Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Piper PA-28-161, N137AT: Accident occurred February 05, 2021 at Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport (KMRB), Martinsburg, Berkeley County, West Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aircraft was parked and struck the pilot in the head. 


Date: 05-FEB-21
Time: 21:30:00Z
Regis#: N137AT
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Operation: 91
City: MARTINSBURG
State: WEST VIRGINIA

MARTINSBURG, West Virginia  — A man was flown to Inova Fairfax Hospital in Falls Church, Virginia, on February 5th after suffering a traumatic injury on the grounds of Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport, a Berkeley County Emergency Ambulance Authority official said.

The man, associated with a plane on the civilian side of the airport south of Martinsburg, was injured due to an equipment malfunction involving a plane on the ground, Field Operations Chief Chad Winebrenner said Saturday.

The injury was life-threatening, Winebrenner said.

The accident occurred around 4:30 to 5 p.m. Friday near a hangar.

The man was not an airport employee, Winebrenner said.

Cessna 441 Conquest II, N44776: Fatal accident occurred February 07, 2021 in Belvidere, Franklin County, Tennessee

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

BCD Aviation LLC


Location: Belvidere, TN 
Accident Number: ERA21LA124
Date & Time: February 7, 2021, 16:48 Local 
Registration: N44776
Aircraft: Cessna 441 
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On February 7, 2021, about 1648 central standard time, a Cessna 441, N44776, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Belvidere, Tennessee. The airline transport pilot and a commercial pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to preliminary radar and communications information obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot took off from Thomasville Regional Airport (TVI), Thomasville, Georgia about 1527 with a destination of Winchester Municipal Airport (BGF), Winchester, Tennessee. As the airplane was descending to 4,000 ft mean sea level (msl), the pilot established contact with the Bowling Green, Kentucky radar controller. The flight was then cleared for the RNAV runway 36 approach. As the airplane descended through 2,300 ft, the radar target disappeared, which was normal due to the radar coverage in the area. About 3 minutes later, the controller attempted to contact the pilot with no response. There was no further communication with the pilot.

Later that evening, the wreckage was found about 6 miles south of BGF. The wreckage path was about 500 ft in length, and oriented on a northerly heading. A large portion of the fuselage and both wings were consumed by a postimpact fire.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N44776
Model/Series: 441 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: IMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BGF,978 ft msl 
Observation Time: 16:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 0°C /-1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 30°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1000 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.14 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Thomasville, GA (TVI) 
Destination: Winchester, TN (BGF)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 35.086901,-86.072045 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Joseph Leonard Mackey
June 13, 1962 - February 7, 2021
~

Joseph Leonard Mackey, 58, of Estill Springs, Tennessee, died suddenly in a tragic plane crash on February 7, 2021 on Keith Springs Mountain, Tennessee. Joe was a living legend who embraced life to the fullest. He was literally larger than life and at 5’19” tall, he was looked up to by just about everyone. Each time someone asked if he played basketball, his comeback would be “No, Do you play mini-golf?”

Joe was quick-witted, entertaining, well-rounded, opinionated, passionate, competitive, dependable, generous, an inspiring role model, ring leader, renegade, true friend, honest brother, fun uncle, loving father, devoted husband and also a prankster.

Joe was born in Morristown, New Jersey on June 13, 1962 to the late Joseph E. and Janice P. (DeBoer) Mackey. He left behind his devoted wife and life-long business partner of 36 years, Sandra L. (Evans) Mackey, his talented son, Joseph Richard Mackey, Breckenridge, CO, his precious daughter, Sarah (Austin) Kinney, Phoenix, AZ and Smokey and the Bandit, their dogs. Surviving are his brother, Robert D. (Melissa) Mackey, Dallas, PA, sister Judith (James) DeBoer, Livingston, NJ, Aunts: Catherine Mackey, Ironia, NJ and Margaret Vanderkooi, Lincoln Park, NJ, Father & Mother-in-law: Richard D. & Dorothy Evans, Wilkes-Barre, PA, sisters-in-law: Bonnie & Dirk Hough, Chambersburg, PA, Lorrie & Jeff Mull, Mountaintop, PA, and Kellie & David Reinert, also W-B, PA and so many cherished cousins, nieces, nephews and a boatload of friends.

