal Airport (CHD) Chandler, Arizona, about 1904.

The airplane was participating in the Gilbert's Annual Constitution Fair, a private event, which involved a night aerial pyrotechnic display and four skydivers parachuting into a predetermined drop zone. According to the pilot and the lead jumper, as the airplane arrived at the planned jump area and altitude of 5,000 ft mean sea level (msl), they were given the go-ahead to jump. The sparklers in a pyrotechnic box located on the left side of the airplane, were activated by a jumper, and shortly thereafter they heard a loud boom off to the left of the airplane, which the pilot described as an explosion. Afterwards, both the pilot and the lead jumper noticed damage to the underside of the airplane's left wing, evidenced by fuel pouring out. The lead jumper stated that there was jagged metal protruding out of a big hole about 2 ft from the pilot's left window. As the leaking fuel and the left wing became engulfed with flames, the skydivers successfully jumped out of the airplane's right-side door. The pilot stated he shut off fuel to the airplane's left tank and attempted a slip maneuver, which he thought might extinguish the fire. He initially considered landing at CHD but realized he would not make the airport, since the fire and resulting heat had worsened. The pilot then radioed a distress call and egressed and parachuted out of the airplane as it was becoming unflyable. The airplane subsequently impacted a house in a residential area about 4 miles north of CHD.

On the night of the accident, one of the airplane's co-owners, who was also the lead jumper, stated to an investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), that he thought it was possible that an issue with the pyrotechnic box had caused the puncture in the wing and resultant fire. Further, during an interview with a law enforcement officer on the night of the accident, the pilot stated that he believed there was a malfunction or premature deployment of the pyrotechnics that caused the airplane to catch fire. He further reported that there were no mechanical issues with the airplane prior to the explosion.

Radar data showed the airplane departing CHD and performing a climbing right turn towards Gilbert, Arizona. Two clockwise patterns were flown around the vicinity of the Gilbert Civic Center, where the landing zone for the skydivers was located. At 1916:44, a peak altitude of 5,725 ft mean sea level (msl) was attained, and the groundspeed indicated 96 knots. At 1917:27, the altitude began to decrease and the pilot advises air traffic control that he has an emergency situation and fire on the wings. The controller acknowledges the transmission and asks the pilot if he wants to go to Chandler. The pilot does not respond and there are no further transmissions from the pilot. The last recorded data was at 1917:55, at an altitude of 3,350 ft msl, and a groundspeed of 105 knots. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 31, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/09/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/20/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 875 hours (Total, all aircraft), 200 hours (Total, this make and model)

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane multi-engine land, single-engine land, single-engine sea, and instrument airplane ratings. He was issued a second-class airman medical certificate on October 9, 2015, without limitations/waivers. The pilot reported that he had accumulated about 875 total flight hours, with about 200 hours in the same make and model as the accident airplane. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N20844
Model/Series: 182P NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1972
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 182261251
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/23/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2950 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3458 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470 U
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 215 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The high-wing all metal airplane was manufactured in 1972. A review of the airframe logbooks revealed that the last annual inspection was accomplished on November 23, 2015, at a total airframe time of 3,458.0 hours.

During interviews with NTSB investigators, the airplane co-owner stated that the airplane was equipped with a pyrotechnic box that was mounted to the airframe step on the left side of the airplane. He stated that the pyrotechnic box would typically be operated during the night jumps for a visual effect for those observing on the ground, and that there were no previous problems with the box. He further stated that two pyrotechnic devices were installed in the box that would sparkle as the jumpers egressed. He estimated that the pyrotechnic devices to be about 8 inches long and have a diameter of about 2 ½ inches. The devices had between a 22-30 second burn duration and were activated by a switch box on the airplane's floor by one of the jumpers about 30 seconds prior to the jump.

The airplane was modified and converted for use in skydiving operations by the current owners in what they described as a standard configuration of an airplane used in the skydiving industry. A total of eight modifications were accomplished in accordance with Title 14 CFR Part 43 through the use of two Major Repair and Alteration, FAA Form 337's, both dated September 19, 2012. A separate FAA Form 337, dated January 11, 2014, located in the airworthiness history for the airplane stated, "this document is an amendment for FAA Form 337, dated 19 Sept. 2012." This form did not stipulate which previous Form 337 was being amended, however it appeared to encompass all areas contained within the previous two 337s, and referenced FAA Form 8110-3, which was not previously mentioned. It was approved by the FAA on November 5, 2014. However, a review of the airplane's maintenance logbook found no supporting documentation for a Supplemental Type Certificate, field approval, or logbook entry, for the installation of the pyrotechnic box on the factory equipped left step located on the left main landing gear spring assembly (leg).

