Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Jay Ambrose: An unhappy Federal Aviation Administration landing

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com


The Federal Aviation Administration does something excellent and then it turns on itself, on responsibility, on honesty, on fairness, on passenger service, maybe even on safety in the air. It reverses course on saying to people wanting to be air traffic controllers that you're first required to have military experience or college education in the field. It says something else is needed — a balderdash test.

We'll get to that shortly, but first let's go back to 1995 when the FAA was doing something excellent — it was getting colleges and universities to teach courses of up to four years in which students could learn the intricacies of this demanding profession in which mistakes can kill.

At the end of the programs, air controller aspirants would take tough, eight-hour, time-proved computer-based aptitude tests. If they passed, had done well in their studies, had solid faculty recommendations and got through interviews with the FAA, graduates would be accepted into the FAA Academy. After more training would come several years of on-the-job apprenticeship resulting in important jobs if all went well.

Now, well, bosh on the military experience or college requirement. On the basis of inept calculations, the FAA decided these procedures were not producing enough women or minorities as controllers. The better diversity option, it figured, was to lower standards for academy admission to a high school diploma, some work experience and passing a take-home biographic questionnaire.

Here is the balderdash: You supposedly reveal your character and aptitudes by saying what it felt like to get your first paycheck or to fail at something or whether you played sports in high school. While the FAA refuses to get much into content, it glows publicly about the test. Fox Business News found an internal FAA report that did not. It said those passing the test in the untrained crowd are far less likely to make it all the way to the top than those who had the college or military experience. This adds up to whole big bunches of inefficiency and wasted moolah, Mr. and Mrs. Taxpayer.

It also turns out that at least some untrained minorities taking the test got help from an FAA insider, news stories tell us, but not the college grads. Thousands of them have flunked it, including some who were absolute whizzes at the profession's demands. They can try again in a year, but meanwhile they have spent thousands of dollars and years of their lives on education that will not pay off.

While some of the 36 university and college programs are now struggling to stay in business, the Mountain States Legal Foundation is planning a rescue. The Denver-based nonprofit, which takes on government tyrannies of all shapes and sizes, has filed a class action lawsuit against the FAA for 3,000 graduates and is making sound, strong points.

It is observing, for instance, how the schools had actually done a superior job at bringing in women and minorities and that record numbers of air traffic controllers are in the process of retiring. The FAA is flunking at replacing them as it should, and those left on hand will have to work long days and weeks. The resulting exhaustion will be less than helpful in making lickety-split decisions that keep planes from crashing.

Some in Congress are considering laws about the balderdash test and a failure to do more about those retiring. In a recent hearing, Rep. Frank LoBiondo, R-N.J., said the new "hiring process is not putting forward the highest quality of controller candidates," noting the number of those getting through the FAA training was down 20 percent on an annual basis. He said "the nation and the flying public" are being "underserved" as the 3,000 qualified graduates are not allowed in the door.

The costs here are plenty — not least the economy if plane takeoffs and landings become more limited. And, even though there are clearly top-notch officials in the FAA, what we are witnessing is what can happen in an administrative state when misled ideological overreaching takes control.

Original article can be found here: http://www.naplesnews.com/columnists/opinion

‘True gentleman’ helicopter pilot remembered for duty and service

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

Charles Aaron
Family, friends and fellow pilots gathered at Camarillo Airport June 21 to pay tribute to Charles Aaron, a 35-year-old Westlake Village man who was killed in a solo motorcycle crash on Kanan Road earlier this month.

Aaron was riding his BMW motorcycle south toward Malibu June 13 when he missed a curve in the road and crashed into the side of a mountain, California Highway officer Leland Tang said.

Aaron was thrown from his motorcycle and died at the scene.

An Air Force veteran who served in Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, Aaron is the son of Chuck Aaron, a renowned aerobatic pilot for Red Bull and president of Westlake Village-based FX Helicopters.

He and his father shared a passion for flying and were best friends. They worked together at the Camarillo Airport and traveled across the U.S. participating in helicopter air shows, said Sean Aaron, the victim’s older brother.

“He was quiet and humble, and a fantastic pilot. He also was gentle and kind,” the brother said.

Aaron and his father recently started a business together; a flight training academy for helicopter pilots. Aaron was an instructor.

Aaron grew up in Florida, but he and his father moved to California about 15 years ago. Aside from flying, the younger Aaron enjoyed surfing, hiking, literature and history.