He was a graduate of Hanover Park High School in E. Hanover, NJ and attended The King’s College in Briarcliff Manor, NY and East Stroudsburg University, PA. Joe started out as a computer programmer but became excited about building houses. He and Sandi owned and operated J&S Custom Homes, Target Homes and Choice Rentals & Property Management in The Poconos area of Pennsylvania for nearly three decades. He held many positions in Monroe County, but most notably, he served as President of the Pocono Builders Association and then had the honor of serving statewide as President of the Pennsylvania Builders Association.

He loved a good debate and would often kick up the heat by presenting opposing views. He liked to win and ‘he was always right’. His personality was captivating, he didn’t put up with excuses and you knew you were doing something wrong if he cleared his throat.

Joe was absolutely passionate about flying airplanes and took any opportunity to be up in the air. Friends would be taken on tours, long distance family were visited often, and new maneuvers and drills were learned and practiced regularly, his favorite being spin training and chandelles. He continually challenged himself through avid studying and enjoyed the camaraderie with his fellow pilots. Joe recently received his certification as a Flight Instructor. If he had two wishes, it would be to travel back in time and to go to Mars.

Joe loved that there was no traffic in the air, but he was widely known for getting pulled over by the police. It all started in college speeding around town in his ‘73 Mustang Mach 1 with those dark tinted windows. He once hit a turkey that was tossed back onto the windshield of a police car that was following him. He got pulled over for ‘flipping him the bird’. On another unfortunate occasion, there was a near miss as a pig darted across the road. He was pulled over… again. “But officer, how did you know it was me?” “Simple, the pig squealed.” Sandi had heard these jokes a million times but played along as Joe knew how to captivate his audience. He was always up to some antics with his friends and has been known to drive a mean snow plow truck.

Joe was a MacGyver; he could construct, troubleshoot and fix anything. He was a master craftsman and his attention to detail was exquisite. He gave much credit for his success to the high caliber of people that he sought out and surrounded himself with. He learned from their work ethic, gift of story-telling and vast life experiences. In return, Joe mentored many others. He was most proud of his son and daughter, Joe and Sarah. He enjoyed having them tag along on business trips, putting them to work on the rentals, picking up rocks or shoveling snow, and challenging them to Scrabble or Rummikub. Most of all, he loved to see them smile and grow up to be the people they are today. Sandi has been an integral part of Joe’s life and supported all his interests and ambitions.

Joe’s idea of relaxing, was WORK, yet his favorite saying was ‘every day is Saturday’. He dabbled in excavation work, a few remodeling projects and a complete renovation of their TN home in his retirement. He loved classic cars, planes, being at the airport, scuba diving, boating, reading, camping, traveling, Star Trek, Sci-fi, games, wood working, watching the news and playing Frisbee with Bandit. He was known as ‘Pocono Joe’ to his new TN friends.

The family will have memorial services to celebrate Joe’s life in the late spring in Winchester, TN as well as in Northeast PA and Morris County, NJ. In lieu of flowers, the family is suggesting donations in his honor to the Mike Rowe Works Foundation for students to gain training in the building trades (www.mikeroweworks.org/donate).

Joe expressed many times that he had done everything he ever wanted do in life and had no regrets. His love for racing cars at 100+ mph on the drag strip and flying planes and jets at over 240 knots may have pressed his foot on the accelerator of his timeline and resulted in his early departure from this earth. He has created a giant black hole in the hearts of all that loved and knew him. Keep your wings level, adjust your attitude, engage...warp speed. Until we meet again. Beam me up, Scotty!  Moore-Cortner Funeral Home, 300 First Ave NW, Winchester, TN 37398,  www.moorecortner.com

Carl Cleveland Spray
October 17, 1942 - February 7, 2021
~

Carl Cleveland Spray, age 78, of Estill Springs, passed from this life on February 7, 2021, in an aircraft accident enroute to the Winchester Airport.  He was born on October 17, 1942, in Franklin County, to the late James C. and Lois (Roggli) Spray. 

Carl loved God, family, friends and flying.  His talents were flying and an ability to repair and refurbish any aircraft and machinery.  He managed the family farm after his parents passed. 

