Sunday, October 16, 2016

Van's RV-4, N2626C: Fatal accident occurred October 16, 2016 in Oregonia, Ohio

http://registry.faa.gov/N2626C 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cincinnati FSDO-05


NTSB Identification: CEN17FA016
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 16, 2016 in Oregonia, OH
Aircraft: MAKELA URHO J RV 4, registration: N2626C
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 16, 2016, at 1740 eastern daylight time, an amateur-built experimental Makela Urho J RV-4, N2626C, collided with an aerial cable and the terrain in Oregonia, Ohio. The private pilot and the pilot-rated passenger were both fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post-impact fire. The aircraft was registered to the pilot and was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from a private airstrip in Wilmington, Ohio, about 1708.

Several witnesses reported seeing the airplane flying at low altitudes at different locations prior to the accident. Three witnesses near the accident site reported seeing the airplane flying low just prior to the accident. One witness estimated the airplane was at an altitude of about 30 feet above the river and the other estimated about 50 feet above the tree tops. Both of these witnesses reported the engine sounded "strong" and at "full power." One of the witnesses momentarily lost sight of the airplane and when it came back into view, it descended into the trees.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Eric Hackney


TURTLECREEK TOWNSHIP —

The Warren County coroner has identified two people killed in a Sunday evening plane crash.

Eric Hackney, 43, and Jesse Loy, 36, both of Punta Gorda, Florida, died of blunt force trauma as a result of the Sunday crash, coroner Doyle Burke said.

Scorched debris from the a single-engine plane crash remains on the side of a remote Turtle Creek Township hillside as investigators try to determine what went wrong.

The plane went down about a half-mile from Morgan’s Riverside Campground in a wooded area just off the bike path near Fort Ancient.

In the moments after the crash, people on the bike trail began to call 911.

“I think it obviously exploded when it crashed,” one caller said.

“God and them two are the only ones who know what happened for sure, but we can only think they had some sort of a malfunction,” said Clint Hackney, Eric Hackney’s brother. “The plane belonged to the pilot, the guy that was flying it. They left our personal runway and flew over to the Waynesville airport to get fuel, they got a full load of fuel and were doing some sightseeing.”

Witness Dirk Morgan said he saw a single-engine plane flying low, which was unusual. Moments later, he started hearing from friends nearby about a plane crash.

The plane went down in an area so remote, firefighters had to hand-carry gear to put the flames out. Morgan helped crews get through the thick underbrush.

“In many cases, we’re going through the underbrush and you could only see 10 feet in front of you.” Morgan said.

Even more challenging was the steep terrain, Morgan said.

“Incredibly steep. We were literally crawling on our hands and knees in some cases,” Morgan said. “I could grab a tree and grab a firefighter’s hand and help pull them up to the next level.”

Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board remained on the scene into Monday afternoon. The cause of the crash has not been determined.


Story and video:   http://www.wlwt.com



TURTLECREEK TOWNSHIP —   Scorched debris from a single-engine plane crash remains on the side of a remote Turtle Creek Township hillside as investigators try to determine what went wrong. 

The plane went down about a half mile from Morgan’s Riverside Campground in a wooded area just off the bike path near Fort Ancient.

In the moments after the crash, people on the bike trail began to call 911.

“I think it obviously exploded when it crashed,” one caller said.

“God and them two are the only ones who know what happened for sure, but we can only think they had some sort of a malfunction,” said a man who claims his brother was one of the victims in the plane.

WLWT is only identifying the man as “Clint” until a positive identification has been made on the two victims.

“The plane belonged to the pilot, the guy that was flying it. They left our personal runway and flew over to the Waynesville airport to get fuel, they got a full load of fuel and were doing some sightseeing,” Clint said.

Dirk Morgan said he saw a single-engine plane flying low, which was unusual.

Moments later, he started hearing from friends nearby about a plane crash.

The plane went down in an area so remote, firefighters had to hand-carry gear to put the flames out.