In a story published on Rotor.org, Matthew Zuccaro, president and CEO of Virginia-based Helicopter Association International, said the younger Aaron was a “consummate professional in the exercise of his duties and activities as a helicopter pilot,” and was “a true gentleman and wonderful person who always offered his assistance to those in need.”

Aaron recently moved to Camarillo, but spent much of his time in Westlake Village with his parents.

Tuesday’s memorial service at Camarillo Airport began with a fly-by tribute. A formation of Russian Yak 52 aircraft passed low with trailing smoke. Then a fleet of nine helicopters arrived accompanied by a black Huey that brought Aaron’s casket and his father to a hangar where the service took place.

“The memorial was very moving and personal. His father described Charles as a humble, caring and a sensitive person. He was also a very accomplished pilot for such a young age,” said Ricarda Bennett, a friend of the family and member of the Professional Helicopter Pilots Association.

The family is still waiting for the final police report on the accident. Aaron was an experienced rider. “He was a superior, conscientious and methodical pilot and motorcyclist, and a cautious person,” Sean Aaron said.

Aaron is survived by his parents Chuck and Jody, brother Sean, sister Ashley Aaron Scott, stepmother Wendi, and girlfriend Sepi Ghahremanpour.

Original article can be found here: http://www.theacorn.com

Cessna 310Q, Industrial Medical Support Inc., N315CB: Incident occurred June 22, 2016 at Long Beach Airport (KLGB), Los Angeles County, California

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

INDUSTRIAL MEDICAL SUPPORT INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N315CB

Date: 22-JUN-16
Time: 21:12:00Z
Regis#: N315CB
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Ferry
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Long Beach FSDO-05
City: LONG BEACH
State: California

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING GEAR COLLAPSED, LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA.





LONG BEACH, CA - A small plane made a soft-belly landing at Long Beach Airport on Wednesday after losing electrical power mid-air and being unable to lower landing gear, authorities said.

Long Beach fire crews responded around 2:12 p.m. to a report of an emergency plane landing at Long Beach Airport, said Jake Heflin, public information officer with the Long Beach Fire Department.

"Apparently the pilot lost all electrical power and was unable to communicate with the (air traffic control) tower, and he was also unable to get the landing gear to lock and secure in place," Heflin said.

The 31-year-old pilot of the twin-engine plane had tried to engage the manual release lever but was not successful, authorities said.

"As the plane landed, obviously it collapsed on its belly and basically skidded down the runway," Heflin said.

The pilot was not injured, and had stepped out of the plane by the time fire officials arrived, he said.

No one else was in the plane, he added.

Original article can be found here: http://patch.com

Cessna 182P Skylane, N9434M; accident occurred June 22, 2016 in Humansville, Polk County, Missouri -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N9434M

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Kansas City FSDO-63


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA229
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 22, 2016 in Humansville, MO
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N9434M
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 22, 2016, about 1130 central daylight time, a Cessna 182P airplane, N9434M, conducted a forced landing near Humansville, Missouri. The commercial rated pilot and passenger sustained no injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight. The cross-country flight departed the Dexter B Florence Memorial Field Airport, Arkadelphia, Arkansas, and was en route to the Skyhaven Airport, Warrensburg, Missouri.

The flight was part of the Air Race Classic competition. The pilot reported that while in cruise flight at 500 feet above ground level, the engine began to surge and lost partial power. She began flying towards the closest airport and attempted to restore engine power. The engine was not responsive and she elected to conduct a forced landing to a field.

An initial examination of the airplane found substantial damage to the fuselage. The airplane and engine were retained for further examination.


HUMANSVILLE, Mo. (KY3) - A small plane crash-landed in northwestern Polk County late Wednesday morning during an all-female cross-country race. The pilot, Susan Larson, 65, of Santa Fe, N.M., called 9-1-1 shortly before noon to say she made an emergency landing with her co-pilot, Amy Ecclesine, 60, of Berkeley, Cal.

The women were flying from Arkadelphia, Ark., to Warrensburg, Mo., the next stop in the race, when they had engine trouble. The pilot said she first thought she could make it to an airport in Stockton but then decided she couldn't make it and landed in a hay field.

The Warrensburg Daily Star-Journal says the Cessna 182 was one of the airplanes racing in the 40th Annual Air Race Classic, which departed from Prescott, Arizona, on Tuesday morning. Race spokeswoman Dianna Stanger says preparations were being made Wednesday afternoon to remove the damaged aircraft from the field.