Carl served his country in the United States Air Force for four years and began his dream of becoming a pilot soon after. He was employed as a Tennessee State Trooper and Washington State Game Warden, and then worked at ARO as an Instrument Technician at Arnold Air Force Base for 10 years.  He then joined Farmers Bank in Winchester as a loan officer and pilot. 

In 1979, Carl started his air charter service and was a flight instructor to many people over the years.  His first love was flying and he excelled.  He was a dedicated member of the Winchester Cumberland Presbyterian Church.  

In addition to his parents, Carl was preceded in death by his father and mother-in-law, Bill and Helen Lappin; brother-in-law, Stanley Gipson; and nephews, Jason Lappin and Michael Spray.  He is survived by his loving wife, Betty (Lappin) Spray of Estill Springs; children, Lisa (Chris) Kelley of Estill Springs, and Steven Spray of Chattanooga; grandchildren, Gracen, Colson, and Declan Kelley of Estill Springs; sister, Clarice Gipson of Winchester; brother, Don (Rosaline) Spray of Tullahoma; sister-in-law, Cindy Marshall of Decherd; brother-in-law, Benny (Kim) Lappin of Bryant, Alabama; and nieces and nephews, Lora (Jeremy) Frost, Monica Spray, Marlene (David) Wright, Michelle Cox, Matt Lappin, Becca Yates, Misti Edwards, and Adam Marshall, and their families.  Visitation was held on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Moore-Cortner Funeral Home in Winchester.  Funeral services were conducted on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021, at 1 p.m. in the Moore-Cortner Funeral Home chapel with Dr. Rev. Michael Clark officiating. Private burial will be held at Franklin Memorial Gardens. The family requests that all attendees please wear a mask and practice social distancing, and they understand if anyone doesn’t feel comfortable attending during the current health pandemic. Moore-Cortner Funeral Home, 300 1st Ave. NW, Winchester, TN 37398, www.moorecortner.com.

Cirrus SR22T, N826DX: Incident occurred February 09, 2021 at Gnoss Field Airport (KDVO), Novato, Marin County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aircraft struck a deer on landing. 

Love To Fly Aviation LLC


Date: 10-FEB-21
Time: 04:31:00Z
Regis#: N826DX
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: NOVATO
State: CALIFORNIA

Van’s RV-7, N611E: Accident occurred February 09, 2021 in Thonotosassa, Hillsborough County, Florida

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Location: Thonotosassa, FL
Accident Number: ERA21LA127
Date & Time: February 9, 2021, 14:53 Local
Registration: N611E
Aircraft: RV770816 LLC RV7 
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: RV770816 LLC
Registration: N611E
Model/Series: RV7 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KVDF, 22 ft msl
Observation Time: 14:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C /20°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / 14 knots, 230°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3400 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 28.0833,-82.2666 (est)

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N488ER: Incident occurred February 09, 2021 at Daytona Beach International Airport (KDAB), Volusia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft aborted takeoff due to a tailstrike.  

Embry–Riddle Aeronautical University


Date: 09-FEB-21
Time: 21:50:00Z
Regis#: N488ER
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: FAR 141 PILOT SCHOOL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
Aircraft Operator: EMBRY RIDDLE AERONAUTICAL UNIV
Flight Number: ERU488
City: DAYTONA BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 177RG Cardinal RG, N8080G: Fatal accident occurred February 08, 2021 in Galt, Grundy County, Missouri

Philip Joseph LeFevre M.D.

Philip Joseph LeFevre IV


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Lycoming; Fort Collins, Colorado

Aircraft Partners LLC


Location: Galt, MO 
Accident Number: CEN21FA125
Date & Time: February 8, 2021, 14:42 Local 
Registration: N8080G
Aircraft: Cessna 177RG
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On February 8, 2021, about 1442 central standard time, a Cessna 177RG airplane, N8080G, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Galt, Missouri. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

Based on preliminary radar information, the flight departed Saint Louis Downtown Airport (CPS), Saint Louis, Missouri, at 1051 and arrived at Omar N. Bradley Airport (MBY), Moberly, Missouri, at 1157.Witnesses at MBY observed the airplane after landing and said the airplane windscreen was completely obscured by ice and there was significant ice accumulated on the rest of the airplane that was about ¼ inch thick. The pilot requested assistance deicing the airplane and the witnesses helped put the airplane in a heated hangar to melt the ice. They also added 16.88 gallons of fuel to the airplane. The pilot told one of the witnesses he would depart as soon as the airplane was deiced and that he dismissed recommendations to stay the night at MBY and depart after the weather improved. The pilot said he would fly north before turning west and that the weather was better to the north. Neither witness knew the pilot’s exact destination, just that he planned to spend the night in Nebraska before he continued to Colorado.

Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data showed the cross-country flight originated from MBY about 1410 and traveled north about 30 miles, turned northwest for about 40 miles, and then flew west-southwest for about 6 miles until the data ended at 1440 (see figure 1). The ADS-B recorded altitudes began at 1,100 ft mean sea level (MSL) and attained a maximum altitude of 1,900 ft before it began a gradual descent until the data ended at 1,200 ft MSL. Terrain along the route of flight varied between about 750 ft and 950 ft MSL. The elevation at the accident site was about 785 ft MSL.

Figure 1 – ADS-B Flight Track

The wreckage was located the following day in a wooded area about 1.5 miles southeast of Galt and about 7 miles west of the last recorded ADS-B point. The initial impact occurred with trees about 30 ft above the ground. The airplane was accounted for in its entirety at the accident site. Both wings and portions of the horizontal stabilizer were separated at impact and located near the initial impact point.

The engine, fuselage, and vertical stabilizer were collocated about 200 ft south of the initial impact point. Damage and dispersion of the wreckage prevented determination of the airplanes attitude at the time of impact.

Flight control continuity to the ailerons could not be verified due to impact damage. Multiple separations were noted in the aileron control cables consistent with overload. Flight control continuity was verified to the rudder and to the elevator attach points.

An unquantified amount of fuel was present in the left-wing fuel tank at the site. The right-wing fuel tank was impact damaged and compromised. Fuel drained from a broken fuel line near the engine firewall when the engine was lifted for recovery. The engine was examined at a secure facility following recovery, and about 1/3 cup of liquid consistent with 100LL aviation fuel was drained from the engine fuel sump during examination. The fuel was clear of contaminants and tested negative for water using water detecting paste.

Engine continuity was verified by manually rotating the propeller and observing inlet and exhaust valve movement on each cylinder. The top spark plugs were removed from each cylinder and compression of each cylinder was verified by placing a thumb over each open spark plug hole and verifying suction and outflow during rotation of the propeller. The four spark plugs demonstrated normal wear patterns when compared to the Champion Aviation Spark Plug chart. Each cylinder was checked visually with a borescope and no anomalies were observed. The left and right magnetos both produced spark at each associated spark plug lead when tested.

Both propeller blades were bent aft and twisting of the blades was evident. Leading edge polishing and chordwise scratches were visible on both blades. No anomalies were noted with the engine that would have prevented the normal production of power. A Garmin GDU-470 and a JPI engine data module (EDM) 700/800 were recovered from the wreckage and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board recorders laboratory to recover any stored data from the flight.

The routine weather observation for MBY at 1355 CST (1955Z) was wind from 030° at 9 knots, visibility 1 3/4 statute miles (weather conditions missing), scattered clouds at 600 ft agl, ceiling broken at 1,500 ft, overcast at 2,700 ft, temperature -12° C, dew point -16° C, altimeter 30.20 inches of mercury (Hg).

