Saturday, May 09, 2020

Bellanca 8GCBC Scout, N4116Y: Fatal accident occurred May 09, 2020 at Byron Airport (C83), Contra Costa County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

 
https://registry.faa.gov/N4116Y


Location: Byron, CA
Accident Number: WPR20LA141
Date & Time: 05/09/2020, 1319 PDT
Registration: N4116Y
Aircraft: BELLANCA 8GCBC
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Glider Tow 

On May 9, 2020, about 1319 Pacific daylight time, a Bellanca 8GCBC, N4116Y, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident at Byron Airport (C83), Byron, California. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 glider tow flight.

The pilot of the glider being towed reported to the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge that the accident flight was his second flight of the day. He stated that a pre-takeoff checklist was performed and that he verified the gliders canopy was closed and locked. Following a normal takeoff, the tow airplane pilot initiated a slight right turn, and shortly after, the glider canopy opened. The pilot stated that the canopy began "flapping" open and closed and he attempted to secure it and control the glider. He added that he briefly became disoriented and turned back toward the airport.

A witness stated that the visibility from the glider to the tow airplane "appeared to potentially have been an issue, as there was a 30-40° angle on the tow line." The witness added that as both the tow airplane and glider neared the end of the runway, the tow pilot cut the tow line, however, was in an "aggressive nose-low attitude" and impacted the ground shortly after in a "45° nose-low attitude."

Airport security camera recordings, as shown in figure 1, captured the accident sequence. The recordings showed that the tow airplane became airborne about mid length of the runway and proceeded in a shallow climb with the glider in trail and at a similar altitude. About 7 seconds after the tow airplane became airborne, the glider pitched upward and ascended, while the tow airplane remained in a shallow climb. About 3 seconds later when the tow airplane began a shallow descent. About 2 seconds later, the tow airplane and glider appeared to remain level, with the glider at a higher altitude than the tow airplane, for about 4 seconds, when the tow airplane and glider appeared to descend. The glider began to ascend about 4 seconds later, while the tow airplane pitched downward to a nose low attitude, impacted the runway, and nosed over, where a post impact fire ensued. The glider executed a 180° right turn and landed on runway 12 uneventfully.

Figure 1: Screen shots of the accident sequence from an airport security camera.

Examination of the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplane impacted the departure end of runway 30 and came to rest inverted. The fabric covering of the airplane was mostly consumed by fire, however, the primary structure of the wings, fuselage, and empennage were intact. All flight control cables appeared to remain attached to their respective flight controls. Photos provided by wreckage recovery personnel showed that the rope cutting mechanism on the tow airplane was engaged. Airport management reported that the tow rope was located about 80 feet beyond the main wreckage of the tow airplane in the grassy area adjacent to the runway. Photos of the tow rope showed that one end appeared to be cut, while the opposing end was intact. The wreckage of the tow airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BELLANCA
Registration: N4116Y
Model/Series:8GCBC 
Aircraft Category:Airplane 
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Northern California Soaring Assoc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light:Day 
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLVK, 393 ft msl
Observation Time: 2053 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 300°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.87 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point:  Byron, CA (C83)
Destination: Byron, CA (C83)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 37.835278, -121.631389

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

A pilot who died after his single-engine plane towing a glider crashed as it took off from Byron Airport on Saturday has been identified by the Contra Costa County coroner's office as 68-year-old Concord resident John Scott.

The two-seat Bellanca 8GCBC flipped over and caught fire at about 1:20 p.m. Saturday, while the trailing glider landed safely, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.

The plane crashed on the edge of the runway, according to the East Contra Costa County Fire Protection District, which responded to the fiery crash alongside firefighters from Byron Airport.

"Unfortunately the pilot who was the sole occupant of the glider tow airplane perished in the crash," ECCFPD said.

Scott was on the Board of Directors of the Northern California Soaring Association. The NCSA is a volunteer glider club that owns five gliders, a tow plane, and operates out of the Byron Airport.


Saturday's fatal crash is to be investigated by the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board, with the NTSB as the lead agency, according to Gregor.


 


A pilot died Saturday after the plane he was flying crashed shortly after takeoff from Byron Airport just south of Discovery Bay.