The race covers more than 2,700 miles across 12 states over four days and ends at 5 p.m. Friday in Daytona Beach, Florida. Stanger says there have been no fatal crashes in the event's four decades.

The website for the Air Race Classic, http://www.airraceclassic.org/, says the race started with 55 teams with 130 pilots. Several of the planes are Cessna 182 models.

Emergency responders say the women walked away from the Cessna Skylane 182P after the landing. A trooper said they "don't have a scratch on them" and they refused ambulance service.

Witnesses saw the plane circling around after the engine failed. The land owner was able to track them down and found they were okay.

The location is near Double J Indoor Arena, off East 344th Road near Highway M, a couple of miles southwest of Humansville.

The land owner wouldn't let reporters and videographers near the landing site, which is shielded from a road by trees, and the Missouri State Highway Patrol said it couldn't share its photos because the women demanded that they not be released.



Here's a profile of the women from the Air Race Classic's website:

This is the ninth Air Race Classic for Susan Larson (Santa Fe, NM). A Commercial pilot, single-engine land and helicopter, Susan has a helicopter flight instructor certificate, a tailwheel endorsement and 3,850 hours under her belt. Susan is a past president of the 99s and a member of the Rio Grande Norte chapter.

The mother of a daughter who is a pilot, Susan flies the ARC, “For the estrogen rush at each flyby, and to update my skill set, particularly my decision-making. Bonding with my co-pilot is an added bonus.” She added, “Since my first ARC in 1986, the many races have become just one Great Race in my dreams. And I'm still trying to win that Great Race.”

Susan is former owner/operator of a helicopter charter and tour company, former owner and manager of a pallet company and a former certified public accountant. The past 30 years have brought her much joy, an in-depth STEM (science, technology, science and math) education, deep friendships, scenery beyond description, a strong bond with a Cessna 182 and experiences that will last a lifetime.

Amy Ecclesine (Berkeley, CA) is flying the ARC for the fourth time. She is a Private pilot, single-engine land, with 700 hours in her logbook. Said Amy, “Racing is the ultimate continuous improvement to my piloting skills; it's a thrill, and I get to see part of the country I might never see from a single engine plane. And the accomplished women's company is wonderful.”

One memorable race experience involved ordering pizza delivered to their hotel and sharing it with their baby birds after a close encounter with a tornado. Amy is a program leader for the radiation protection group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Before that, she worked at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, where she met Susan. Amy has run more than 80 triathlons and enjoys snorkeling, singing, dancing, motorcycling, skiing and open-water swimming – anything involving speed. She is a member of the Bay Cities chapter of the 99s.

End of team profile from website

Original article can be found here:  http://www.ky3.com


HUMANSVILLE, Mo. -- The Missouri Highway Patrol confirms a small plane has crashed in Polk County, Missouri and the pilot was able to walk to a nearby house for help.

The crash was reported about 11:30 a.m. near the Polk-Cedar County line, near the Double J Arena southwest of Humansville.

The two females, ages 60 and 65, were able to walk away from the crash unharmed.

They're from New Mexico and were traveling from Arkadelphia, Ark. to Warrensburg, Mo.

The pilot tried to make it to a nearby airport but was unsuccessful and put the plane down in a field, on its top.

Trooper Josh White, from the Missouri State Highway Patrol said, "We had several reports of an aircraft circling in the area, it was stalling, engine cutting out, then disappearing behind a tree line." 

The FAA is investigating.

Story and video:  http://www.ozarksfirst.com

A pilot and a passenger walked away with minor injuries after their aircraft crashed near Double J Arena southwest of Humansville around 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 22.

According to Missouri Highway Patrol Master Sgt. Gary Riggs, the pilot, a 65-year-old female, and her passenger, a 60-year-old female, both of Santa Fe, N.M.

Sgt. Jason Pace of the Missouri Highway Patrol confirmed the plane was en route to Warrensburg from Arkadelphia, Ark. when it went down.

It appears the crash was caused by engine trouble, Riggs said. Both people declined medical treatment at the scene.

"The landowner (where the plane crashed) heard the plane cutting out, and he knew it was going down," Riggs said. 

The plane landed just 1/4 mile inside Polk County at the Polk/Cedar county line.

The aircraft is a Cessna 182 four-passenger single engine plane. Riggs said the highway patrol has contacted the FAA regarding the crash. 

Humansville Rural Fire Protection District, Humansville Police Department and the Polk County Sheriff's Office responded, with the highway patrol leading the investigation.