The flight passed about 10 miles south and west of Kirksville Municipal Airport (IRK), Missouri, about 1425. A special weather observation for IRK at 1446 was wind from 030° at 8 knots, visibility 3/4 statute mile in haze, vertical visibility 1,800 ft agl, temperature -14° C, dew point -17° C, altimeter 30.21”Hg. Remarks: automated station with a precipitation discriminator, 6-hour maximum temperature -0.1° C, temperature -13.9° C, dew point temperature -16.7° C.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N8080G
Model/Series: 177RG
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: IMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KIRK,965 ft msl
Observation Time: 14:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 38 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -14°C /-17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots / , 20°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 1.25 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Moberly, MO (MBY)
Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 40.10722,-93.37464 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Philip Joseph LeFevre IV, of Sunset Hills, Missouri, died February 8, 2021, in a tragic plane accident. His father, Dr. Philip Joseph LeFevre III, also perished in the crash. Philip was born March 6, 1973 in Springfield, Missouri to Dr. Philip Joseph LeFevre III and Patricia (Adams) LeFevre, both deceased. He is the devoted husband to Laura (Heinz) LeFevre whom he married on November 7, 1998. Philip is also the loving father of three precious children: Philip V, Patrick, and Colette, ages eight, six, and four, respectively. He is survived by his four older sisters: Michelle (Alan) Arbuckle, Cherie (Matt) Grahek, Christie (Michael) King, and Julie (Warren) Nakatani. He is also the "favorite" uncle to 14 nieces and nephews.

Philip is a graduate of Glendale High School and Drury University, both in Springfield, Missouri. He received his Executive MBA from Washington University, St. Louis, MO in 2011.

Philip became a licensed mortgage broker in 2004 and was the CEO and president of three successful companies: Accord Financial, Accord Properties, and his current company, Lending Partners.

From an early age, Philip longed to be a pilot. Under the tutelage of his father-in-law, James (Jim) Heinz, he began flight training in 2006 and earned a private pilot's license in 2007. In 2010, he achieved his instrument rating. He was able to purchase his own private plane, which was used to engage with clients all over Missouri for his business, and of course, to soar the open skies with his family, especially his father. In 2020, they were able to complete his father's bucket list by flying to the few remaining states left that his father had not set foot in.

Growing up, Philip was fortunate to spend his summers on Table Rock Lake at the family cabin. Many days were spent fishing off the boat dock or skiing recklessly on the lake. As previously mentioned, he was truly the favorite uncle, tirelessly spending hours driving the boat for inner tubing, skiing, and exploring the lake. His children have experienced all the joys of his childhood and love the lake as much as he did. He was a child at heart himself, and his ever-joyful disposition and optimistic outlook on life were contagious.

From childhood through adulthood, he was extremely gifted with his hands. Like his father, there was nothing that he could not take apart and put back together, be it electrical, plumbing, woodworking, mechanical, etc. The family relied heavily on his expertise and called him when anything broke. One of his most beautiful creations were cedar birdhouses with copper roofs given to friends and family. His children show every sign of following in his footsteps, with their intelligence and inquisitiveness.

His final gift to his children was a beautifully built tree house that he designed and constructed with his own two hands. In Philip's own words, "it had all the bells and whistles," minus heat, electric, and Wi-Fi, which were sure to be installed at a later date.

Loving husband, father, brother, son, uncle, and nephew. You will be dearly missed.

Services: A Mass will be held February 17, 2021, at 10:00 a.m. at St. Justin Martyr Catholic Church, 11910 Eddie and Park Road, St. Louis, MO 63126. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that donations be made in his honor to: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital https://www.stjude.org

Dr. Philip Joseph LeFevre III of Glendale, Missouri, died February 8, 2021, in a tragic plane accident. His son, Philip Joseph LeFevre IV, also perished in the crash. Dr. LeFevre was born July 9, 1935 in South Bend, Indiana to Henry LeFevre and Agnes (Steinbrunner) LeFevre. He was married 54 years to Patricia (Adams) LeFevre, who preceded him in death on February 12, 2019. Dr. LeFevre is the father of five children and is survived by his four children and their spouses. He is the proud Pop-Pop of 17 grandchildren: Amanda and Jack (Michelle (LeFevre) and Alan Arbuckle), Elise, Joseph, Genevieve, and Cecilia (Cherie (LeFevre) and Matt Grahek), Michael Jr., Annabel, Augustine, and Gabriel (Christie (LeFevre) and Michael King), Eleanor, Catherine, Margaret, and Elizabeth (Julie (LeFevre) and Warren Nakatani), and Philip V, Patrick, and Colette (Philip IV (deceased) and Laura (Heinz) LeFevre). He is also the proud Great Pop-Pop to Adeline (Elise Grahek). Dr. LeFevre is survived by his siblings: Kathleen (Dan, deceased) Bohman, Cy (Helen) LeFevre, Larry (Kathy) LeFevre, and Marg (Dave) Brunswick. He is preceded in death by his parents and his brothers, Henry (Bud) and Joseph (Theresa, deceased).