Morgan helped crews get through the thick underbrush.

“In many cases we’re going through the underbrush and you could only see 10 feet in front of you.” Morgan said.

Even more challenging was the steep terrain, according to Morgan.

“Incredibly steep. We were literally crawling on our hands and knees in some cases,” Morgan said. “I could grab a tree and grab a firefighter’s hand and help pull them up to the next level.”

Investigators with the FAA and the NTSB remained on the scene into Monday afternoon. No cause has been determined.


A forensic dental team is working to make a positive identification on the victims.

UPDATE@4:10 p.m.

Alan Wolfson, manager of the Warren County Airport outside Lebanon, said the crash did not involve a plane based there. Likewise, staff at the Red Stewart Airfield outside Waynesville said the plane was not based there.

The Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport north of Springboro has been closed for construction since Friday.

UPDATE @ 10:42 a.m.

Investigators suspect the victims of yesterday’s fatal plane crash in Warren County have local ties to the area.

But results of autopsies under way at the Miami Valley Crime Lab will also be used in determining the identities of the victims of the third fatal plane crash in the area in less than three months.

“If it’s who we think it is, they have local ties,” Doyle Burke, chief investigator for the Warren County Coroner’s Office, said Monday morning.

However Burke said the apparent victims did not live in the area.

Burke declined to identify the apparent victims, pending confirmation through dental records and notification of next of kin.

Today investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) were expected to arrive at the crash site, on state land near Camp Kern and the Little Miami River.

Emergency crews were first dispatched around 5:45 p.m. Sunday after callers reported smoke and flames coming from a low-flying plane.

The crash scene is in a remote, wooded area, east of Lebanon in Turtlecreek Twp., on property near a Church of God camp between the YMCA camp and Moore-Saur Road.

ATVs and boats were used to get to the site and a fire was put out without it spreading beyond the crash area.

The two-seat prop plane was heavily damaged and authorities were still working on Monday to identify its tail number.

It was not known where the plane was headed, nor from where it came.

Dirk Morgan said he looked up to see the smoking plane fall out of the sky Sunday.

“It came right through the treetops and then crashed to the floor,” said Morgan, owner of Morgan Riverside Camps on the Little Miami River.

Morgan used his knowledge of the rough terrain to help firefighters and first responders reach the crash site – roughly at the bottom of a cliff near the river.

“It’s an extremely steep hill, probably 300 vertical feet just to get down to the river valley - no roads, no trails,” said Morgan, a member of the family also operating a canoe rental business on the river.

“I went up to Moore-Saur Road to my neighbors’ property — the Church of God camp. First responders were there, and I helped them go over the hill and carry equipment down the hill,” Morgan said.

“I had to make two trips down to try to help them bring fire extinguishers and pick axes. … It was so steep you had to hold onto small saplings to keep from sliding 50 feet down the hill. So coming back up it was almost all fours, and I felt bad for the firefighters because they were in full turnout gear.”

Morgan said firefighters had to stop three times before reaching the spot.

Other firefighters arriving later took boats on the river or ATVs guided by GPS to get there.

“It’s along the Little Miami River between Strout Road and Fort Ancient SR 350. Those are the two bridges that it’s between,” Morgan said.

Morgan, one of the first at the scene, said he cringed at what he saw. The plane had sawed off trees as it fell.

“There were pieces of trees and then I kind of looked up. There was an opening in the big Sycamore trees that were down there and there were parts of the plane hanging from the tree limbs,” Morgan said.

“I just know I saw the smoking remains of what appeared to be a plane and parts, and I prayed for the families who lost their loved ones.

“I don’t think anyone survived,” he said before officials confirmed the worst. “I don’t know how they could.”

Burke and Sgt. Robert Burd of the Ohio State Highway Patrol briefed reporters at the staging area near Camp Kern.

“The plane’s burnt. It is a complete loss,” said Burd, assistant commander of the Lebanon Post.

Burke said it was impossible to tell even the sex or ages of the victims at the crash site.