According to the Warrensburg Daily Star-Journal, the pair was part of the 40th Annual Air Race Classic, a cross-country all-female air race. Participants were scheduled to land in Warrensburg today.  

Original article can be found here: http://bolivarmonews.com

Burkes Rouge BR-1, N677DB: Accident occurred June 22, 2016 near Brigham City Airport (KBMC), Box Elder County, Utah -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N677DB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA129
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 22, 2016 in Ogden, UT
Aircraft: BURKES BR-1, registration: N677DB
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 22, 2016, about 0800 mountain daylight time, a Burkes BR-1 airplane, N677DB, made a forced landing onto a field after experiencing a total loss of engine power. The airline transport pilot (sole occupant) was uninjured and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from Ogden-Hinckley Airport (OGD) at 0740.

The pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was a test flight. The airplane took off uneventfully and was operating normally. About twenty minutes into the flight the airplane's engine suddenly lost complete power with no indications or warning. The pilot executed a forced landing in a wheat field. As the airplane impacted the wheat, it nosed over and tumbled before coming to rest.

The airplane has been recovered to a secure location for further examination.


BOX ELDER COUNTY, Utah - Authorities are investigating a plane crash in Box Elder County just west of Brigham City.

According to officials, the plane was based at the Ogden airport.

The pilot, Dwight Burkes, was the only person on board and walked away with only a small cut on his hand.

The plane went down near 800 N. and 2600 W. Wednesday morning.

Burkes said he was taking an experimental flight in a plane be built from a kit and has numerous planes like this.

Story and video:   http://fox13now.com




 BOX ELDER COUNTY, Utah (ABC4 Utah) Emergency crews responded to a plane crash outside Brigham City limits Wednesday morning. 

Box Elder County officials say an "experimental aircraft" left the Ogden Airport escorted by a chase plane. While the plane was flying over the Corinne area of Box Elder County, the pilot experienced a power failure. 

The pilot attempted to restart the plane, but was unsuccessful. He was able to land the plane in a field west of 2700 West 800 North near Brigham City. 

The pilot, identified, as Dwight Burkes of Ogden, had no significant injuries. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.good4utah.com












CORINNE, Utah, June 22, 2016 (Gephardt Daily) –- The pilot of an experimental plane walked away from minor injuries after crashing into a wheat field in Corinne, in Box Elder County.

Dwight Burkes, of Ogden, took off from the Ogden Airport, according to a statement released by Lt. Jame Summerill, of the Box Elder County Sheriff’s Office.

Burkes, followed by a chase plane, experienced engine failure while over Corinne, which is six miles west of Brigham City.

Dispatchers sent Box Elder County Sheriff’s deputies to the scene at about 8 a.m.

Original article can be found here:     http://gephardtdaily.com

Cessna 182, N377H: Accident occurred June 21, 2016 in Blaine, Minnesota

http://registry.faa.gov/N377H

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA231
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 21, 2016 in Blaine, MN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/12/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 182Q, registration: N377H
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was conducting a local personal flight. The pilot reported that, while in the traffic pattern, she applied carburetor heat and extended the flaps to 10 degrees. At this point, the passenger informed her that the engine manifold air pressure had reduced to 4 inches. She added throttle, and the manifold air pressure recovered to between 14 and 15 inches. The pilot stated that she was concerned about having an engine failure and kept the airspeed at 80 knots until she was sure the airplane could reach the runway. She added that she then throttled back and that the airspeed reduced to 60 knots and, as the airplane crossed the end of the runway, she "lost all airspeed." She stated that, shortly after, the airplane descended to 8 to 10 ft above the ground and then landed hard. Based on the available information, the airplane's engine responded to the pilot's control inputs. It is likely that the pilot's concern about the engine led to her failure to maintain a proper approach airspeed during the landing, which resulted in a hard landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain a proper airspeed during the landing approach, which resulted in an improper flare and hard landing.

On June 21, 2016, about 1947 central daylight time, a Cessna 182Q airplane, N377H, sustained substantial damage during a hard landing on runway 27 at the Anoka County-Blaine Airport (ANE), Blaine, Minnesota. The pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane sustained damage to the forward fuselage and firewall. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated about 10 minutes prior to the accident.