In June 2020, Dr. LeFevre celebrated 50 years as a psychiatrist. He was in private practice for over 42 years and, during his last eight years in medicine, served as a professor at the St. Louis University School of Medicine, and as a practitioner with SLUCare Department of Neurology & Psychiatry.

A Requiem Mass will be held February 15, 2021, at 11:00 a.m. at St. Mary's Assumption Catholic Church, 1126 Dolman Street, St. Louis, MO 63104.

In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that donations be made in his honor to organizations near and dear to his heart:

Our Lady of Guadalupe Monastery https://www.ourladyofguadalupemonastery.com

The Carmelite Monastery

Please mail donations to their address: 9150 Clayton Rd, St. Louis, MO 63124

The Greater Missouri Alzheimer's Association https://www.alz.org/greatermissouri

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N348RM: Accident occurred February 07, 2021 at Grimes Field Airport (I74) Urbana, Champaign County, Ohio

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio

Lunken Flight Training Center LLC


Location: Urbana, OH
Accident Number: CEN21LA126
Date & Time: February 7, 2021, 20:00 UTC
Registration: N348RM
Aircraft: Cessna 172S
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N348RM
Model/Series: 172S 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 40.130746,-83.754296 (est)

Lancair Evolution, N7569A: Accident occurred February 07, 2021 at Shively Field Airport (KSAA) Saratoga, Carbon County, Wyoming

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver

GA Air LLC

Location: Saratoga, WY
Accident Number: WPR21LA108
Date & Time: February 7, 2021, 18:44 Local
Registration: N7569A
Aircraft: ABBETT GERRY LANCAIR EVOLUTION 
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On February 7, 2021, about 1844 mountain standard time, a Abbett Gerry Lancair Evolution airplane, N7569A, sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident at near Saratoga, Wyoming. The pilot and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The pilot reported he was at cruise flight at flight level 270 when suddenly the front windshield departed the airplane. The pilot initiated an emergency descent and subsequently landed at Shively Field Airport (SAA), Saratoga, Wyoming, without further incident.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ABBETT GERRY
Registration: N7569A
Model/Series: LANCAIR EVOLUTION 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting: 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 42.1,-107.58



Gerry Abbett was 27,000 feet in the air and traveling at approximately 350 miles per hour when the windshield of his Lancair Evolution, for all intents and purposes, disappeared.

According to information from FlightAware, Abbett and his two passengers departed Afton, Wyoming around 6:12 p.m. and were expected to arrive in Cheyenne, Wyoming just after 7:30 p.m. The aircraft never made it to Cheyenne, but instead made an emergency landing at Shively Airfield around 7 p.m. on February 7.

"When I got up here, the plane had already landed," said Larry De Andredes, manager of Saratoga Jet Center. "There were three people on the airplane, two of the passengers were in the ambulance but he (Abbett) was actually standing at the airplane and I was just asking him 'Are you okay?' and he said 'Yeah, we're all okay'."

When Abbett and his passengers first departed Afton, they had every intention of returning directly to Valparaiso, Indiana. According to Abbett,  however, shortly after takeoff the plane was experiencing some drag while in the air. The culprit, Abbett and his passengers believed, was some snow packed into the retractable gear of the vessel.

"We believe it was because Afton had snow drifts on its taxiways and runway and we had to taxi through it and it prevented the gear door from shutting. We didn't feel it was safe to turn around and land back at the same airport with the runway conditions, so we decided to head towards Cheyenne. It's a place I land at frequently, it's a familiar place," said Abbett in an interview via phone with the Saratoga Sun. "The plane was flying fine. With the gear door not fully closed it was drag, so we were flying a little slower than normal but otherwise everything was fine." 

Abbett had been in the air approximately 32 minutes when things suddenly changed.

"People don't realize it, but when it happens in a pressurized airplane the glass goes outside not inside," De Andredes said. "I just can't even imagine what this guy was in for because, immediately, you have the relative wind in your face. Not to mention, if you use a standard lapse rate of two degrees per thousand feet ... it's going to be about 50 to 54 degrees colder."