According to the airplane's co-owner and the accident pilot, the pyrotechnic box was attached to the airplane's left main landing gear step, just prior to the accident flight. The pilot stated that the co-owner told him that the box was approved and properly tested. When he asked the co-owner about the installed box, the co-owner said that it was a sparkler box that was considered a minor alteration and did not need a field approval since it could easily be removed. The pilot stated he checked the security of the box on his preflight but did not check for its approval in the airplane's paperwork based on the co-owner's statements. The pilot stated that this was his second skydiving night flight that used pyrotechnics with the company. The co-owner stated that three bolts and nuts were used to secure the box and that the FAA was not aware of the box installation.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCHD, 1243 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1918 MST
Direction from Accident Site: 206°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  15 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.86 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 35°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Chander, AZ (CHD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Chander, AZ (CHD)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1904 MST
Type of Airspace: Class B

A review of data from the CHD automated weather observation station, located about 4 miles south of the accident site revealed that at 1918 conditions were winds variable at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear sky, temperature 35° C, dew point -1° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.86. inches of mercury. 

Airport Information

Airport: CHANDLER MUNI (CHD)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 1243 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 4 None
Aircraft Fire: In-Flight and On-Ground
Ground Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Explosion: In-Flight
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.324722, -111.780278 (est) 

Examination of the accident site by the NTSB investigator-in-charge revealed that the airplane penetrated through a roof of a single-story residential house at an elevation of about 1,247 ft msl. A postimpact fire ensued, which consumed most of the airplane and interior of the house. The airplane impacted the residence at a steep nose down attitude. All major components of the airplane were contained within the wreckage site. Most of the wreckage debris was scattered in the back half of the house and backyard. Behind the backyard fence there was an open field.

The majority of both wings were located in the backyard. The wings sustained thermal damage and substantial leading-edge compression. The engine and parts of the propeller dome were located at the point of ground impact. Due to thermal damage, flight control continuity could not be established. The instrument control panel and cabin area were mostly consumed by the postimpact fire. Following the on-scene examination, the airplane wreckage was recovered to a secure facility for further examination.

Further examination of the airplane revealed that the remnants of the interior structure of the left wing, where the fuel tank was located, showed no outward buckling or other similar damage. Portions of the upper and lower left wing skins and all of the left main fuel tank were destroyed by thermal damage.

Examination of the left main landing gear leg revealed holes with wires that ran from the pyrotechnic box along the gear leg, under the gear leg fairing, through a hole in the landing gear bulkhead, and then through a hole drilled in the cabin floor inspection plate, into the cabin. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on the pilot. Testing was negative for ethanol. The following drugs were tested for: amphetamines, opiates, marijuana, cocaine, phencyclidine, benzodiazepines, barbiturates, antidepressants, and antihistamines. Positive results for morphine and ondansetron were present. Tests were negative for the remainder of the drugs.

A review of the pilot's postaccident medical care by the NTSB's Chief Medical Officer revealed that the pilot was administered amounts of morphine for pain during his evacuation from the accident scene and ondansetron during his evaluation at the emergency department. The positive toxicology results were consistent with the medications administered to the pilot during his postaccident treatment.

Tests And Research

Several pieces of aluminum sheet metal, the mounting bracket, and remnants of a pyrotechnic device, were located on the ground near the drop zone. The aluminum metal pieces were examined by specialists in the NTSB Materials Laboratory. A complete report is contained in the public docket. The recovered aluminum metal pieces were consistent with the pyrotechnic box that was constructed with folded and riveted aluminum sheet metal, to contain two pyrotechnics devices, and attached to the airplane, on a step, on the left main landing gear leg.

Two recovered aluminum pieces of the sheet metal had circular holes in them, consistent with those used to mount the pyrotechnic box to the step on the left main landing gear leg. The top of the pyrotechnic box appeared to have a top with a long piano hinge on one side, presumably to access the box. Three recovered pieces of aluminum sheet metal had screw holes for the piano hinge distributed along their top edge.

Examination of the aluminum metal pieces revealed a high degree of fragmentation, fractures along the fold lines, outward deformation, pedaling and curling of some of the edges, and cratering from high velocity particle impact, that were consistent with an explosion that originated from the inside of the pyrotechnics box. The aluminum metal pieces were consistent with shrapnel from the explosion.

Additional Information

According to Title 14 CFR Part 105, section 105.21: "no person may conduct a parachute operation, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow a parachute operation to be conducted from that aircraft, over or into a congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or open-air assembly of persons, unless a certificate of authorization for that parachute operation has been issued."