The pilot reported that while in the traffic pattern, she applied carburetor heat and extended the flaps to 10 degrees. At this point her passenger informed her that the engine manifold pressure had reduced to 4 inches of manifold air pressure (MAP). She added throttle and the it recovered to 14-15 MAP. She stated that she was concerned about having an engine failure and kept the airspeed at 80 knots until she was sure she had the runway made. She then throttled back. The airspeed reduced to 60 knots and as the airplane crossed the end of the runway she "lost all airspeed". She stated that a short time later the airplane was 8-10 ft in the air and a hard landing was made.

Hughes 269B, N941BD: Accident occurred June 21, 2016 in Princeton, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N941BD

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA339
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 21, 2016 in Princeton, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2016
Aircraft: HUGHES 269B, registration: N941BD
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The uncertificated helicopter pilot who was familiar with the helicopter, which was parked at a farm, decided to relocate the helicopter to another location on the farm. Having no other means to move the helicopter, he decided to fly the helicopter to the new location. As he neared the new location in a hover, he became "scared" by the proximity of electrical wires, the helicopter pitched up, the tail rotor impacted the ground, and the helicopter rolled onto its right side. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to its stabilizer.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The uncertificated pilot's failure to maintain pitch and directional control, which resulted in an impact with terrain and a rollover.

Diamond DA-42 Twin Star, N327TS: Incident occurred June 21, 2016 in Stuart, Martin County, Florida

Kathryn's Report:http://www.kathrynsreport.com

EDWARDS TWINSTAR LLC:    http://registry.faa.gov/N327TS

Date: 21-JUN-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N327TS
Aircraft Make: DIAMOND
Aircraft Model: DA42
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19
City: STUART
State: Florida

AIRCRAFT ON DEPARTURE ROLL, PASSENGER DOOR SEPARATED FROM FUSELAGE, AIRCRAFT RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, STUART, FLORIDA.

Piper PA-28R-200, Hillsboro Aero Academy LLC, N1430X: Incident occurred June 21, 2016 in Hood River County, Oregon

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

HILLSBORO AERO ACADEMY LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N1430X

Date: 21-JUN-16
Time: 23:30:00Z
Regis#: N1430X
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28R
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09
City: HOOD RIVER
State: Oregon

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, HOOD RIVER, OREGON.

Stolp SA-300 Starduster Too, N789GA: Incident occurred June 18, 2016 in Hermiston, Umatilla County, Oregon

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

http://registry.faa.gov/aN789GA

Date: 18-JUN-16
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N789GA
Aircraft Make: STOLP STARDUSTER
Aircraft Model: SA300
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09
City: HERMISTON
State: Oregon

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, NEAR HERMISTON, OREGON.

Cessna 182P Skylane, N1248S: Incident occurred June 18, 2016 at Ocean City Municipal Airport (26N), Cape May County, New Jersey

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

COTE ORPHAN LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1248S


Date: 18-JUN-16
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N1248S
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Philadelphia FSDO-17
City: OCEAN CITY
State: New Jersey

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING STRUCK THE PROPELLER, OCEAN CITY, NEW JERSEY.

Mooney M20F Executive, N7184V: Accident occurred June 17, 2016 in Unionville, Putnam County, Missouri

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N7184V

Date: 17-JUN-16

Time: 22:30:00Z
Regis#: N7184V
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20F
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Kansas City FSDO-63
City: UNIONVILLE
State: Missouri

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, UNIONVILLE, MISSOURI.

Cessna 152, N67889: Accident occurred June 21, 2016 in Clearlake Oaks, Lake County, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N67889

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Sacramento FSDO-25

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA330
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 21, 2016 in Clearlake Oaks, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/03/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N67889
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight school reported that the private pilot submitted a night visual flight rules flight plan for authorization by the school, and then intentionally flew a route for which he had not received proper mountain flying endorsements from the flight school. During the night cross country flight, the pilot reported that he did not refuel at any of his stopover airports and became lost over mountainous terrain. The pilot further reported he attempted unsuccessfully to contact air traffic control, but after 4.3 hours of flight the fuel was exhausted and the engine lost power. After the loss of power, he reported that he glided towards a winery and impacted power lines, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage and right aileron.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's deviation from his original flight plan, which resulted in becoming lost in mountainous terrain at night, fuel exhaustion, loss of engine power, and a collision with power lines during a forced landing.


CLEARLAKE OAKS, Calif. – A pilot flying solo on Tuesday night survived a plane crash in the hills above Clearlake Oaks.

The crash was first dispatched shortly after 9:30 p.m. on Morine Ranch Road, according to radio and California Highway Patrol reports.

