Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Kelowna unites with United Airlines

 

Kelowna unites with United Airlines with daily flights to LA. Castanet's Kelly Hayes reports.

Teen to attempt solo cross-Canada flight: Matthew Gougeon hopes to establish a record to become the youngest person to fly an amphibious aircraft solo from coast to coast

Matthew Gougeon says flying has been a lifelong passion. He begins his cross-Canada solo flight on Friday.



A Sudbury teenager is taking to the skies in an attempt to set a record for a cross-country flight.

Sixteen-year-old Matthew Gougeon hopes to become the youngest person to fly an amphibious aircraft solo from coast to coast.

He planned to leave home his home in Sudbury, Ont., Tuesday for Tofino, B.C., where his journey will begin.

Gougeon is set to officially start his solo adventure on Friday and hopes to land in Halifax on July 20.

He'll fly a Cessna 182 with amphibious floats for his cross-country trip and estimates the entire journey will take about 25 hours in the air.

As he attempts to establish a record, Gougeon will also be collecting donations for the Neil Armstrong Fund, which provides flight training to young people.

"The main goal of the flight is to collect donations for those who are not fortunate enough to fly, and have the determination and work ethic to become a pilot," he said on his website.

Confident flyer

The high school student appears to be ready to soar towards his goals.

"I'm pretty confident with my flying right now," Gougeon said in an online video posted five days ago. "Pretty much the hardest part is landing and I've got that pretty much down pat."

The teen will have a camera mounted on his wing to document parts of his trip and plans to keep those interested in his journey updated through his website along the way.

As his trip will be a low-altitude one, Gougeon will need to be able to see the ground at all times, a factor which makes weather a significant element.

"I can't fly without visual reference to the ground," he explained. "Weather could potentially be a big problem and that is really a challenge because that makes it really hard to estimate how many days it will take."

If he runs into any problems mid-air, Gougeon said he plans to tackle them with rational thinking.

"You just have to go with the flow," he said. "Whatever happens you have to think about the possible outcomes of the decisions you're about to make and decide what's best from there."

Personal challenge

While his formal flight training began at 13, Gougeon had already logged many hours in the air with his father, who is also an avid flyer.

Gougeon, who currently has a recreational pilot licence, made his first solo flight a little less than two years ago in an aircraft used for military training in the Second World War.

Last summer, he passed his private pilot written test on the first try.

Gougeon said his trip is a "personal challenge" which builds on years of flying.

"My first flight was one week after I was born," the teen said on his website. "Flying has been a passion of mine all of my life."

Click on the audo button to hear Gougeon's interview with CBC Sudbury Points North host Jason Turnbull.

http://www.cbc.ca


http://www.northernlife.ca

Vital Scan: Jack Roush Segment – Lett R/Campbell K. AIRCAM, N912S, Accident occurred April 19, 2002 in Troy, Alabama

Excerpt from the Discovery show Vital Scan that features the amazing rescue of NASCAR owner Jack Roush from a plane crash. 

 



NTSB Identification: MIA02LA086.
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Friday, April 19, 2002 in Troy, AL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/20/2002
Aircraft: Lett R/Campbell K AIRCAM, registration: N912S
Injuries: 1 Serious.
 
The airplane had been flying around the area low level for about 30 minutes, when it struck power lines, about 70 feet above a lake, then fell into the water. The crash site was located about 2 to 3 miles southeast of the airport. The airplane was only partly submerged with the nose on the bottom of the lake. A witness jumped into the lake and rescued the pilot from the submerged wreckage. There were no reports of any mechanical problems before the airplane struck the power lines. There were no reported obstructions due to weather, and the reported visibility about the time of the accident was 10 statute miles.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:  the pilot-in-commands decision to fly at a low altitude and his improper visual lookout resulting in an in-flight collision static with wires.

On April 19, 2002, about 1804 central daylight time, a Lett R/Campbell K. AIRCAM homebuilt airplane, N912S, registered to Pike Aviation Inc., and operated by an individual, struck power lines, and impacted in a lake while maneuvering near Troy, Alabama. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time. No flight plan was filed for the 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight. The airplane was destroyed. The airline transport-rated pilot reported serious injuries. The flight had departed from the Troy Airport, about 1715.

The pilot stated in a letter that, "I have no recollection of the accident nor any other incidents which occurred on 4/19/02." According to witnesses, the airplane had been flying around the area low level for about 45 minutes, when it struck power lines, about 70 feet above a lake, and then fell into the water. The crash site was located about 2 to 3 miles southeast of the Troy Airport. According to witnesses at the scene the airplane was found lying inverted at the east end of the lake, in about 6 to 8 feet of water. The airplane was only partly submerged with the nose on the bottom of the lake. A witness jumped into the lake and rescued the pilot from the submerged wreckage. There were no reports of any mechanical problems before the airplane struck the power lines. There were no reported obstructions due to weather, and the reported visibility about the time of the accident was 10 statute miles.

Toxicological tests were conducted on specimens obtained from the pilot during admission to the hospital by the Federal Aviation Administration, Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The tests were negative for Ethanol in Serum, and positive for Lidocaine in Serum.