Tuesday, September 13, 2022

Piper PA-46-310P Malibu, N43605: Fatal accident occurred September 13, 2022 in Williams, Coconino County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona 

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances.


Date: 13-SEP-22
Time: 17:35:00Z
Regis#: N43605
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA46
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 2
Flight Crew:1 Fatal
Pax: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: WILLIAMS
State: ARIZONA

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.

Chad and Brandi Wilson
~


Brandi Michelle Wilson, age 42, of Wichita Falls passed on September 13, 2022. She was born on April 27, 1980 to Gary and Susan Freudiger in Shattuck, Oklahoma. Growing up in Wichita Falls, Brandi attended Rider High School and was an officer in FFA where she showed pigs and heifers and played soccer. She graduated in the class of 1998, and then went on to graduate from Vernon College with a Business Associate Degree. All her life, Brandi had a servant’s heart, devoting time to her children and community. Most notably, Brandi volunteered for Holliday ISD for nearly ten years. The joy of Brandi’s life was her family, and she was rarely ever seen without a smile. She was always the first to offer to host and loved organizing Bunco, Bingo, and puzzle nights.

Chad Allen Wilson, age 42, of Wichita Falls passed on September 13, 2022. He was born on February 8, 1980 to Jack and Pam Wilson in Amarillo, Texas. Chad spent his early childhood years in Pampa, Texas before moving to Wichita Falls where he attended Rider High School and played golf. He graduated in the class of 1997. Chad had many different interests. He was an avid hunter and fisherman, frequently found to be doing these activities with his sons and friends. Chad also had a passion for flying. His friend of 30 years, Jason Creacy, described him as the best family man he has ever known. His kids fondly remember him grabbing what he would call his “Chad sized” ice cream, a full pint, and devouring it in one sitting.

Chad and Brandi were friends in high school and later connected in their early twenties. Chad and Brandi were married on April 26, 2003 in Wichita Falls, Texas. They established their life together in Wichita Falls where they raised their four children and built a successful business, Wilson Contracting, which is celebrating 15 years this October. Chad was preceded in death by his mother, Pam Wilson. Brandi was preceded in death by her father, Gary Freudiger. Chad and Brandi are survived by their parents Jack Wilson and Susan Freudiger; their children Taylor Morgan, Colton Chad, Carli Michelle, and Caden Marshall; and their siblings and nephews Curtis, Rosa, Cameron, and Tanner Wilson, and Trey, Kelli, Branson, and Bauer Burney. Memorials may be made to Harvest Food Ministry, Holliday ISD PTO, or Hospice of Wichita Falls.

Fond memories and expressions of sympathy may be shared at www.hamptonvaughancrestview.com for the Wilson family.



WICHITA FALLS (KFDX/KJTL) — Final arrangements have been made for a beloved Wichita Falls couple as the community continues to mourn their passing following a plane crash on Tuesday.

Chad and Brandi Wilson, owners of the local construction company Wilson Contracting, lost their lives on Tuesday, September 13, 2022, when a plane carrying the couple crashed in Arizona.

According to a post made by a family member on Wilson’s Facebook page, visitation for the couple will take place on Friday, September 16, 2022, from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. at Hampton Vaughan Crestview.

Funeral services will take place the following day, on Saturday, September 17, at First Baptist Church in downtown Wichita Falls at 10 a.m. in the Worship Center.

An email account has been set up for friends and family members of Chad and Brandi Wilson to send pictures or videos of them with the couple that will play in a slide show during the service.

A shirt has also been designed in honor of Chad and Brandi Wilson and is available for purchase online.

Texoma’s Homepage first reported the deaths of the Wilsons on Tuesday, September 14, 2022, following the news of their plane crashing in Arizona.

According to Coconino County Sheriff’s Office, around 11:48 a.m. (Arizona time) on Tuesday, Sept. 13, the sheriff’s deputies out of the Williams/Grand Canyon Substation responded to an area north of Seligman about a report of a missing aircraft.

Deputies notified the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of a plane that had gone off the radar between Kingman and Flagstaff.


Coconino County Sheriff's Office
For Immediate Release
September 13, 2022

Contact: Jon Paxton
Phone: 928-226-5089

SUBJECT: CCSO Responds to Fatal Aircraft Crash North of Seligman


Seligman, Arizona; On September 13, 2022 at 11:48 am Coconino County Sheriff’s Office Deputies out of the Williams/Grand Canyon Substation responded to an area north of Seligman, Arizona for a report of a missing aircraft. Deputies were notified by the Federal Aviation Administration of a plane that had gone off radar in a remote area north of Seligman, Arizona.