An FAA Certificate of Authorization (COA) was approved for the night of the accident flight that authorized parachute operations at Gilbert, Arizona, between 19:00 to 20:00 by the Arizona Skyhawk Parachute Demonstration Team. The planned parachute operation listed was for one pass with four jumpers, at an altitude of 4,000 ft msl, or as authorized by ATC (higher if possible). The FAA National Aviation Events Program's website lists examples of night airborne pyrotechnic special provisions that should be included in the COA for those events conducted at night. However, there was no special provision in the approved COA for the accident night, that authorized the use of pyrotechnics by the airplane.

The authorization included a provision where the airplane owner would contact Lockheed Martin Prescott Flight Service Station (FSS) of the date, time, place, areas, altitudes, nature of activity, duration, and request a NOTAM be issued. However, a NOTAM search by the FSS failed to locate any NOTAMs issued for the accident flight and jump.

The pilot stated that he was unaware that the use of pyrotechnics during the flight was not authorized by the FAA. He further stated that he did not read the COA for the parachute jump event. The airplane's co-owner and lead jumper also stated that the four jumpers had a small pyrotechnic device that they mounted to their ankle, similar but smaller to that on the airplane, that would sparkle as they jumped.


According to Title 14 CFR Chapter 1, Subchapter A, Part 1, section 1.1, the definition of the pilot-in-command (PIC): "means the person who has the final authority and responsibility for the operation and safety of the flight." The PIC is responsible for the overall safety of the flight, including ensuring the flight is in compliance with all applicable regulations. The language of a former NTSB decision stated factors to consider when determining the extent of a PIC's responsibilities: "As a general rule, the PIC is responsible for the overall safe operation of the aircraft. However, a particular task is the responsibility of another, if the PIC has no independent obligation (e.g. based on operating procedures or manuals) or ability to ascertain the information, and if the captain has no reason to question the other's performance, then and only then will no violation be found." (FAA letter to Mr. Johnson, February 13, 1997).

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA183
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Gilbert, AZ
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N20844
Injuries: 1 Serious, 5 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2016, about 1918 Mountain standard time, a Cessna 182P, N20844, was destroyed when it impacted a residential structure, following a reported inflight fire near Gilbert, Arizona. The airplane was registered to and operated by P & T Aerial Services LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot was seriously injured and the 4 passengers sustained minor injuries. One of the two occupants of the house sustained a minor injury. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the skydiving flight. The local flight departed Chandler Municipal Airport (CHD) Chandler, Arizona, at an unknown time.

The airplane was participating in the Gilbert's annual Constitution Fair, which involved an aerial pyro technic display and four skydivers parachuting into a predetermined drop zone about 1 mile northwest from the accident site. According to one of the skydivers, as the airplane arrived at the planned jump area and altitude, about 5,000 feet, mean sea level, he heard a loud noise and noticed damage to the airplane's left wing. Shortly thereafter, the skydivers successfully jumped out of the airplane as its left wing became engulfed with flames. The pilot radioed a distress call and then egressed out of the airplane. The airplane subsequently impacted in a residential area about 4 miles from the north of CHD.

Examination of the accident site by a National Transportation Safety Board, investigator-in-charge revealed that the airplane struck through the house's roof and a post impact fire consumed a majority of the airplane and the interior of the house. 

The airplane wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.






GILBERT, AZ (KPHO/KTVK/AP) -  Radio transmissions from Saturday night indicate that the pilot of a small plane that crashed into a Gilbert home did not have much time after a fire started on the aircraft.

The pilot can be heard saying, "I'm having an emergency situation. Fire on the wing. Fire in the airplane."

The air traffic controller responded by asking if the pilot wanted to land at Chandler Municipal Airport or Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport. The pilot, later identified as Ryan Kilgore, never responded and a few seconds later a Southwest Airlines pilot can be heard saying, "That plane went down."

A fire department official said the pilot of the burning plane tried unsuccessfully to put out the fire before he bailed out, following the exit of four skydivers who were his passengers.

Gilbert Fire and Rescue Capt. Josh Ehrman said the pilot donned a parachute and jumped from the single-engine plane, landing in a field about two blocks from the Saturday evening crash.

Ehrman says the four skydivers landed as planned during a fair at a city facility about a half-mile away from the crash site.

We spoke with an experienced pilot Aron Whitesell, Director of Flight Operations at Chopperguy. He's experienced in both helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft.

Whitesell says a fire in an aircraft is extremely dangerous.