The crash occurred around 1:30 p.m. when a tow plane with a glider attached took a nosedive and flipped before catching fire, said Gil Guerrero, East Contra Costa Fire Protection District battalion chief.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said the plane was a Bellanca 8GCBC Scout.

Witnesses said the plane was fully engulfed within 20 seconds and they heard several explosions, Guerrero said.

The glider was able to land safely without incident but the tow plane pilot was pronounced dead at the scene. No other injuries were reported.

Airport rescue firefighters extinguished the flames before his team arrived, Guerrero said.

The pilot, a 68-year-old man, is not being identified until his family can be contacted.

Local officials turned the investigation over to the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board, which will work to determine a probable cause. Such investigations often take a year or more to complete.

https://www.mercurynews.com







The pilot of a Bellanca 8GCBC Scout plane died when the aircraft crashed and burned at Byron Airport, Saturday, May 9th.

The identity of the pilot has not yet been released.

Firefighters from the airport responded to the crash at the north end of runway 12 that was reported shortly before 1:30 p.m. and found the plane upside down at the edge of the runway. They extinguished the fire, but the body of the pilot was found in the cockpit.

According to East Contra Costa Fire Protection District Battalion Chief Gil Guererro, the pilot was towing a glider before the accident. The glider pilot landed without incident.

No information regarding a possible cause of the crash was available. Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration reported to the airport, and investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board were also expected.

The plane carried the insignia of the Northern California Soaring Association (NCSA) on its tail. According to its website, NCSA is a volunteer club headquartered at the airport and also owns five gliders and a tow plane.

https://www.thepress.net

Controlled Flight into Terrain: Cessna 150M, N6AF; fatal accident occurred May 27, 2018 near Bainbridge Island, Washington

Pilot Lee Elliott, 70, and his girlfriend Joan Burns (passenger) were sightseeing over Elliott Bay near Bainbridge Island in the Cessna 150M on May 27th, 2018 when the aircraft crashed.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N6AF

Location: Bainbridge Island, WA
Accident Number: WPR18LA151
Date & Time: 05/27/2018, 1705 PDT
Registration: N6AF
Aircraft: CESSNA 150M
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 27, 2018, about 1705 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 150M airplane, N6AF, was substantially damaged when it impacted water near Bainbridge Island, Washington. The private pilot was fatally injured, and the passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to the passenger, before departure from Harvey Field Airport (S43), Snohomish, Washington, the pilot used his iPad for navigation via the ForeFlight application. They took off and landed at Vashon Island, Washington.

After takeoff from Vashon Island, while flying over the water, the passenger told the pilot that she thought the airplane was too low. The pilot replied that they were fine and that they were able to fly safely 200 ft above the water. The passenger stated that the pilot looked down at the iPad and she saw him push the flight control yoke forward. The airplane subsequently impacted the water and flipped over. The passenger reported that she blacked out for a short time. When she regained consciousness, she saw the pilot still restrained by his seat belt and slumped over; he appeared to be unconscious. The passenger was able to egress on her own as the airplane began to sink. The passenger reported that there were no mechanical problems with the airplane before the impact. An individual on a boat in the area of the accident site saw the splash of water when the airplane impacted the water, marked the location via a GPS device, and rescued the passenger.

A witness on the shore was looking out toward the water when she saw a low-flying airplane. The airplane came into view and was descending in a nose-low attitude. She initially thought it was going to skim the water and perform a loop, but the airplane continued its descent until it impacted the water. The airplane flipped over and quickly sank.

Radar data captured the airplane as it departed to the south from Vashon Island, then turned northbound over the waterway on the west side of Vashon Island. The flight continued north over the water at an altitude of about 700 ft mean sea level (msl) until radar contact was lost about 0.1 nautical mile from the accident site.

Search efforts on the day of the accident were unsuccessful in locating the wreckage. On June 14, an independent dive team located the wreckage inverted on the sea floor at a depth of 176 ft below the surface. The airplane was not recovered at that time. When the dive team returned to recover the wreckage, it was no longer at that location and could not be located again.