Due to the remoteness of the area and weather, the Arizona Department of Public Safety Air Rescue Helicopter out of Kingman Arizona, was requested to assist in the search. At approximately 1:30 pm DPS Air Rescue confirmed the aircraft had crashed in the location. They landed at the scene and confirmed there were two fatalities as a result of the crash.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board have been notified of the crash. The identification of the deceased has not been determined at this time and the investigation is ongoing by detectives with the Sheriff’s Office, the Coconino County Medical Examiner’s Office, and the  National Transportation Safety Board. No further information is available at this time.

If the public has any further information on this incident, please contact the Sheriff’s Office at (928) 774-4523.

100 comments:

  1. From the ADSB
    data looks like he flew right into a cell.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Looks like the pilot may have originally decided to go around the storm to the south but then decided to fly through the small gap between the cells. When it got too rough the pilot preformed a 180 turn to return to smoother air. I would suspect the plane was damaged and uncontrollable by the turbulence causing the rapid decent from FL175. ATC tapes should give a better idea of the pilots intentions and what transpired prior the possible breakup of the aircraft.

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    2. https://flightaware.com/live/flight/N43605

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    3. Only a student pilot certificate on the FAA website. I am thinking he had 20 hours flight time tops. Maybe I am wrong..............

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    4. N43605 also made Wichita Falls ---> Vegas flights on 4/29 and 6/13 that show up on adsbexchange. Probably had some additional time in the seat beyond the 20 hour guesstimate before the September accident flight happened.

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  2. Reportedly Malibu was grounded by FAA years ago after many crashes where wing fell off in turbulence. Later it was determined nothing wrong with plane but flown at high altitudes by inexperienced pilots who lost control and let airspeed build up too high causing wing to break off. Many pilots were not instrument rated or low time pilots . ADS-B data shows circle path south of several thunderstorm cells so apparently plane was not in a cell at time of crash if ADS-B weather overlay is based on real time with no delay in updating weather If plane was using satellite weather to avoid cells, satellite weather has up to 5 min delay so cell north of flight path could have actually been at crash site . Or Pilot could have been flying at 16,00 feet without oxygen and became incapacitated. Malibu has P at end of model number so it may have been pressurized .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Listing on Aircraft.com for accident aircraft does not indicate aircraft was pressurized. https://www.aircraft.com/aircraft/208688873/n43605-1984-piper-malibu

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    2. All Malibu are pressurized. The Matrix is a P46 with out pressurization.

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    3. Malibu Matrix was not pressurized

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  3. How can pilot /owner get insurance or medical with history of DUI unless owner listed another pilot on insurance but actually flew plane himself . I had a friend who owned a hot air balloon that requires no medical but company Ad on balloon did require insurance . Pilot could not get insurance in his name due to accident or violation so pilot simply listed another pilot on insurance but actually never used the other pilot but flew balloon himself . I had another friend with single engine rating who bought a new twin but he did hire a qualified pilot to fly him in the twin. Malibu pilot could have simply had no insurance and no medical but learned to fly plane safety until crash .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Justice and freedom in Wichita County are available to those who can pay. Perhaps insurance and PP certs are as well?

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    2. Unless the plane was financed, nobody likely cared if he was insured.

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  4. A Malibu crashed in NC couple years ago . Plane was flying from Florida with 2 Married couples on board. Think both husbands had pilot license . They were in cruise flight then apparently hit turbulence, maybe IFR , lost control , let plane overspend in spiral descent and pulled wing off.

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  5. With the alt below 18K, was this a VFR flight with flight following? I’m based about 50 miles south of the site KPRC and yesterday we had about the worse storms of the season and we’ve had several. It was much more than scattered T-storms to nav around.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, VFR and looks like they descended to 15.5 and then climbed to 17.5 to try and clear them. Based in information available, this looks to be either a newly rated PP or still student pilot that was in over their head probably thinking the airplane on autopilot would fly right through them. So sad.

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    2. Hope life insurance helps kids in the future but usually there is an aviation exclusion aside from the impression that this guy did not care about stuff and might not have protected his family. But there has to be some CFI/s sweating checking out this guy without proper vetting. And the FAA was right there making sure a non rated non medical pilot was not flying out of a general aviation airport. FAA relies on Darwin to winnow out these guys and leaves their wreckage to the lawyers.

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  6. It is not a requirement to have insurance to own an aircraft, some states have laws on it, but most do not. Some people may opt to take the chance.

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  7. Search Kathryn’s Report for Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage / JetProp DLX, N709CH: Fatal accident occurred June 07, 2019 in Castalia, Nash County, North Carolina.

    http://www.kathrynsreport.com/search?q=N709ch


    Similar type flight . Wings came off . Pilot in left seat was not IFR rated but pilot in right seat was IFR rated but was not current and low time IfFR . Plane was on an IFR flight plan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you implying the PA46 has structural issues that cause failures? Because it doesn't. There are many NTSB reports that detail how the wings came off high performance aircraft like the Malibu, PC-12, TBM Series, Aerostar, etc., in convective conditions because the pilot lost control.