"If the cockpit is full of smoke and No. 1, he can't see. And No. 2, you end up passing out," Whitesell said. 

He says pilots are trained to know their surroundings if an emergency occurred but sometimes that's not good enough. Depending on the emergency, a pilot has to act fast.  

"You can't pull over on the side of the road like a car so a fire is always going to be your biggest concern as a pilot. A lot of time, there is no option. You do your best to avoid people as much as possible, but (there are) power lines, poles, street lights so there is not always going to be an option," Whitesell said. 

Kilgore did suffer burns to his body which leads Whitesell to speculate that he tried to stay with the aircraft as long as possible.  

We have reached out to Kilgore's family but haven't heard back.

Story, video and photo gallery:   http://www.azfamily.com

Newly obtained cell phone video shows a plane crashing into a Phoenix area home.

In the video the plane appears as a bright dot streaking towards the ground.

The small plane crashed into a Gilbert home Saturday night.

Two people were inside the home at the time of the crash. Neither was injured

Five people were inside the plane, but officials say that since all five of them are skydivers they were able to parachute to safety.

The pilot was the last one to jump out. He landed in a field about a mile from the crash site.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are now investigating what caused the crash.

The pilot did receive burn injuries.


Story and video:   http://www.kvoa.com

Ryan Kilgore
~

Ryan Kilgore Recovery Fund: https://www.gofundme.com




Help Peter and Sharon with damages: https://www.gofundme.com



GILBERT, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) -  An investigation was underway Sunday after a small plane crashed into a house in Gilbert. Miraculously, everyone survived.

Workers began removing wreckage from the home.

A posting to a gofundme account identified the pilot as Ryan Kilgore.

"I started the fundraising page because I have no idea what the medical expenses will be for Ryan's recovery and care, not to mention the emotional trauma of enduring a plane crash," his brother, Colton, wrote. 

"The initial expenses I anticipate are travel costs for our parents to fly to Arizona to be with him tomorrow (Monday), as well as potential loss of work as a result of this incident, and medical costs will follow," his brother stated.

He set a goal of raising $25,000. As of 12:15 p.m. Sunday, more than $4,300 had been pledged.

Daylight revealed the extent of damage. The back wall of the home was almost gone.

Half of the plane made it into the home and the other half was in the backyard.

A gofundme account was also set by neighbors for the couple whose home was ruined by the crash.

The crash happened just after 7 p.m. Saturday near Lindsey and Ray roads.

A neighbor was outside working and could tell something wasn't right.

Abdul Khan is an aircraft mechanic. The loud noise he heard from the plane told him something was terribly wrong.

“This one started coming down like a big ball,” Khan said. “It went flat for a little bit and then started nose-diving. It was so close we thought it was going to come into our house. When it came down, it made a big noise.”

Khan said when he got to the scene, the house was on fire.

The pilot and all four skydivers aboard the single-engine aircraft were able to parachute out of the plane safely.

That plane then struck the roof of a home, causing a huge fire.[

We are told a man and woman were inside at home when the plane hit. Amazingly, they were able to make it out of the house safely and were not injured.

The pilot suffered minor burns and he's being treated at a local hospital.

Shortly after the crash, viewers started contacting us, reporting hearing a loud explosion and seeing a fireball falling from the sky.

By 9:30, Gilbert fire officials said they had the fire under control and were working to put out hot spots.

Gilbert police tweeted that the small plane was carrying skydivers for an annual Constitution Fair event.

"Please keep Ryan in your prayers, for physical and emotional healing, and joining us in thanking God for protecting his life," Colton Kilgore wrote on the gofundme page.

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.wsfa.com



GILBERT, AZ (KPHO/KTVK) - An investigation was underway Sunday after a small plane crashed into a house in Gilbert. Miraculously, everyone survived.

A posting to a gofundme account identified the pilot as Ryan Kilgore.

"I started the fundraising page because I have no idea what the medical expenses will be for Ryan's recovery and care, not to mention the emotional trauma of enduring a plane crash," his brother, Colton, wrote. 

"The initial expenses I anticipate are travel costs for our parents to fly to Arizona to be with him tomorrow (Monday), as well as potential loss of work as a result of this incident, and medical costs will follow," his brother stated.

He set a goal of raising $25,000. As of 12:15 p.m. Sunday, more than $4,300 had been pledged.

Daylight revealed the extent of damage. The back wall of the home was almost gone.

Half of the plane made it into the home and the other half was in the backyard.

The crash happened just after 7 p.m. Saturday near Lindsey and Ray roads.

A neighbor was outside working and could tell something wasn't right.