For Abbett, as soon as the windshield of his airplane had disappeared, he immediately recognized that the vessel had lost its pressure.

"The very first thing that went into my mind was 'We just lost our pressure. We lost our pressure and we need to come down so that we won't pass out'," Abbett said.

With no oxygen available at 27,000 feet-for reference, Mount Everest's elevation is approximately 29,000 feet-Abbett had to descend quickly. Fortunately, turboprops like the LancAir are designed to move quickly and that includes their descent.

"With these types of airplanes, you can pretty much nosedive it," said Abbett. "Our initial descent was over 8,000 feet a minute."

Abbett took his Lancair Evolution, a plane which has a carbon fiber body, from 27,000 feet to 12,500 feet within minutes ... Medicine Bow Peak sits at approximately 12,000 feet-to get both him and his passengers at a level in which oxygen was available. That still left extreme cold, around minus 45 degrees celsius (minus 49 degrees Fahrenheit), and high winds coming into the plane. Through all of it, Abbett remained calm.

"I've never been the type of person that has ever panicked when something happens. Whenever something arises like that, it's almost like I get a heightened awareness. My eyes will get big and my brain will just become focused," said Abbett. "It's really hard to explain but that's just kind of the way I've always been."

Because Abbett remained calm, it also helped at least one of his passengers remain calm as well. Sitting next to Abbett was his nephew, who is also an instrument trained pilot.

"I wouldn't necessarily say he was panicked but, for good reason, he was seriously concerned. Once he looked over and he saw how I was operating and he saw what was going on, his words to me were 'That made me realize you were on it' and it helped relax him," Abbett said. "Now, the passenger in the back, he didn't know what was going on. I kind of feel like he had the worst of it because he was getting the majority of the wind. In the front, we were able use the avionics panel to kind of duck behind to prevent most of the wind from hitting us directly. He didn't have that luxury and, on top of that, he didn't have the luxury of knowing anything that was going on."

When Abbett landed his plane at Shively Airfield, that calm he had in the air remained.

"The EMT that took my blood pressure at the time just kind of shook his head and laughed," said Abbett. "He was like 'Wow, that's really good'."

Despite subzero temperatures and high speeds, neither Abbett nor his passengers were injured. This comes as a shock to both De Andredes and Bob Maddox, owner of Saratoga Jet Center.

"I am an experienced pilot and what this guy did was at the 'Captain Sully' level, maybe beyond," said Maddox in an email to the Sun.

"You just can't give that guy enough credit, really," said De Andredes.

For Abbett, however, it's difficult to see himself in a heroic role.

"If I was reading about someone else that went through that and did that, I guess I would probably think that of that person, but being myself I don't know," Abbett said. "It's hard for me to think of myself in that regard. I just did what I do."

While Abbett has returned to Indiana, his airplane has not. It is currently sitting at Shively Airfield, but out of the elements thanks to Brush Creek Ranch who has allowed Abbett to store his airplane in their hanger until he can decide what to do with it. Additionally, the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the incident.

Abbett is thankful that he was able to land at Shively Airfield, which boasts one of the longest runways in the United States. He also credits his airplane for saving the lives of him and his passengers as much as others credit him. Along with the avionics, the heat put out by the Lancair Evolution kept Abbett's hands warm enough to operate the controls.

Said Abbett, "It did everything I asked it. WIthout that, I don't think we would have made it."

Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, N125MG: Accident occurred February 07, 2021 and Incident occurred April 26, 2019

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

 Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Hillsboro Aero Academy LLC


Location: Redmond, OR
Accident Number: WPR21LA117
Date & Time: February 7, 2021, 14:00 Local 
Registration: N125MG
Aircraft: Piper PA-44-180
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N125MG
Model/Series: PA-44-180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot school (141)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time: 15:14 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 44.254102,-121.15058 (est)

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

April 26, 2019: Gear collapsed and propeller strike at Hillsboro Airport (KHIO), Washington County, Oregon.

Hillsboro Aero Academy LLC

Date: 26-APR-19
Time: 20:30:00Z
Regis#: N125MG
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 44 180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PORTLAND
State: OREGON