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    2. Show me a report where the wings came off an Aerostar??

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    3. There has never been a wing come off a TBM. I have over 7000 hours in them and have never heard of a inflight structural failure. LZ

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  8. wilsoncontractingwf.com is pilots business web site. Apparently a smart man. Can’t tell year model or engine type from FAA web site but plane cost was probably around $500k. Prop planes fly in lower altitudes where most weather occurs compared to jets that can fly over most weather or fly high enough to get to clear air to see cells visually. Most newer pilots have never flown in severe weather. It’s not fun in a jet with 2 pilots . Bad way to learn .

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    1. Aircraft was listed on Aircraft.com as an 1984 model.

      Aircraft.com whenhttps://www.aircraft.com/aircraft/208688873/n43605-1984-piper-malibu

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    2. A Swiss Malibu advert's price comparison listed the N43605 price from March 2018 when this aircraft (S/N 46-8408052) was listed on Controller.com. Asking price was $197,500 USD back then.

      Year / Serial / TT (Frame) / TT (Engine) / USD
      1984 46-8408052 4'435 1'382 197'500

      From 2018 price survey at:
      http://n9127z.com/en/pricing.htm

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    3. “smart” as in productive, okay. Probably sharp enough to get his flying carts too. But his business was mainly sucking off govt. demolition contracts. Doesn’t take a ton of smarts, mostly keeping palms greased. But even if a genius, doesn’t make a DWI repeater, Parole and counseling dodger, and WAY over confident Chad, a decent person.

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    4. A life of soy consumption must underlie all of that projection. Texas man using machines and skill, but you presume bribery...

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    5. Skill is certainly not an issue in this case. The “projection” the poster above makes is pretty much spot-on.

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  9. At the least, society will be safer now … on the ground and in the air.

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  10. Ugh. Malibu is a great airplane, but a lot of inexperienced pilots get into heavy weather with them, lose control, and break up the airplane. This looks to be yet another example. Just because it's a cabin class airplane doesn't mean it's capable of shooting small gaps in heavy T storm cells.......clearly, it's NOT.

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    1. I’d like to know any aircraft that can and does fly into convective…

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    2. These birds do!

      https://www.omao.noaa.gov/learn/aircraft-operations/aircraft/lockheed-wp-3d-orion

      https://flightaware.com/photos/view/951273-33f2ea397498c68aa08804fccee91bfd43a0d8cf/aircraft/N42RF/sort/votes/page/1

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    3. I used to fly in those P3s, and they do not fly into heavy convection over land. Around it. Or through hurricanes over water.For well planned studies, and with highly experienced pilots, navigators and weather officers.

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  11. Per ad. 1984 Plane was for sale for $234,000 with Tach 1986.5
    AFTT – 2822
    SFRM 1834 (Nov 1989) Continental TSIO-520-BE1F

    TBO is listed at 2000 hours but in 1989 or 33 years ago this plane had factory Re manufactured engine at only 988 hours so engine was probably at TBO at time of crash . Many engines need top overhaul around 1000 hours . Part 91 operations can run engines indefinitely if padding annual inspection. Owner operated heavy equipment so he may have been used to operating engines until failure . Most pilots would be worried operating engine nest TBO.

    No radar pod on wings and no radar listed in Ad. Storm scope listed in ad.

    Picking way around cells using storm scope or satellite weather with 5 min delays is not as safe as using on board live radar.

    Seems like older airplane needing engine overhaul bought at cheap price due to run out engine .that could cost $100,000 to overhaul .

    If pilot had DUIs and no medical as reported above, seems like flying plane with engine at or beyond TBO with no radar flying near cells was acceptable risk or sign of lack of aviation experience .

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Engine hours are likely not relevant. One of the preeminent AP/IAs in GA (Mike Busch, owner and Director of Savvy Maintenance) has something like 4000+hrs on the Continental engines on his C310. We don't "run to failure", we "run on condition". And what is "padding an annual inspection"? I've been studying via practical experience for my Airframe and Powerplant certs with a 55 year IA and former Repair Station manager and I've never heard the term. Beyond that, an engine out scenario simply turns an airplane into a glider.

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    2. compression testing each cylinder annual AW inspection and not letting them get below 60/80, is the way to go.

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    3. FYI 60/80 is just an old WWII thing and it is not a minimum compression requirement for either Lycoming or Continental. Both manufacturers publish Service Bulletins describing the compression testing process and both have vastly different requirements and neither is the old “60/80”. I realize that this is unrelated to the original blog but I believe it’s important to dispel falsehoods when you see them.