Abdul Khan is an aircraft mechanic. The loud noise he heard from the plane told him something was terribly wrong.

“This one started coming down like a big ball,” Khan said. “It went flat for a little bit and then started nose-diving. It was so close we thought it was going to come into our house. When it came down, it made a big noise.”

Khan said when he got to the scene, the house was on fire.

The pilot and all four skydivers aboard the single-engine aircraft were able to parachute out of the plane safely.

That plane then struck the roof of a home, causing a huge fire.

We are told a man and woman were inside at home when the plane hit. Amazingly, they were able to make it out of the house safely and were not injured.

The pilot suffered minor burns and he's being treated at a local hospital.

Shortly after the crash, viewers started contacting us, reporting hearing a loud explosion and seeing a fireball falling from the sky.

By 9:30, Gilbert fire officials said they had the fire under control and were working to put out hot spots.

Gilbert police tweeted that the small plane was carrying skydivers for an annual Constitution Fair event.

"Please keep Ryan in your prayers, for physical and emotional healing, and joining us in thanking God for protecting his life," Colton Kilgore wrote on the gofundme page.

Story, video and photo gallery:   http://www.azfamily.com

Aviation show offers something for everyone: Second annual event features diverse mix of flying contraptions



Flying machines of all kinds were on display Saturday at Durango-La Plata County Airport as part of the second annual Aviation Celebration.

The eclectic makeup included drones, private planes, military aircraft and experimental craft, including ultra-light planes. There also were fast cars, flight demonstrations, heavy equipment for airport operations, live music, and food and drink.

The featured attraction of the day was the U.S. Army Golden Knights Parachute Jump Team, which performed areal tricks from 7,000 feet before landing safely on the ground. The group, which made two jumps Saturday, did it from a CH-47 Chinook helicopter rather than its usual fixed-wing plane because of an air-intake problem with the plane.

Aircraft serve many purposes – including recreational enjoyment, transportation for commuters, saving people from the high country and fighting wars – and the Aviation Celebration did a good job of showcasing all of those facets, said Mancos resident Chris Roach, who is a volunteer with the Civil Air Patrol.

“It’s a good representation of the breadth of the purpose-driven aircraft,” he said.

For spectators, it was a chance to get up close and personal with equipment and an industry that most people aren’t used to being around, he said. The event was held south of the airport terminal on the tarmac, an area that is usually off limits to the public.

Some of the flying contraptions stoked awe and curiosity; Roach said he is always mesmerized by the Chinook helicopter, which has two rotors.

“It looks like a rock with egg beaters,” he said, adding, “I’ve always been suspicious of things that fly backwards and sideways.”

Southwest Colorado is ideal for aviation in some respects but not so much in others. For example, the flying weather tends to be favorable, Roach said, but pilots should be certified for mountain flying, where the air is thin and wind direction can be erratic.

For Durango resident Frank Valen, it was his second year to attend the Aviation Celebration. Last year seemed to have more aircraft, he said, including an F-16 fighter jet, but it didn’t have the Army Golden Knights. (An F/A-18 Hornet happened to land at the airport during the event, but it didn’t appear to be involved with the celebration.)

He said it’s a nice end-of-summer event and a way to enjoy the outdoors and see equipment that most people will never get to see up close. He was there with his grandkids, Gabe Wyne, 10, Chris Wyne, 7, and Alex Wyne, 6.

“The kids love the emergency vehicles,” he said.

He hopes the event will continue and grow.

“This thing could be ridiculously huge if promoted a little more,” Valen said. “Whatever this community wanted to make of it, they could.”

Army Sgt. First Class Kevin Presgraves, who completed two parachute jumps Saturday, compared Durango’s fledging aviation show to his favorite hometown ma and pop diner. Sometimes, it’s just what the heart needs.

“I absolutely love this,” he said after signing an autograph for a boy. “We love the small shows. I love all the shows, but I really love the ma and pop shows.”

Story and video:  http://www.durangoherald.com

Discovered Cessna aircraft had false US markings



A Cessna aircraft discovered hidden near a Region Nine airstrip had false registration markings, a top Government official said yesterday.

The aircraft was discovered Wednesday morning after security forces received a tip-off the previous day.

A team of officials, including army and police ranks, has since taken possession of the aircraft located near the Yupukari airstrip.

Yesterday, Minister of State, Joseph Harmon, during the post-Cabinet press briefings, disclosed that the registration on the Cessna plane, N767Z, appeared to be false.

This was verified by aviation investigators who confirmed that there is an aircraft currently flying in the US that bore the same registration, Harmon disclosed.