He said the victims can be identified through missing persons reports, dental records or DNA.

At the time of the crash, winds of 8 mph were reported at the nearest reporting station, the Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport north of Springboro. There was possibly some light rain, but no reports of severe weather, according to WHIO TV Meteorologist Brett Collar.

Rain and thunderstorms are believed to have contributed to the crash that killed a Michigan man and his wife in Clark County on July 22, according to the NTSB.

Levon King, 81, and his wife, Gloria King, 85, died when their experimental aircraft crashed in a cornfield in Harmony Twp. The plane crashed seven miles east of Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport.

The couple were flying home to Michigan from Georgia, relatives said, when the RV-9A plane that Levon King built himself went down.

The NTSB continues to investigate the fatal crash involving Clayton Heins, 20, a student pilot from Arcanum, and his friend, Jacob Turner, 19, of Greenville, on Sept. 14, in Darke County. The plane was reportedly headed for the Moraine Air Park when it crashed in a cornfield.

Heins was flying a single-engine Piper PA-11 aircraft, owned by his father, when it crashed off Dull Road near Arcanum, according to reports.

On Sunday, investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the fatal crash scene in Warren County. The NTSB joined the investigation Monday.

INITIAL REPORT

Emergency crews were first dispatched around 5:45 p.m. Sunday after callers reported smoke and flames coming from a low-flying plane. The crash scene was located in a remote, wooded area near the Little Miami River, on property between Camp Kern and Moore-Saur Road, the Warren County Sheriff’s Office said.

Investigators said they had to use ATVs and boats to access the wreck. The plane was heavily burned and authorities were still working to identify its tail number.

It was not known where the plane was headed, nor from where it came.

Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the scene Sunday night, and members from the National Transportation Safety Board are expected to arrive Monday.

Doyle Burke, chief investigator with the Warren County Coroner’s Office, said they took two unidentified bodies to the Miami Valley Regional Crime Lab. The victims are expected to be identified through missing persons reports, dental records or DNA.


Story and video:  http://www.whio.com





TURTLECREEK TWP.

UPDATE @ 10:20 p.m.

A two-seater prop plane was still burning when crews arrived this evening.

The plane crashed in a heavily wooded inaccessible area on state property near Camp Kern. Crews had to use ATVs and boats to access the wreck. The plane is heavily burned and authorities are still working to get its tail number. It’s undetermined where the plane was headed, nor from where it came. the FAA was on scene tonight, and the NTSB is expected on Monday.

A 911 caller reported hearing some noises and noticed a low-flying plane before the crash.

Late tonight, Doyle Burke, chief investigator with the Warren County Coroner’s Office, was taking two unidentified bodies to the Miami Valley Regional Crime Lab. The victims are expected to be identified through missing persons reports, dental records or DNA.

UPDATE @ 9:30 p.m.

Officials from the FAA and NTSB were expected to arrive this evening to inspect the wreckage of a small plane crash near Camp Kern.

The crash site is in a heavily wooded area that is difficult to access. An Ohio State Highway Patrol helicopter, based in Columbus, was flying above, shining its light over the area.

UPDATE @ 7:55 p.m.

A Warren County Coroner’s investigator confirmed tonight that two people died in the crash of a small aircraft near Camp Kern.

Investigators at the scene were awaiting the arrival of members of the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration.

The plane’s tail number could not be seen because it was facing the ground. The mangled plane crashed in a heavily wooded area, investigators said.

The identities and genders of the crash victims are unknown.

UPDATE @ 6:50 p.m.

The Warren County Coroner’s Office confirms it was called tonight to the scene of the plane crash, which possibly involves multiple fatalities.

UPDATE @ 6:40 p.m.

The plane crash is under investigation by the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

An updated location of the crash is on property off Gilmour Road, still near Camp Kern. No further information was available about how many people were aboard, the type of aircraft or whether there were any survivors.