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    4. Wrong! What about the accessories ( Bendix magnetos), they seldom see any maintenance, or internal inspection, especially the Bendix 2000 series double magneto/single drive unit models. An impulse coupling failure will ruin your day too. *** You sir, are asking for an aluminum over-coat. ***

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    5. "just an old WWII thing" reply:
      see DOT/FAA AC 43.1311B w/Change1, Current in 2022, para 8-14, page 8-6 thru 8-8.
      Not "just an old WWII thing" according to the FAA.

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  12. Must have been terrifying spiraling down from 16–17k feet after watching break off . So sad.

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  13. United States of America 🇺🇸 :
    A private Piper PA-46-310P Malibu, registration N43605, was destroyed after an apparent encounter with adverse weather conditions and a subsequent inflight breakup near Williams, Arizona.
    The student pilot and one passenger sustained fatal injuries. The personal flight departed from Albuquerque-Double Eagle II Airport (KAEG), New Mexico, with an unknown destination.
    Review of the student pilot's records show that he was issued a student pilot license in 2020, the pilot purchased a Cessna 182 in 2021, and the accident aircraft was purchased in 2022. The student pilot had 5 previous DWI arrests and 2 parole/probation violations. The pilot had no medical certificate. The passenger was his wife and was not pilot rated.
    Review of the flight data show that the pilot most likely flew into a thunderstorm cell and attempted a 180 turn, control was lost afterwards.
    The airplane came to rest on its left side in an open field, both wings, vertical and horizontal stabilizers broke off inflight and were found a mile or so from the main wreckage. The fuselage was found separate to the parts mentioned.

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    1. happens in Europe too. Money doesn't mean good judgment.
      Report: unlicensed pilot stalls unairworthy Learjet following fuel starvation (2012)
      "The accident involving a Learjet 24 at Bornholm, Denmark earlier this year was caused by inadequate en route fuel management which resulted fuel starvation and a stall on final approach, an investigation concluded. The Danish Accident Investigation Board (AIB DK) also noted that the airplane had no valid certificate of airworthiness and the pilot also did not posses the right license.
      https://news.aviation-safety.net/2012/12/20/report-unlicensed-pilot-stalls-unairworthy-learjet-following-fuel-starvation/

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  14. Why does 'a beautiful airplane' break up in the sky?

    Mr. Williams was off the ground shortly after 7:30 a.m., en route to a meeting in Winnipeg. He was carrying four passengers, including two of his firm's top executives. By 8:15 a.m., they were all dead, and the once-beautiful Piper was a twisted trail of wreckage, scattered over a four-kilometre radius near Wainwright, about 200 kilometres east of Edmonton.

    Almost immediately, investigators could see that they were dealing with an aviation rarity - a structural failure that ripped the plane apart in the air. The wings and tail of Mr. Williams's plane were located several kilometres away from the mangled fuselage.

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/why-does-a-beautiful-airplane-break-up-in-the-sky/article18447534/

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    1. Does a stabbing victim die because a homicidal maniac or because of uncontrolled blood loss?
      In this case, the cause of the accident was an unqualified sociopath operating a high performance aircraft and not understanding his skill and experience limits and the aircrafts limitation. Without the training and experience he flew it into a convective cell that caused loss of control and aircraft breakup. Impact with the ground at high speed caused their deaths. Flying with this accident guy you'd need and ejection system or a Cirrus-like CAPES chute system if you valued your life.

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    2. Wing-knocked-off Malibu crashes from trying to push through weather represent an expectation of being able to get on top of weather in that aircraft. If Malibu owners didn't point their aircraft at weather that should have been avoided this wouldn't keep happening. The wing attach point can't tell whether or not the pilot is certified.

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    3. The relevant Convective SIGMET called for tops to FL410.

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  15. This fatal accident by a non-licensed operator (I wouldn't call him a pilot, just an aircraft operator), along with possible age-medical factors in the two recent GA mid-air collisions (North Las Vegas and Watsonville accidents) are going to drive the FAA to push for Federal mandatory liability insurance for all registered US aircraft.
    Why will this happen to GA? Simple.
    All 50 states and DC have mandatory auto liability insurance requirements to maintain valid automobile registrations. If auto owner loses liability insurance or not have insurance and then the DMV cancels your auto registration. It then becomes the insurance industry's problem to check driving records (valid license) and driving history (DUI's, reported accidents) and factor in driver age and experience to set premium rates and whether to issue liability insurance at all (decline to cover).