The pilot's remains were not recovered. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 70, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present:No 
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/16/2016
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N6AF
Model/Series: 150M M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 15076185
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1601 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-200 SERIES
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSEA, 434 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1653 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 151°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 270°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.26 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Snohomish, WA (S43)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Bainbridge Island, WA
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time:
Type of Airspace: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire:None 
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 47.723889, -122.543889 (est) 

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Beechcraft C90 King Air, N257CQ; accident occurred August 01, 2015 at Georgetown Scott County Regional Airport (27K), Kentucky


















Generator Switches
 Federal Aviation Administration 



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Transportation Safety Board of Canada; Gatineau, Quebec, Canada
Pratt and Whitney; Longueuil, Quebec, Canada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N257CQ


Location: Georgetown, KY
Accident Number: ERA15LA293
Date & Time: 08/01/2015, 2100 EDT
Registration: N257CQ
Aircraft: BEECH C90B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 2 Serious, 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 1, 2015, about 2100 eastern daylight time, a Beechcraft King Air C90B, N257CQ, experienced a loss of engine power during cruise flight and subsequently impacted terrain near Georgetown Scott County Airport – Marshall Field (27K), Georgetown, Kentucky. The commercial pilot and one passenger sustained serious injuries and the two other passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed the James M Cox Dayton International Airport (DAY), Dayton, Ohio, about 2030 with an intended destination of Lake Cumberland Regional Airport (SME), Somerset, Kentucky. The airplane was owned and operated by Absher Air LLC as a personal flight in accordance with the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91.

According to the pilot's statement the flight had stopped in DAY where two of the passengers disembarked. After the passengers disembarked, the pilot reported that he checked the fuel quantity indicator for the 45-minute flight, which indicated 1,200 lbs. of fuel. He determined that the flight needed between 360 and 410 lbs. of fuel and that they did not require any additional fuel. The flight departed DAY around 2030 and climbed to 12,000 ft above mean sea level. While enroute, the cross-feed light illuminated and the pilot recycled the "cross feed" switch, no other indicator lights illuminated. The cross-feed light illuminated again, and the pilot decided to land the airplane in order to troubleshoot the indicator. He requested to divert to the nearest airport, which was 27K, and it was directly beneath the flight. Subsequently, the right-engine shutdown and auto feathered. The pilot reduced power on the left engine, lowered the nose, and extended the landing gear in order to assist with descending and entering the traffic pattern for runway 21. He further reported that when the landing gear extended and locked into place the electrical system for the airplane "failed."

Additionally, he reported that as he began to level out the descent, pushed the power levers for the left engine forward; however, the left engine did not respond. As the flight paralleled the intended runway he determined that there were trees between the airplane and the runway; however, when he was able to visually acquire the lights he maneuvered the airplane to fly perpendicular to those lights, later determining that the lights he observed were the parallel taxiway lights. As the flight approached the taxiway, he determined that the flight was lower than the required flight path to make the field. As they continued, he pulled "gently on the control wheel" and heard the passenger in the right seat telling the passengers to "brace for impact." The next thing he could recall was laying in the grass talking with a first responder.

Flight information indicated that the flight originated at Red Lake Airport (CYRL), Red Lake, Ontario, Canada, earlier in the afternoon, flew to Duluth International Airport (DLH), Duluth, Minnesota, where fuel records indicated the airplane was fueled with 140 gallons of Jet A fuel with prist. The flight departed DLH about 50 minutes later and then landed in DAY, prior to departing for SME. According to personnel at the three fixed base operations (FBO) facilities at DAY, the airplane was not fueled at DAY prior to departure. One FBO facility reported that security video captured the airplane taxiing onto the FBO ramp and the engines being shut down. Several people exited the airplane and were let out through the security gate to the parking lot. Subsequently, four people returned to the aircraft and it taxied out.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, multiengine land, and instrument rating. He held an FAA second-class medical certificate, issued August 14, 2014, which was issued with two (2) limitations of "Must wear corrective lenses" and "Not valid for any class after." At the time of his most recent medical examination, the pilot reported 3,022.0 total hours of flight experience. He also held a mechanic certificate with an inspection authorization, which was issued on March 27, 2007, and renewed in March of 2015.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA records and recent phase inspection workorders, the airplane was issued an airworthiness certificate on November 19, 1975, and was originally registered to Absher Air, LLC on December 12, 2001. It was powered by two Pratt and Whitney of Canada PT6A-21 engines that drove McCauley four-bladed propellers. According to workorders, the most recent phase inspection, which was a Phase 1 and 2, was conducted on April 30, 2015, with a recorded hourmeter of 2312.0 hours. At that time it had accumulated 2312.0 total hours. The hourmeter was located within the instrument panel and indicated 2324.6 hours at the time of the accident.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 2054 recorded weather observation at Lexington Blue Grass Airport (LEX), Lexington, Kentucky, located approximately 14 miles to the southwest of the accident location, included wind from 340° and 6 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 22°C, dew point 15°C; barometric altimeter 30.00 inches of mercury.

