Friday, July 23, 2021

Schweizer SGS 1-26E, N2517H: Accident occurred June 17, 2021 near Willimantic-Windham Airport (KIJD), Windham County, Connecticut



This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Enfield, Connecticut 

Connecticut Soaring Association


Location: WILLIMANTIC, CT 
Accident Number: ERA21LA276
Date & Time: June 17, 2021, 11:45 Local
Registration: N2517H
Aircraft: Schweizer SGS 1-26E 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Schweizer
Registration: N2517H
Model/Series: SGS 1-26E NO SERIES 
Aircraft Category: Glider
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KIJD,247 ft msl
Observation Time: 11:52 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C /3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / 16 knots, 310°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.96 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: WILLIMANTIC, CT
Destination: WILLIMANTIC, CT

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 41.736922,-72.181846 (est)






Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N472SP: Accident occurred July 22, 2021 and Incident occurred April 18, 2017

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida 

American Aviation Inc


Location: Brooksville, FL 
Accident Number: ERA21LA302
Date & Time: July 21, 2021, 20:15 Local 
Registration: N472SP
Aircraft: Cessna 172 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N472SP
Model/Series: 172 S 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 28.473611,-82.455417 (est)

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida 

April 18, 2017:   Aircraft on approach, struck a bird near Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport  (KBKV),   Brooksville,   Hernando County, Florida

Date: 18-APR-17
Time: 17:55:00Z
Regis#: N472SP
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
City: BROOKSVILLE
State: FLORIDA

Beech 95-B55 Baron, N66SR: Incident occurred July 22, 2021 at Salina Regional Airport (KSLN), Kansas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Aircraft landed and veered off runway damaging landing gear and propeller. 

InBound LLC


Date: 22-JUL-21
Time: 17:09:00Z
Regis#: N66SR
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 95-B55
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SALINA
State: KANSAS

Steen Skybolt, N1QQ: Incident occurred July 22, 2021 at Northampton Airport (7B2), Hampshire County, Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Bradley

Aircraft practicing high speed taxiing, hit a runway light, slowed down and flipped over. 


Date: 22-JUL-21
Time: 14:15:00Z
Regis#: N1QQ
Aircraft Make: MCGLASHON
Aircraft Model: STEEN SKYBOLT
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: NORTHAMPTON
State: MASSACHUSETTS









Cessna 140, N84BC: Accident occurred July 22, 2021 in Caddo Mills, Hunt County, Texas



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Aircraft rudder became jammed and made a forced landing in a field and flipped over. 


Date: 22-JUL-21
Time: 14:45:00Z
Regis#: N84BC
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 140
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: CADDO MILLS
State: TEXAS

Piper PA-28-180, N4746L: Incident occurred July 21, 2021 at Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; North Texas

Aircraft landed hard and a broken nose wheel cover was found on the runway. 

JRC Aviation Inc


Date: 21-JUL-21
Time: 21:15:00Z
Regis#: N4746L
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DALLAS
State: TEXAS

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N75776: Incident occurred July 22, 2021 at South Valley Regional Airport (U42), Salt Lake City, Utah

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aircraft incurred a propeller strike on landing. 


Date: 22-JUL-21
Time: 00:02:00Z
Regis#: N75776
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: UTAH

Boeing E75 (PT-13D) Kaydet, N51CF: Accident occurred July 22, 2021 at Baraboo-Wisconsin Dells Airport (KDLL), Sauk County, Wisconsin

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:     
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Mission Boston D-Day LLC


Location: Baraboo, WI 
Accident Number: CEN21LA333
Date & Time: July 22, 2021, 19:30 Local
Registration: N51CF
Aircraft: Boeing E75
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Boeing
Registration: N51CF
Model/Series: E75
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDLL,976 ft msl 
Observation Time: 19:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C /19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4600 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Mason City, IA (MCW)
Destination: Baraboo, WI

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 43.524428,-89.777409 (est)











Red Bluff Airport (KRBL) Runs Out Of Fuel: Multiple planes grounded until refill



RED BLUFF, California — The Red Bluff Airport has run out of aviation fuel, and it’s not the only one.