    What will happen then is the FAA Registration Branch will cancel N-number registrations if the listed aircraft owner cannot provide proof of liability insurance. They will then tie this N-number valid/revoked database to the ATC flight monitoring national airspace system to alert ATC controllers to the operation of any unregistered aircraft in monitored airspace. Unregistered aircraft could then be denied controlled airspace operations by ATC controllers. ADSB-Out that reports N-number registration is the technical requirement now in-place for operations in all Class A, B, C and Class E above 10,000 msl that will enable this. All that will need to happen is Congress pass the enabling legislation into law so the FAA can mandate proof of liability insurance for all US registered aircraft.
    Then it will be the insurance industry's problem to sort out non-pilots, unqualified pilots, and age-issues (higher premiums) in order for aircraft owners to provide Proof of Liability Coverage to the FAA Registration Branch, and then maintain that coverage (and provide automated electronic reporting if liability insurance policy is cancelled, just like happens now with almost all auto liability insurance reporting to states' DMV.)
    This is coming. ADSB-Out was the technical enabler for this. If you don't want this when it is proposed, you'll have to contact your Congressperson, because the FAA will need Congressional authority to make this happen.

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  16. Before 9-11, Kids could solo at 16 because your medical was also your student pilots license on one piece of paper issued by local doctor.. You could not solo without both medical and license but you could start taking lessons with no license and no
    Medical then get medical / license same day as you soloed

    Many kids soloed on their 16th birthday because they had been flying with instructor or maybe parents for years .

    It was a milestone event to solo on 16th birthday but doctor could not issue solo license / medical until 16th birthday

    So kids would take flying lessons before birthday then run to doctor on birthday to get medical / student license in one hour then go to airport and solo same day .

    After 9-11, medical was separated from license .

    Now a student pilot must turn 16, then submit data and background check by TSA and wait maybe 30’days to be issued a student pilot license by FAA before student can take first lesson

    No more solos on 16 th birthday .

    Pilot that crashed the Malibu only had student pilots license but no medical because his DUIs may have prevented him from getting medical.

    It’s legal to start teaching a student with no medical as long as student has a plastic FAA student pilots license but instructor can’t officially sign students logbook authorizing solo until student has medical.



    ReplyDelete
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    1. Flight schools now use "discovery flights" as a work around for a First flight. This may end after the Santa Monica tragedy where it seems clear the "student" and the CFI were fighting over the controls. Suicide? panic? We likely will never know.

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    2. Wrong! You do not need to wait to get your student pilot cert to take flying lessons. You just need to have the student pilot certificate (and your medical) before you solo. The FAA says so on their web page:

      https://www.faa.gov/pilots/become/student_cert#:~:text=You%20don't%20need%20a,certificate%20to%20take%20flying%20lessons.

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  17. About April 27, 2021 another Malibu crashed near cells . Dentist, wife, autistic son and young flight instructor died after flying too close to cells .

    https://www.fox23.com/news/local/four-killed-crash-light-aircraft-arkansas/J3H6ILLRI5EFPMXBNV56TPL4OA/

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  18. This Malibu crash should be on Kathryn’s Report

    https://www.khits.com/story/608842776568197bf3cd78e0/sheriff:-witness-saw-plane-missing-wing-before-crash-that-killed-tulsa-family

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    Replies
    1. 2 more similar Malibu crashes after wings broke off near cells

      http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2021/04/fatal-accident-occurred-april-23-2021.html


      http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2019/06/piper-pa-46-350p-malibu-mirage-jetprop.htm

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    2. Can probably break a wing off of about anything in the proper incompetent hands.

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    3. Bingo! You fly any aircraft near a cell and you'll lose a wing. The accident database is full of them for all makes and models, Malibus are no different. Also, any aircraft in the hands of an unlicensed, untrained pilot with no medical clearance is a situation ripe for disaster.

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  19. Picked the wrong airplane to push turbulence in. V tail, PA46, Piper Lance, T210 without struts, are some airplanes that don't seem to tolerate severe turbulence.

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  20. These relatively inexperienced pilots keep doing things like this....... Get a license, get an instrument rating, then go out and grab a pressurized, theoretically "all weather" airplane and fly it right into "all kinds of weather" and pull the wings off it.

    They have no appreciation for what their airplane CAN'T do. A Malibu, a T or P 210, a P Baron, all the 400 series Cessnas - basically ALL turbocharged piston airplanes and MANY single engine turboprops will carry you right into the worse part of a thunderstorm in terms of turbulence and precipitation, but at those altitudes have completely insufficient power to climb once the weather walls you in.

    They just know that the airplane is pressurized and air conditioned and booted with FIKI certification and a service ceiling somewhere in the 20's, so SURELY that's enough. Then many don't bother to get competent high altitude training. They don't get any supervised flights near convective weather with a SEASONED pilot in the right seat, ditto regarding icing. They just get their shiny new toy and a quickie checkout from some putz or some puppy mill masquerading as a training vendor and they're "GOOD TO GO". Just dumb.

    There is no substitute for experience, good judgement, and high quality training followed by a period of mentoring.

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    1. Unfortunately for many of these victims, what you fly is dictated by your checkbook, not by talent and experience!