FIRST REPORT

Emergency crews found the wreckage of a small plane that crashed in Turtlecreek Twp. this evening near Camp Kern.

The first calls came in around 5:45 p.m. to Warren County dispatch that a plane was flying low and that smoke and flames could be seen.

The crash was found near the Little Miami River on property between Camp Kern, 5291 Ohio 350, and Moore-Saur Road, according to the sheriff’s office.

Story and video:   http://www.journal-news.com

UPDATE:

The highway patrol says a 911 call came in about a low flying plane near the waterfront in Warren County.

The two seater prop plane went down somewhere around 6 oclock this evening, October 17, 2016 on the border of Turtlecreek Township and Salem Township.

Firefighters and other first responders hurried to the scene.

They had boats, ATVs and portable fire extinguishers.

First responders had to go about 3/4 of a mile to get to the plane which caught on fire once it crashed

"When I arrived on scene the plane was still on fire. Most if the fuel had already burned out of it, mostly a rubber fire. And we were able to put that out bit it was contained. We didn't have any fire brush or anything else catch fire, so pretty we'll contained," said Sargeant Robert Burd with the Highway Patrol Lebanon Post.

"Every incident is different. It' just a matter for the family's sake we need to make sure we get the victims positively identified and find out what happened," said Warren County Coroner.Doyle Burke.

The coroner said dental records will probably have to be used to help identify the victims.

It's not known if they were males or females.

The bodies were taken to the Montgomery County Coroner's Office.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will be coming to the crash site Monday to start it's investigation

UPDATE: Investigators confirm two people are dead after a small plane crash near Camp Kern.

They tell us the bodies will be taken to Dayton for identification.

Investigators say it was a fiery crash.

"When I arrived on scene the plane was still on fire. Most if the fuel had already burned out of it, mostly a rubber fire. And we were able to put that out bit it

was contained. We didn't have any fire brush or anything else catch fire, so pretty we'll contained," said Sgt. Robert Burd, Ohio Highway Patrol.

The bodies are burned beyond recognition, and the coroner will have to use dental records to ID the bodies.

UPDATE: Warren County Sheriff's Dispatch confirmed a small airplane has crashed in the southern part of the county.

The plane went down in Turtlecreek Township near Camp Kern and the Little Miami River.

The wreckage was reportedly found on a steep hill facing the river off of Route 350.

Dispatch also confirmed that the coroner has been called to the scene. It is unclear at this time how many were onboard the aircraft.

Ohio State Patrol is now investigating the accident.

UPDATE: Warren County Dispatch has confirmed the coroner has been called to the scene of the crash.

TURTLECREEK TOWNSHIP, Ohio (WKRC) - Warren County Sheriff's Dispatch confirmed a small airplane has crashed in southern Warren County.

Details are scarce at this point, but they did say the plane went down in Turtlecreek Township near Camp Kern and the Little Miami River.

Source:   http://abc22now.com

Fly Hard Trikes SkyCycle: Fatal accident occurred October 16, 2016 in Manchester, Coffee County, Tennessee

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Nashville FSDO-19

UNREGISTERED ULTRALIGHT, SKYCYCLE, CRASHED IN A FIELD, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS FATALLY INJURED, NEAR HILLSBORO, TENNESSEE. 

Date: 16-OCT-16
Time: 21:50:00Z
Regis#: UNREGISTERED
Aircraft Model: SKYCYCLE
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: Fatal
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: HILLSBORO
State: Tennessee

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.





MANCHESTER, Tenn. - One person was killed in an ultralight plane crash in Coffee County.

The incident happened around 4:45 p.m. Sunday in the 2500 block of Prairie Plains Road.

Officials said 52-year-old Michael David Nelms was killed in the crash. His body was transported to the Medical Examiner's Office to determine the exact cause of death. 

Those on the scene said they could see the ultralight plane. Parts of the emergency chute were wrapped around a fence and power line.

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration were called to the scene. The cause of the crash was under investigation. 