According to the Minister, the aircraft was found partly hidden in bushes, and covered in a camouflage net.

Subsequently, a team comprising officials from the Guyana Defence Force (GDF), Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA), Customs Anti-Narcotics Unit (CANU) and the Guyana Police Force (GPF), immediately began an investigation.

Harmon noted that the area is one that is heavily patrolled by security forces. The ranks have an excellent relationship with the communities in that area, he said.

Region Nine borders Brazil with mining, cattle rearing and farming taking place there.

The Minister added that Yupukari and its surrounding areas have had regular and constant surveillance.

Hinting that there is a suspicion that the plane is involved in the drug trade, the Minister disclosed that another airstrip not very far from Yupukari is a favourite for operators.

Investigators are now trying to determine if the plane had cargo and what exactly it was fetching, if anything.

According to Harmon, the plane could not have been there long as the area is heavily patrolled.

Source: http://www.kaieteurnewsonline.com


Members of the Guyana Defence Force (GDF), the Guyana Police Force’s Criminal Investigations Department (CID), the Customs Anti-Narcotics Unit (CANU), the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) and other related agencies, over the past two days conducted an assessment of the twin-engine Cessna Aircraft, which was discovered at Yupukari, Upper Takutu- Upper Essequibo (Region Nine).

The team is busy gathering evidence that will assist investigators in uncovering the circumstances under which the aircraft came to be abandoned at the location.

Yesterday morning, a team including Head of CANU, James Singh, and GCAA officials, ventured into the area to further assess the aircraft for damage and capabilities in order to make recommendations on what should be done with it.

Additionally, the CANU team is seeking to determine whether the aircraft may have any links to the narcotics trade, the Ministry of the Presidency said yesterday.

During a search of the aircraft, several pieces of communication equipment were discovered. These have been secured to be further examined for any potential leads.

The ministry said that the police and army are speaking with nearby residents in the hope of turning up leads in the case and this has resulted in a number of them sharing information they deemed as ‘suspicious activity’, such as the presence of motorcycles frequently at midnight in the area. They also reported that the abandoned aircraft has previously been sighted circling the area on numerous occasions in the past.

The plane, bearing registration number N767Z, was first brought to the attention of officials on Tuesday by a resident of the area. The following day, Wednesday, a joint army and police patrol, that included CANU, was dispatched to the location to conduct a full investigation.

Minister of State, Joseph Harmon, in an invited comment, said that while the Government is yet to receive a full report on what would have transpired over the last few days, President David Granger and the entire Government are committed to ensuring that a full investigation into the matter is completed.

The Minister noted that reports received from residents near the area where the aircraft was discovered have raised serious concerns for those involved in the investigation.

Source: http://www.kaieteurnewsonline.com



Guyanese authorities say the illegal aircraft that was found at Yupukari, Rupununi Region last week had been frequenting the area and that communication equipment found aboard is being analyzed.

“During a search of the aircraft, several pieces of communication equipment were discovered. These have been secured to be further examined for any potential leads,” the Ministry of the Presidency said in a statement.

The Ministry of the Presidency did not say specifically whether any traces of drugs or illegal weapons were found aboard the twin-engine Cessna plane.

However, law enforcement agents were able to ascertain that the plane had been often seen in that region and motorcycles could have been heard late at night. “The Police and Army are speaking with nearby residents in the hopes of turning up leads in the case and this has resulted in a number of them sharing information they deemed as ‘suspicious activity’, such as the presence of motorcycles frequently at midnight in the area. They also reported that the abandoned aircraft has previously been sighted circling the area on numerous occasions in the past,” the government said in a statement.

Agents of the Customs Anti-Narcotics Unit (CANU) including its Head, James Singh, have already visited the plane that was found hidden under a canopy of vegetation just off a makeshift airstrip. “The CANU team is seeking to determine whether the aircraft may have any links to the narcotics trade.”

Officials of the Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) have also ventured into the area to further assess the aircraft for damages and capabilities in order to make recommendations on what should be done with it. 

Authorities said that the plane, which was draped in a camouflage cover, had been awaiting repairs when a patrol discovered it.

The plane, bearing registration number N767Z, was first brought to the attention of officials on Tuesday by a resident of the area.  The following day, Wednesday, September 14, a Joint Army and Police team, inclusive of CANU, were dispatched to the location to conduct a full investigation. That registration subsequently turned out to be fake.

Demerara Waves Online News has, however, been informed by usually reliable sources that at least one law enforcement agency had known of the plane’s presence there at least three weeks ago and had been staking out the area for the aviation technicians and other persons to return so that they could have been arrested.