According to the United States Naval Observatory, Sun and Moon Data, official sunset was at 2048 and end of civil twilight was 2117 the moonrise occurred at 2136 and 98% of the moon disc would have been visible had the moon been above the horizon.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

According to a FAA inspector, the airplane impacted the ground in a right-wing low attitude. The airplane slid about 174 ft, impacted an embankment, became airborne, and then came to rest on airport property, about 238 ft from the initial impact location. According to FAA and local police photographs, the airplane came to rest upright, on the belly of the aircraft, parallel to an airport taxiway. The left engine propeller was found in the feathered position, separated from the engine flange, and was in the vicinity of the wreckage. All four propeller blades exhibited S-bending and chordwise scratching along the propeller face. The right engine propeller blade was in flat pitch; however, only one propeller blade was bent aft and no other damage was observed on the other three right engine propeller blades.

Photographic documentation provided by the FAA showed the "master switch," which included battery, generator 1, and generator 2 in the "OFF" position.

According to recovery personnel, 12 gallons of fuel was located in the left inboard tank, and about 10 gallons of fuel was located in the right inboard tank; however, the outboard fuel tanks in both wings were breached. The recovery personnel further reported observing blighting in the surrounding foliage of the where the aircraft came to rest.

On-scene examination of the cockpit by an FAA inspector revealed that the left engine power lever was in the full forward position and the right engine power lever was approximately mid-range. The left engine propeller lever was full forward and the right engine propeller lever was in the feather position. The condition lever for the left engine was near "low idle" and the right condition lever was in the forward position. Although the airplane was equipped with a cockpit voice recorder (CVR) the unit was deactivated and circuit breaker pulled and collared on April 5, 2007.

The left engine remained attached to the left wing at the accident location. The compressor turbine disc was intact with minimal scoring on the adjected center bore which coincided with minor rubbing on the power turbine baffle. Mechanical continuity was found from the accessory gear box to the compressor turbine.

The propeller was impact separated from the propeller hub and according to photographic evidence was co-located with the main wreckage. The left propeller was a McCauley model 4HFR34C768C, 4-bladed, controllable pitch propeller. According to the most recent Phase inspection the propeller's most recent overhaul was December 17, 2012. At the time of the Phase inspection the propeller had accrued 2,312.0 hours total time in service (TTIS) and 114.8 hours time since overhaul (TSO). Post recovery examination of the propeller revealed various degrees of S-bending and tip curling on all four (4) of the blades. The blade angles also appeared to be in or near the feathered position and exhibited signature marks consist with as being under power at the time of impact.

The right engine remained attached to the right wing at the accident location and the propeller remained attached to the engine. The propeller blades were in the latch position or near flat pitch. The chip detector was removed, examined, and was free of debris. The power turbine shaft section was unable to be rotated by hand and was subsequently disassembled. Examination of the shroud and power turbine disc revealed two score marks along the inner section of the power turbine. The compressor section rotated smoothly by hand and mechanical continuity for the compressor turbine to the starter generator. No other abnormalities were noted.

The fuel pump removed and a liquid, similar in smell as Jet A aviation fuel was present in the fuel bowl and no debris was noted. The fuel screen was removed and was free of debris.