Source:  http://www.newschannel5.com

Cessna 182D Skylane, N8718X: Fatal accident occurred October 15, 2016 in South Lake Tahoe, El Dorado County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N8718X

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25


NTSB Identification: WPR17FA008
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 15, 2016 in South Lake Tahoe, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182D, registration: N8718X
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 15, 2016, at 1552 Pacific daylight time a Cessna 182D, N8718X, struck the eastern face of Red Peak Mountain, in the Desolation Wilderness near South Lake Tahoe, California. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The cross-country flight departed Winnemucca Municipal Airport, Winnemucca, Nevada about 1320 with a planned destination of Westover Field / Amador County Airport, Jackson, California. Marginal visual meteorological conditions with moderate rain prevailed at Lake Tahoe Airport, 10 miles east of the accident site, and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot was returning from a hunting trip in Idaho, and had stopped at Winnemucca to service the airplane with fuel. Preliminary radar and audio data revealed that after takeoff, he initiated a climb to 10,500 ft. As he approached Reno, he made contact with Northern California TRACON (Terminal Radar Approach Control), requesting visual flight rules (VFR) flight following. The controller assigned the airplane a squawk code, and the flight progressed at a mode C reported altitude of 10,700 ft while remaining on a heading of 220 degrees magnetic, and travelling at a ground speed of between 40 and 60 knots.

Having reached Southeast Reno at 1505, the controller initiated handoff of the airplane to Oakland Center, and provided the pilot with the Oakland frequency. The pilot read back the frequency correctly, however Oakland controllers reported that the pilot did not make contact. The flight progressed at the same general heading and altitude for the next 30 minutes, however, radar data indicated that as the airplane approached the mountain range, it began to veer 30 degrees left and then right, while descending. Two minutes later, the airplane had descended to the last recorded radar target at 9,600 ft, about 1/2 mile east of the 9,100 ft mountain peak.

Controllers were unable to establish contact with the pilot, and an alert notice (ALNOT) was issued. Snow, rain, and strong wind conditions hampered the search effort, and the airplane wreckage was subsequently discovered three days later, at an elevation of about 8,100 ft, just below the last radar target.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Tyrell Kremer pilots his Cessna 182 above the Sierra Nevada en route from Stockton to Salmon, Idaho, on Oct. 8, 2016. He was reported missing on Oct. 15 as he attempted to fly to Jackson. Following an air and ground search that was delayed by poor weather conditions, he was found near the wreckage of his plane in a rugged and remote of the Sierra near Lake Schmidell on Oct. 18.






The El Dorado County Coroner’s Office identified the body of a man found Tuesday afternoon near the site of a Sierra Nevada plane crash as Tyrell Kremer, the pilot of an aircraft reported missing days before.

The 52-year-old Wilton resident was flying from Idaho to Jackson early Oct. 15 after a weeklong hunting trip, said longtime friend Rick Seifert, who was in Idaho with Kremer.

Kremer’s body was found days later near the wreckage of a small plane by search and rescue crews in a rugged area of the Sierra Nevada on Tuesday afternoon, according to the El Dorado County Sheriff’s Office. The plane, a small, single-engine Cessna manufactured in 1960, was registered under Kremer’s name, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Kremer worked as a senior safety consultant for Alliant Insurance Services, providing safety training and onsite help for construction companies, according to Seifert, who said the two first met on a construction site roughly 20 years ago.

“He could relate to anyone on the job site and he was very dedicated to create a safe job site for thousands of construction workers,” he said.

Seifert described Kremer as a loving father and husband who lived in Wilton, an unincorporated town in Sacramento County, and grew up in Idaho. The two had started a magnetized hanger business based in Idaho.

On Oct. 14, the two went to dinner after what Seifert called a successful hunting trip. Seifert said Kremer planned to leave early Saturday, and that the two did not see each other the next day.

“He wanted to get off early in the morning because the weather was coming in,” Seifert said about Kremer.