Airports around the state have been struggling to replenish fuel supplies, particularly for what is called avgas, which is used on general aviation and commercial planes.

While there have been nationwide aircraft fuel shortages, according to Airport Manager Scott Miller, the issue is less about supply and more about lack of employees. The job crisis seems to have bled into the aviation industry.

“All the reports we got say it’s not so much lack of fuel or supply of fuel,” Miller said. “It’s the drivers supplying the fuel.”

Sean Manaea strikes out career-high 13 in Oakland’s victory over Seattle
Aviation fuel requires dedicated drivers and trucks due to the temperamental nature of the material.

Miller said a single gallon of jet fuel being mixed with the avgas can dramatically lower the fuel octane that is required for the aircraft that need it.

“This situation is up and down the state, it’s difficult to get fuel for aviation,” Miller said.

Miller said the Oroville Airport had a similar situation in the last week and the airfield in Redding still has no fuel since it ran out.

So far, residents have had to cancel flights and some individuals have been unable to fly their planes out of the airport because their tanks are empty.

While Miller and others have been working with other airports to order and split fuel deliveries, it could still be some time before the shipments come.

“Before, we used to be able to order fuel and get deliveries the next day,” Miller said. “Now, it went from a week away, to 10 days to, now, 17-plus days. Right now we’re looking at Aug. 3.”

When the airport does receive the fuel, it will likely have to split it with another airport.

Miller said the Red Bluff Airport, as of Thursday, is completely out of avgas and has only 12,000 gallons of Jet A fuel, which is used for attack vehicles, helicopters and larger aircraft. Some of the Jet A fuel was used Tuesday night for an air ambulance.

Carden Aircraft Services Director of Maintenance Gary Walker said the company would be taking a hit from the lack of gas for aircraft.

“Financially, the lack of fuel sales hurts,” Walker said. “That and the frustration of not being able to serve our customers.”

Walker said this is the first time he’s seen a shortage like this in his career. He is one of the people aiding Miller in contacting other airport managers to set up deliveries.

“We’re not just sitting and waiting for it to happen,” Walker said. “We’re trying to actively solve the problem.”

Miller explained that the timing is a hazard in itself. The state is in the middle of fire season with wildfires popping up in various counties such as the large Dixie Fire in Butte County.

A lack of aircraft fuel could be detrimental to firefighting efforts.

Red Bluff Fire Captain Ray Barber said it would be a concern to his department if for any reason an airbase was needed at the airport.



Cirrus SR20, N39MB: Incident occurred July 22, 2021 at Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK), Chamblee, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aircraft nose gear wheel pan broke off during landing.  

N39MB LLC


Date: 22-JUL-21
Time: 13:45:00Z
Regis#: N39MB
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Cirrus SR22 GTS, N211CM: Incident occurred July 19, 2021 in Campton, Wolfe County, Kentucky

MoneyPit Investment Corp








Greenville pilot Clark Jernigan  was trained on what to do in the event of an emergency landing.

Last month, for the first time in his 38 years as a pilot, he had to put that training to work.

Jernigan was traveling from the Dayton-Phillipsburg Airport in Ohio, en route to the Greenville Downtown Airport, when engine failure led him to land on a Kentucky highway.

Jernigan was not injured. The small Cirrus SR 22 plane he and Michael Zurenko purchased 13 years ago was not damaged.

Jernigan told The Greenville News via phone Saturday that he’s still here due to intense emergency training from the likes of Rick Beach, a pilot safety instructor with the Cirrus Owners and Pilots Association (COPA) and other trainers he’s worked with over the years.

The training by Beach, in particular, helped Jernigan remember the guide to deploying the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS).

The emergency landing happened at approximately 6:30 p.m., Monday, July 19. Jernigan picked up the plane from Phillipsburg after a facility had painted its exterior, giving it a new interior, and provided annual maintenance.

He and two pilots with the maintenance facility perform a test flight for an hour and a half to confirm that it was safe to leave.

Everything checked out fine, he said.