Source:  http://demerarawaves.com

American Airlines to offer Burlington to New York flights

American Airlines will offer a direct flight from Burlington to New York's LaGuardia Airport beginning on Dec. 15, giving competition to Delta Air Lines, currently the only airline offering that flight.

"It opens up a choice," Airport Director Gene Richards said Wednesday. "I would encourage people to shop and be a good consumer."

An economy flight on Delta to LaGuardia on Dec. 15, returning Dec. 19, was as low as $252 round trip on Wednesday. The lowest roundtrip cost on American Airlines for the same dates was $307. Richards believes the competition between the two airlines will likely drive the price down for the LaGuardia flight.

"Delta is going to want to keep that route for itself," Richards said. "American is saying, 'We want a piece of it.'"

Richards said there was more news from American Airlines: a second daily flight to Charlotte, North Carolina. Richards expects the flight to be popular, as Charlotte is a destination of choice for Vermonters moving south, or simply vacationing. Richards said many ex-IBM employees ended up moving to North Carolina to work in that state's large technology sector.

"It's happening down there," Richards said. "A lot of people migrate from the Vermont area."

Another advantage of the second Charlotte flight is that it will leave at 8 a.m. and arrive at 10:30 a.m., making connections to anywhere else easier. Charlotte is American Airline's largest hub in the nation, Richards said. For those returning the same day, they can be back in Burlington by 8 p.m.

Richards said the Charlotte flight load is around 92 percent, "which is just amazing."

Burlington International Airport is currently served by six airlines — Allegiant, American, Delta, Jet Blue, Porter and United  — which among them offer nonstop service to Charlotte, Chicago, Detroit, Newark, LaGuardia and JFK airports in New York, Orlando, Philadelphia, Toronto, and Dulles and National airports in Washington, D.C.

"That's amazing service for a community our size," Richards said. "As I tell people, you can get anywhere in the world today."

Read more here: http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com

Green Valley man reached back 100 years to make history

Jim Otey glides through the air in a 1909 Curtiss Pusher replica biplane at Lewiston-Nez Perce County Regional Airport in 2010 to celebrate the centennial of the first flight in Idaho history.



If you venture north to the Pima Air and Space Museum you'll find hangars full of aviation history.

You'll also find people who have played a role in that history, like 76-year-old Green Valley resident Jim Otey.

He first took to the skies as a teenager in Washington state and bought his first plane at 18. He was drafted into the Army not long after, and served from 1962-65, conducting surveillance flights over West Germany aboard a Grumman OV-1 Mohawk.

The Auburn, Wash., native returned home, taking a job with Boeing in Seattle, where he worked for more than three decades. He spent the majority of his career as a test pilot, including for the Boeing 777, which he flew all over the world before taking early retirement in 1999, at 58.

Two years ago, he and his wife, Inge, moved to Green Valley, and he has been a docent at Pima Air since.

Love of aviation

He continued tinkering with airplane development after moving to Lewiston, Idaho in 2000, joining the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 328, a group of aviation enthusiasts who met at the town's airport.

Otey met fellow plane buff Dean Wilson through the organization, and the two soon got to work on their magnum opus — a full-size, functional replica of the iconic 1909 Herring-Curtiss Pusher Model D biplane that made history on Oct. 13, 1910, when it was the first airplane to fly in Idaho and Washington.

The idea behind recreating the historic plane was hatched after a friend who was helping his sister move across the state line in Clarkston, Wash., stumbled upon a partial set of plans for the aircraft.

He contacted Otey and asked if he wanted it as a decoration. But Otey and Wilson had a more ambitious idea.

"I spoke to (Dean), and asked him if he thought this was a doable project," Otey recalls. "Dean thought it was too big of a project at first, but I thought we might as well take a look."

They contacted the Glenn H. Curtiss Museum in New York, which sold him a full copy of the plans for $25, and the two got to work.

With help from fellow members of their EAA chapter, they spent the better part of two-and-a-half years, $20,000 and close to 2,000 hours building the plane with a goal of flying it from Lewiston's airport on Aug. 13, 2010, 100 years after its original flight.

It was an ordeal, requiring 128 one-eighth-inch cable wires and thousands of parts to hold the plane's bamboo frame and sailplane cloth covers intact.

Otey and Wilson barnstormed their way around the area to raise money and managed to cover the cost of the project.

"Without Dean's skill and my fundraising ability this would have never happened," Otey says.

But the first obstacle they encountered happened long before their replica took to the blue skies of Idaho.