When no family or friends had heard from Kremer by midday Saturday, Seifert said they began to worry. Seifert said Kremer had been flying for about 25 years and was good about notifying his loved ones of his landings.

Mark Deutschendorf, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s Reno office, said a wind advisory had been issued for Saturday throughout the entire Lake Tahoe area. Heavy rain and low visibility caused by cloud coverage were persistent through the day, he said.

“There really wasn’t any break in the weather,” Deutschendorf said.

On Sunday, the El Dorado County Sheriff’s Office reported that his plane had gone missing. Authorities said the last known position of the aircraft was traced to an area of the Sierra Nevada southwest of Lake Tahoe.

Search and rescue crews on the ground and in the air battled with a fury of rain and wind as they searched for the missing aircraft in the following days. The El Dorado County Sheriff’s Office posted on its Facebook page that search efforts had been stalled due to poor weather conditions.

On Tuesday, the Sheriff’s Office posted at 3:40 p.m. that ground crews would continue to work throughout the night while airborne search efforts had been suspended for that day. Kremer’s body was found outside of his wrecked plane in the Desolation Wilderness, southwest of Lake Schmidell, at 4:15 p.m., according to the El Dorado County Sheriff’s Office.

A woman who answered the phone listed under Kremer’s name said his family did not wish to comment on Kremer’s death.

Seifert said Kremer’s passion for helping others and his positive attitude would be missed among those who worked with him.

“He was a very unique and well-liked individual who will leave a big hole in the construction industry,” he said.

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com

Cessna 150F, N7948F: Accident occurred October 16, 2016 near Berry Hill Airport (7GA7), Stockbridge, Henry County, Georgia

http://registry.faa.gov/7948F

NTSB Identification: ERA17LA015
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 16, 2016 in Stockbridge, GA
Aircraft: CESSNA 150, registration: N7948F
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 16, 2016, about 1430 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 150F airplane, N7948F, impacted a field after takeoff from Berry Hill Airport (7GA7), Stockbridge, Georgia. The private pilot and passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the local flight.

Shortly after takeoff from runway 11, the airplane cleared a line of trees 75 to 100 feet tall, approximately 500 feet from the departure end of the runway, then went into a steep nose down descent and struck the ground at a nearly vertical attitude less than 800 feet from the runway.

The airplane was secured for additional investigation.



Family members aren’t sure what happened Sunday to cause a plane crash in Stockbridge that left a man and his granddaughter seriously injured, but they are thankful their relatives are alive.

Jamie Thompson and his 8-year-old granddaughter London were headed back to Cherokee County when Thompson’s Cessna 150 crashed into trees while trying to land in a field near Millers Mill Road, the Henry County Fire Department said.

Thompson, an experienced pilot, took London out for trips all the time, wife Jennifer told Channel 2 Action News.

“They do everything together when she’s here and when he’s home from work,” she said.

Thompson did all he could to save his granddaughter before first responders arrived, Channel 2 reported.

“He was trapped inside the plane and he was twisted because he was trying to get her out,” Jennifer Thompson told the station.

Corey Smith witnessed the crash and rushed to save them, Jennifer Thompson said.

London was flown to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta with broken bones in her lower body, Channel 2 reported. She is now in a wheelchair.

Thompson was treated at Grady Memorial Hospital for broken bones and head injuries. He was released Monday.

The family said neither remembers what happened after the crash, Channel 2 reported. Relatives said the family dog was killed in the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the cause of the incident.

Source:   http://www.ajc.com














STOCKBRIDGE, Ga. - The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating a plane crash that injured two people Sunday afternoon in Henry County.

It happened off Millers Mill Road near Stockbridge around 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

Henry County Police Captain Joey Smith said a man in his 40s was rushed to Grady Memorial Hospital by ambulance.  An 8-year-old girl was airlifted to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.  Both suffered serious injuries, but according to officials, they are expected to survive.  Police have not released the victims' names.

The plane took off from Berry Hill Airport just before the crash.