Based on radio reports, the crash involving the Cessna two-seater plane sparked a small wildland fire, with some damage to nearby power lines reported.

Northshore Fire and Cal Fire responded to the crash, along with sheriff's deputies and a California Highway Patrol helicopter, according to scanner reports.

Radio traffic between Lake County Central Dispatch and responding firefighters indicated that the pilot was able to get out of the plane on his own, called 911 on his cell phone and walked part of the way from the scene where he met first responders.

Northshore Fire Chief Jay Beristianos said firefighters had difficulty accessing the plane and the injured pilot. Fire trucks were getting stuck while trying to get up the narrow vineyard trails leading to the crash site.

Radio reports indicated that a vineyard worker finally helped authorities locate the pilot close to 10:30 p.m. The plane was reported at Morine Ranch Road at Red Rock Road under power lines.

The pilot was transported by a sheriff's deputy down to medic units, which took him to a landing zone at Orchard Shores. There, a REACH air ambulance picked up the pilot and lifted off for Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital at around 11 p.m., according to radio reports.

Fire units at the scene had reported that the vegetation that burned as a result of the crash measured about 15 feet by 15 feet, and had been knocked down quickly after firefighters arrived at about 10:30 p.m. At that point they estimated they would be on scene for a few hours mopping up.

Pacific Gas and Electric also was asked to respond to the scene to assess damage to power lines, according to fire traffic.

Beristianos, who remained on scene after the majority of other units cleared, said Cal Fire cut a line around the fire area. He said some power lines also were down.

Based on what firefighters had encountered at the scene, Beristianos said it appeared that the pilot made a hard landing in the brush.

He called the man “very lucky.”

Beristianos – who would clear the scene just after midnight – said the incident was being overseen by the Lake County Sheriff's Office, with deputies to wait on scene for Federal Aviation Administration investigators to arrive.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.lakeconews.com

Federal Aviation Administration Joins Push to Use Wireless Signals For Aircraft-Safety Systems: FAA sets up advisory committee to cooperate with European experts to provide guidance to the industry

Kathryn's Report: http://www.kathrynsreport.com




The Wall Street Journal
By ANDY PASZTOR
June 22, 2016 6:31 a.m. ET


U.S. aviation regulators have teamed up with their European counterparts to develop common standards aimed at harnessing wireless signals for a potentially wide array of aircraft-safety systems.

Nearly a year after Airbus Group SE unsuccessfully urged Federal Aviation Administration officials to join in such efforts, Peggy Gilligan, the agency’s senior safety official, has set up an advisory committee to cooperate with European experts specifically to “provide general guidance to industry” on the topic.

The FAA’s decision became public Tuesday, during a meeting of the top policy-making committee of RTCA Inc., an industry-government group that serves as the regulatory agency’s primary think tank on technical issues. The goal, according to the FAA, is “to enable improvements in safety and a reduction in weight” by eliminating some of the wiring that now connects many systems on board jetliners.

Both the FAA and Boeing Co. were initially cool to the notion. But the latest move to develop joint U.S.-European standards, according to RTCA documents, is intended to eliminate “significant variability in wireless technology, application and protection for aviation products.” The initiative is slated to run over roughly three years.

So far, most public attention has focused on enhanced wireless technology to improve connectivity for passengers surfing the Web during flights. But the Airbus effort move is part of a broader, less well-known initiative—which includes rival Boeing and several international avionics suppliers—to research use of on board wireless signals for safety-related applications such as a backup for engine controls; monitoring the condition of landing-gear systems; detecting dangerous icing on airplane surfaces; and alerting pilots about defective airspeed sensors. Some backers estimate the result could be to eliminate some 220 pounds of wiring on the average jetliner.

European authorities already are developing standards for such wireless applications outside passenger cabins. Now, an RTCA-organized panel, led by officials of Airbus and Honeywell International Inc., will seek to ensure there are common standards for safety-related uses on both sides of the Atlantic.

Previously, Airbus indicated that company engineers envision a wider range of applications, potentially even as backup systems for moving critical wing and tail surfaces that control flight.

Proponents envision such wireless applications will be separate from signals used by passengers for entertainment or communications. But one of the main issues the RTCA panel will study is how safety-related wireless signals could impact signals already used for radio altimeters that tell pilots the altitude of aircraft.

The proposed uses also raise significant issues about future aircraft vulnerabilities to cyberattacks. As a result, U.S. and European experts have been instructed to delve into those matters.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsj.com