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    2. Very good, comprehensive and concise post!

      Delete
  21. Never assume that you are completely anonymous and cannot be identified by your posts.

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  22. Malibu PA46 crash NTSB attributed to pilot error :

    https://www.muskogeephoenix.com/news/ntsb-pilot-error-cause-of-fatal-2021-plane-crash/article_a6487e44-35f2-11ed-a1c2-3341207030ca.html

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    1. http://www.kathrynsreport.com/2021/04/fatal-accident-occurred-april-23-2021.html

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  23. Complacency kills another one...and an innocent passenger...

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  24. CHAD ALLEN WILSON

    ...
    County: WICHITA
    Country: USA
    Medical Information:
    No Medical Information Available
    Certificates
    STUDENT PILOT
    Certificates Description
    Certificate: STUDENT PILOT
    Date of Issue: 12/15/2020



    Limits:
    CARRYING PASSENGERS IS PROHIBITED.

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    Replies
    1. Solo flight, or flight without a CFI, requires a CFI solo endorsement and a valid medical cert, at least a Class 3. None of which he had. He knew he was breaking multiple USC laws and FAA regs. He didn't care.

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    2. His C182, N6862M, purchased March 2021, made it logistically unnecessary to use an FBO rental or continue with a CFI after he decided he was ready to fly solo. ADS-B captures of N6862M show up in Adsbexchange.

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  25. This is similar to that Cirrus that also crashed in TX with a father student pilot and son.
    Just like for mass shootings... the problem is enforcing the laws on the books and obviously this perp violating common sense laws committed a murder suicide violating federal regs regarding pilot certification and limitations. May I also believe he didn't have a high performance and complex endorsement? LOL.
    I have no sympathy for people who break the rules and have one or many of the hazardous attitudes in Aviation.
    The FAA correctly denied him any medical based on his driving record and probably no CFI was willing to teach him as soon as they found out the details of his past. So the system did work as intended in that sense.
    But sadly 99.99% of all pilots are fearful of the regulations written in blood so the community self polices itself quite efficiently, which in turns leaves the door wide open for any criminal minded that decides to break the rules thinking the "blood" part won't apply to them sooner or later.
    Many of these "business" types and I use that term loosely for contractors and ranch owners, professions that don't have background checks and require more greasing hands and connection skills than actual skills in the field, are used to skirting the law and violating it when no one is watching.
    And government contractors are the worst: Milk taxpayer's money for project that could be finished in a week but take 6 month to finish.

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    Replies
    1. Reply to comment “This is similar to the Cirrus”.

      Excellent comment! I’d like to add, You Tube has both a positive and negative effects on aviation safety, mostly positive in my option, but there are some videos that give me concern. One series of videos is about a man that receives a twin Cessna for free from the owner. The plane had been setting for years in the weather. The new owner is not an A&P mechanic, yet he goes about conducting maintenance that is outside the domain of an aircraft owner’s responsibilities as prescribed by the FAA.

      Many of these accidents not only have pilots that are not properly certified but their aircraft are not being maintained and licensed correctly. They appear to have an attitude that they are above the law in every aspect.

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    2. That C401 was never going to fly again. It would need multiple sign-offs from A&Ps and A&Es which it was never going to get. Running the engines allowed him to get the airplane in the deal he made with the owner. The owner grounded the plane 20 years earlier because he didn't have the $80K to comply with a mandatory AD on the wing structure. That YouTuber didn't have that kind of money. Plus these high performance turbocharged piston twins are cheap as dirt on Trade-a-plane because no one can afford to maintain them anymore. A 20 year old turbo C-182 with updated avionics is worth far more than one of these high performance piston twins that is in good condition because of the mnx costs.

      Delete
    3. It is generally understood that YT is a place where you can build a story line about how you are going to "get that old airplane running again" while having no intention of completion to a signed off condition. You only have to read the comments of fans who adore the "accident experts" to realize how easy it is to string along the easy marks for monetization and follower count.

      Will one of YT's gullible fan boys seen in comments eventually be inspired to take on a derelict aircraft, get it running on his own and be a menace to the public and family? Seems likely. Same way you get car surfing and skateboarders intercepting traffic after sliding down handrails of steps out front of public buildings. Weak suggestible minds watching videos.

      Delete
  26. List of DUIs as long as your arm, brother-in-law was a DA or something, nuff said.

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    1. Well people can't blame the FAA because the system works... he was most likely denied a medical and told he could at best hope for a sport pilot license if he had a valid driver's license. Or he could be a non commercial glider or balloon pilot. But of course he got himself a high performance complex machine but didn't understand such aircraft will kill you the first chance they get.
      I suspect no insurance either, so whatever creative lawyer for the estates for the kids will probably try to sue whoever sold the plane or the FAA for "negligence" in not having been able to prevent the criminal from owning an airplane he was not qualified or allowed to fly. Yes strict liability in the US tort system is that insane believe it or not.