"It did not get airborne until it got well down the runway here, which I thought was a little peculiar and once he got into the air, the engine did not sound right to me," said Steve Seal who watched the plane leave the runway.

People who frequent the small airport said Sunday they are glad the two victims did not fare worse.

"My prayers are for them, you know.  That's tough," said Gregg Harless. "I hope it'll be a situation where they have an opportunity to go fly again."

The exact cause of the crash is still under investigation.

Story and video:   http://www.fox5atlanta.com





STOCKBRIDGE, Ga. -- Officials have confirmed that a man and young child were injured Sunday afternoon in a plane crash in Henry County.

The incident happened around 2:30 p.m. in the 900 block of Millers Mill Road in the Stockbridge area and involved a Cessna 150 aircraft.

Officials said both a man in his 40s and an 8-year-old girl received serious injuries.  The man has been taken to Grady Memorial Hospital for treatment.

The Child was taken to Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

Officials confirm that the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been notified of the accident.

At this time, the cause of the accident is not clear.

Source:   http://www.11alive.com

Cirrus SR22, N176CF: Iowa State University wipes airplane records from websites

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY: http://registry.faa.gov/N176CF




Records used last month to inform the public of damage to a state-owned airplane piloted by Iowa State University President Steven Leath last year have been removed from websites by the school or its foundation.

Leath had pledged in an interview “to be as open and transparent as possible” about questions surrounding his use of university planes.

The removed documents include flight records posted on the university’s website. Also removed was flight information posted on FlightAware.com, which bills itself as the world’s largest flight tracking company.

Leath said the university removed the records on its site after an Associated Press report about Leath's plane mishap because they enabled a reporter to identify whom he was meeting. Leath claims the reporter asked “totally inappropriate” questions, including donations raised as a result of the meetings.

“You can still get the information, we’re glad to give it to you, we’re just going to take the donors' names and stuff off,” Leath told the Iowa State Daily on Oct. 5, according to a transcript of the interview published online by the university.

The records removed from the school's website did not list donor names, according to copies that the Register downloaded before their removal. Those records listed names of passengers on the planes, departure and arrival information, dates of the flights, number of miles flown and cost.

The university on Wednesday posted redacted copies of the records. Names of many nonemployee passengers have been redacted, including that of John Dudley, a professional bowhunter. Leath took Dudley on at least four donor-funded trips that mixed hunting and business.

In some cases, even the names of current ISU employees are blocked from public view. One state employee, for example, is shown only as "Frank."

Leath told the ISU Student Government Senate that “we’re going do everything (we can) to make as much freely available as absolutely possible.”

The Des Moines Register asked university spokesman John McCarroll to explain why the university had removed information from the FlightAware website that was available before the scandal. McCarroll responded with a one-sentence email, saying the information was blocked for both university-owned aircraft “for reasons of security, donor privacy and athletic recruiting.”

Leath last month vowed to stop flying himself and reimbursed the university’s foundation $15,000 to cover damage. He will answer questions from the Iowa Board of Regents about the issue during a meeting Wednesday and Thursday.

The Associated Press reported that Leath used one of the school’s planes multiple times to travel to and from North Carolina, where he owns a mountain home. He has denied the trips violated any university policies, saying he met and socialized with donors during at least some portions of the trips.

Removing the records from public view raises serious questions about the university’s intentions, said Randy Evans, executive director of the Iowa Freedom of Information Council and the Register's former opinion page editor.

“Transparency for them is apparently a synonym for obscurity,” Evans said. “It’s going to be a tough sale for the foundation to make the case they are good stewards of the foundation’s money when these types of actions are taken.”

State Sen. Jeff Danielson, D-Cedar Falls and chairman of the Senate State Government Committee, is drafting legislation to require greater transparency from Iowa’s three state universities. He said the questions surrounding Leath's flights demonstrate that comprehensive regent accountability is necessary.

“You’d hope that they would do the right thing without a law, but right now it sounds like they need a law in place,” Danielson said.