"It turned out that where the original flight had taken place, there was a Walmart store there now," Otey says. "So we actually tried to get Walmart to close down the parking lot early in the morning and we'd take off from there and make the exact same flight. They would hear nothing of it."

They also got by with a little luck, like getting a Cessna 150 engine for $10,000 from a friend after his experimental plane failed to fly properly.

The two had more good fortune when a retired CEO of a local bullet manufacturer improvised a way to make the turnbuckles they'd need to keep all those wires in place out of motorcycle spokes — far cheaper than the store-bought version, which were $28 apiece.

Going up

The next obstacle was getting the plane approved for flight by the Federal Aviation Administration, which wanted them to test out all of the plane's wires and turnbuckles before takeoff.

"We had to test them to two times the expected tension that the airplane would experience in flight," Otey says. "We passed the test."

Otey and Wilson flew several test flights totaling 12 hours before the big day, making sure the plane could make it.

Otey said the event itself was something he'll never forget.

"It was a citywide celebration," he says. "I was flying at about 50 feet in the air, and part of that got on national TV. It was pretty neat."

He said whizzing through the air at 50 mph in the open-air biplane in front of thousands of spectators was thrilling.

"It's kind of a motorcycle with no windshield," Otey says. "The engine is behind you, and it doesn't have a muffler, so it's real loud some two feet behind you."

Otey flew without incident during the exhibition, and showed off its impressive stability by conducting a low-level flyby without his hands on the controls.

Otey still beams when he talks about the accomplishment that the two men were able to achieve on the banks of the Snake River six years ago.

"The pride that comes with being able to do this and expose aviation to the public that they don't know about," Otey says. "Aviation history is made every day. But there's a time zone that goes along with it, and it doesn't take long before it's all behind you."

Otey is honored to have played a role in that long history, and to be given the chance to showcase all the hard work he and Wilson put in.

"That day in Lewiston had pride associated with it, because I helped build the dang thing," he says. "I touched every piece on that plane, and you get to the point where you know every piece by touch."

A new owner

The two made sure to reimburse every dollar they received from donors after they sold the airplane in 2011 for $60,000 to aviation collector Kermit Weeks, who runs the Fantasy of Flight Museum in Polk City, Fla.

"Kermit loves airplanes, and luckily he loved our airplane," Otey recalls. "So he brought his checkbook with him to Lewiston."

Otey was impressed by Weeks' humility and willingness to work with them on a price for their airplane.

"I love the man," Otey says. "He hung around with me for two days, took a thousand photos of this airplane, and asked me questions about it. And after his inspection he bought us dinner and wrote out a check."

The two kept the plane in storage for just over six months to avoid paying additional Florida sales taxes, before shipping it off in a tractor to the museum.

Weeks flew the plane around the Florida museum several times after purchasing it, and says taking it in the air is a unique experience.

"It's a great plane," Weeks says. "One general rule with any aircraft of that age, though, is don't fly any higher than you're willing to fall."

He's taken employees and friends on rides since purchasing the plane, and says he usually cruises at around 40 mph.

Life in the pilot's seat

Otey is still active in the flying community in Southern Arizona, serving as a flight instructor at Ryan Field and Tucson International Airport, and at visiting community airstrips in the area.

He also volunteers with Wright Flight, a Tucson-based non-profit dedicated to introducing children to aviation by getting them in the pilot's seat of an airplane.

"We're trying to bring the idea to kids that flying is something that they can look forward to," he says. "There are thousands and thousands of people employed in aviation, and we bring that to their minds."

Aviation's always been a part of Otey's life, living on a residential airstrip for more than 20 years while working at Boeing.

"Our tradition on Fridays nights was to jump in our four-seat airplane and fly someplace for dinner," he says. "Because we lived at an airport, I'd say, 'Let's fly to another airport that has a restaurant.' So my kids got introduced to flying early in their lives."

He'd commute by air several days a week to the company's Everett headquarters about 60 miles north.

"I lived on one airport and worked at another," he says. "It was 21 minutes by air, versus an hour-and-a-half of driving through the traffic in Seattle."

He decided to volunteer at the museum shortly after moving to Green Valley, when he found himself having more than enough free time on his hands.

"My wife got sick and tired of me sitting around and watching TV," he says. "I love working there. It's perfect for me because of my history of flying and love of older and experimental aircraft. I have a lot of background and experience with aviation, so it was an easy fit for me to volunteer there."

Otey says he wouldn't have gotten where he has in life if not for aviation.

"Flying has been a big, big, big part of my life," he says. "I started as a young child building model airplanes out of balsa wood sticks and moved on from there."

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://www.gvnews.com