      Delete
    2. That part of the system worked. The part where they find out he is flying illegally and stop him did not work, as it usually does not until after an incident. Partially the fault of the FAA and partially the fault of enablers and "see no evilers"

      Delete
    3. He most certainly didn't even have Texas DL, as it was certainly revoked for his DUI offenses. He was totally relying on the fact the FAA doesn't have air patrol troopers checking operators licenses, so he could fly with impunity knowing no one in GA FBOs checks/asks to see a PPL license if you own your own plane. He abused a trust system. That will cost all of us someday.

      Delete
    4. In theory any police officer or TSA or even FBO can ask for a pilot license. Or ask the full name then run it in https://amsrvs.registry.faa.gov/airmeninquiry/
      This is why any airman, student and above, signs a waiver saying his info can be disseminated. It's public info. And the community self polices itself and those who ignore the rules written in blood sooner or later get the taste of why they are written in blood.

      Delete
    5. Consider what a 100% ramp check would look like and whether it would be "worth it". Construct the idea in the form of a gate keeper in a guard shack who checks every plane that heads out toward the taxiway. Include the following assumptions:
      1. Staff this 24 Hours/365 at every field, including non-towered
      2. Overcome opt outs/lag/data errors if airmen registry is used
      3. Figure out authentication for logbook endorsements
      4. Overcome fake credentials/impersonation of a legit pilot
      5. Overcome integrity issues of those hired as gatekeepers
      6. What fee would have to be collected for doing the program

      Now consider the actual number of uncertified pilots that exist or have expired medicals you hope to catch in contrast to those you erroneously detain or write up due to #2 & #3. Notice that #4 & #5 are workarounds.

      Potential for making a difference is way too low to even start the conversation - it's basically a no go from the get go, with a potential to impede legit pilots that far exceeds any potential to catch perps.

      Delete
  27. Here is another tragic accident of a low time student owner/pilot (total time 35 hrs) getting flight instruction in his V-tail Bonanza. The CFI had 700 hrs total time, with no experience in a Bonanza.

    The plane had an electric controlled prop, and during a touch and go they did not bring the RPM up during the approach to touch. The engine had reduced power on take off because of the high propeller pitch angle. They tried to turn back to land, stalled and cartwheeled across the open flat desert of Arizona, the CFI was ejected and killed, the owner/student pilot burned to death. A straight ahead landing would have allowed them to walk away.

    Here is the video, it is worth watching the entire video, but you can skip forward to the 11:35 mark for a summation.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JUHxU8q_Xo

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    1. Correction to my posting above:

      A review of the aircraft registration at the FAA listed the engine as "Unknown". The presenter in the video may have been correct when he said, "the plane was a 2.2 million dollar turbine powered aircraft".

      Does anyone here know if it was piston or turbine powered? How much easy money did this person have to burn?

      Delete
    2. Think it was piston engine per picture in ad for $234,000. Think it had high time engine right at TBO in ad .

      Delete
  28. Any PA46 is a danger for the aviation. They are just fragile, the same like the PA 28. It´s not difficult to find out if you go for a little research. They lose a wing any time if they are stressed just a little bit over the limits. I am convinced the break in part even before if there are certain circumstances. But ok if you buy one you should do your homework before. I am FI and ARPL rated flying for over 20 years now and if you ready about PA46 accidents they mostly disassemble them self in the air. That's a fact and it's time to talk frankly about this. Just compare to Cessna strut planes.

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    1. When you convinced yourself that they mostly disassemble them self in the air, what was the total number of known breakup events you based that on? How many PA46 aircraft in total have been produced?

      Did you notice that some of the recent breakups had ADS-B data ground speeds showing that the pilots did not reduce speed at all as they entered the stormy conditions?

      Delete
    2. You know what is also a danger "for the aviation"? People that willfully break multiple laws by flying with no license, no training, no medical, and a history of alcohol abuse. That has more to do with the cause of this accident than anything else. These laws exist for a reason and anyone who thinks they don't apply to them clearly demonstrates a negligent anti-authority hazard attitude which will carry over to bad ADM leading to accidents like this.

      Delete
  29. Check out how many fatal Malibu wrecks involved doped-up pilots. Interesting.

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  30. Malibu must be easy to learn to fly because many crashes seem to be by lower time pilots who are proficient enough to be signed off by instructor on normal procedures. After checkout, pilots seem to lose control in turbulent or IMC and let speed build up in spiral until a wing breaks off .

    Footballer in UK was killed in a Malibu think after pilot got in IFR or just lost control over English Channel at night .