Source:  http://www.desmoinesregister.com

Bellanca 17-31A Turbo Viking, N93668: Accident occurred October 16, 2016 at McAlester Regional Airport (KMLC), Pittsburg County, Oklahoma



http://registry.faa.gov/N93668 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA019
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 16, 2016 in Mc Alester, OK
Aircraft: BELLANCA 17-31A, registration: N93668
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 16, 2016, at 1205 central daylight time, a Bellanca 17-31A, N93668, experienced a total loss of engine power during an initial climb from a touch and go landing on runway 20 at Mc Alester Regional Airport (MLC), Mc Alester, Oklahoma. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight instructor and a private pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was newly registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an airplane checkout instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Sundance Airport, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.






The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are working together on the investigation into a plane crash at McAlester Regional Airport on Sunday.

NTSB Spokesman Terry Williams said not much is known at this point, but more details should be available within the next “day or two.”

“We are still in the very early stages of this investigation,” Williams said.

The crash injured the two occupants of the plane — the pilot and one passenger.

Airport Manager Butch Mellor said Sunday the pilot and a passenger of a four-seater aircraft were believed to be doing “touch and go” procedures at the airport when the plane went down to the south of the airport runway. Mellor said he was told the pilot and passenger are a student and instructor.

Both were taken by ambulance to a hospital. Mellor said preliminary reports are that the injuries were not considered life-threatening.

Mellor said he was told the two victims are from either the Oklahoma City or Sundance area. The incident happened some time before 9:30 a.m.

Phil Brenner, owner of BrenAir Aviation in McAlester, was at work Monday, but not during the incident Sunday. He said the airport did not need to close at any time because the crash occurred off the runway. He said the damage appeared to be extensive.

“It’s pretty well totaled,” Brenner said of the aircraft.

Source:   http://www.mcalesternews.com





Officials are working to pull two people from a plane that crashed near McAlester Regional Airport. 

The pair was transported to the hospital with non life threatening injuries. 

Around 12 p.m. a call came in that a plane had crashed at the south end of the airport.

OHP said a student pilot went to give the plane full power to take off and lost all power for an unknown reason. 

One male is from Oklahoma and the other is from Florida. 

The FAA and NTSB responded to the crash.

Source:  http://www.fox23.com 






MCALESTER, Okla. (KTUL) — Police are investigating a small plane crash near McAlester Regional Airport.

According to the manager at the McAlester Regional Airport, a small plane crashed at the south end of the runway.

The plane was carrying two passengers, a student pilot and flight instructor.

OHP Caption Paul Timmons tells Channel 8, the crew were doing touch-and-go landing when the plane crashed.

Both victims were life-flighted to a McAlester hospital then the pilot was life-flighted to a hospital in Tulsa.

The cause of the crash is still unknown.

Source:   http://ktul.com



















































AIRCRAFT:       1973 Bellanca 17-31A N93668

ENGINE - M&M, S/N:               Lycoming O-540-KIES; L11719-48

PROPELLER – M&M, S/N:       Hartzell HCC3YR-1RF

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:       2519.20 hours TT; no overhaul found in logbook

PROPELLER:    TT UNK; time since last inspection:  30.05 hours

AIRFRAME:     2754.20 hours

OTHER EQUIPMENT:     Northstar M3GPS, Narco AT50 transponder, ComIIB, CP 25 Audio, TKM MX1 Com, portable GPS antenna and Air Gizmo mount.
         
DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:   In-flight power failure resulting in off-airport landing

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    Center fuselage broken; control surfaces destroyed; wings destroyed; case engine mounts destroyed; engine mount bent; firewall distorted; propeller is non-repairable; aircraft panel destroyed; broken window glass.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:    Air Salvage of Dallas in Lancaster, Texas       

REMARKS:    Sold AS IS/WHERE IS.  Logbooks are held with Brown and Company USA, Inc.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N93668.htm