The right propeller was a McCauley model 4HFR34C768C, 4-bladed, controllable pitch propeller. According to the most recent Phase inspection the propeller's most recent overhaul was December 17, 2012. At the time of the Phase inspection the propeller had accrued 2,312.0 hours TTIS and 114.8 hours TSO. The blade angles also appeared to be in the latch position, and devoid of any signature marks consist with developing power at the time of impact. Following the removal of the lower cowling the propeller blades moved to a feather or near feather position. The propeller blade angle is controlled by oil pressure and therefore it is likely that the absence of oil pressure allowed the blade angles to move to a feather position.

For detailed information about the wreckage and impact information, reference the report titled "Airplane and Engine Examination Report" in the docket associated with this accident investigation.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to the King Air C90B (model C90A) "Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual," section V "Performance – Maximum Cruise Power," the airplane's fuel consumption at 12,000 ft would be about 311 pounds per hour per engine.

According to the King Air C90B (Model C90A) "Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual," section IV "Normal Procedures – Engine Starting (Battery)" checklist stated in part the following:

5. Right Ignition and Engine Start Switch – OFF (at 51% N1 or above)

6. Right Condition Lever – HIGH IDLE

7. Right Generator – RESET, THEN ON [R DC GEN], (L GEN TIE OPEN], and [R GEN TIE OPEN] – Extinguished

8. Battery - CHARGE (until loadmeter reads approximately .50 or less)

NOTE

Airplanes Prior To LJ-1534:

The [BATTERY CHARGE] will illuminate approximately 6 seconds after generator is on the line. If the annunciator does not extinguish within 5 minutes, refer to the BATTERY CHARGE RATE procedure in Section 3A, ABNORMAL PROCEDURES.

13. Left Ignition and Engine Start Switch (51% N1 or above) - OFF

14. Right Condition Lever - REDUCE TO LOW IDLE

15. Left and Right Prop RPM - 1100 MINIMUM

16. Voltmeter (L GEN) - 27.5 TO 29.0 VOLTS

17. Left Generator - RESET, then ON [L DC GEN] - EXTINGUISHED

18. Right Generator - RESET, THEN ON [L GEN TIE OPEN] and [R GEN TIE OPEN] remain extinguished with switch in the reset position)

The FAA provided regulatory guidance and the time the airplane's battery must be able to provide power to the airplane's systems in CFR 23.1353(h) "Storage Battery Design and Installation" which stated:

(h) In the event of a complete loss of the primary electrical power generating system, the battery must be capable of providing at least 30 minutes of electrical power to those loads that are essential to continued safe flight and landing. The 30 minute time period includes the time needed for the pilots to recognize the loss of generated power and take appropriate load shedding action.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/14/2014
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/10/2014
Flight Time:  3182 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1122 hours (Total, this make and model), 2935 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 90 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 13 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make:BEECH 
Registration: N257CQ
Model/Series: C90B
Aircraft Category:Airplane 
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: LJ-1419
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 10
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/30/2015, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 9705 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 13 Hours
Engines: 2 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 2324.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney - Canada
ELT:
Engine Model/Series:PT6A-21 
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 550
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLEX, 989 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2054 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 215°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  / None
Wind Direction: 340°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: DAYTON, OH (DAY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: SOMERSET, KY (SME)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 2023 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: GEORGETOWN SCOTT COUNTY - MARS (27K)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 947 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: 03
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5498 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious, 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 38.228333, -84.436389 (est)

Flightstar II: Accident occurred April 20, 2020 in Oakdale, California

NTSB Identification: WPR20CA127
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 20, 2020 in Oakdale, CA
Aircraft: FLIGHTstar 2, registration: Unregistered

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Grumman G-44 Widgeon, N91040: Accident occurred April 30, 2020 at Anchorage-Merrill Field Airport (PAMR), Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

https://registry.faa.gov/N91040 

NTSB Identification: ANC20CA045
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 30, 2020 in Anchorage, AK
Aircraft: GRUMMAN G44, registration: N91040

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


Aircraft landed gear up.

Date: 01-MAY-20
Time: 01:47:00Z
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ANCHORAGE
State: ALASKA