    Footballer had carbon monoxide in blood . Pilots body was never found but assumed to have been affected by carbon monoxide too.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-62594529

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    1. The aircraft is a marginal issue compared to the pilot issues here where a criminal (as in breaking several federal laws) owner was operating a machine completely illegally without license and endorsements. It doesn't matter if the plane was a jet or a Cessna 172. Besides that GARA makes the manufacturer i.e Piper immune from any liability since it has more than 25 years of age.
      The fact is any hoodlum with a company can buy himself a plane. Same as any hoodlum with no driver's license can buy himself a vehicle and the dealer will not check their driver's license and if they pay cash won't ask for an insurance policy. This is a similar case to https://www.mrt.com/news/article/Father-son-are-victims-of-small-plane-crash-12962115.php where a student pilot was flying a Cirrus with no license and no medical.

      Delete
  31. Embry-Riddle has stopped using the Piper PA-28 Arrow after a wing broke off in the pattern at Daytona Beach. The father of the student pilot is suing Piper Aircraft.

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    1. That lawsuit was filed March 2019, not sure what that has to do with the PA46 accident discussion, however.

      Copy of the as-filed PA-28 lawsuit:
      https://media.clickorlando.com/document_dev/2019/03/15/Capra_1552673328234_21580487_ver1.0.pdf

      Delete
    2. Thank you for posting the lawsuit. It is worth the time to read the document. It appears that Piper issued a service bulletin and a AD for the wing attach fittings on PA-28's, later after being lobbied, the FAA withdrew the AD and Piper withdrew the service bulletin. The wing came off a PA-28 during the finial check ride flight killing the student.

      You could carry the logic that Piper knows about weakness or fatigue crack problems on the Malibu after reading this lawsuit. This is quite interesting since we know that the NTSB and airframe/engine manufactures like to blame the pilot not themselves. As mentioned in the lawsuit the NTSB allow the airframe/engine manufactures to participate in crash investigations.

      Delete
    3. The Malibu maybe developing fatigue cracks in the wing attach fittings much like the early Cessna 210 series. It cost about $50K to fix a Cessna 210.

      Here is a short video that clearly shows and describes the inspection and replacement process of the carry thru spar on the Cessna 210.

      Delete
    4. Re: "You could carry the logic that Piper knows about weakness or fatigue crack problems on the Malibu after reading this lawsuit."

      That doesn't make any sense. There isn't any crossover or commonality of the PA-28 fatigue problem to PA-46 airframe history/accidents.

      Read about the well publicized case of the North Carolina N709CH breakup as an example. All fracture surfaces exhibited signatures of overload.

      Link to N709CH examination, from Docket:
      https://data.ntsb.gov/Docket/Document/docBLOB?ID=13641251&FileExtension=pdf&FileName=Examination%20Summary-Rel.pdf

      Link to N709CH Final Report:
      https://data.ntsb.gov/carol-repgen/api/Aviation/ReportMain/GenerateNewestReport/99567/pdf

      Delete
    5. From the report cited above: "(right / left ) wing was separated chordwise just outboard of the main landing gear trunnion fittings."

      Both wings failed at the same location from overload. It be interesting to see if this aircraft failed at the same location(s).

      Delete
  32. Interesting that it doesn't even have an NTSB# yet on their monthly list. https://data.ntsb.gov/carol-main-public/query-builder?month=9&year=2022

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you check CAROL every day for a N number's prelim report to come out, you probably have noticed that the NTSB number shows up a day or two before the prelim is posted. Not seeing the number appear yet when you checked at day 10 since the crash is normal.

      Delete
  33. The pilot looks like a real cocky asshole in the picture.

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    1. Based on what? No hat, shirt logo or visible tats that align with the appearance factors currently in vogue to criticize. Not seeing it.

      Delete
    2. As the dude well above comments, “Texas man with skill and a machine.” Those words are synonymous.

      Delete
  34. In N709CH crash in NC, seems unusual that ATC controller was partially blamed for not pointing out cells to pilot . Pilot wax blamed for not having instrument rating but listed himself as pilot in command on flight plan which is illegal . Pilot in right seat had instrument rating but not current and BFR was expired. Plane was flying on IFR flight plan at 27,000 feet which requires IFR rating above 18,000 feet . Pilot owner only had about 312 total hours and 143 in Malibu . Copilot in right seat had 1062 total hours and 173 in Malibu . Both pilots seem low time pilots for Turbine engine insurance coverage . Plane was 148 pounds over gross weight at time of crash probably more over gross at takeoff . Hard to believe these rich successful business men would risk or gamble flying illegally . Killed their wives too . Plane broke up in flight with tail sections found 2.6 miles away . Wings were found maybe 1 Mile away . Must have been terror with screaming in last few minutes spiraling down with no wings .

    ReplyDelete
  35. His actions do make him look like a fool.

    ReplyDelete