About 45 minutes into the flight to Greenville, Jernigan said he had a subtle indication that one of the plane’s two magnetos - an engine driven electrical generator - may have failed. That failure was confirmed but, like most aircrafts, the Cirrus 22 can continue to operate with one magneto.

Fifteen minutes later, the engine quit, Jernigan said. It did so without shaking or any apparent causes, he said. “It just stopped developing power.”

That’s when Jernigan recalled the CAPS checklist of what to do when an engine fails in flight. The checklist includes determining whether the plane can glide to the nearest airport.

That wasn’t an option due to lack of energy to get there. Another option is to find a suitable landing site.

As he was descending, Jernigan considered pulling the plane's attached parachute. While positioning the airplane in a good location to pull a parachute, he saw that his landing site would be a highway.

“We are trained to have what we call floor for pulling the parachute. That is an altitude below which you won’t have enough time for the parachute to fully deploy,” he said. “My floor was 2,200 feet above sea level altitude. The terrain below me was about 1,200 feet above sea level. It was my intent that my floor would be 1,000 feet around the surrounding terrain." 

His biggest worry as he surveyed the Mountain Parkway – a 75-mile highway that traverses the mountain landscapes of eastern Kentucky- was whether he’d identified the power lines accurately.

“So often, with an off-airport landing, power lines can appear that were not seen until the person is too close to avoid them,” he said. It appeared that Jernigan had a suitable landing without the power lines.

But Jernigan recognized that he was about to descend at an altitude which would render the parachute worthless.

“I knew from my training that, at that point, based on the sight view, that I could land the airplane on the highway,” he said.

The airplane typically touches down at about 75 miles an hour. Jernigan was able to merge it in with the cars on a roadway that allows speeds up to 70 miles per hour.

The landing was in Wolfe County, near the town of Campton, Kentucky.

The plane’s wingspan is about 38 feet, Jernigan said. The highway on which it landed was about 25 feet with guardrails on either side.

There was no room for cars to go around it, he said. He feared that the plane would be rear-ended, but it wasn’t. Cars, noticing its descent, stopped and made way for the plane.

“We are trained to have what we call floor for pulling the parachute. That is an altitude below which you won’t have enough time for the parachute to fully deploy,” he said. “My floor was 2,200 feet above sea level altitude. The terrain below me was about 1,200 feet above sea level. It was my intent that my floor would be 1,000 feet around the surrounding terrain." 

His biggest worry as he surveyed the Mountain Parkway – a 75-mile highway that traverses the mountain landscapes of eastern Kentucky- was whether he’d identified the power lines accurately.

“So often, with an off-airport landing, power lines can appear that were not seen until the person is too close to avoid them,” he said. It appeared that Jernigan had a suitable landing without the power lines.

But Jernigan recognized that he was about to descend at an altitude which would render the parachute worthless.

“I knew from my training that, at that point, based on the sight view, that I could land the airplane on the highway,” he said.

The airplane typically touches down at about 75 miles an hour. Jernigan was able to merge it in with the cars on a roadway that allows speeds up to 70 miles per hour.

The landing was in Wolfe County, near the town of Campton, Kentucky.

The plane’s wingspan is about 38 feet, Jernigan said. The highway on which it landed was about 25 feet with guardrails on either side.

There was no room for cars to go around it, he said. He feared that the plane would be rear-ended, but it wasn’t. Cars, noticing its descent, stopped and made way for the plane.

In the midst of an experience unlike any that Jernigan has experienced, the “most wonderful 48-hours of my life” unfolded because the kindness, generosity, and resourcefulness of the people of Campton and Wolfe County.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), with Jernigan’s permission, inspected the engine. Mechanics from Steel Aviation, which had performed the work on the plane prior to Jernigan picking it up, sent mechanics to replace the magnetos, test the engine, and determine its airworthy before having a professional pilot take it to a nearby airport for more surveillance.

A friend and owner of another Cirrus plane, Justin Winter, eventually flew Jernigan home, thus ending Jernigan’s week in Campton, Kentucky.